History WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids / Literature

17th Dec '17 1:48:00 AM Scraggle
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* ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''

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* %%* ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''
14th Dec '17 5:51:52 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** ''Literature/{{Coraline}}''. Full of distinctly Freudian terror, but the true creepiness of the book isn't always apparent to kids, who might see it as just a book about scary monsters.

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** ''Literature/{{Coraline}}''. Full ''Literature/{{Coraline}}'' is full of distinctly Freudian terror, but the true creepiness of the book isn't always apparent to kids, who might see it as just a book about scary monsters.
5th Dec '17 10:58:16 PM Pichu-kun
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/ErinHunter is actually various writers using one name. They specialize in {{xenofiction}} works aimed at the 13 and under crowd. Their books are full of FamilyUnfriendlyViolence and FamilyUnfriendlyDeath. This even extends to books by the authors under either their own names or different names, such as ''Literature/WingsOfFire''.
5th Dec '17 10:55:50 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''A is for Adam'' is a kid's book aimed to teach about the Bible to young children. It features rhyming and teaches the alphabet. Unlike most Biblical works aimed at kids, it doesn't water down the Bible. It also features references to animal sacrifice (complete with a bloody dead lamb), BrotherSisterIncest, and SiblingMurder.



* ''Literature/TheGirlOfInkAndStars'' has a premise that sounds innocent enough: the PluckyGirl protagonist must journey into the forbidden forest and use her skills with map-making to find her SpoiledSweet best friend. However, the story itself features said protagonist growing up in a town ruled with an iron fist by a cruel Governor (who whips people and does other horrible things) corrupt law enforcers, demon attacks, descriptions of the decaying environment, and, early on, the town being spooked by [[spoiler: the brutal murder of a THIRTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL.]] It's also rife with AdultFear, and features such [[SarcasmMode lovely]] scenes as the search party [[spoiler: ''finding a desolate village filled with bones and an 'X' made from dried blood and dog teeth.'']]
** The book also doesn't shy away with its descriptions of blood, wounds, scars, or how much Isabella's journey is wearing her down, physically AND mentally. It's not ''gory'' or anything, but it still gets quite dark at times.

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* ''Literature/TheGirlOfInkAndStars'' has a premise that sounds innocent enough: the PluckyGirl protagonist must journey into the forbidden forest and use her skills with map-making to find her SpoiledSweet best friend. However, the story itself features said protagonist growing up in a town ruled with an iron fist by a cruel Governor (who whips people and does other horrible things) corrupt law enforcers, demon attacks, descriptions of the decaying environment, and, early on, the town being spooked by [[spoiler: the brutal murder of a THIRTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL.]] It's also rife with AdultFear, and features such [[SarcasmMode lovely]] scenes as the search party [[spoiler: ''finding a desolate village filled with bones and an 'X' made from dried blood and dog teeth.'']]
**
'']] The book also doesn't shy away with its descriptions of blood, wounds, scars, or how much Isabella's journey is wearing her down, physically AND mentally. It's not ''gory'' or anything, but it still gets quite dark at times.



* ''Literature/OutOfTheDust'' is a popular children's book in America. It's told through poems from the eyes of a teenage girl living through the Great Depression, more specifically the dustbowl. ''Out of the Dust'' is nothing but a miserable story about a girl whose [[spoiler:pregnant mother suffers [[BodyHorror graphically described]] burns in a freak accident]] and [[spoiler:mother later dies of her injuries alongside her newborn son]]. The protagonist herself [[spoiler:suffers painful burns to her hands which almost [[CareerEndingInjury end her piano playing hobby]]]]. Her father ends up distant and depressed after all those events. That's not even related to the fact they live in a poor, rural area where dust storms are an everyday occurrence. There is an optimistic ending, but the book is mostly tragedy after tragedy. The author received complaints for how grim of a children's book and has noted that she believes children can handle harsher topics than adults give them credit.



* The ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' books are marketed for kids, but are full of inhuman viewpoints, death, mutilation, starvation, general creepiness, and the implication that the BigBad is taking cats [[spoiler: and turning them into walking, talking {{toys}}, or silent, deadly killing machines, somehow]]. Being illustrated by DaveMcKean (as is ''Literature/{{Coraline}}'', above) probably doesn't help much, either.

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* ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' is a series about dogs surviving on their own after their owners evacuate. It sounds like a nice little adventure, but the series can get rather grim and dark. The main villain of the first arc is a murderous religious zealot who [[spoiler:killed her own son]] and is on a mission to kill other dogs because she believes the Sky-Dogs wish so. ''Survivors'' has its fair share of mature themes, including religion and violence, though it doesn't reach the levels of violence as sister-series ''Literature/WarriorCats''
* The ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' books are marketed for kids, but are full of inhuman viewpoints, death, mutilation, starvation, general creepiness, and the implication that the BigBad is taking cats [[spoiler: and either turning them into walking, talking {{toys}}, or silent, deadly killing machines, somehow]]. Being illustrated by DaveMcKean Creator/DaveMcKean (as is ''Literature/{{Coraline}}'', above) probably doesn't help much, either.



* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[OurDragonsAreDifferent in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]

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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[OurDragonsAreDifferent in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter chapter, another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]
15th Nov '17 9:07:42 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Perhaps kidlit's defining BlackComedy, as naughty children are subjected to a variety of dreadful consequences ranging from near-drowning to falling down a garbage chute that leads to an incinerator. While the novel has the kids survive, they're very much changed for their experiences, and adaptations have played with their fates -- they're ambiguous in the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film]], and the [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage musical]] goes with possible DeathByAdaptation (''if'' they're lucky, they'll get a DisneyDeath or rescue, but only offstage). Making matters worse, the factory proprietor has NoSympathy for them! This doesn't even get into adaptation-specific twists and references: the 1971 film has [[SurrealHorror the notorious boat ride]] and the line "I am now telling the computer ''exactly'' what it can do with a bar of chocolate!". The 2013 musical has multiple jokes about alcohol and/or drinking problems amongst the adult characters.

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** ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Perhaps kidlit's defining BlackComedy, as naughty children are subjected to a variety of dreadful consequences ranging from near-drowning to falling down a garbage chute that leads to an incinerator. While the novel has the kids survive, they're very much changed for their experiences, and adaptations have played with their fates -- they're ambiguous in the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film]], and the [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage musical]] goes with possible DeathByAdaptation (''if'' they're lucky, they'll get a DisneyDeath or rescue, but only offstage). Making matters worse, the factory proprietor has NoSympathy for them! This doesn't even get into adaptation-specific twists and references: the 1971 film has [[SurrealHorror the notorious boat ride]] and the line "I am now telling the computer ''exactly'' ''[[AssShove exactly]]'' what it can do with a bar lifetime supply of chocolate!". chocolate!" The 2013 musical has multiple jokes about alcohol and/or drinking problems amongst the adult characters.
15th Nov '17 9:07:04 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Perhaps kidlit's defining BlackComedy, as naughty children are subjected to a variety of dreadful consequences ranging from near-drowning to falling down a garbage chute that leads to an incinerator. While the novel has the kids survive, they're very much changed for their experiences, and adaptations have played with their fates -- they're ambiguous in the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film]], and the [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage musical]] goes with possible DeathByAdaptation (''if'' they're lucky, they'll get a DisneyDeath or rescue, but only offstage). Making matters worse, the factory proprietor has NoSympathy for them! This doesn't even get into adaptation-specific twists and references: the 1971 film has [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment the notorious boat ride]] and the line "I am now telling the computer ''exactly'' what it can do with a bar of chocolate!". The 2013 musical has multiple jokes about alcohol and/or drinking problems amongst the adult characters.

to:

** ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Perhaps kidlit's defining BlackComedy, as naughty children are subjected to a variety of dreadful consequences ranging from near-drowning to falling down a garbage chute that leads to an incinerator. While the novel has the kids survive, they're very much changed for their experiences, and adaptations have played with their fates -- they're ambiguous in the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film]], and the [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage musical]] goes with possible DeathByAdaptation (''if'' they're lucky, they'll get a DisneyDeath or rescue, but only offstage). Making matters worse, the factory proprietor has NoSympathy for them! This doesn't even get into adaptation-specific twists and references: the 1971 film has [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment [[SurrealHorror the notorious boat ride]] and the line "I am now telling the computer ''exactly'' what it can do with a bar of chocolate!". The 2013 musical has multiple jokes about alcohol and/or drinking problems amongst the adult characters.



** Descriptions of the author's next book are interesting too: ''Year of the Jungle'' -- about her childhood during UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar -- is picture book for four-year-olds.

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** Descriptions of the author's next book are interesting too: ''Year of the Jungle'' -- about her childhood during UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar -- is a picture book for four-year-olds.
15th Nov '17 9:04:14 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Creator/RoaldDahl could be one of this trope's patron saints, with several of his children's novels serving as near-fixtures on challenged book lists for years. (His adult-aimed fiction [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids falls under this trope's inverted counterpart]].) Particularly controversial works include:

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* Creator/RoaldDahl could be one of this trope's patron saints, with several of his children's novels serving as near-fixtures on challenged book lists for years. (His adult-aimed fiction [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids falls under this trope's [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids inverted counterpart]].counterpart]], and sometimes under BleachedUnderpants too.) Particularly controversial works include:
15th Nov '17 9:03:17 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** ''The Witches'': The very nature of the witches -- a race of child-hating hags who live only to rid the world of them by any means neccessary, the crueler the better -- is disturbing enough to put off sensitive adults.

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** ''The Witches'': ''Literature/TheWitches'': The very nature of the witches -- a race of child-hating hags who live only to rid the world of them by any means neccessary, the crueler the better -- is disturbing enough to put off sensitive adults.
15th Nov '17 9:02:59 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* ''Literature/{{Coraline}}''. Full of distinctly Freudian terror, but the true creepiness of the book isn't always apparent to kids, who might see it as just a book about scary monsters.



* Also from Creator/NeilGaiman, the first page of ''Literature/TheGraveyardBook'' involves a family being murdered, and the killer then going after the baby that crawled away. Other loveliness includes TheProtagonist threatening to mentally torture school bullies, a man being hit by a police car, hangings, and a FateWorseThanDeath.
** For those not familiar with his work, Creator/NeilGaiman does not believe in talking down to kids. He has also reached the conclusion that children often enjoy horrific stories more than adults, which dovetails with his observation that, unlike adults, many children know no mercy when it comes to what happens to villains (cf. the deaths of many of the villains in beloved fairy tales).



** ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles''. Yeah, is still a book series aimed at older children, even though it contains a massive amount of extreme violence such as decapitation. Wounds are even sometimes described in explicit detail. Maybe the fact that it's written media and not shown as actual pictures keeps the [[MoralGuardians Moral Guardians]] away.

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** ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles''. Yeah, is still a book series aimed at older children, even though it contains a massive amount of extreme violence such as decapitation. Wounds are decapitation and even sometimes described in explicit detail. disembowelment. Maybe the fact that it's written media and not shown as actual pictures keeps the [[MoralGuardians Moral Guardians]] MoralGuardians away.


Added DiffLines:

* Creator/NeilGaiman does not believe in talking down to kids. He has also reached the conclusion that children often enjoy horrific stories more than adults, which dovetails with his observation that, unlike adults, many children know no mercy when it comes to what happens to villains (cf. the deaths of many of the villains in beloved fairy tales).
** ''Literature/{{Coraline}}''. Full of distinctly Freudian terror, but the true creepiness of the book isn't always apparent to kids, who might see it as just a book about scary monsters.
** The first page of ''Literature/TheGraveyardBook'' involves a family being murdered, and the killer then going after the baby that crawled away. Other loveliness includes TheProtagonist threatening to mentally torture school bullies, a man being hit by a police car, hangings, and a FateWorseThanDeath.
4th Sep '17 8:50:48 PM Peteman
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* Much of ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' is a ''brutal'' deconstruction of WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld, and it's one of the clearest and most prevalent examples of WarIsHell in children's literature. By the start of the last book, ''The Beginning'', they've spent ''three years'' fighting a horrific war, just trying to HoldTheLine until the Andalites show up and bring enough of a fighting force to stop the [[PuppeteerParasite Yeerks]]. None of the main characters are in anything even close to a healthy mental or emotional state. One of them sent his cousin to kill his brother, knowing she'd die too. And she agrees with his decision because she doesn't think she'd be able to function in normal life without the war anymore. Another spearheaded a plot to kill his own mother because she was the host for one of the Yeerks' leaders. A third was trapped in a body--and a species--not his own in the first book. It's much darker than its market would suggest.

to:

* Much of ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' is a ''brutal'' deconstruction of WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld, and it's one of the clearest and most prevalent examples of WarIsHell in children's literature. By the start of the last book, ''The Beginning'', they've spent ''three years'' fighting a horrific war, just trying to HoldTheLine until the Andalites show up and bring enough of a fighting force to stop the [[PuppeteerParasite Yeerks]]. None of the main characters are in anything even close to a healthy mental or emotional state. One of them sent his cousin to kill his brother, knowing she'd die too. And she agrees with his decision because she doesn't think she'd be able to function in normal life without the war anymore. Another spearheaded a plot to kill his own mother because she was the host for one of the Yeerks' leaders. A third was trapped in a body--and a species--not his own in the first book. It's much darker than its market would suggest.
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