History YMMV / PrideAndPrejudice

9th Dec '17 7:48:32 AM AdelePotter
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* FanPreferredCouple: A lot of the fandom ships Mary/Mr. Collins instead of Charlotte/Mr. Collins, usually on the grounds that Mary actually would've been quite happy as a minister's wife, and since they're both bookish, wannabe intellectual {{Know Nothing Know It All}}s, they'd have plenty to talk about. It's {{fanon}} that Mary has feelings for him, but Mr. Collins is just too dense to realize how perfect she'd be for him.
2nd Dec '17 1:44:19 PM frozen
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* CriticalResearchFailure: The 2005 film is a repeat offender. Among other things, Elizabeth has her hair loose when she arrives at Netherfield, something a woman of the time would never have dreamed of doing.

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* CriticalResearchFailure: The 2005 film is a repeat offender. Among other things, Elizabeth has her hair loose when she arrives at Netherfield, something a woman of the time would never have dreamed of doing.doing, and both Mr. Bennet and Longbourn as a whole are depicted as far more bucolic and unsophisticated than they were in the novel.
24th Nov '17 9:31:56 PM frozen
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* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that she doesn't like him and considers him to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story may be really true.)

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* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that she doesn't like him and considers him to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story Wickham story may be really true.))
** Countless fanfics turn Austen’s unsympathetic characters into complete monsters.
23rd Nov '17 4:29:18 PM frozen
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*** Which at least for Mr. Collins is actually truer to the original than many other adaptations, especially those that make him into a rapist. Austen was a rector’s daughter; she might poke fun at the clergy but Collins never gets any worse than stupid and overly conventional.
27th Oct '17 11:46:58 PM XFllo
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** Also, Mary has a lot of fans who like to see her as a disliked nerd when really she's an arrogant KnowNothingKnowItAll, who takes things like her sister ruining herself and the family as times to moralize and give lectures with no empathy or care for the family's problems. [[JerkassWoobie (Not to say there isn't anything sympathetic by a plain lonely girl turning to books when everyone focuses on her sisters' beauty, but arrogance is a clear and definite fault and it's heavily implied she's not that smart anyway.)]] Another case where the movies are at least partly to blame; many adaptations, such as the 2005 one, file off the more unlikable parts of Mary.

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** Also, Mary has a lot of fans who like to see her as a disliked nerd when really she's an arrogant KnowNothingKnowItAll, who takes things like her sister ruining herself and the family as times to moralize and give lectures with no empathy or care for the family's problems. [[JerkassWoobie (Not to say there isn't anything sympathetic by a plain lonely girl turning to books when everyone focuses on her sisters' beauty, but arrogance is a clear and definite fault and it's heavily implied she's not that smart anyway.)]] Another case where the movies are at least partly to blame; many adaptations, such as the 2005 one, file off the more unlikable parts of Mary.



** The 2005 film in general, to anyone who's read the book or even knows anything about the time when it's set.



** Austen probably didn't expect Mary to get as much sympathy as she does. Of course, she probably also didn't expect her future readers to be living in a world that in general has a bit more sympathy for people like Mary -- i.e., introverted, bookish types who don't like balls. Especially since Mary's living in a world where she has no option but to get herself a husband, whereas today's readers (many of whom happen to be introverted, bookish types) have far more options in life (not to mention, far more ways to meet people than Mary would) and can't help but sympathize with someone who doesn't have the choices they do. [[JerkassWoobie Yeah, Mary's a bit of a jerk, but she's not a bad person.]] It's hard not to feel a tiny bit sorry for her.
** Similarly, Lydia, though still viewed as obnoxious and unlikable, tends to get at least ''some'' sympathy from modern readers, since most would argue that ''no one'' deserves to be stuck with Wickham for the rest of their life, especially considering Lydia is ''fifteen''. In Austen's time, Lydia getting married at that age would be considered to be a bit young, but still allowable and relatively normal. (Like getting married at nineteen or twenty in today's day and age.) Today, marrying a fifteen year old off to a known scumbag who's twice her age would be ''unthinkable''. Most adaptations that are set in the modern day tend to give Lydia a little more sympathy, and often cut her marriage to Wickham altogether.

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** Austen probably didn't expect Mary to get as much sympathy as she does. Of course, she probably also didn't expect her future readers to be living in a world that in general has a bit more sympathy for people like Mary -- i.e., introverted, bookish types who don't like balls. Especially since Mary's living in a world where she has no option but to get herself a husband, whereas today's readers (many of whom happen to be introverted, bookish types) have far more options in life (not to mention, far more ways to meet people than Mary would) and can't help but sympathize with someone who doesn't have the choices they do. [[JerkassWoobie Yeah, Mary's a bit of a jerk, but she's not a bad person.]] It's hard not to feel a tiny bit sorry for her.
** Similarly, Lydia, though still viewed as obnoxious and unlikable, tends to get at least ''some'' sympathy from modern readers, since most would argue that ''no one'' deserves to be stuck with Wickham for the rest of their life, especially considering Lydia is ''fifteen''. In Austen's time, Lydia getting married at that age would be considered to be a bit young, but still allowable and relatively normal. (Like getting married at nineteen or twenty in today's day and age.) Today, marrying a fifteen year old off to a known scumbag who's twice her age would be ''unthinkable''. Most adaptations that are set in the modern day tend to give Lydia a little more sympathy, and often cut her marriage to Wickham altogether.



** Everyone's reaction towards fifteen-year-old Lydia running off with late-twenties Wickham. Today, it would be more like "arrest that creeper!" But Lydia's family gets them quietly married so as not to arouse suspicion and gossip, which would have ruined the family. Darcy is ahead of the times by trying to get Lydia to leave Wickham when he first finds them, only arranging their marriage after she refuses to come to her senses and go home. (He also ''did'' manage to get his own sister away from Wickham.)

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** Everyone's reaction towards fifteen-year-old Lydia running off with late-twenties mid-twenties Wickham. Today, it would be more like "arrest that creeper!" But Lydia's family gets them quietly married so as not to arouse suspicion and gossip, which would have ruined the family. Darcy is ahead of the times by trying to get Lydia to leave Wickham when he first finds them, only arranging their marriage after she refuses to come to her senses and go home. (He also ''did'' manage to get his own sister away from Wickham.)
20th Oct '17 5:02:24 PM frozen
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** "See? [[SlapSlapKiss Deeply rooted dislike is always just a mask for true love]]!" Tell that to Mr. Collins. Not to mention, when Elizabeth is acting like she hates Darcy, it's not to hide her true feelings for him -- she acts like she hates him because she ''does'' hate him, namely because he's being a jerk. When she realizes he's not a bad guy (and when he takes steps to improve his character so he ''isn’t’’ the ‘bad guy’) she starts being more civil and eventually falls in love with him.

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** "See? [[SlapSlapKiss Deeply rooted dislike is always just a mask for true love]]!" Tell that to Mr. Collins. Not to mention, when Elizabeth is acting like she hates Darcy, it's not to hide her true feelings for him -- she acts like she hates him because she ''does'' hate him, namely because he's being a jerk. When she realizes he's not a bad guy (and when he takes steps to improve his character so he ''isn’t’’ ''isn’t'' the ‘bad guy’) she starts being more civil and eventually falls in love with him.
20th Oct '17 5:01:37 PM frozen
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** "See? [[SlapSlapKiss Deeply rooted dislike is always just a mask for true love]]!" Tell that to Mr. Collins. Not to mention, when Elizabeth is acting like she hates Darcy, it's not to hide her true feelings for him -- she acts like she hates him because she ''does'' hate him, namely because he's being a jerk. When she realizes he's really not a bad guy, she starts being more civil and doesn't insult him anymore once she falls in love.

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** "See? [[SlapSlapKiss Deeply rooted dislike is always just a mask for true love]]!" Tell that to Mr. Collins. Not to mention, when Elizabeth is acting like she hates Darcy, it's not to hide her true feelings for him -- she acts like she hates him because she ''does'' hate him, namely because he's being a jerk. When she realizes he's really not a bad guy, guy (and when he takes steps to improve his character so he ''isn’t’’ the ‘bad guy’) she starts being more civil and doesn't insult him anymore once she eventually falls in love.love with him.
19th Oct '17 3:18:14 AM frozen
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** “Rest in fucking pieces, Mr. Darcy.”
19th Oct '17 3:13:31 AM frozen
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** A couple people heard about it (or became aware of its plot) through the game, although part of it might have been because Aglefumph, who LetsPlay'd it twice, has a lot of followers.
19th Oct '17 12:06:02 AM frozen
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* HarsherInHindsight: Darcy buys Bingley a commission as an officer in the Newcastle regulars as part of his bribe to force him to marry Lydia. In real life the regiments stationed at Newcastle fought at Waterloo and suffered the heaviest casualties of any British troops; the officer corps in particular was killed off virtually to the man. Austen couldn’t have predicted this, of course, but had Wickham been real he wouldn’t have survived to plague the Bingleys.

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* HarsherInHindsight: Darcy buys Bingley Wickham a commission as an officer in the Newcastle regulars as part of his bribe to force him to marry Lydia. In real life the regiments stationed at Newcastle fought at Waterloo and suffered the heaviest casualties of any British troops; the officer corps in particular was killed off virtually to the man. Austen couldn’t have predicted this, of course, but had Wickham been real he wouldn’t have survived to plague the Bingleys.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.PrideAndPrejudice