History VideoGame / GITADORA

7th Jun '18 12:03:41 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* CoOpMultiplayer: One of the biggest draws of the series is that multiple players can play as a band together: two on ''[=GuitarFreaks=]'' and one on a linked ''drummania'' cabinet. Two versions of the pair allow linking up with ''Keyboardmania'' as well for a five-player "Super Session", [[MisbegottenMultiplayerMode but the songlist drops in quantity dramatically when playing in Super Session mode]].
21st May '18 10:18:42 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* MinisculeRocking: Most BEMANI songs are already short enough by most people's standards at only 90-130 seconds, but "Thank You For Playing" from the console version of ''V3'' holds the honor of the shortest playable in any BEMANI game ever at ''five seconds long.''

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* MinisculeRocking: Most BEMANI songs are already short enough by most people's standards at only 90-130 seconds, but [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nk7a3M9oUpY "Thank You For Playing" Playing"]] from the console version of ''V3'' holds the honor of the shortest playable in any BEMANI game ever at ''five seconds long.''
21st May '18 10:12:26 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* NintendoHard: The ''drummania'' portion stands out in being not only hard to master (in fact, it's one of the hardest ''BEMANI'' games at the highest levels, alongside ''VideoGame/PopNMusic'' and ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX''), but also hard to ''learn''. Whereas other ''BEMANI'' games can be simply learned by figuring out which buttons, panels, or part of the screen to hit or step on, ''drummania'' requires you to understand some real-world drumming basics (for one, non-drummers may see crossing one's hands to hit the hi-hat as ViolationOfCommonSense) since you ''are'' playing on a real simulated-drum set and not just pressing buttons; failure to use proper technique can be damaging to your hands and your upper body on the whole. And once you start trying to learn the charts, you realize that many higher-end charts require you to keep multiple rhythms in your head at the same time.

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* NintendoHard: The ''drummania'' portion stands out in being not only hard to master (in fact, it's one of the hardest ''BEMANI'' games at the highest levels, alongside ''VideoGame/PopNMusic'' and ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX''), but also hard to ''learn''. Whereas other ''BEMANI'' games can be simply learned by figuring out which buttons, panels, or part of the screen to hit or step on, ''drummania'' requires you to understand some real-world drumming basics (for one, non-drummers may see crossing one's hands to hit the hi-hat as ViolationOfCommonSense) since you ''are'' playing on a real simulated-drum set and not just pressing buttons; failure to use proper technique can be damaging to your hands and even your upper body on the whole.back. And once you start trying to learn the charts, you realize that many higher-end charts require you to keep multiple rhythms in your head at the same time.
21st May '18 10:10:52 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* NintendoHard: The ''drummania'' portion stands out in being not only hard to master (in fact, it's one of the hardest ''BEMANI'' games at the highest levels, alongside ''VideoGame/PopNMusic'' and ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX''), but also hard to ''learn''. Whereas other ''BEMANI'' games can be simply learned by figuring out which buttons, panels, or part of the screen to hit or step on, ''drummania'' requires you to understand some drumming basics (for one, non-drummers may see crossing one's hands to hit the hi-hat as ViolationOfCommonSense) since you ''are'' playing on a real simulated-drum set and not just pressing buttons; failure to use proper technique can be damaging to your hands and your upper body on the whole. And once you start trying to learn the charts, you realize that many higher-end charts require you to keep multiple rhythms in your head at the same time.

to:

* NintendoHard: The ''drummania'' portion stands out in being not only hard to master (in fact, it's one of the hardest ''BEMANI'' games at the highest levels, alongside ''VideoGame/PopNMusic'' and ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX''), but also hard to ''learn''. Whereas other ''BEMANI'' games can be simply learned by figuring out which buttons, panels, or part of the screen to hit or step on, ''drummania'' requires you to understand some real-world drumming basics (for one, non-drummers may see crossing one's hands to hit the hi-hat as ViolationOfCommonSense) since you ''are'' playing on a real simulated-drum set and not just pressing buttons; failure to use proper technique can be damaging to your hands and your upper body on the whole. And once you start trying to learn the charts, you realize that many higher-end charts require you to keep multiple rhythms in your head at the same time.
21st May '18 10:10:30 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* NintendoHard: The ''drummania'' portion stands out in being not only hard to master (in fact, it's one of the hardest ''BEMANI'' games at the highest levels, alongside ''VideoGame/PopNMusic'' and ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX''), but also hard to ''learn''. Whereas other ''BEMANI'' games can be simply learned by figuring out which buttons, panels, or part of the screen to hit or step on, ''drummania'' requires you to understand some drumming basics (for one, non-drummers may see crossing one's hands to hit the hi-hat as ViolationOfCommonSense) since you ''are'' playing on a real simulated-drum set and not just pressing buttons; failure to use proper technique can be damaging to your hands and your upper body on the whole. And once you start trying to learn the charts, you realize that many higher-end charts require you to keep multiple rhythms in your head at the same time.



* SequelDifficultySpike: Its not as bad as Beatmania's difficulty curve, but songs have been getting harder as time goes by, ''especially'' on drums (and ''especially'' drums on XG).

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* SequelDifficultySpike: SequelDifficultySpike:
**
Its not as bad as Beatmania's difficulty curve, but songs have been getting harder as time goes by, ''especially'' on drums (and ''especially'' drums on XG).XG).
** ''XG'' introduces two additional fret buttons a la ''Guitar Hero'' and ''Rock Band'', two more drums, and one more bass pedal, resulting in a more difficult experience all across the board.
9th Mar '18 11:27:32 PM LABcrab
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** "Pot-pourri d'orange" and "Pot-pourri d'marmalade" by Orange Lounge.
18th Feb '18 3:43:47 PM Lirodon
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The series has been most prominently cited as the influence for Creator/{{Harmonix}}'s franchises ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' (originally published by [=RedOctane=], a company whose other claims to fame include making third-party dance pads for DDR, publishing the ''VideoGame/InTheGroove'' home versions. Later turned into a CashCowFranchise by Creator/{{Activision}} before its untimely death in 2011), and ''VideoGame/RockBand'' (which took ''Guitar Hero'' and added drums, plus karaoke built off its work on fellow Konami franchise ''VideoGame/KaraokeRevolution'', and ''lots and lots'' of DownloadableContent). While the first [=GuitarFreaks=] got a U.S. release, it flopped. Konami hasn't officially released the series in America since: when faced with the aforementioned competition, it decided to play FollowTheLeader with itself and release the dismal ''VideoGame/RockRevolution'' instead, and then played a HeelFaceTurn as the publisher for an arcade version of ''Guitar Hero''.

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The series has been most prominently cited as the influence for Creator/{{Harmonix}}'s franchises ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' (originally published by [=RedOctane=], a company whose other claims to fame include making third-party dance pads for DDR, and publishing the ''VideoGame/InTheGroove'' home versions.version. Later turned into a CashCowFranchise by Creator/{{Activision}} before its untimely death in 2011), and ''VideoGame/RockBand'' (which took ''Guitar Hero'' and added drums, plus karaoke built off its work on fellow Konami franchise ''VideoGame/KaraokeRevolution'', and ''lots and lots'' of DownloadableContent). While the first [=GuitarFreaks=] got a U.S. release, it flopped. Konami hasn't officially released the series in America since: when faced with the aforementioned competition, it decided to play FollowTheLeader with itself and release the dismal ''VideoGame/RockRevolution'' instead, and then played a HeelFaceTurn as the publisher for an arcade version of ''Guitar Hero''.
26th Jan '18 12:39:00 AM Cryoclaste
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Much like other {{Bemani}} franchises, the series uses a soundtrack with a mixture of original music by Konami's in-house artists, along with songs from J-rock acts and U.S. or European rock bands (the latter occurs infrequently in recent versions, but was more common in the early era). In 2010, Konami pulled a IIDX and introduced an upgraded version of the franchises known as XG; which brought revamped cabinets with a more powerful sound system, high definition screens, and redesigned instruments (specifically, the guitar now has five buttons, sustains and an effector pedal, and the drumset got two additional drum pads, double bass pedals, and a raised stage platform)

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Much like other {{Bemani}} VideoGame/{{Bemani}} franchises, the series uses a soundtrack with a mixture of original music by Konami's in-house artists, along with songs from J-rock acts and U.S. or European rock bands (the latter occurs infrequently in recent versions, but was more common in the early era). In 2010, Konami pulled a IIDX and introduced an upgraded version of the franchises known as XG; which brought revamped cabinets with a more powerful sound system, high definition screens, and redesigned instruments (specifically, the guitar now has five buttons, sustains and an effector pedal, and the drumset got two additional drum pads, double bass pedals, and a raised stage platform)
4th Sep '17 11:38:02 PM Lirodon
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** BossRush: "ENCORE CONQUEST" is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, a medley of five Encore stage songs compressed into over two minutes of pain.

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** BossRush: "ENCORE CONQUEST" is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, a medley of five Encore stage boss songs [[note]]specifically "DAY DREAM", "under control", "鬼姫", "Timepiece phase II", and "over there".[[/note]] compressed into over 2:26 of pain.
** ''Overdrive'' added
two minutes more, "The ULTIMATES -Brightness-" (the unlocked Encore songs from Gitadora), and "The ULTIMATES -Darkness-" (a medley of pain.unlocks from Extra Rush cycles).
5th Jul '17 6:23:02 PM nombretomado
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In 1999, {{Creator/Konami}}, who had cemented themselves as masters of the arcade RhythmGame with ''{{beatmania}}'' and the recently released ''VideoGame/PopnMusic'' and ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'', decided to expand their horizons into games that didn't just involve hip-hop and dance. It began with ''[=GuitarFreaks=]''; a game that involved playing a relatively simplified rendition of a guitar by holding down one or more of the three buttons on its neck (colored in red, green, and blue) and using a switch at the bottom to "strum" it. Konami knew what they were doing so much, that with the release of [=GuitarFreaks 2nd Mix=] later that summer, they also introduced a companion series known as ''[=DrumMania=]'' (which was ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, having to use a five-piece set of drum pads attached to the cabinet as instructed). The two games could also be linked for multiplayer in an arrangement they called "session play".

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In 1999, {{Creator/Konami}}, who had cemented themselves as masters of the arcade RhythmGame with ''{{beatmania}}'' ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}}'' and the recently released ''VideoGame/PopnMusic'' and ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'', decided to expand their horizons into games that didn't just involve hip-hop and dance. It began with ''[=GuitarFreaks=]''; a game that involved playing a relatively simplified rendition of a guitar by holding down one or more of the three buttons on its neck (colored in red, green, and blue) and using a switch at the bottom to "strum" it. Konami knew what they were doing so much, that with the release of [=GuitarFreaks 2nd Mix=] later that summer, they also introduced a companion series known as ''[=DrumMania=]'' (which was ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, having to use a five-piece set of drum pads attached to the cabinet as instructed). The two games could also be linked for multiplayer in an arrangement they called "session play".



** Then we have XG, which ran in parallel with the V series as a SpinOff (kinda like {{beatmania}} IIDX) for two versions until it was phased out (GF/DM V7 and V8 just used the content and portions of the UI from their XG counterpart grafted onto the legacy engine/gameplay). Now we have the shift to "GITADORA" as the name of the series for the newest release in 2013 (which, for all intents and purposes, is [=XG4=]). The title screens brand them as [="GITADORA: GuitarFreaks" and "GITADORA: DrumMania"=] respectively.

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** Then we have XG, which ran in parallel with the V series as a SpinOff (kinda like {{beatmania}} IIDX) ''VideoGame/{{beatmania}} IIDX'') for two versions until it was phased out (GF/DM V7 and V8 just used the content and portions of the UI from their XG counterpart grafted onto the legacy engine/gameplay). Now we have the shift to "GITADORA" as the name of the series for the newest release in 2013 (which, for all intents and purposes, is [=XG4=]). The title screens brand them as [="GITADORA: GuitarFreaks" and "GITADORA: DrumMania"=] respectively.
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