History WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids / Literature

2nd Feb '16 2:00:22 AM Furienna
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* Plenty of books by Creator/AstridLindgren come off as really dark for being children's books, when you read them again as a grown-up.
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* Plenty Lots of books works by Creator/AstridLindgren come off as really dark for being children's books, when you read them again as a grown-up.

** "Emil i Lönneberga" is mostly a light-hearted franchise, but the last book includes Emil saving a piglet from being eaten by his mother, getting "drunk" when he eats fermented cherries and saving his best friend from dying from blood poisoning during a blizzard.
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** "Emil i Lönneberga" is mostly a light-hearted franchise, but the last book includes Emil saving a new-born piglet from being eaten by his mother, getting "drunk" when he eats fermented cherries and saving his best friend from dying from blood poisoning during a blizzard.

** Literature/{{Madicken}} can be rather dark too in the second installment. The neighbor has to sell her body to science, so she can give her alcoholic husband money to pay off the mortgage. Then a girl is publically canned in front of her classmates in school (she ''had'' stolen the headmaster's wallet, but still). And a deranged man almost abducts both of Madicken's younger sisters, and we also have Madicken's crush almost dying from pneunomia.
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** Literature/{{Madicken}} can be rather dark too too, especially in the second installment. The neighbor has to sell her body to science, so she can give her alcoholic husband money to pay off the mortgage. Then a girl is publically canned in front of her classmates in school (she ''had'' stolen the headmaster's wallet, but still). And a deranged man almost abducts both of Madicken's younger sisters, and we also have Madicken's crush almost dying from pneunomia.pneumonia.
2nd Feb '16 1:56:17 AM Furienna
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** "Emil in Lönneberga" is mostly a light-hearted franchise, but the last book includes Emil saving a piglet from being eaten by his mother, getting drunk when he eats fermented cherries and saving his best friend from dying from blood poisoning during a blizzard. ** Literature/TheBrothersLionheart might still be the worst offender though. The protagonist is sick from tubercolosis, but his beloved brother dies before him when he saves him from a fire. And when it seems like the brothers can be happy together in a magical land after death, they have to start fighting an evil dictator and a creepy dragon. [note: To be fair though, this book has reportedly been a great comfort for terminally sick children.]
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** "Emil in i Lönneberga" is mostly a light-hearted franchise, but the last book includes Emil saving a piglet from being eaten by his mother, getting drunk "drunk" when he eats fermented cherries and saving his best friend from dying from blood poisoning during a blizzard. ** Literature/TheBrothersLionheart might still be the worst offender though. The protagonist is sick from tubercolosis, but his beloved brother dies before him when he saves him from a fire. And when it seems like the brothers can be happy together in a magical land after death, they have to start fighting an evil dictator and a creepy dragon. [note: To (To be fair though, this book has reportedly been a great comfort for terminally sick children.])
2nd Feb '16 1:52:55 AM Furienna
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* A lot of books by Creator/AstridLindgren. Including, but not limited to, children and beloved elderly people dying, NightmareFuel monsters, and very realistic and heartbreaking descriptions of the problems with alcoholism and poverty.
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* A lot Plenty of books by Creator/AstridLindgren. Including, Creator/AstridLindgren come off as really dark for being children's books, when you read them again as a grown-up. ** "Mio, my Mio" is very much like the first couple of books in the "Harry Potter" saga. That is, it opens with a realistic portrayal of child neglect/abuse, but not limited to, children the protagonist then is taken to a magical world, where everything seems to be lovely and beloved fun, only to realize that he has to fight a really creepy villain, whose very name is enough to scare people, and his equally creepy henchmen. ** "Sunnanäng" was a collection of four short stories, which all push the boundaries for what parents will want to read for their children. In the first story, two little orphans are painfully neglected/abused. And in the second story, another orphan is forced to live in gruesome poverty among a bunch of elderly people dying, NightmareFuel monsters, (and she also has to [spoiler: give her soul up to make a tree able to play music]. And in the third story, we get a pretty graphic description of sheep being killed by a wolf, and a girl gets abducted by the fair folks. And in the a feverish boy (who is very realistic close to dying) dreams about him being a knight in Medieval times, who has to sacrifice his life to save his king's life. ** "Emil in Lönneberga" is mostly a light-hearted franchise, but the last book includes Emil saving a piglet from being eaten by his mother, getting drunk when he eats fermented cherries and heartbreaking descriptions of saving his best friend from dying from blood poisoning during a blizzard. ** Literature/TheBrothersLionheart might still be the problems with alcoholism worst offender though. The protagonist is sick from tubercolosis, but his beloved brother dies before him when he saves him from a fire. And when it seems like the brothers can be happy together in a magical land after death, they have to start fighting an evil dictator and poverty.a creepy dragon. [note: To be fair though, this book has reportedly been a great comfort for terminally sick children.] ** Literature/{{Madicken}} can be rather dark too in the second installment. The neighbor has to sell her body to science, so she can give her alcoholic husband money to pay off the mortgage. Then a girl is publically canned in front of her classmates in school (she ''had'' stolen the headmaster's wallet, but still). And a deranged man almost abducts both of Madicken's younger sisters, and we also have Madicken's crush almost dying from pneunomia. ** Literature/RonjaTheRobbersDaughter is mostly a rather light-hearted story, but it has the scene when Mattis has Birk (an eleven-year-old boy) beaten up, and it has Ronja's grandfather figure die in the end (it is a very calm and peaceful death though, but we still see Mattis becoming very heart-broken).
28th Jan '16 8:36:56 AM WhatArtThee
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** ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Perhaps kidlit's defining BlackComedy, as naughty children are subjected to a variety of dreadful consequences ranging from near-drowning to falling down a garbage chute that leads to an incinerator. While the novel has the kids survive, they're very much changed for their experiences, and adaptations have played with their fates -- they're ambiguous in the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film]], and the [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage musical]] goes with possible DeathByAdaptation (''if'' they're lucky, they'll get a DisneyDeath or rescue, but only offstage). Making matters worse, the factory proprietor has NoSympathy for them! This doesn't even get into adaptation-specific twists and references: the 1971 film has [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment the notorious boat ride]] and the line "I am now telling the computer ''exactly'' what it can do with a bar of chocolate!" The 2013 musical has multiple jokes about alcohol and/or drinking problems amongst the adult characters, while the lyrics are rife with references to classical composers, modern art, the ''Tao Te Ching'', etc. -- witty, but likely to be lost on kids.
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** ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Perhaps kidlit's defining BlackComedy, as naughty children are subjected to a variety of dreadful consequences ranging from near-drowning to falling down a garbage chute that leads to an incinerator. While the novel has the kids survive, they're very much changed for their experiences, and adaptations have played with their fates -- they're ambiguous in the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film]], and the [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage musical]] goes with possible DeathByAdaptation (''if'' they're lucky, they'll get a DisneyDeath or rescue, but only offstage). Making matters worse, the factory proprietor has NoSympathy for them! This doesn't even get into adaptation-specific twists and references: the 1971 film has [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment the notorious boat ride]] and the line "I am now telling the computer ''exactly'' what it can do with a bar of chocolate!" chocolate!". The 2013 musical has multiple jokes about alcohol and/or drinking problems amongst the adult characters, while the lyrics are rife with references to classical composers, modern art, the ''Tao Te Ching'', etc. -- witty, but likely to be lost on kids.characters.

* ''Literature/TheHobbit'', due to [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien's]] natural propensity for large volumes of text. ** The book is hardly all that wordy book. However, it can't be common for a children's book to feature a 50-year old bachelor as the main protagonist.
7th Dec '15 7:33:49 AM Sharlee
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** The Tiffany Aching novels have a preteen (to start with) witch facing various inhuman creatures, including the Queen of TheFairFolk (one of Pterry's nastier villains) and a being of pure hatred towards witches. The last book begins with [[spoiler:an abusive father beating his pregnant daughter into a miscarriage, and nearly being lynched by his disgusted neighbors.]] All the books also feature references to sex, which become steadily less coded as they go on. Interestingly, ''Discworld/{{Wintersmith}}'' and ''Discworld/IShallWearMidnight'' don't use the "smaller hardback" format of ''Maurice'' and the first two Tiffany books, although they're still listed as "for younger readers". Terry's view is that '''all''' ''Discworld'' novels are aimed at anyone who understands the jokes.
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** The Tiffany Aching novels have a preteen (to start with) witch facing various inhuman creatures, including the Queen of TheFairFolk (one of Pterry's nastier villains) and a being of pure hatred towards witches. The last next-to-last book begins with [[spoiler:an abusive father beating his pregnant daughter into a miscarriage, and nearly being lynched by his disgusted neighbors.]] All the books also feature references to sex, which become steadily less coded as they go on. Interestingly, ''Discworld/{{Wintersmith}}'' and ''Discworld/IShallWearMidnight'' don't use the "smaller hardback" format of ''Maurice'' and the first two Tiffany books, although they're still listed as "for younger readers". Terry's view is that '''all''' ''Discworld'' novels are aimed at anyone who understands the jokes.
5th Dec '15 1:08:58 PM dcasey98
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* ''Literature/HarryPotter''. The ''Harry Potter'' example is so prevalent that some editions of the books have plain covers in [[RealIsBrown dingy earth-tones]] (as opposed to the colorful fantasy illustrations that the "main" editions have) so that adult readers don't have to feel so embarrassed when they read it on the train. Considering most children's books are written by adults, you think adults wouldn't feel they needed to justify reading a children's book in the first place... After all, if the author isn't embarrassed at having written, why should an adult feel embarrassed at reading it?
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* ''Literature/HarryPotter''. The ''Harry Potter'' example is so prevalent that some editions of the books have plain covers in [[RealIsBrown dingy earth-tones]] (as opposed to the colorful fantasy illustrations that the "main" editions have) so that adult readers don't have to feel so embarrassed when they read it on the train. Considering most children's books are written by adults, you think adults wouldn't feel they needed to justify reading a children's book in the first place... After all, if the author isn't embarrassed at having written, why should an adult feel embarrassed at reading it?

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* ''Literature/HarryPotter''. *** Her point still remains. The ''Harry Potter'' example is so prevalent that some editions of the books have plain covers in [[RealIsBrown dingy earth-tones]] (as opposed to the colorful fantasy illustrations that the "main" editions have) so that adult readers don't have to feel so embarrassed when they read it on the train. Considering most children's books are written by adults, you think adults wouldn't feel they needed to justify reading a children's book in the first place... After all, if book also contains: the author isn't embarrassed at having written, why should strangulation of a child, head-bashing, gruesome injury and descriptions of blood, graphic descriptions of burning, and the death of a man, caused by an adult feel embarrassed at reading it?11 year old boy who was just trying to defend himself from attack.

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* ''Literature/HarryPotter''. The ''Harry Potter'' example **Frankly, this is so prevalent that some editions of the books have plain covers in [[RealIsBrown dingy earth-tones]] (as up for debate. Decapitation is only mentioned, never described or depicted. Suicide is an overarching theme or threat on occasion, but again, it's never depicted. As opposed to other YA series like Harry Potter, Divergent, or Twilight, torture is never described and only briefly mentioned or very briefly depicted, mutilation is never described at length, and not described harshly at all. Child prostitution isn't mentioned by name, and flies right over the colorful fantasy illustrations that the "main" editions have) so that adult heads of anyone not old enough to understand, and even older readers don't have to feel so embarrassed when they read it on the train. Considering most children's books are written by adults, you think adults wouldn't feel they needed to justify reading a children's book might miss it, no one is ever buried alive in the first place... After all, if books, and death by fire and venom happen, but the author isn't embarrassed at having written, why should an adult feel embarrassed at reading it?most gruesome descriptions are usually kept very short. For all the hoopla about The Hunger Games violence, despite the violent premise, many readers opened the books to find a story that wasn't altogether more disturbing or graphic than other YA franchises such as Harry Potter, Divergent, or even Twilight.
27th Nov '15 3:24:01 PM mjlush
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Added DiffLines:
* “Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.” ― G.K. Chesterton.
27th Nov '15 6:25:23 AM WhatArtThee
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* The ''Literature/AlexRider'' series by Anthony Horowitz. So, you think this is a fun-for-young-teens novel series? Not quite, the titular character is just a fourteen-year-old manipulated to work for MI6. He then endures many horrific things over a single year. This series can be considered the ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' of SpyFiction. ** They have a large amount of violence, horror, some swearing, and one use of the word "balls".
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* The ''Literature/AlexRider'' series by Anthony Horowitz. So, you think this is a fun-for-young-teens novel series? Not quite, the titular character is just a fourteen-year-old manipulated to work for MI6. He then endures many horrific things over a single year. This series can be considered the ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' of SpyFiction. ** They have Horowitz, which has a large amount of violence, horror, some swearing, and one use of the word "balls".

** ''Esio Trot'': Mr. Hoppy, a ShrinkingViolet who is in love with the woman below his balcony, Mrs. Silver, impresses her by buying many tortoises and using a mechanical gadget to take Mrs. Silver's tortoise Alfie up to his floor and send a larger tortoise down, to make it look like Alfie is growing bigger (Mrs. Silver was complaining that Alfie had only grown three ounces in the eleven years she had owned him; she once tells Mr. Hoppy that if he can make Alfie grow bigger, she'll be his slave for life. This alone raises quite a few eyebrows). This impresses Mrs. Silver enough to give Mr. Hoppy the courage to ask her to marry him, and she accepts. In short, a man gets what he wants through lies and deception!

* The book ''Good Friends Are Hard to Find'' is aimed at parents, meant to give them tips on how to help their children make friends. It is not aimed at kids, but has a cartoony cover with "cute" monsters, and cartoon illustrations of cute animals at the start of each chapter. This, combined with the fact that it generally talks about elementary school-age issues, makes it very easy to mistake for a kid's book. At one point, a story is told where a "sad boy" who has gotten into mild trouble at school abruptly blurts out that he wants to kill himself.

** Though Rowling's ''Literature/TheCasualVacancy'' makes all her previous books look like fluffy bunnies, even the darker ones.

** For example, while Christina Rossetti insisted ''Goblin Market'' was a children's poem, it's kind of difficult to ignore the LesYay, to say nothing of the [[IncestIsRelative incest]].
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** For example, while Christina Rossetti insisted ''Goblin Market'' was a children's poem, it's kind of difficult to ignore the LesYay, to say nothing of the [[IncestIsRelative incest]].
16th Sep '15 8:22:58 AM Midna
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The "product placement" was probably for realism
* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything. Language so profane it could make Quentin Tarantino blush, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), constant ProductPlacement, and glorifications of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.
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* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything. Language Everything: language so profane it could make Quentin Tarantino blush, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), constant ProductPlacement, and glorifications glorification of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.
16th Sep '15 8:21:56 AM Midna
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This reads as "visually depicted swearing". Changed it to something less logic bomb-y.
* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything. Graphic swearing Quentin Tarentino could blush at, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), constant ProductPlacement, and glorifications of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.
to:
* Lauren Myracle's ''Literature/TheTTYLSeries'' have cute covers with 8-bit emoji, and they're about three girls who are friends and are in school, and communicate fully through instant messaging. What could ''possibly'' go wrong?! Everything. Graphic swearing Language so profane it could make Quentin Tarentino could blush at, Tarantino blush, plus mentions of anything sexual you can think of (like masturbation, oral sex, erections, fondling, porn, ''anything''), constant ProductPlacement, and glorifications of alcohol and drugs. Despite all this, they are marketing towards pre-teens, are sold near kids' books, and have ''no'' warnings on them whatsoever about the content inside. There are plenty of negative reviews on Amazon, one of which states that a daughter who read this book went up to her mom and asked what the word "ejaculate" means. To make it even worse, Lauren Myracle has created books that are much less ambiguously for kids.
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