History YMMV / PrideAndPrejudice

17th Mar '17 11:03:47 AM AdelePotter
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* LoveToHate: Wickham. Most of the fandom delights in trashing him at every opportunity, and justifiably so.



* UnintentionallySympathetic: Austen probably didn't expect Mary to get as much sympathy as she does. Of course, she probably also didn't expect her future readers to be living in a world that in general has a bit more sympathy for people like Mary -- i.e., introverted, bookish types who don't like balls. Especially since Mary's living in a world where she has no option but to get herself a husband, whereas today's readers (many of whom happen to be introverted, bookish types) have far more options in life (not to mention, far more ways to meet people than Mary would) and can't help but sympathize with someone who doesn't have the choices they do. [[JerkassWoobie Yeah, Mary's a bit of a jerk, but she's not a bad person.]] It's hard not to feel a tiny bit sorry for her.

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* UnintentionallySympathetic: UnintentionallySympathetic:
**
Austen probably didn't expect Mary to get as much sympathy as she does. Of course, she probably also didn't expect her future readers to be living in a world that in general has a bit more sympathy for people like Mary -- i.e., introverted, bookish types who don't like balls. Especially since Mary's living in a world where she has no option but to get herself a husband, whereas today's readers (many of whom happen to be introverted, bookish types) have far more options in life (not to mention, far more ways to meet people than Mary would) and can't help but sympathize with someone who doesn't have the choices they do. [[JerkassWoobie Yeah, Mary's a bit of a jerk, but she's not a bad person.]] It's hard not to feel a tiny bit sorry for her.her.
** Similarly, Lydia, though still viewed as obnoxious and unlikable, tends to get at least ''some'' sympathy from modern readers, since most would argue that ''no one'' deserves to be stuck with Wickham for the rest of their life, especially considering Lydia is ''fifteen''. In Austen's time, Lydia getting married at that age would be considered to be a bit young, but still allowable and relatively normal. (Like getting married at nineteen or twenty in today's day and age.) Today, marrying a fifteen year old off to a known scumbag who's twice her age would be ''unthinkable''. Most adaptations that are set in the modern day tend to give Lydia a little more sympathy, and often cut her marriage to Wickham altogether.
3rd Feb '17 5:32:29 PM jabberwocky1996
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Added DiffLines:

** In the director's commentary for the 2005 version, Joe Wright confirmed that Mary is in love with Mr. Collins but in his own words [[Main/ObliviousToLove "he's too stupid to notice"]].
3rd Feb '17 5:28:53 PM jabberwocky1996
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Added DiffLines:

** The scene with Bingley practicing his proposal to Jane with Darcy becomes this with the knowledge [[Main/IronyAsSheIsCast that Simon Woods, Bingley's actor, came out as gay in 2009]].
11th Jan '17 1:04:19 PM AdelePotter
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Added DiffLines:

* NarmCharm: Most hardcore fans will agree that the 2005 film is a flawed adaptation of the book -- and, indeed, a flawed movie in general -- but most will also agree that it's a fun, lighthearted flick and enjoyable to both book fans and newcomers, in spite of how silly it can get.
11th Jan '17 12:54:55 PM GothicProphet
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* CriticalResearchFailure: The 2005 film is a repeat offender. Elizabeth would never have been so forward as to ask Mr. Darcy if he cared to dance; the Bennets apparently live in a pig-sty (literally - we see a pig ''inside the house''); and Elizabeth has her hair loose when she arrives at Netherfield, something a woman of her station would never have dreamed of doing.

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* CriticalResearchFailure: The 2005 film is a repeat offender. Elizabeth would never have been so forward as to ask Mr. Darcy if he cared to dance; the Bennets apparently live in a pig-sty (literally - we see a pig ''inside the house''); and Among other things, Elizabeth has her hair loose when she arrives at Netherfield, something a woman of her station the time would never have dreamed of doing.
11th Jan '17 12:52:20 PM GothicProphet
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Added DiffLines:

* CriticalResearchFailure: The 2005 film is a repeat offender. Elizabeth would never have been so forward as to ask Mr. Darcy if he cared to dance; the Bennets apparently live in a pig-sty (literally - we see a pig ''inside the house''); and Elizabeth has her hair loose when she arrives at Netherfield, something a woman of her station would never have dreamed of doing.


Added DiffLines:

** The 2005 film in general, to anyone who's read the book or even knows anything about the time when it's set.
4th Jan '17 5:21:02 PM wootzits
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* DracoInLeatherPants: Mr Darcy is an unusual example of this trope. The point of the story is to not judge by first impressions alone, and Elizabeth does discover that Darcy can be a genuinely decent and noble person once she manages to look past the unfavourable view she initially developed of him. However, many readers tend to extrapolate this to view Darcy as a borderline saint who was always completely misunderstood and perfect. In fact, ''Darcy himself'' admits that many of Elizabeth's initial criticisms of his character were, in fact, entirely justified -- he genuinely could be a bit of a cold, unpleasant snob (albeit not nearly the hateful bastard that Elizabeth had convinced herself she was) and had to do plenty of soul-searching and improvement of his character in order to become a man worthy of her affections.

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* DracoInLeatherPants: Mr Darcy is an unusual example of this trope. The point of the story is to not judge by first impressions alone, and Elizabeth does discover that Darcy can be a genuinely decent and noble person once she manages to look past the unfavourable view she initially developed of him. However, many readers tend to extrapolate this to view Darcy as a borderline saint who was always completely misunderstood and perfect. In fact, ''Darcy himself'' admits that many of Elizabeth's initial criticisms of his character were, in fact, entirely justified -- he genuinely could be a bit of a cold, unpleasant snob (albeit not nearly the hateful bastard that Elizabeth had convinced herself she he was) and had to do plenty of soul-searching and improvement of his character in order to become a man worthy of her affections.
27th Dec '16 12:34:45 PM fearlessnikki
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Added DiffLines:

* ValuesResonance: Jane Austen notably doesn't fall into the trap of RealWomenDontWearDresses that so many modern writers do when invoking TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry - where the 'smart' sister (or more importantly 'less feminine') is held up as the better of the two. Jane for example is the pretty sister, but her virtues are from her kindness and desire to see the good in everyone rather than her beauty. Lydia meanwhile embodies the negative qualities of the pretty sister - shallowness, being an AttentionWhore, naivety amongst men. Mary likewise shows that the smart sister can have negative qualities too, as she's a KnowNothingKnowItAll who's NotSoDifferent from Lydia and Kitty. She's just as much an AttentionWhore as them - but with her 'knowledge' rather than her beauty. Lizzie meanwhile has virtues that don't come from being less feminine than the other women around her - but from her awareness of the society they live in and her desire to challenge it.
29th Nov '16 4:07:31 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* EnsembleDarkhorse: Even those that groan at reading the book, nay even some haters, love Mr. Bennet and his snark.

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* EnsembleDarkhorse: Even those that groan at reading the book, nay even some haters, love Mr. Bennet and his snark.[[DeadpanSnarker snark]].
29th Oct '16 5:51:56 PM nombretomado
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** KateBeaton's "[[http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php?id=120 Ooh, Mr. Darcy!]]" from ''Webcomic/HarkAVagrant''

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** KateBeaton's Kate Beaton's "[[http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php?id=120 Ooh, Mr. Darcy!]]" from ''Webcomic/HarkAVagrant''
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