History YMMV / PrideAndPrejudice

1st Feb '16 11:13:49 PM toongrrl1990
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Added DiffLines:
** Mr. Darcy admiring Lizzy's "fine eyes" became this in the fandom when talking of the 1995 miniseries where [[MyEyesAreUpHere Lizzy is played by the chesty Jennifer Ehle]].
2nd Dec '15 5:41:19 AM Scabbard
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** Mr. Bennet states that Lizzy is the kind of woman who would not be happy in marriage unless she "looked up to [her husband] as a superior", and Lizzy assures him that she does see Mr. Darcy that way. Although this one does depend on whether you think they mean that Darcy is socially or emotionally superior to Lizzie in standing or import (as in, Darcy is superior to Lizzie), or rather that they mean that he'd appear so when compared to the rest of the man around (as in, Darcy is superior to any other man Lizzie might be interested in).
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** Mr. Bennet states that Lizzy is the kind of woman who would not be happy in marriage unless she "looked up to [her husband] as a superior", and Lizzy assures him that she does see Mr. Darcy that way. Although this one does depend on whether you think they mean that Darcy is socially or emotionally superior to Lizzie in standing or import (as in, Darcy is superior to Lizzie), or rather that they mean that he'd appear so when compared to the rest of the man men around (as in, Darcy is superior to any other man Lizzie might be interested in).
2nd Dec '15 5:33:58 AM Scabbard
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* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she doesn't like him and considers him to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story may be really true.)
to:
* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she doesn't like him and considers him to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story may be really true.)
2nd Dec '15 5:32:28 AM Scabbard
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** Also in the 2005 adaptation, Jena Maloney plays Lydia and Donald Sutherland plays Mr. Bennet...Jena plays [[BloodKnight Johanna Mason]] in Catching Fire, and Sutherland plays [[BigBad President Snow]].
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** Also in the 2005 adaptation, Jena Maloney plays Lydia and Donald Sutherland plays Mr. Bennet... Jena plays [[BloodKnight Johanna Mason]] in Catching Fire, and Sutherland plays [[BigBad President Snow]].
2nd Dec '15 5:26:30 AM Scabbard
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* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she married Darcy, she'd ''also'' be married to man that, at that point, she doesn't like and considers to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story may be really true.)
to:
* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she married Darcy, she'd ''also'' be married to man that, at that point, she doesn't like him and considers him to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story may be really true.)
23rd Oct '15 10:05:30 PM akanesarumara
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* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she married Darcy, she'd ''also'' be married to man that, at that point, she doesn't like and considers to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate.
to:
* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she married Darcy, she'd ''also'' be married to man that, at that point, she doesn't like and considers to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate. (There is also the fact that the gushing servants and obviously well-kept estate convince Lizzie that perhaps Mr. Darcy is not quite as bad as she thought and the letter in which he detailed his side of the Wickam-story may be really true.)
23rd Oct '15 10:00:28 PM akanesarumara
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: A fair few feminist critics of the book posit Elizabeth as being just as materialistic as any of the less sympathetic characters by focusing on her feelings for Darcy changing as she visits his magnificent estate. (Considering that, during this retelling, Jane immediately thereafter entreats her to please be serious, these critics may have missed the mark, or at least the humor.)
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: A fair few feminist critics of the book posit Elizabeth as being just as materialistic as any of the less sympathetic characters by focusing on her feelings for Darcy changing as she visits his magnificent estate. (Considering that, during this retelling, Jane immediately thereafter entreats her to please be serious, these critics may have missed the mark, or at least the humor.humor- especially as Lizzie may have referred to the fact that said estate was well-organized and full of servants gushing over Mr. Darcy, which indeed ''was'' a turning point for her.)
7th Oct '15 2:34:57 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:
** Those adaptations which don't just [[AdaptationalAttractiveness outright ignore]] the fact that Jane is supposed to be more beautiful than Lizzie tend to call on the values dissonance between Regency and modern standards of female beauty to play with it, by casting an actress who is beautiful in the classical sense favoured in the early nineteenth century (as typically found in Greco-Roman art) to play Jane while casting someone who is beautiful in a more modern sense to play Elizabeth.
5th Jul '15 8:32:54 AM TheLyniezian
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** Darcy's and Elizabeth's debate about the dangers and merits of yielding to ''{{persuasion}}'' -- emphasis Elizabeth's.
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** Darcy's and Elizabeth's debate about the dangers and merits of yielding to ''{{persuasion}}'' ''[[Literature/{{Persuasion}} persuasion]]'' -- emphasis Elizabeth's.
4th Jul '15 10:09:46 AM AdelePotter
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* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke.
to:
* RonTheDeathEater: As mentioned above, some modern-day critics seize on Elizabeth's comment that her feelings for Darcy changed after seeing his grand estate as evidence that she is selfish, materialistic and shallow -- ignoring that, in context, she is clearly making a joke. Not to mention, in the book, when she first sees the estate, she comments to herself that it all could've been hers had she married Darcy... and then promptly reminds herself that had she married Darcy, she'd ''also'' be married to man that, at that point, she doesn't like and considers to be a massive prick, so she's glad she turned him down, estate or no estate.
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