History Woolseyism / VideoGames

20th Jun '16 10:16:09 PM Nicoaln
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* For many, the {{Bowdlerization}} of a scene in ''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' was this. In the original version Albedo's torment of MOMO included self-mutilation via a knife - cutting his arm and his head off. The American version replaces this with him instead ripping his arm and then his ''head'' clean off. This actually manages to make it even ''more'' unnerving. The bone-crunching noises, combined with him ''breaking his neck'' add to the creepiness.



* For many, the {{Bowdlerization}} of a scene in ''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' was this. In the original version Albedo's torment of MOMO included self-mutilation via a knife - cutting his arm and his head off. The American version replaces this with him instead ripping his arm and then his ''head'' clean off. This actually manages to make it even ''more'' unnerving. The bone-crunching noises, combined with him ''breaking his neck'' add to the creepiness.

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* For many, the {{Bowdlerization}} of a scene in ''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' was this. In the original version Albedo's torment of MOMO included self-mutilation via a knife - cutting his arm and his head off. The American version replaces this with him instead ripping his arm and then his ''head'' clean off. This actually manages to make it even ''more'' unnerving. The bone-crunching noises, combined with him ''breaking his neck'' add to the creepiness.
20th Jun '16 10:13:51 PM Nicoaln
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* For many, the {{Bowdlerization}} of a scene in ''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' was this. In the original version Albedo's torment of MOMO included self-mutilation via a knife - cutting his arm and his head off. The American version replaces this with him instead ripping his arm and then his ''head'' clean off. This actually manages to make it even ''more'' unnerving. The bone-crunching noises, combined with him ''breaking his neck'' add to the creepiness.
19th Jun '16 1:51:38 PM HaroldRowsdower
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* ''VideoGame/ProjectXZone 2'' features an American character, whose dialogue in the Japanese version is peppered with GratuitousEnglish, and whose character design is such that it would be difficult to change her nationality (and thus the foreign language she uses). The English version instead plays with the TranslationConvention, giving her broken and awkward speech to represent that, being American, she learned Japanese from Anime and video games and thus is terrible at it.
14th Jun '16 2:08:47 AM Doug86
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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'':

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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'':''VideoGame/FireEmblem'':
9th Jun '16 12:53:45 AM X2X
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* The Newcomer trailers for the 3DS and Wii U iterations of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' feature punny phrases for each characters introduced ("[[VideoGame/PunchOut Little Mac]] [[BoxingBattler Punches In!]]", "[[VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising Palutena]] [[LightEmUp Alights!]]", and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Robin]] [[MagicKnight Brings the Thunder!]]", to name a few), as opposed to simply "(insert name here) 参戦 joins the battle!" (only MegaMan's trailer has a splash with this phrase in both English and Japanese).

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* The Newcomer trailers for the 3DS and Wii U iterations of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' feature punny phrases for each characters introduced ("[[VideoGame/PunchOut Little Mac]] [[BoxingBattler Punches In!]]", "[[VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising Palutena]] [[LightEmUp Alights!]]", and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Robin]] [[MagicKnight Brings the Thunder!]]", to name a few), as opposed to simply "(insert name here) 参戦 joins the battle!" (only MegaMan's VideoGame/{{Mega Man|Classic}}'s trailer has a splash with this phrase in both English and Japanese).



** The second game translated by them, ''VideoGame/{{Chantelise}}'', contains the same translation style. One of the most noteworthy things they changed was the name of a character, who in Japanese was "Mirai", a Japenese word for "future." The name wound up being heavily symbolic [[spoiler: since she had concocted a plan to break the ViciousCycle of sacrifices and ultimately finish off the BigBad, but only long after her own death]], and it had originally even been the name of the climactic chapter, it wound up being changed to "Fortuna" and the chapter's name to "Fortuna Favors the Bold". [[http://www.carpefulgur.com/drakblog/?p=41 They did not make this decision lightly.]]
* In the manual for ''Iron Tank'', the boss tanks are called "[[IncrediblyLamePun Think Tanks]]". Maybe because they're autonomous robotic tanks? Or maybe it's just due to BlindIdiotTranslation.

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** The second game translated by them, ''VideoGame/{{Chantelise}}'', contains the same translation style. One of the most noteworthy things they changed was the name of a character, who in Japanese was "Mirai", a Japenese word for "future." The name wound up being heavily symbolic [[spoiler: since she had concocted a plan to break the ViciousCycle of sacrifices and ultimately finish off the BigBad, but only long after her own death]], and it had originally even been the name of the climactic chapter, it wound up being changed to "Fortuna" and the chapter's name to "Fortuna Favors the Bold". Bold." [[http://www.carpefulgur.com/drakblog/?p=41 They did not make this decision lightly.]]
* In the manual for ''Iron Tank'', the boss tanks are called "[[IncrediblyLamePun "[[{{Pun}} Think Tanks]]". Tanks]]." Maybe because they're autonomous robotic tanks? Or maybe it's just due to BlindIdiotTranslation.



* ''VideoGame/MapleStory'': At least in the European version, this trope is present with a heavy helping of TheyJustDidntCare, particularly in the newer releases, the translations range from strange, to gibberish, to downright odd: with instances of characters keeping having (presumeably) their Korean names in cutscenes before switching to a new set in game. (IE: Claudine being Sigmund in the Xenon tutorial). Bonus points, sometimes these is mixed up in a particularly silly way, with characters alternating names from text screen to text screen, and even having tags say one thing and the dialouge giving them different names entirely.
* The NES version of ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon III'' underwent a complete script rewrite from its Japanese Famicom counterpart. The [[MacGuffin MacGuffins]] of the game, the Rosetta Stones, were renamed into the Sacred Stones (since the real life Rosetta Stone was something else entirely) and the plot now involves saving Marian (err [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Marion]]) again, giving the Lee brothers some incentive for helping out Hiruko search for the Sacred Stones (as opposed to helping her out for the hell of it). Moreover, the sub-plot with Machine Gun Willy's brother Jim (the first stage's boss) as the new leader of the Black Warriors was left out completely, as it was quickly forgotten after the first stage, and the identity of Brett's murderer was changed into someone else (namely [[spoiler:Hiruko]]). The identity of the final boss is changed from a revived Cleopatra to [[SdrawkcabAlias Queen Noiram]], who is really Marion possessed by an evil spirit. Unfortunately, the localization team made no changes to the game's presentation and Marion is mysteriously absent after the final boss battle, even though the ending assures us she's fine. [[http://koti.mbnet.fi/goutetsu/misc/doubledragon3_comparison.htm Here's a script comparison]] between the Famicom and NES versions.

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* ''VideoGame/MapleStory'': At least in the European version, this trope is present with a heavy helping of TheyJustDidntCare, particularly in the newer releases, the translations range from strange, to gibberish, to downright odd: with instances of characters keeping having (presumeably) (presumably) their Korean names in cutscenes before switching to a new set in game. (IE: Claudine being Sigmund in the Xenon tutorial). Bonus points, sometimes these is mixed up in a particularly silly way, with characters alternating names from text screen to text screen, and even having tags say one thing and the dialouge giving them different names entirely.
* The NES version of ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon III'' underwent a complete script rewrite from its Japanese Famicom counterpart. The [[MacGuffin MacGuffins]] {{MacGuffin}}s of the game, the Rosetta Stones, were renamed into the Sacred Stones (since the real life Rosetta Stone was something else entirely) and the plot now involves saving Marian (err [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Marion]]) again, giving the Lee brothers some incentive for helping out Hiruko search for the Sacred Stones (as opposed to helping her out for the hell of it). Moreover, the sub-plot with Machine Gun Willy's brother Jim (the first stage's boss) as the new leader of the Black Warriors was left out completely, as it was quickly forgotten after the first stage, and the identity of Brett's murderer was changed into someone else (namely [[spoiler:Hiruko]]). The identity of the final boss is changed from a revived Cleopatra to [[SdrawkcabAlias Queen Noiram]], who is really Marion possessed by an evil spirit. Unfortunately, the localization team made no changes to the game's presentation and Marion is mysteriously absent after the final boss battle, even though the ending assures us she's fine. [[http://koti.mbnet.fi/goutetsu/misc/doubledragon3_comparison.htm Here's a script comparison]] between the Famicom and NES versions.



* Not as much of a ''change'', but the main character of ''VideoGame/SpaceChannel5'' is named "Ulala". It is the official pronunciation for the name "Urara", which is a common name in Japan, but in English, most characters pronounce it as "Ooh-La-La"...which is often what people say about attractive women. Conveniently enough, that's quite a part of the game, too! FridgeBrilliance on the part of the developers?
** The meaning of Urara is "beautiful girl". It might well be deliberate.
* The translations of later VideoGame/DynastyWarriors games as well as the ''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors'' series give each character their own unique lines upon defeating enemy officers, whereas in Japanese they all simply shout variations of "Enemy Officer Defeated".
* The French version of ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' was retitled ''Mortal Kombat: Mystification'' because the word "deception" is spelled and sounds like the French word for "disappointment", which isn't a great PR move. On top of that, "mystification" is actually a perfectly good translation of "deception", so it works.

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* Not as much of a ''change'', but the main character of ''VideoGame/SpaceChannel5'' is named "Ulala". "Ulala." It is the official pronunciation for the name "Urara", "Urara," which is a common name in Japan, but in English, most characters pronounce it as "Ooh-La-La"..."Ooh-La-La"... which is often what people say about attractive women. Conveniently enough, that's quite a part of the game, too! FridgeBrilliance on the part of the developers?
** The meaning of Urara is "beautiful girl". girl." It might well be deliberate.
* The translations of later VideoGame/DynastyWarriors ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'' games as well as the ''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors'' series give each character their own unique lines upon defeating enemy officers, whereas in Japanese they all simply shout variations of "Enemy Officer Defeated".
Defeated."
* The French version of ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' was retitled ''Mortal Kombat: Mystification'' because the word "deception" is spelled and sounds like the French word for "disappointment", "disappointment," which isn't a great PR move. On top of that, "mystification" is actually a perfectly good translation of "deception", "deception," so it works.
9th Jun '16 12:31:07 AM X2X
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** The names of the individual Mavericks were this for the longest time as well. Names like "Burnin' Noumander" and "Metamor Mothmeanos", though cool-sounding to a Japanese audience, sounded ''terrible'' to an English ear and became "Flame Mammoth" and "Morph Moth," respectively. Unfortunately, they had to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks take it too far]] in ''VideoGame/MegaManX5'' and give the Mavericks cringe-worthy ''Music/GunsNRoses'' names, where "Tidal Makkoeen" became (ugh) "''Duff [=McWhalen=]''."

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** The names of the individual Mavericks were this for the longest time as well. Names like "Burnin' Noumander" and "Metamor Mothmeanos", Mothmeanos," though cool-sounding to a Japanese audience, sounded ''terrible'' to an English ear and became "Flame Mammoth" and "Morph Moth," respectively. Unfortunately, they had to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks take it too far]] in ''VideoGame/MegaManX5'' and give the Mavericks cringe-worthy ''Music/GunsNRoses'' names, where "Tidal Makkoeen" became (ugh) "''Duff [=McWhalen=]''."



** This actually bears more importance than most players realize, even though it's more fan speculation than actual WordOfGod (which was, sadly, Capcom's shtick for nearby two and a half decades on that matter). Rock's conflict between ends justifying means and [[ThreeLawsCompliant The Three Laws of Robotics]], at that very moment, was what drove Dr. Light into building Mega Man X, and most importantly, his Suffering Chip, which was made precisely to insert regret in its owner about resorting to destruction. Even nowadays, many fans still imagine [[WhatCouldHaveBeen how that fact alone would bring the closing of the Blue Bomber's chapter, and the start of his successor]].

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** This actually bears more importance than most players realize, even though it's more fan speculation than actual WordOfGod (which was, sadly, Capcom's shtick for nearby nearly two and a half decades on that matter). Rock's conflict between ends justifying means and [[ThreeLawsCompliant The Three Laws of Robotics]], at that very moment, was what drove Dr. Light into building Mega Man X, and most importantly, his Suffering Chip, which was made precisely to insert regret in its owner about resorting to destruction. Even nowadays, many fans still imagine [[WhatCouldHaveBeen how that fact alone would bring the closing of the Blue Bomber's chapter, and the start of his successor]].
8th Jun '16 11:33:16 PM X2X
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* Planet names in the European version of ''VideoGame/{{Meteos}}'' were heavily Woolseyised compared to their American counterparts (often straight transliterations from the Japanese planet names), giving them a more Greek or Latin feel. Example substitutions include "Gigantis" for "Yooj", "Aetheria" for "Brabbit" and "Insomnis" for "Dawndus".

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* Planet names in the European version of ''VideoGame/{{Meteos}}'' were heavily Woolseyised compared to their American counterparts (often straight transliterations from the Japanese planet names), giving them a more Greek or Latin feel. Example substitutions include "Gigantis" for "Yooj", "Yooj," "Aetheria" for "Brabbit" and "Insomnis" for "Dawndus"."Dawndus."



** An early, minor Woolseyism took place in the translation of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIIDraculasCurse'', as the main character "Ralph C. Belmondo" became "Trevor Belmont". ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaCurseOfDarkness Curse of Darkness]]'' gives the impression that the Japanese adapted the name "Trevor" in the Japanese canon when one chooses to hear the Japanese voice track. In truth, he is still called Ralph in Japan. They simply rerecorded the Japanese dialogue so that the Japanese actor says Trevor instead of Ralph (confusing, isn't it).
** In the ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Sorrow]]'' games, native Japanese student "Souma Kurusu" became a foreign transfer student named "Soma Cruz".

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** An early, minor Woolseyism took place in the translation of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIIDraculasCurse'', as the main character "Ralph C. Belmondo" became "Trevor Belmont". Belmont." ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaCurseOfDarkness Curse of Darkness]]'' gives the impression that the Japanese adapted the name "Trevor" in the Japanese canon when one chooses to hear the Japanese voice track. In truth, he is still called Ralph in Japan. They simply rerecorded the Japanese dialogue so that the Japanese actor says Trevor instead of Ralph (confusing, isn't it).
** In the ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Sorrow]]'' games, native Japanese student "Souma Kurusu" became a foreign transfer student named "Soma Cruz".Cruz."



** Many enemy names have this treatment in later ''Castlevania'' titles. For example: A skeleton enemy that kicks its own head around as an attack, introduced in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'', is given the incredibly unimaginative name "Soccer Boy" in the original Japanese game, while in the English translation is instead cleverly called "[[Theatre/{{Hamlet}} Yorick]]".
** One of the few aversions until later times was with the whip-using skeleton, whose Japanese name was a pun of Simon Belmont's first name. Its English name went from the BlindIdiotTranslation of "Gates of Death" in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIIDraculasCurse'' to the much more suitable localization of "Hellmont" in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDespair''.

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** Many enemy names have this treatment in later ''Castlevania'' titles. For example: A skeleton enemy that kicks its own head around as an attack, introduced in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'', is given the incredibly unimaginative name "Soccer Boy" in the original Japanese game, while in the English translation is instead cleverly called "[[Theatre/{{Hamlet}} Yorick]]".
Yorick]]."
** One of the few aversions until later times was with the whip-using skeleton, whose Japanese name (Shimon) was a pun of Simon Belmont's first name. Its English name went from the BlindIdiotTranslation of "Gates of Death" in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIIDraculasCurse'' to the much more suitable localization of "Hellmont" in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDespair''.



** The sequel series, ''MegaManStarForce'', also has its share of good localization points, the foremost being changing "Ox" and "Harp" to "Taurus" and "Lyra" to reflect the [[ThemeNaming constellation-based naming scheme]] of the alien characters. For some reason, however, Lyra and Sonia still combine to form [[DubInducedPlotHole "Harp Note," not "Lyra Note" as one would rightly expect...]]
** There's another one from ''MegaManStarForce'' that concerns the name of Aaron Boreal's lab. In the Japanese, [=AMAKEN=] was an abbreviated shorthand for "Amachi's Laboratory". The localization team turned it into [[FunWithAcronyms "Aerospace and Modern Astronomy Knowledge Expansion Nexus"]].
* A Woolseyism appears in the ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'' series with the name Dr. Weil. In Japan, he is known as Dr. Vile, [[OneSteveLimit which is awfully close to the name of]] [[VideoGame/MegaManX another character]], so they changed it to Weil. If pronounced using German phoenetics, it would be heard as 'vile.' In addition, his name also referred to Dr. Ray Kurzweil, a futurist who, besides giving the idea of Singularity, also talked about cybernetics a lot. Considering what Dr. Weil turned out to be by Mega Man Zero 4 (as well as implied to be the case in Mega Man Zero 3), the name actually fits. Note that in the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/MegaManX'', Vile is called VAVA, making Dr. Vile not a violation of the OneSteveLimit.
* The ''Series/MegaManX'' series has a Woolseyism in the naming of its antagonists as "Mavericks", as opposed to "Irregulars". "Maverick" is a fitting name, being synonymous with "nonconformist" and "irregular", referring to how the bosses and enemies in the series were rebelling against their programming and against society.
** The names of the individual Mavericks were this for the longest time as well. Names like "Burnin' Noumander" and "Metamor Mothmeanos", though cool-sounding to a Japanese audience, sounded ''terrible'' to an English ear and became "Flame Mammoth" and "Morph Moth", respectively. Unfortunately they had to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks take it too far]] in ''VideoGame/MegamanX5'' and give the Mavericks cringe-worthy ''Music/GunsNRoses'' names, where "Tidal Makkoeen" became (ugh) "''Duff [=McWhalen=]''".
* ''VideoGame/MegaMan7'' included a Woolseyism in its ending: When Mega Man defeated Dr. Wily, he mentions that he intends to kill Dr. Wily as he has had enough of his trying to beg for mercy and tricking him. Wily attempts to remind Mega Man that he is a robot and robots aren't supposed to kill humans. Mega Man then tells Wily that he's "more than a robot" and to prepare to die before Bass saves Dr. Wily. Actually, Mega Man saying that he was "more than a robot" was only in the English version. In the Japanese version, Mega Man went [[VisibleSilence visibly silent]] after Wily's comment. It also as a result gave a WhatTheHellHero moment for Mega Man to Western players, as it made it seem as though Mega Man was actually going to go through with killing Wily in cold blood, when in the original Japanese version, he had an internal debate as to whether he should kill Wily or not.

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** The sequel series, ''MegaManStarForce'', ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'', also has its share of good localization points, the foremost being changing "Ox" and "Harp" to "Taurus" and "Lyra" to reflect the [[ThemeNaming constellation-based naming scheme]] of the alien characters. For some reason, however, Lyra and Sonia still combine to form [[DubInducedPlotHole "Harp Note," not "Lyra Note" as one would rightly expect...]]
** There's another one from ''MegaManStarForce'' ''Star Force'' that concerns the name of Aaron Boreal's lab. In the Japanese, [=AMAKEN=] was an abbreviated shorthand for "Amachi's Laboratory". Laboratory." The localization team turned it into [[FunWithAcronyms "Aerospace and Modern Astronomy Knowledge Expansion Nexus"]].
Nexus."]]
* A Woolseyism appears in the ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'' series with the name Dr. Weil. In Japan, he is known as Dr. Vile, [[OneSteveLimit which is awfully close to the name of]] [[VideoGame/MegaManX another character]], so they changed it to Weil. If pronounced using German phoenetics, it would be heard as 'vile.' "vile." In addition, his name also referred to Dr. Ray Kurzweil, a futurist who, besides giving the idea of Singularity, also talked about cybernetics a lot. Considering what Dr. Weil turned out to be by Mega ''Mega Man Zero 4 4'' (as well as implied to be the case in Mega ''Mega Man Zero 3), 3''), the name actually fits. Note that in the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/MegaManX'', Vile is called VAVA, making Dr. Vile not a violation of the OneSteveLimit.
* The ''Series/MegaManX'' ''VideoGame/MegaManX'' series has a Woolseyism in the naming of its antagonists as "Mavericks", as opposed to "Irregulars". "Irregulars." "Maverick" is a fitting name, being synonymous with "nonconformist" and "irregular", "irregular," referring to how the bosses and enemies in the series were rebelling against their programming and against society.
** The names of the individual Mavericks were this for the longest time as well. Names like "Burnin' Noumander" and "Metamor Mothmeanos", though cool-sounding to a Japanese audience, sounded ''terrible'' to an English ear and became "Flame Mammoth" and "Morph Moth", Moth," respectively. Unfortunately Unfortunately, they had to [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks take it too far]] in ''VideoGame/MegamanX5'' ''VideoGame/MegaManX5'' and give the Mavericks cringe-worthy ''Music/GunsNRoses'' names, where "Tidal Makkoeen" became (ugh) "''Duff [=McWhalen=]''".
[=McWhalen=]''."
* ''VideoGame/MegaMan7'' included a Woolseyism in its ending: When Mega Man defeated Dr. Wily, he mentions that he intends to kill Dr. Wily as he has had enough of his trying to beg for mercy and tricking him. Wily attempts to remind Mega Man that [[ThreeLawsCompliant he is a robot and robots aren't supposed to kill humans.humans]]. Mega Man then tells Wily that he's "more than a robot" and to prepare to die before Bass saves Dr. Wily. Actually, Mega Man saying that he was "more than a robot" was only in the English version. In the Japanese version, Mega Man went [[VisibleSilence visibly silent]] after Wily's comment. It also as a result gave a WhatTheHellHero moment for Mega Man to Western players, as it made it seem as though Mega Man was actually going to go through with killing Wily in cold blood, when in the original Japanese version, [[LogicBomb he had an internal debate as to whether he should kill Wily or not.not]].



* Several Woolseyisms in ''VideoGame/ValkyrieProfile''. Most notable was the change of "Ahly"'s name to "Hrist", as the latter is a valkyrie in Norse mythology.
** ''Valkyrie Profile: Covenant of the Plume'' actually translated the original, modern Japanese into dated English. The result was that the localized version had a very great deal more immersion and atmosphere than the original.

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* Several Woolseyisms in ''VideoGame/ValkyrieProfile''. Most notable was the change of "Ahly"'s Ahly's name to "Hrist", "Hrist," as the latter is a valkyrie {{valkyrie|}} in Norse mythology.
** ''Valkyrie Profile: Covenant of the Plume'' ''VideoGame/ValkyrieProfileCovenantOfThePlume'' actually translated the original, modern Japanese into dated English. The result was that the localized version had a very great deal more immersion and atmosphere than the original.



*** For those who are curious, Genevieve is the patron saint of Paris in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Still not quite...accurate (Genevieve is a vampire seductress in the game) But it at least beats ''Jdwallace''.
* The head of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'' FanTranslation, Clyde "Tomato" Mandelin, has a position at Creator/FUNimation, so it only figures that said fan translation would have a few examples of Woolseyisms. For just one example, at one point in the original Japanese, a sunbaked pig says that the name of a famous Japanese ham company came to him in a dream; in the translation, he says that the words "Oscar" and "Mayer" appeared instead.
** A lot of the enemy names were made into puns, in keeping with the comedic feel of the Mother series. A short list: Einswine (a brain-augmented pig), Navy SQUEAL (an aquatic Pigmask), and the Squawking [[Film/ArmyOfDarkness Boomstick]] (an exploding chicken head on a stick)

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*** For those who are curious, Genevieve is the patron saint of Paris in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Still not quite... accurate (Genevieve is a vampire seductress in the game) But game), but it at least beats ''Jdwallace''.
* The head of the ''VideoGame/{{Mother ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER 3}}'' FanTranslation, Clyde "Tomato" Mandelin, has a position at Creator/FUNimation, so it only figures that said fan translation would have a few examples of Woolseyisms. For just one example, at one point in the original Japanese, a sunbaked pig says that the name of a famous Japanese ham company came to him in a dream; in the translation, he says that the words "Oscar" and "Mayer" appeared instead.
** A lot of the enemy names were made into puns, in keeping with the comedic feel of the Mother ''MOTHER'' series. A short list: Einswine (a brain-augmented pig), Navy SQUEAL (an aquatic Pigmask), and the Squawking [[Film/ArmyOfDarkness Boomstick]] (an exploding chicken head on a stick)



*** [[BilingualBonus 'Fassad' is also Arabic for 'corruption', which makes it fit even better.]]
* In the North American version of the SNES ports of ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' and ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Street Fighter Alpha 2]]'', the character Sodom has his name changed to Katana. Considering that his character is a Japanophile, the AsLongAsItSoundsForeign sword certainly seems more appropriate than the biblical reference. As well, in the same port of ''Final Fight'', the metalhead thug Damnd has his name changed to Thrasher, which many fans felt was more appropriate. These changes were most likely made due to Nintendo of America's policies regarding religious references and offensive material in games, rather than any sort of desire to punch up the translation, however.

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*** [[BilingualBonus 'Fassad' Fassad is also Arabic for 'corruption', "corruption," which makes it fit even better.]]
* In the North American version of the SNES ports of ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' and ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Street Fighter Alpha 2]]'', ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha 2'', the character Sodom has his name changed to Katana. Considering that his character is a Japanophile, the AsLongAsItSoundsForeign sword certainly seems more appropriate than the biblical reference. As well, in the same port of ''Final Fight'', the metalhead thug Damnd has his name changed to Thrasher, which many fans felt was more appropriate. These changes were most likely made due to Nintendo of America's policies regarding religious references and offensive material in games, rather than any sort of desire to punch up the translation, however.
8th Jun '16 2:50:08 PM pinkdalek
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** At the end of the game, before facing Sephiroth, Cloud says "Let's go" as a sort of suggestion ("''Iku yo.''"), causing Cid to yell at him for sounding weak. In the English version, Cloud instead says "Alright everyone, let's mosey," turning it from a mildly funny character beat into a fan-favourite line.
8th Jun '16 9:33:05 AM Nepeta
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* In the third game, instructions given to [[spoiler:Pearl Fey]] tell her to "gravely roast the master in the fires of Hades", [[spoiler:which is basically asking to send Misty and Maya Fey to hell]]. The reader, a young child, obviously doesn't understand what this means, and so ends up throwing gravy from a roast dinner over a hanging scroll. In the Japanese version, the instructions said to "Give [[spoiler:"Misty Fey]] magnificent burial rites" in kanji. [[spoiler:Pearl]], not being able to read kanji that well, asks the others to translate for her and is told how they are read ("''karei indou''"), but not what they mean - so she interprets this as "Indian curry" and throws that over a hanging scroll. Both of which would end up looking a sort of "brownish slob" obscuring the the scroll's picture, thus having the scroll's brown slob obstruction explained believably in both versions.

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* In the third game, instructions given to [[spoiler:Pearl Fey]] tell her to "gravely roast the master in the fires of Hades", [[spoiler:which is basically asking to send Misty and Maya Fey to hell]]. The reader, a young child, obviously doesn't understand what this means, and so ends up [[HilarityEnsues throwing gravy from a roast dinner over a hanging scroll.scroll]]. In the Japanese version, the instructions said to "Give [[spoiler:"Misty Fey]] magnificent burial rites" in kanji. [[spoiler:Pearl]], not being able to read kanji that well, asks the others to translate for her and is told how they are read ("''karei indou''"), but not what they mean - so she interprets this as "Indian curry" and throws that over a hanging scroll. Both of which would end up looking a sort of "brownish slob" obscuring the the scroll's picture, thus having the scroll's brown slob obstruction explained believably in both versions.
7th Jun '16 8:11:21 PM Willbyr
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* The title of the sequel to ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors,'' ''VirtuesLastReward,'' is itself a Woolseyism. In Japanese, the title of the game is written in kana (which indicate only sound and not meaning), and thus can be read two ways: "Good People Die" and "I Want To Be a Good Person." The English title was thus changed to a combination of the idioms "virtue is its own reward" and "gone to his last reward."

to:

* The title of the sequel to ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors,'' ''VirtuesLastReward,'' ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward,'' is itself a Woolseyism. In Japanese, the title of the game is written in kana (which indicate only sound and not meaning), and thus can be read two ways: "Good People Die" and "I Want To Be a Good Person." The English title was thus changed to a combination of the idioms "virtue is its own reward" and "gone to his last reward."
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Woolseyism.VideoGames