History YMMV / PrideAndPrejudice

7th Apr '18 7:34:01 PM AdelePotter
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* BrokenBase: Which adaptation is better, the 1995 miniseries or the 2005 movie? Well, let's ask the fandom what they th--[[InternetBackdraft OH GOD THE FLAMES]].
29th Mar '18 4:20:44 AM jormis29
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** Another for the 2005 film - specifically Lizzy turning down Mr Collins. Repeatedly. In ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' the two actors star together, where Tom Hollander stops Keira Knightley's wedding and has her arrested.

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** Another for the 2005 film - specifically Lizzy turning down Mr Collins. Repeatedly. In ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' the two actors star together, where Tom Hollander Creator/TomHollander stops Keira Knightley's wedding and has her arrested.
25th Mar '18 6:52:40 PM AdelePotter
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* RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap: An interesting case with Lydia. While many modern readers find her to be aggravating as ever, many also find her to be UnintentionallySympathetic. Modern views on relationships, maturity, reputation, and abuse being as different as they are from Regency era views, a lot of modern readers see Lydia as a victim -- a sometimes annoying one, but a victim nonetheless. Between the fact that Lydia really hasn't done anything awful enough to deserve being married to ''Wickham'', and the fact that she was ''fifteen'' (practically an adult by Regency standards, but still basically a ''child'' by ours), a lot of readers have somewhat softened their views towards her. This is probably why a lot of adaptations set in the modern day tend to treat her with more sympathy, and give her a happy ending.
25th Mar '18 6:41:00 PM AdelePotter
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* DracoInLeatherPants: Mr Darcy is an unusual example of this trope. The point of the story is to not judge by first impressions alone, and Elizabeth does discover that Darcy can be a genuinely decent and noble person once she manages to look past the unfavourable view she initially developed of him. However, many readers tend to extrapolate this to view Darcy as a borderline saint who was always completely misunderstood and perfect. In fact, ''Darcy himself'' admits that many of Elizabeth's initial criticisms of his character were, in fact, entirely justified -- he genuinely could be a bit of a cold, unpleasant snob (albeit not nearly the hateful bastard that Elizabeth had convinced herself he was) and had to do plenty of soul-searching and improvement of his character in order to become a man worthy of her affections.

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* DracoInLeatherPants: Mr DracoInLeatherPants:
**Mr
Darcy is an unusual example of this trope. The point of the story is to not judge by first impressions alone, and Elizabeth does discover that Darcy can be a genuinely decent and noble person once she manages to look past the unfavourable view she initially developed of him. However, many readers tend to extrapolate this to view Darcy as a borderline saint who was always completely misunderstood and perfect. In fact, ''Darcy himself'' admits that many of Elizabeth's initial criticisms of his character were, in fact, entirely justified -- he genuinely could be a bit of a cold, unpleasant snob (albeit not nearly the hateful bastard that Elizabeth had convinced herself he was) and had to do plenty of soul-searching and improvement of his character in order to become a man worthy of her affections.affections.
** Similarly, a lot of Mr. Bennet's fans tend to gloss over the fact that, while he is sympathetic, funny, and loving towards Elizabeth and Jane, he was a crappy husband to the admittedly exhausting Mrs. Bennet, and did a lousy job with his three younger daughters. Yes, Lydia caused a lot of trouble, but she may not have been so foolish and impulsive if her own father had bothered to try and steer her in a better direction. Even Elizabeth, who loves him dearly, acknowledges that he had a hand in this mess, and is frustrated by his apathy and detachment.
21st Mar '18 1:06:05 PM abby-anne
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* JerkassWoobie: [[StepfordSmiler Mrs. Bennet]] is an [[AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents embarrassing, loudmouth ditz]] who almost ruins her daughters' chances at marriage, but she clearly just wants to see her daughters happily married. Especially since she [[AwfulWeddedLife wound up married to]] a DeadpanSnarker who verbally abuses and humiliates her in front of their children at any given opportunity. Even [[DaddysGirl Elizabeth]] eventually realizes what an awful husband her father was.
16th Feb '18 5:24:30 PM XFllo
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** On the other hand, Charlotte averts this in the 2005 version (in which she is played by Claudie Blakley); while she wouldn't crack any mirrors, her face isn't one anyone would reliably call pretty. Lucy Scott in the 1995 miniseries, however, is decidedly more attractive than her book counterpart.

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** On the other hand, Charlotte averts this in the 2005 version (in which she is played by Claudie Blakley); while she wouldn't crack any mirrors, mirrors and is fairly good-looking, her face isn't one anyone would reliably call pretty. Lucy Scott make-up and hair-does are rather low-key and she is not prettied up.
** Charlotte Lucas (Lucy Scott)
in the 1995 miniseries, however, is decidedly more attractive than her book counterpart.



** Countless fanfics turn Austen’s unsympathetic characters into complete monsters.
10th Feb '18 9:02:47 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Since we learn very little about her other than she's sickly, some fans like to flesh out Anne de Bourgh. Popular interpretations are that she fakes (or least plays up) her illnesses as a way of coping with and avoiding her overbearing mother, and that neither she nor Darcy had any particular interest or desire to marry the other and that the whole "betrothal" was merely Lady Catherine seeing things that weren't there.
9th Feb '18 5:44:13 AM fruitstripegum
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** While Elizabeth is by no means meant to be unattractive, Jane is universally considered the Pretty One. This can be slightly difficult to believe when she is played by, for example, ''Keira Knightley''.
12th Jan '18 7:18:54 AM SeptimusHeap
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** Depending on the writer/director, Mr Collins ranges from "awkward and stupid but sincere" (2005 movie) to "probably some kind of sexual predator" (''LostInAusten''). The 2005 version is actually truer to the original than many other adaptations, especially those that make him into a rapist. Austen was a rector’s daughter; she might poke fun at the clergy but Collins never gets any worse than stupid and overly conventional.

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** Depending on the writer/director, Mr Collins ranges from "awkward and stupid but sincere" (2005 movie) to "probably some kind of sexual predator" (''LostInAusten'').(''Series/LostInAusten''). The 2005 version is actually truer to the original than many other adaptations, especially those that make him into a rapist. Austen was a rector’s daughter; she might poke fun at the clergy but Collins never gets any worse than stupid and overly conventional.
1st Jan '18 6:58:51 AM fearlessnikki
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* AdaptationDisplacement:
** The 1995 miniseries to a certain degree, especially within the fandom itself. While everyone still knows it was a book first, the miniseries is so faithful that the instances of {{Fanon}} (e.g. the "shelves in the closet" joke) get frequently treated like canon.

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* AdaptationDisplacement:
**
AdaptationDisplacement: The 1995 miniseries to a certain degree, especially within the fandom itself. While everyone still knows it was a book first, the miniseries is so faithful that the instances of {{Fanon}} (e.g. the "shelves in the closet" joke) get frequently treated like canon.



** Depending on the writer/director, Mr Collins ranges from "awkward and stupid but sincere" (2005 movie) to "probably some kind of sexual predator" (''LostInAusten'').

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** Depending on the writer/director, Mr Collins ranges from "awkward and stupid but sincere" (2005 movie) to "probably some kind of sexual predator" (''LostInAusten''). The 2005 version is actually truer to the original than many other adaptations, especially those that make him into a rapist. Austen was a rector’s daughter; she might poke fun at the clergy but Collins never gets any worse than stupid and overly conventional.



*** Which at least for Mr. Collins is actually truer to the original than many other adaptations, especially those that make him into a rapist. Austen was a rector’s daughter; she might poke fun at the clergy but Collins never gets any worse than stupid and overly conventional.
* CriticalResearchFailure: The 2005 film is a repeat offender. Among other things, Elizabeth has her hair loose when she arrives at Netherfield, something a woman of the time would never have dreamed of doing, and both Mr. Bennet and Longbourn as a whole are depicted as far more bucolic and unsophisticated than they were in the novel.



* {{Fanon}}:
** As noted above, some fans are convinced that Mary secretly has feelings for Mr Collins, and that she was hoping he would propose to her as the next sister in prominence after Lizzy turns him down.
** Jane is commonly portrayed as a blonde, presumably due to the influence of the HairOfGoldHeartOfGold trope. Her hair colour is never mentioned in the text, and she's not blonde in the 1940s film.



* TheyChangedItNowItSucks: The 2005 goes for TheDungAges approach to the Bennets, where Longbourn is depicted as slightly shabbier than it was in the book. This is in contrast to the 1995 miniseries's clean, polished look.



** While Mrs. Bennet was always intended to come off as silly, she comes off as significantly more so to modern readers than she did to readers in Austen's time, when marrying well was actually essential to a woman's future financial security. This is especially true with the Bennet sisters, who would lose everything upon their father's death (since the home is passing to Mr. Collins) if they have not yet married. To put it in perspective, a modern analogue would be the "helicopter parents" who obsess over their kids getting into a good university.

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** While Mrs. Bennet was always intended to come off as silly, she comes off as significantly more so to modern readers than she did to readers in Austen's time, when marrying well was actually essential to a woman's future financial security. This is especially true with the Bennet sisters, who would lose everything upon their father's death (since the home is passing to Mr. Collins) if they have not yet married. To put it in perspective, a modern analogue would be the "helicopter parents" who obsess over their kids getting into a good university. ''Film/BrideAndPrejudice'' notably makes her obsessed with securing green cards so the daughters can go to America.
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