History Woolseyism / VideoGames

20th May '17 1:35:39 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Alexander O. Smith's work on ''VagrantStory'', the first ''[[PhoenixWrightAceAttorney Phoenix Wright]]'' game, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'', and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' (alongside Joseph Reeder) is rarely passed over in reviews of said games, usually being held up as hugely successful Japanese-to-English translations (at least when they're not being criticized for PurpleProse pretension).

to:

* Alexander O. Smith's work on ''VagrantStory'', ''VideoGame/VagrantStory'', the first ''[[PhoenixWrightAceAttorney Phoenix Wright]]'' game, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'', and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' (alongside Joseph Reeder) is rarely passed over in reviews of said games, usually being held up as hugely successful Japanese-to-English translations (at least when they're not being criticized for PurpleProse pretension).
19th May '17 6:06:38 AM TommyTiger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[caption-width-right:256:[[SincerityMode Well said, Kefka. Well said.]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:256:[[SincerityMode Well said, Kefka. Well said. Really well said.]]]]
13th May '17 11:53:45 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* As the creator of ''KatamariDamacy'' decided to leave the project when ''Me and My Katamari'' was being made, the Japanese script was therefore very dry and empty. The American translator was given the task to ghost-write the script entirely from scratch, and did so brilliantly. The King's dialogue was full of obscure literary and cultural allusions and his campness was played up to new, hilarious heights.

to:

* As the creator of ''KatamariDamacy'' ''VideoGame/KatamariDamacy'' decided to leave the project when ''Me and My Katamari'' was being made, the Japanese script was therefore very dry and empty. The American translator was given the task to ghost-write the script entirely from scratch, and did so brilliantly. The King's dialogue was full of obscure literary and cultural allusions and his campness was played up to new, hilarious heights.
12th May '17 8:57:46 AM FF32
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}: FES'', the two game modes, called "Episode Yourself" and "Episode Aegis" was changed respectively to "The Journey" and "The Answer" in the localized version. Considering the theme of the story, this a much welcomed change compared to the rather Engrish names the original version used. Furthermore, the ultimate Persona, Orpheus Kai, which means "Reborn" or "Custom", was changed to Orpheus Telos. Telos is the Greek word for "goal" or "purpose." Similarly, Lucifel, the Angelic form of the demon Lucifer, had his name changed to "Helel" (the Hebrew name of the fallen angel) out of necessity to differentiate it from the demonic form of Lucifer.
** Additionally, in the original game, the period of time during which the team fought the Shadows was originally called "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Shadow Time]]" in the Japanese release. The American localization changed this to the much more ominous-sounding "Dark Hour."
** One of the social links is related to playing an MMO. In the Japanese version, the MMO was based off the original two ''Megami Tensei'' games for the Famicom, which were never released outside Japan. In the English version, all of these references were changed to refer to the earlier ''Persona'' games (or in one case, [[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne Nocturne]]), all but one of which were released in America.
** The soft drinks in vending machines. What was a Japanese-only drink turns into Starvicks (An unusual blend of coffee and cough syrup), 1up, Fountain Dew (an unusually yellow drink), Dr. Salt, etc.
*** Don't forget the [[Series/TwentyFour Bauer]]Bar, which lets you keep going for 24 hours!



* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}: FES'', the two game modes, called "Episode Yourself" and "Episode Aegis" was changed respectively to "The Journey" and "The Answer" in the localized version. Considering the theme of the story, this a much welcomed change compared to the rather Engrish names the original version used. Furthermore, the ultimate Persona, Orpheus Kai, which means "Reborn" or "Custom", was changed to Orpheus Telos. Telos is the Greek word for "goal" or "purpose." Similarly, Lucifel, the Angelic form of the demon Lucifer, had his name changed to "Helel" (the Hebrew name of the fallen angel) out of necessity to differentiate it from the demonic form of Lucifer.
** Additionally, in the original game, the period of time during which the team fought the Shadows was originally called "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Shadow Time]]" in the Japanese release. The American localization changed this to the much more ominous-sounding "Dark Hour."
** One of the social links is related to playing an MMO. In the Japanese version, the MMO was based off the original two ''Megami Tensei'' games for the Famicom, which were never released outside Japan. In the English version, all of these references were changed to refer to the earlier ''Persona'' games (or in one case, [[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne Nocturne]]), all but one of which were released in America.
** The soft drinks in vending machines. What was a Japanese-only drink turns into Starvicks (An unusual blend of coffee and cough syrup), 1up, Fountain Dew (an unusually yellow drink), Dr. Salt, etc.
*** Don't forget the [[Series/TwentyFour Bauer]]Bar, which lets you keep going for 24 hours!



* YearX: Rather than being a specific year, the in-game calendar is dated 20XX. Though it should be noted that the dates clearly match the 2016 calendar, so this game takes place roughly 4 years after the end of ''Persona 4''.
1st May '17 9:20:24 PM Ishntknew
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Way back in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'', in Japan, after the Dragon Lord falls, his pet dragon pulls a GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere. In America, the Dragon Lord instead [[OneWingedAngel transforms into his true self]]. This went over so well that later appearances by the Dragon Lord in the series have him transform.
23rd Apr '17 8:12:36 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Franchise/TalesSeries''

to:

* ''Franchise/TalesSeries''''VideoGame/TalesSeries''
10th Apr '17 1:43:53 AM Gairyuki
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Similarly, his penultimate LimitBreak, "Finishing Touch", is one to its original Japanese name, "Garyou Tensei", an idiom that means just that, putting the finishing touches on something.
6th Apr '17 11:48:29 AM Bartzv
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Magus leaps to mind. His original designation in Japanese was "Maou" (魔王 Maou, "Demon King"), denoting his position of leadership over the Mystics ("Demons" in Japanese, natch). You'll notice it isn't a name (since you later find out it's [[spoiler:Janus]]); it's a TITLE. Due to Nintendo of America's rather puritan rules for translation requiring the removal of any religious references or references to alcohol, his "name" was changed from "Maou" to "Magus," Latin for "Magician." Obviously, still not his name, and perfectly encapsulates his role in both his society and the party (he's the most powerful user of Black Magic in the game, and the only one who knows magic without having to be taught beforehand).

to:

* Magus leaps to mind. His original designation in Japanese was "Maou" (魔王 Maou, "Demon King"), denoting his position of leadership over the Mystics ("Demons" in Japanese, natch). You'll notice it isn't a name (since you later find out it's [[spoiler:Janus]]); it's a TITLE. Due to Nintendo of America's rather puritan rules for translation requiring the removal of any religious references or references to alcohol, his "name" was changed from "Maou" to "Magus," Latin for "Magician." Obviously, still not his name, and perfectly encapsulates his role in both his society and the party (he's the most powerful user of Black Magic in the game, and the only one who knows magic without having to be taught beforehand). The DS version splits the difference by giving him the title of "Fiendlord" (as the Mystics are called "Fiends" in the DS version) while keeping "Magus" as his personal alias.
2nd Apr '17 12:29:41 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There's a scene where Chie compares Naoto's family to the Kuzunoha clan, who play a prominent role in the ''Devil Summoner'' games as well as ''{{Persona 2}}''. In the original Japanese release, the comparison was actually to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosuke_Kindaichi Kindaichi]] [[Manga/TheKindaichiCaseFiles family]]. Nevertheless, this off-the-cuff Woolseyism has given fruit to a lot of EpilepticTrees.

to:

** There's a scene where Chie compares Naoto's family to the Kuzunoha clan, who play a prominent role in the ''Devil Summoner'' games as well as ''{{Persona 2}}''.''VideoGame/Persona2''. In the original Japanese release, the comparison was actually to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosuke_Kindaichi Kindaichi]] [[Manga/TheKindaichiCaseFiles family]]. Nevertheless, this off-the-cuff Woolseyism has given fruit to a lot of EpilepticTrees.
31st Mar '17 7:13:48 PM HeroicJay
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Advance'' remake for the game, released twelve years later, contains an {{NPC}} [[TakeThat who takes a shot]] at a FanTranslation of the game which was far more literal -- and not nearly as entertaining. The ''Advance'' version also changed a couple of Kefka's lines, such as (among others), Kefka's line in the picture on this page, "son of a submariner", to "son of a sandworm". Both work in the context, but there are no submarines in the game. There's also Kefka's "HATE HATE HATE" speech, which oddly enough, was referenced in the English translation of ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' several years later, since in the Japanese version he says "dammit dammit dammit" instead of "hate hate hate", making the leap pretty easy.

to:

** The ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Advance'' remake for the game, released twelve years later, contains an {{NPC}} [[TakeThat who takes a shot]] at a FanTranslation of the game which was far more literal -- and not nearly as entertaining. The ''Advance'' version also changed a couple few of Kefka's lines, such as (among others), giving him wisecracks he did not have in the SNES version. Though a bit more contested, Kefka's line in the picture on this page, "son of a submariner", to "son of a sandworm". Both work in the context, but there are no submarines in the game. There's also Kefka's "HATE HATE HATE" speech, which oddly enough, was referenced in the English translation of ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' several years later, since in the Japanese version he says "dammit dammit dammit" instead of "hate hate hate", making the leap pretty easy.
This list shows the last 10 events of 625. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Woolseyism.VideoGames