History UsefulNotes / TheBritishInvasion

30th May '16 8:12:09 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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The first invasion may have just been in the 1960s, but it turned full circle when American artists took the sound yet further, such as [[Music/JimiHendrix The Jimi Hendrix Experience]] (even if only the guitarist and second bassist were American) and early heavy metal bands. This lead to the Second British Invasion in the late [[TheSeventies 1970s]] and early [[TheEighties 1980s]], with {{punk rock}}, the NewWaveOfBritishHeavyMetal (or NWOBHM), and [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]] (not to be confused with the heavy metal). This second wave of British music was brought on, perhaps inadvertently, by {{MTV}}. In their early years, MTV was desperate for any music videos they could get their hands on, and it just so happened that most of the music videos of that time were coming out of Britain, thanks to shows like ''TopOfThePops'' that helped to popularize the format over there in TheSeventies. By contrast, most American music videos during the same period were merely videotaped concert performances. MTV threw these British videos on the air, and the bands suddenly saw themselves developing [[{{Squee}} screaming]] [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff American fanbases]] virtually overnight. Combine this with the [[DorkAge creative slump]] in American popular music following [[DeaderThanDisco the anti-disco backlash]] of the late '70s/early '80s, and British pop and rock took over the American music market.

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The first invasion may have just been in the 1960s, but it turned full circle when American artists took the sound yet further, such as [[Music/JimiHendrix The Jimi Hendrix Experience]] (even if only the guitarist and second bassist were American) and early heavy metal bands. This lead to the Second British Invasion in the late [[TheSeventies 1970s]] and early [[TheEighties 1980s]], with {{punk rock}}, the NewWaveOfBritishHeavyMetal (or NWOBHM), and [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]] (not to be confused with the heavy metal). This second wave of British music was brought on, perhaps inadvertently, by {{MTV}}. In their early years, MTV was desperate for any music videos they could get their hands on, and it just so happened that most of the music videos of that time were coming out of Britain, thanks to shows like ''TopOfThePops'' ''Series/TopOfThePops'' that helped to popularize the format over there in TheSeventies. By contrast, most American music videos during the same period were merely videotaped concert performances. MTV threw these British videos on the air, and the bands suddenly saw themselves developing [[{{Squee}} screaming]] [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff American fanbases]] virtually overnight. Combine this with the [[DorkAge creative slump]] in American popular music following [[DeaderThanDisco the anti-disco backlash]] of the late '70s/early '80s, and British pop and rock took over the American music market.
23rd May '16 12:23:06 PM Kitchen90
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* Music/TheSearchers
23rd May '16 7:21:49 AM Kitchen90
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12th Dec '15 2:43:15 PM AndyLA
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One odd influence here is that, anytime there is a large influx of artists of any media from "across the pond" (such as Oasis or Radiohead), it is often labeled as a British Invasion by enthusiasts of that particular medium. For instance:

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One odd influence here is that, anytime there is a large influx of artists of any media from "across the pond" (such as Oasis Oasis, Radiohead, Franz Ferdinand or Radiohead), Arctic Monkeys), it is often labeled as a British Invasion by enthusiasts of that particular medium. For instance:
4th Oct '15 7:23:51 PM nombretomado
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Finally in about 2005, there was a British television invasion on American shores, thanks to the creation of BBC America as well as the rise of video sharing websites and the revival of British juggernaut ''Series/DoctorWho.'' Following in ''Who's'' footsteps were both of its spinoffs, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures,'' ''Series/BeingHuman,'' ''Series/{{Sherlock}},'' ''Series/TopGear,'' ''Series/{{Merlin}},'' and ''Series/DowntonAbbey.''

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Finally in about 2005, there was a British television invasion on American shores, thanks to the creation of BBC America as well as the rise of video sharing websites and the revival of British juggernaut ''Series/DoctorWho.'' Following in ''Who's'' footsteps were both of its spinoffs, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures,'' ''Series/BeingHuman,'' ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}},'' ''Series/{{Sherlock}},'' ''Series/TopGear,'' ''Series/{{Merlin}},'' and ''Series/DowntonAbbey.''
28th Sep '15 1:23:50 AM hydrix
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On a smaller note you could also annotate the British influence in the American video game scene of the 1980's, with the British made Commodore 64 being a massive success there (even though most of the games were developed by Americans) and the British influence on video games of the 1990's, when Creator/{{Rareware}}, thanks to the success of games such as Franchise/DonkeyKongCountry and VideoGame/BanjoKazooie, became a household name for most video game enthousiasts and would make of the SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem the best selling video game console during TheFourthGenerationOfConsoleGames.
14th May '15 4:17:51 PM nombretomado
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When British ComicBook talents like Creator/AlanMoore and GrantMorrison started coming over in 1980s America to make their mark, their tremendous success was likened to being a comic book British Invasion.

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When British ComicBook talents like Creator/AlanMoore and GrantMorrison Creator/GrantMorrison started coming over in 1980s America to make their mark, their tremendous success was likened to being a comic book British Invasion.
7th Apr '15 9:38:39 AM nombretomado
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Finally in about 2005, there was a British television invasion on American shores, thanks to the creation of BBC America as well as the rise of video sharing websites and the revival of British juggernaut ''DoctorWho.'' Following in ''Who's'' footsteps were both of its spinoffs, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures,'' ''Series/BeingHuman,'' ''Series/{{Sherlock}},'' ''Series/TopGear,'' ''Series/{{Merlin}},'' and ''Series/DowntonAbbey.''

to:

Finally in about 2005, there was a British television invasion on American shores, thanks to the creation of BBC America as well as the rise of video sharing websites and the revival of British juggernaut ''DoctorWho.''Series/DoctorWho.'' Following in ''Who's'' footsteps were both of its spinoffs, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures,'' ''Series/BeingHuman,'' ''Series/{{Sherlock}},'' ''Series/TopGear,'' ''Series/{{Merlin}},'' and ''Series/DowntonAbbey.''
13th Feb '15 6:40:37 AM enitharmon
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A second front opened, largely in Liverpool for reasons that are no accident. Liverpool was the biggest transatlantic port and more heavy manufactured goods in those days were heading west than east. Ships arriving in Liverpool carried recordings of Black music, particularly {{Soul}}, and also comics, as ballast and these were eagerly seized on by the locals. The locals formed bands to play Soul covers in underground cellar clubs, sometimes creating their own version of Soul inflected with British Music Hall and



to:

A second front opened, largely in Liverpool for reasons that are no accident. Liverpool was the biggest transatlantic port and more heavy manufactured goods in those days were heading west than east. Ships arriving in Liverpool carried recordings of Black music, particularly {{Soul}}, and also comics, as ballast and these were eagerly seized on by the locals. The locals formed bands to play Soul covers in underground cellar clubs, sometimes creating their own version of Soul inflected with British Music Hall and


and childrens' street songs.

Popular British artists like Music/CliffRichard were hitherto being billed as homegrown equivalents of American acts; so Cliff was the British Elvis. What was evolving and emerging from the blues clubs in London and the cellars of Liverpool was something new and something that many British people felt was needed; a popular music to call their own. From the perspective of American mainstream radio at the time it had a particular merit; it was a "white" music that was "safe" for mainstream American audiences, and thus America's black music, previously the stuff of Black-oriented radio, could be played back to a mainstream American audience.

13th Feb '15 6:30:07 AM enitharmon
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The British didn't invade themselves, of course, and the term BritishInvasion sounds to British ears like a bad case of WeAllLiveInAmerica. In fact it all begins with an American invasion; not the 1944 invasion of France but the period before that when American [=GIs=] were, in the common phrase of the time, [[YanksWithTanks "overpaid, overfed, oversexed and over here"]]. They brought with them from an America little touched at home by the war goods that the bombed and beleagured British were learning to do without like chocolate, chewing-gum and novelties like nylon stockings. They also brought a new kind of music with them, and for many this was their first exposure to jive and especially blues. Blues didn't get played on domestic radio but after the war was over enthusiasts could seek it out on the American Forces Network from occupied Germany, and from there began to import recordings and try playing it themselves. American blues artists then began touring and growing a following, but it was in 1958 when Muddy Waters came over, bringing with him the electric blues, that the British Blues movement really took off, led by performers like Alexis Korner.

A second front opened, largely in Liverpool for reasons that are no accident. Liverpool was the biggest transatlantic port and more heavy manufactured goods in those days were heading west than east. Ships arriving in Liverpool carried recordings of Black music, particularly {{Soul}}, and also comics, as ballast and these were eagerly seized on by the locals. The locals formed bands to play Soul covers in underground cellar clubs, sometimes creating their own version of Soul inflected with British Music Hall and


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