History WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids / Literature

21st Nov '16 11:39:08 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything: language so profane it could make Quentin Tarantino blush, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), and glorification of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.

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* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything: language so profane it could make Quentin Tarantino blush, lots of swearing, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), and glorification of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing marketed towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means.inside. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.
14th Sep '16 6:53:25 PM ctempire
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* ''Mama Ga Obake Ni Natchatta'', a Japanese picture book, is about a child and the ghost of his mother. While the book is intended for ages three and up, some parents complained that it is too emotional and scary for children.
6th Sep '16 10:06:17 AM molokai198
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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[EverythingsBetterWithDragons in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]]

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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[EverythingsBetterWithDragons in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]
28th Aug '16 6:18:38 AM Silverblade2
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* The ''Choose Your Own Adventure'' books were sold to kids as offering the ability to play the title role in a kid's adventure book. They are, however, remembered for the terrifying endings that arise when incorrect choices are made, with some books even giving detailed descriptions of being eaten, shot, stabbed, poisoned, torn to bits, electrocuted, immured, trapped in tortuous time-loops forever, and so on. These older books are generally no longer considered suitable for children, although the creator of the series - Edward Packard - said in an interview in 1981 that in his experience children enjoyed the exaggerated deaths.
* {{Fairy tale}}s, and pre-20th century bed-time stories. Maybe some of them were designed to ScareEmStraight, but still, some push it UpToEleven, with both psychological and BodyHorror many snuff films don't get even close to. An example for the psychological horror story: a tale by [[Creator/HansChristianAndersen Andersen]] consists of nothing else than [[Literature/TheLittleMatchGirl a lengthy description of the hypothermia-induced delirium a little girl suffers while she slowly freezes to death.]] About tales with BodyHorror... too many to list.\\\
Fairy Tales were written for peasant children who grew up in rather a CrapsackWorld. What would be considered fit for them would be different then what is considered fit for modern suburban kids. Although it might be argued that even these generally have a stronger stomach then many adults realize. Some of them were originally written for adults. In these cases, it's WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids. Indeed, a lot of what we now consider to be for kids ("Literature/LittleRedRidingHood", for example) were originally tavern stories adults told each other. They weren't told to children until ''much'' later.



* Much Victorian literature is like this. While Victorians are stereotyped as a whole century of MoralGuardians, one can find more then a few surprises along the way. Including occasionally things that it would be hard to imagine in a ''modern'' children's story.
** For example, while Christina Rossetti insisted ''Goblin Market'' was a children's poem, it's kind of difficult to ignore the [[IncestIsRelative incest]].



* “Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.” ― G.K. Chesterton.
11th Aug '16 5:52:27 AM LondonKdS
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* ''Der Literature/{{Struwwelpeter}}'' gets this reaction from just about everyone nowadays, given its frequent death, mutilation, and DisproportionateRetribution.
4th Jul '16 12:45:54 PM Jean792
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* ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''
27th Jun '16 5:40:16 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''Literature/DarkestPowers'' series is essentially the same as its dark, adult oriented ''Literature/TheOtherworld'' sister series. It's ''somewhat'' toned down, basically just the sex and profanity taken out. Thus we have a series about teenagers trying to escape getting killed [[spoiler:and one of them doesn't]].

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* ''Literature/DarkestPowers'' series is essentially the same as its dark, adult oriented ''Literature/TheOtherworld'' sister series. series but aimed at a younger audience. It's ''somewhat'' more toned down, basically just down. Basically only the sex and profanity are taken out. Thus we have a series about teenagers trying to escape getting killed [[spoiler:and one of them doesn't]].doesn't]] with plenty of BodyHorror and NightmareFuel sprinkled about.



* Most of the people getting up in arms over the blunt descriptions of puberty and other "naughty" things found in ''Theatre/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'' are forgetting the fact that the book was written by, you know, a 13-year-old girl dealing with things every 13-year-old girl goes through (well, minus the whole Nazi thing).
** Except for the vast majority of people, who remember what the word "diary" means.

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* Most of the people getting up in arms over the blunt descriptions of puberty and other "naughty" things found in ''Theatre/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'' are forgetting the fact that the book was written by, you know, a 13-year-old girl dealing with things every 13-year-old girl goes through (well, minus the whole Nazi thing).
** Except for the vast majority of people, who remember what the word "diary" means.
thing). It was a personal diary after all.


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* ''Literature/IWantMyHatBack'' sounds and looks like its aimed at a very young audience however [[spoiler:the rabbit being eaten by the bear in revenge]] is certainly not something you see in most picture books.
9th Jun '16 7:38:37 AM Prfnoff
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* Anything written by the late Robert Cormier would count here, especially ''The Chocolate War'' and ''Fade'' (two books that frequently make it to "frequently banned books" lists) but not limited to those two books. His novels were specifically written for older children and preteens but are about anything from (terminally ill) children being used as live guinea pigs to a young boy with amnesia who's being marked for death as soon as he regains his memory.

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* Anything written by the late Robert Cormier Creator/RobertCormier would count here, especially ''The Chocolate War'' ''Literature/TheChocolateWar'' and ''Fade'' ''Literature/{{Fade}}'' (two books that frequently make it to "frequently banned books" lists) but not limited to those two books. His novels were specifically written for older children and preteens but are about anything from (terminally ill) terminally ill children being used as live guinea pigs (''The Bumblebee Flies Anyway'') to a young boy with amnesia who's being marked for death as soon as he regains his memory.memory (''Literature/IAmTheCheese'').
5th Jun '16 5:15:29 PM rojopixler
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* ''Literature/TheGrishaTrilogy'' has an in-universe example with the ''Istorii Sankt'ya'', a book of religious stories for children which contains extremely graphic illustrations of saints being martyred.
27th Apr '16 11:05:56 AM WhatArtThee
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* The ''Literature/AlexRider'' series by Anthony Horowitz, which has a large amount of violence, horror, some swearing, and one use of the word "balls".

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* The ''Literature/AlexRider'' series by Anthony Horowitz, which has a large amount of violence, horror, some swearing, and one use of the word "balls".sexual dialogue.



* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' features a lot more violence and horror than you would expect, despite being for kids.
** To elaborate: Much of the series is a ''brutal'' deconstruction of WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld, and it's one of the clearest and most prevalent examples of WarIsHell in children's literature. By the start of the last book, ''The Beginning'', they've spent ''three years'' fighting a horrific war, just trying to HoldTheLine until the Andalites show up and bring enough of a fighting force to stop the [[PuppeteerParasite Yeerks]]. None of the main characters are in anything even close to a healthy mental or emotional state. One of them sent his cousin to kill his brother, knowing she'd die too. And she agrees with his decision because she doesn't think she'd be able to function in normal life without the war anymore. Another spearheaded a plot to kill his own mother because she was the host for one of the Yeerks' leaders. A third was trapped in a body--and a species--not his own in the first book. It's much darker than its market would suggest.

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* Much of ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' features a lot more violence and horror than you would expect, despite being for kids.
** To elaborate: Much of the series
is a ''brutal'' deconstruction of WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld, and it's one of the clearest and most prevalent examples of WarIsHell in children's literature. By the start of the last book, ''The Beginning'', they've spent ''three years'' fighting a horrific war, just trying to HoldTheLine until the Andalites show up and bring enough of a fighting force to stop the [[PuppeteerParasite Yeerks]]. None of the main characters are in anything even close to a healthy mental or emotional state. One of them sent his cousin to kill his brother, knowing she'd die too. And she agrees with his decision because she doesn't think she'd be able to function in normal life without the war anymore. Another spearheaded a plot to kill his own mother because she was the host for one of the Yeerks' leaders. A third was trapped in a body--and a species--not his own in the first book. It's much darker than its market would suggest.



* ''Literature/HarryPotter''. The ''Harry Potter'' example is so prevalent that some editions of the books have plain covers in [[RealIsBrown dingy earth-tones]] (as opposed to the colorful illustrations that the "main" editions have) so that adult readers don't have to feel so embarrassed when they read it on the train. Considering most children's books are written by adults, you think adults wouldn't feel they needed to justify reading a children's book in the first place... After all, if the author isn't embarrassed at having written, why should an adult feel embarrassed at reading it?
** One of the best example of this {{trope}} is the ''Deathly Hallows'' [[Film/HarryPotter film]], which has a scene that caused major uproar (among MoralGuardians and parts of the fandom): [[spoiler: Naked [[TheHero Harry]] and [[TheSpock Hermione]] making out -- a vision which [[TheMcCoy Ron]] sees as the locket shows his worst nightmares]]. Another is Bellatrix writing on Hermione's arm with a knife. Sure, we all know that Cruciatus is worse, but it is perceived as unreal. When Umbridge forced Harry to carve words into the back of his hand, it was also done with a magic medium, and therefore less visceral.

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* ''Literature/HarryPotter''. The ''Harry Potter'' example is so prevalent that some editions of the books have plain covers in [[RealIsBrown dingy earth-tones]] (as opposed to the colorful illustrations that the "main" editions have) so that adult readers don't have to feel so embarrassed when they read it on the train. Considering most children's books are written by adults, you think adults wouldn't feel they needed to justify reading a children's book in the first place... After all, if the author isn't embarrassed at having written, why should an adult feel embarrassed at reading it?
** One
''Literature/HarryPotter'' has one of the best example examples of this {{trope}} is in the ''Deathly Hallows'' [[Film/HarryPotter film]], which has a scene that caused major uproar (among MoralGuardians and parts of the fandom): [[spoiler: Naked [[TheHero Harry]] and [[TheSpock Hermione]] making out -- a vision which [[TheMcCoy Ron]] sees as the locket shows his worst nightmares]]. Another is Bellatrix writing on Hermione's arm with a knife. Sure, we all know that Cruciatus is worse, but it is perceived as unreal. When Umbridge forced Harry to carve words into the back of his hand, it was also done with a magic medium, and therefore less visceral.



** Frankly, this is up for debate. Decapitation is only mentioned, never described or depicted. Suicide is an overarching theme or threat on occasion, but again, it's never depicted. As opposed to other YA series like Harry Potter, Divergent, or Twilight, torture is never described and only briefly mentioned or very briefly depicted, mutilation is never described at length, and not described harshly at all. Child prostitution isn't mentioned by name, and flies right over the heads of anyone not old enough to understand, and even older readers might miss it, no one is ever buried alive in the books, and death by fire and venom happen, but the most gruesome descriptions are usually kept very short. For all the hoopla about The Hunger Games violence, despite the violent premise, many readers opened the books to find a story that wasn't altogether more disturbing or graphic than other YA franchises such as Harry Potter, Divergent, or even Twilight.



* ''Literature/{{Phenomena}}'': While the main series is dark enough already it is with it's strangely 9+, is [[AscendedExtra Azur's spin-offs]] said to be for younger children. The first 4 books are filled with suspense, he's banned from his home and he's kidnapped and tortured, in [[FromBadToWorse the 5th book]] his brother is seen covered in the blood of innocent people, in the 6th he, himself, is seen covered in blood of innocents eating of an uncensored torn off leg complete with a SlasherSmile, on the cover! Worse still, the books are illustrated so you can see his suffering on every page.

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* ''Literature/{{Phenomena}}'': While the main series is dark enough already it is with it's strangely 9+, is 9+, [[AscendedExtra Azur's spin-offs]] are said to be for younger children. The first 4 books are filled with suspense, he's banned from his home and he's kidnapped and tortured, in [[FromBadToWorse the 5th book]] his brother is seen covered in the blood of innocent people, in the 6th he, himself, is seen covered in blood of innocents eating of an uncensored torn off leg complete with a SlasherSmile, on the cover! Worse still, the books are illustrated so you can see his suffering on every page.



* Yeah, ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'' is still a book series aimed at older children, even though it contains a massive ammount of extreme violence such as decapitation. Wounds are even sometimes described in explicit detail. Maybe the fact that it's written media and not shown as actual pictures keeps the [[MoralGuardians Moral Guardians]] away.

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* Yeah, ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'' is still a book series aimed at older children, even though it contains a massive ammount amount of extreme violence such as decapitation. Wounds are even sometimes described in explicit detail. Maybe the fact that it's written media and not shown as actual pictures keeps the [[MoralGuardians Moral Guardians]] away.



** Literature/RonjaTheRobbersDaughter is mostly a rather light-hearted story, but it has the scene when Mattis has Birk (an eleven-year-old boy) beaten up, and it has Ronja's grandfather figure die in the end (it is a very calm and peaceful death though, but we still see Mattis becoming very heart-broken).
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