History WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids / Literature

19th Jan '17 11:19:22 AM Ylana_Starscream
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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[EverythingsBetterWithDragons in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]

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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[EverythingsBetterWithDragons [[OurDragonsAreDifferent in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]
13th Jan '17 12:16:57 AM Xtifr
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* This is a large part of the reason why ''In the Night Kitchen'' by the late [[DepravedKidsShowHost Maurice Sendak]] was banned from various school libraries and children's book shops: The child protagonist Mickey loses his pajamas for some reason and ends up naked for a substantial chunk of the story, with his nudity uncensored.

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* This is a large part of the reason why ''In the Night Kitchen'' by the late [[DepravedKidsShowHost Maurice Sendak]] Creator/MauriceSendak was banned from various school libraries and children's book shops: The child protagonist Mickey loses his pajamas for some reason and ends up naked for a substantial chunk of the story, with his nudity uncensored.
4th Jan '17 7:27:09 AM TudorRose
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* While Robin Jarvis' ''Literature/DeptfordMice'' books feature cute animals, their being targeted at children is very questionable because many of the characters are subjected to violent, absolutely horrific deaths such as being skinned alive, decapitated, or having their body slowly eaten away by a deadly poison.
21st Dec '16 11:04:23 AM Xtifr
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* The ''Literature/ChroniclesOfPrydain'' contains death, zombies, human sacrifice and much more.

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* The ''Literature/ChroniclesOfPrydain'' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfPrydain'' contains death, zombies, human sacrifice and much more.
21st Nov '16 11:39:08 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything: language so profane it could make Quentin Tarantino blush, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), and glorification of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.

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* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything: language so profane it could make Quentin Tarantino blush, lots of swearing, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), and glorification of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing marketed towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means.inside. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.
14th Sep '16 6:53:25 PM ctempire
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* ''Mama Ga Obake Ni Natchatta'', a Japanese picture book, is about a child and the ghost of his mother. While the book is intended for ages three and up, some parents complained that it is too emotional and scary for children.
6th Sep '16 10:06:17 AM molokai198
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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[EverythingsBetterWithDragons in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]]

to:

* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[EverythingsBetterWithDragons in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]
28th Aug '16 6:18:38 AM Silverblade2
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* The ''Choose Your Own Adventure'' books were sold to kids as offering the ability to play the title role in a kid's adventure book. They are, however, remembered for the terrifying endings that arise when incorrect choices are made, with some books even giving detailed descriptions of being eaten, shot, stabbed, poisoned, torn to bits, electrocuted, immured, trapped in tortuous time-loops forever, and so on. These older books are generally no longer considered suitable for children, although the creator of the series - Edward Packard - said in an interview in 1981 that in his experience children enjoyed the exaggerated deaths.
* {{Fairy tale}}s, and pre-20th century bed-time stories. Maybe some of them were designed to ScareEmStraight, but still, some push it UpToEleven, with both psychological and BodyHorror many snuff films don't get even close to. An example for the psychological horror story: a tale by [[Creator/HansChristianAndersen Andersen]] consists of nothing else than [[Literature/TheLittleMatchGirl a lengthy description of the hypothermia-induced delirium a little girl suffers while she slowly freezes to death.]] About tales with BodyHorror... too many to list.\\\
Fairy Tales were written for peasant children who grew up in rather a CrapsackWorld. What would be considered fit for them would be different then what is considered fit for modern suburban kids. Although it might be argued that even these generally have a stronger stomach then many adults realize. Some of them were originally written for adults. In these cases, it's WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids. Indeed, a lot of what we now consider to be for kids ("Literature/LittleRedRidingHood", for example) were originally tavern stories adults told each other. They weren't told to children until ''much'' later.



* Much Victorian literature is like this. While Victorians are stereotyped as a whole century of MoralGuardians, one can find more then a few surprises along the way. Including occasionally things that it would be hard to imagine in a ''modern'' children's story.
** For example, while Christina Rossetti insisted ''Goblin Market'' was a children's poem, it's kind of difficult to ignore the [[IncestIsRelative incest]].



* “Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.” ― G.K. Chesterton.
11th Aug '16 5:52:27 AM LondonKdS
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* ''Der Literature/{{Struwwelpeter}}'' gets this reaction from just about everyone nowadays, given its frequent death, mutilation, and DisproportionateRetribution.
4th Jul '16 12:45:54 PM Jean792
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* ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids.Literature