History WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids / Literature

3rd May '18 10:31:56 PM WildeOscar
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* This is a large part of the reason why ''In the Night Kitchen'' by the late Creator/MauriceSendak was banned from various school libraries and children's book shops: The child protagonist Mickey loses his pajamas for some reason and ends up naked for a substantial chunk of the story, with his nudity uncensored.

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* This is a large part of the reason why ''In the Night Kitchen'' by the late Creator/MauriceSendak was banned from various school libraries and children's book shops: The child protagonist Mickey loses his pajamas for some reason (WordOfGod says it was meant to be a symbol of him losing his inhibitions) and ends up naked for a substantial chunk of the story, with his nudity uncensored.
28th Mar '18 9:50:04 PM nombretomado
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* The entire point of the StarWarsExpandedUniverse series ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' was to be a horror series for kids, [[FollowTheLeader a la]] Literature/{{Goosebumps}}. BodyHorror and {{Mind Screw}}s abounded to the point where the book that revolved around ghosts was the least scary of the twelve. Hell, they introduced a planet that [[QuicksandSucks eats people alive]] in the ''very first book''. Other lovely highlights include worms that suck the marrow out of your bones so that the empty space can be filled with a serum that makes you [[AndIMustScream an unwitting zombie]], a [[IKnowWhatYouFear machine that traps you in your own nightmares]], forcible conversion into a [[BrainInAJar B'omarr brain spider]], swarms of [[EatenAlive beetles that eat you from the inside out]], other humans [[ImAHumanitarian who also think your flesh is tasty]], and some of the sickest {{Mad Scientist}}s in the Star Wars universe. Good God, everywhere these kids go people die like flies! Special mention goes to the psychological trauma that goes with the question "If clones made of you have all your memories and think they are you, ''[[TomatoInTheMirror how do you know you yourself aren't a clone?]]''

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* The entire point of the StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' series ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' was to be a horror series for kids, [[FollowTheLeader a la]] Literature/{{Goosebumps}}. BodyHorror and {{Mind Screw}}s abounded to the point where the book that revolved around ghosts was the least scary of the twelve. Hell, they introduced a planet that [[QuicksandSucks eats people alive]] in the ''very first book''. Other lovely highlights include worms that suck the marrow out of your bones so that the empty space can be filled with a serum that makes you [[AndIMustScream an unwitting zombie]], a [[IKnowWhatYouFear machine that traps you in your own nightmares]], forcible conversion into a [[BrainInAJar B'omarr brain spider]], swarms of [[EatenAlive beetles that eat you from the inside out]], other humans [[ImAHumanitarian who also think your flesh is tasty]], and some of the sickest {{Mad Scientist}}s in the Star Wars universe. Good God, everywhere these kids go people die like flies! Special mention goes to the psychological trauma that goes with the question "If clones made of you have all your memories and think they are you, ''[[TomatoInTheMirror how do you know you yourself aren't a clone?]]''
10th Mar '18 6:15:54 AM Cdv4
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** Then there’s the Graphic Novel for the first book. Have fun seeing things like [[spoiler:A dragon being horrifically burnt alive (it’s worse than it sounds) A dragon getting what’s essentially ''acid on them including the eye,'' and an uncensored ''impalement'']]. The only real thing that was censored was hilariously enough a line that mentions a “bar” and the prologue.
8th Feb '18 8:20:20 AM AreYouTyler
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** ''Literature/TheBrothersLionheart'' might still be the worst offender though. The protagonist (a nine-year-old boy) is sick from tubercolosis, but his beloved brother dies before him when he saves him from a fire. And when it seems like the brothers can be happy together in a magical land after death, they have to start fighting an evil dictator and a creepy dragon. (To be fair though, this book has reportedly been a great comfort for terminally sick children.)

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** ''Literature/TheBrothersLionheart'' might still be the worst offender though. The protagonist (a nine-year-old boy) is sick from tubercolosis, tuberculosis, but his beloved brother dies before him when he saves him from a fire. And when it seems like the brothers can be happy together in a magical land after death, they have to start fighting an evil dictator and a creepy dragon. (To be fair though, this book has reportedly been a great comfort for terminally sick children.)
23rd Dec '17 3:52:04 PM nombretomado
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** ''TheCandyShopWar'' features the surprisingly vicious John Dart, who has no qualms about [[spoiler:[[BoundAndGagged binding and gagging]] ten-year-olds or shooting people's legs almost clean off]]. Not to mention both books running on twice their allotted helping of ParanoiaFuel.

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** ''TheCandyShopWar'' ''Literature/TheCandyShopWar'' features the surprisingly vicious John Dart, who has no qualms about [[spoiler:[[BoundAndGagged binding and gagging]] ten-year-olds or shooting people's legs almost clean off]]. Not to mention both books running on twice their allotted helping of ParanoiaFuel.
21st Dec '17 4:23:08 PM Midna
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* Most of the people getting up in arms over the blunt descriptions of puberty and other "naughty" things found in ''Theatre/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'' are forgetting the fact that the book was written by, you know, a 13-year-old girl dealing with things every 13-year-old girl goes through (well, minus the whole Nazi thing). It was a personal diary after all.

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* Most of the people getting up in arms over the blunt descriptions of puberty and other "naughty" things found in ''Theatre/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'' are forgetting the fact that the book was written by, you know, a 13-year-old girl dealing with things every 13-year-old girl goes through (well, minus the whole Nazi thing). It was a personal diary after all. The controversy is especially funny when you realize that the people complaining about it are implying that Anne Frank was too young to describe her own puberty in her own words.
17th Dec '17 1:48:00 AM Scraggle
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* ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''

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* %%* ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''
14th Dec '17 5:51:52 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** ''Literature/{{Coraline}}''. Full of distinctly Freudian terror, but the true creepiness of the book isn't always apparent to kids, who might see it as just a book about scary monsters.

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** ''Literature/{{Coraline}}''. Full ''Literature/{{Coraline}}'' is full of distinctly Freudian terror, but the true creepiness of the book isn't always apparent to kids, who might see it as just a book about scary monsters.
5th Dec '17 10:58:16 PM Pichu-kun
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/ErinHunter is actually various writers using one name. They specialize in {{xenofiction}} works aimed at the 13 and under crowd. Their books are full of FamilyUnfriendlyViolence and FamilyUnfriendlyDeath. This even extends to books by the authors under either their own names or different names, such as ''Literature/WingsOfFire''.
5th Dec '17 10:55:50 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''A is for Adam'' is a kid's book aimed to teach about the Bible to young children. It features rhyming and teaches the alphabet. Unlike most Biblical works aimed at kids, it doesn't water down the Bible. It also features references to animal sacrifice (complete with a bloody dead lamb), BrotherSisterIncest, and SiblingMurder.



* ''Literature/TheGirlOfInkAndStars'' has a premise that sounds innocent enough: the PluckyGirl protagonist must journey into the forbidden forest and use her skills with map-making to find her SpoiledSweet best friend. However, the story itself features said protagonist growing up in a town ruled with an iron fist by a cruel Governor (who whips people and does other horrible things) corrupt law enforcers, demon attacks, descriptions of the decaying environment, and, early on, the town being spooked by [[spoiler: the brutal murder of a THIRTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL.]] It's also rife with AdultFear, and features such [[SarcasmMode lovely]] scenes as the search party [[spoiler: ''finding a desolate village filled with bones and an 'X' made from dried blood and dog teeth.'']]
** The book also doesn't shy away with its descriptions of blood, wounds, scars, or how much Isabella's journey is wearing her down, physically AND mentally. It's not ''gory'' or anything, but it still gets quite dark at times.

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* ''Literature/TheGirlOfInkAndStars'' has a premise that sounds innocent enough: the PluckyGirl protagonist must journey into the forbidden forest and use her skills with map-making to find her SpoiledSweet best friend. However, the story itself features said protagonist growing up in a town ruled with an iron fist by a cruel Governor (who whips people and does other horrible things) corrupt law enforcers, demon attacks, descriptions of the decaying environment, and, early on, the town being spooked by [[spoiler: the brutal murder of a THIRTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL.]] It's also rife with AdultFear, and features such [[SarcasmMode lovely]] scenes as the search party [[spoiler: ''finding a desolate village filled with bones and an 'X' made from dried blood and dog teeth.'']]
**
'']] The book also doesn't shy away with its descriptions of blood, wounds, scars, or how much Isabella's journey is wearing her down, physically AND mentally. It's not ''gory'' or anything, but it still gets quite dark at times.



* ''Literature/OutOfTheDust'' is a popular children's book in America. It's told through poems from the eyes of a teenage girl living through the Great Depression, more specifically the dustbowl. ''Out of the Dust'' is nothing but a miserable story about a girl whose [[spoiler:pregnant mother suffers [[BodyHorror graphically described]] burns in a freak accident]] and [[spoiler:mother later dies of her injuries alongside her newborn son]]. The protagonist herself [[spoiler:suffers painful burns to her hands which almost [[CareerEndingInjury end her piano playing hobby]]]]. Her father ends up distant and depressed after all those events. That's not even related to the fact they live in a poor, rural area where dust storms are an everyday occurrence. There is an optimistic ending, but the book is mostly tragedy after tragedy. The author received complaints for how grim of a children's book and has noted that she believes children can handle harsher topics than adults give them credit.



* The ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' books are marketed for kids, but are full of inhuman viewpoints, death, mutilation, starvation, general creepiness, and the implication that the BigBad is taking cats [[spoiler: and turning them into walking, talking {{toys}}, or silent, deadly killing machines, somehow]]. Being illustrated by DaveMcKean (as is ''Literature/{{Coraline}}'', above) probably doesn't help much, either.

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* ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' is a series about dogs surviving on their own after their owners evacuate. It sounds like a nice little adventure, but the series can get rather grim and dark. The main villain of the first arc is a murderous religious zealot who [[spoiler:killed her own son]] and is on a mission to kill other dogs because she believes the Sky-Dogs wish so. ''Survivors'' has its fair share of mature themes, including religion and violence, though it doesn't reach the levels of violence as sister-series ''Literature/WarriorCats''
* The ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' books are marketed for kids, but are full of inhuman viewpoints, death, mutilation, starvation, general creepiness, and the implication that the BigBad is taking cats [[spoiler: and either turning them into walking, talking {{toys}}, or silent, deadly killing machines, somehow]]. Being illustrated by DaveMcKean Creator/DaveMcKean (as is ''Literature/{{Coraline}}'', above) probably doesn't help much, either.



* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[OurDragonsAreDifferent in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]

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* The ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' series is normally a kid-friendly adventure series [[OurDragonsAreDifferent in a world of dragons]], with a few bits of intenser-than-usual violence. (Which is to be expected, as the author was also part of the team that worked on ''Literature/{{Warriors}}''.) However, some of the books feature surprisingly mature themes, ''especially'' the third and fifth books. The third book [[HiddenDepths explores]] the character of Glory, who is a victim of an [[TheUnfavorite especially]] abusive childhood and [[BoomerangBigot deeply ingrained bigotry against her own kind]], played very seriously. The fifth book, meanwhile, is all about Sunny, an [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids often looked-down-upon]] [[TheCutie cutie]] who then proceeds to discover [[TheAntiNihilist Nietzchean nihilism]] [[BreakTheCutie after her worldview is shattered.]] Also, special mention to ''Darkstalker'', which features a character who has PTSD after watching his family be massacred and thinks about self-harm in one chapter chapter, another character having some utterly horrifying visions of the future, another character whose parents are in a seriously dysfunctional relationship, and an ending that involves [[spoiler:one of the protagonist using a mind control spell to drag his own father out in public and make him cut his tongue out and then disembowel himself with his own claws.]]
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