History Series / TheyThinkItsAllOver

29th Jun '16 9:47:02 PM mlsmithca
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* InherentlyFunnyWords: Invoked in the Series 11 finale with Allan Border and Sean Hughes, as Sean exploited the inherently funny nature of the word "hedgehog" by working it into his answers in almost every round, starting by telling Gary Lineker that when he claimed Shane Warne was sponsored by a headgear manufacturer for "Sporting Bluff", his card actually said "hedgehog".

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* InherentlyFunnyWords: InherentlyFunnyWords:
** Jo Brand invoked this in tandem with demonstrations that timing is everything in comedy by getting the audience to laugh simply by mentioning the name of TV presenter Mariella Frostrup at unexpected moments. On her appearance on Gary Lineker's team in Series 1, [[SideBet she collected £5 from Gary]] when her guess of Frostrup as the writer of an "Author, Author" quote got a laugh; when she appeared on Gary's team again in Series 3 and got another (more muted) laugh by asking Nick Hancock if "Mariella Frostrup" was a "dirty" word she was allowed to say without fear of censure, she collected £10 from Gary.
**
Invoked again in the Series 11 finale with Allan Border and Sean Hughes, as Sean exploited the inherently funny nature of the word "hedgehog" by working it into his answers in almost every round, starting by telling Gary Lineker that when he claimed Shane Warne was sponsored by a headgear manufacturer for "Sporting Bluff", his card actually said "hedgehog".



** In a Series 3 episode with Chris Waddle and Jo Brand, the "Celebrations" round was de-railed by side bets among Gary's team members. When Nick Hancock tried to curb Jo's use of sexual terms, as his parents were in the audience, she went down a list of words to gauge their acceptability: "poo", "bum", and [[RuleOfThree "Mariella Frostrup"]]. When the audience laughed at the last of these, Jo revealed that she had bet Gary £10 that she could get a laugh just by mentioning Frostrup's name, and collected her money. After a second digression about whether or not Jo shaved her legs led to her allowing Gary to feel them, she asked if he had been sexually excited by the experience, and he said he had. As he had bet her £60 that he would claim to "have a hard-on" at some point during the episode, it was then his turn to collect.

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** In a later Series 1 episode with John Barnes and Jo Brand, Gary Lineker's team had to identify an "Author, Author" quote whose subject claimed to have been banned from nearly every hotel in England. When Nick Hancock prompted them for a guess, Jo Brand guessed TV presenter Mariella Frostrup, to audience laughter. She then told Gary he owed her £5, as she had bet him she could get a laugh just by mentioning Frostrup's name.
** In a Series 3 episode with Chris Waddle and Jo Brand, the "Celebrations" round was de-railed by side bets among Gary's team members. When Nick Hancock tried to curb Jo's use of sexual terms, as his parents were in the audience, she went down a list of words to gauge their acceptability: "poo", "bum", and [[RuleOfThree "Mariella Frostrup"]]. When the audience laughed at the last of these, Jo revealed that [[CallBack she had revived her bet Gary £10 that she could get a laugh just by mentioning from two series earlier with Gary]] regarding the [[InherentlyFunnyWords inherently funny nature of Frostrup's name, and collected her money.name]]; this time, the bet was for £10. After a second digression about whether or not Jo shaved her legs led to her allowing Gary to feel them, she asked if he had been sexually excited by the experience, and he said he had. As he had bet her £60 that he would claim to "have a hard-on" at some point during the episode, it was then his turn to collect.
22nd Jun '16 1:35:02 PM mlsmithca
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** Jonathan Ross was by far the most talkative panellist after becoming a regular, but this didn't stop him from cursing out David Gower for talking over his clues during "The Name Game" in the Series 12 episode with TheSwearJar, Audley Harrison, and Fiona Allen. He likened Gower's comments to his childhood Christmases when his grandfather would talk all the way through the Christmas Day film on television. Nick Hancock fired back, "And now it's ''you!''"


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** Jonathan Ross was by far the most talkative panellist after becoming a regular, but this didn't stop him from cursing out David Gower for talking over his clues during "The Name Game" in the Series 12 episode with TheSwearJar, Audley Harrison, and Fiona Allen. He likened Gower's comments to his childhood Christmases when his grandfather would talk all the way through the Christmas Day film on television. Nick Hancock fired back, "And now it's ''you!''"


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** In the 2006 World Cup special, Ian Wright scoffed at Boris Becker and Steffen Freund's indignation over Budweiser being declared the official beer of that year's FIFA World Cup instead of a local German beer, and said that the Germans had sold out to foreigners. Sean Lock countered by telling Ian that he was looking forward to seeing Arsenal playing in the Emirates Stadium during the following season.
15th Jun '16 3:15:42 PM mlsmithca
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Gower and Lineker both left after fifteen series in May 2003 to focus on their careers as commentators/pundits, and were replaced by cricketer Phil Tufnell and goalkeeper David Seaman. Seaman only stayed for two series before being replaced by his former Arsenal teammate Ian Wright, while Tufnell left after another series and was replaced by German tennis star Boris Becker. Hancock was replaced as presenter by standup comic Creator/LeeMack at the same time Tufnell left, and finally Ross left after another series and was replaced for two specials by comedian Sean Lock. This frantic revolving door of personnel and the gradual shift in tone of ''Series/AQuestionOfSport'' (of which ''They Think It's All Over'' was conceived as a more irreverent version) from serious game show to light-hearted comedy contributed to the series' cancellation in 2006.

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Gower and Lineker both left after fifteen series in May 2003 to focus on their careers as commentators/pundits, and were replaced by cricketer Phil Tufnell and goalkeeper David Seaman. Seaman only stayed for two series before being replaced by his former Arsenal teammate Ian Wright, while Tufnell left after another series to focus on his broadcasting career and was replaced by German tennis star Boris Becker. Hancock was replaced as presenter by standup comic Creator/LeeMack at the same time Tufnell left, and finally Ross left after another series and was replaced for two specials by comedian Sean Lock. This frantic revolving door of personnel and the gradual shift in tone of ''Series/AQuestionOfSport'' (of which ''They Think It's All Over'' was conceived as a more irreverent version) from serious game show to light-hearted comedy contributed to the series' cancellation in 2006.



* ThePointsMeanNothing: David Gower certainly thought so, as he had a much more casual attitude toward the competitive side of the show for most of his appearances than Gary Lineker, to the point of blithely admitting that he neither knew nor cared about the answers to some questions - which, as Lee Hurst and especially Jonathan Ross were poor clue givers during "The Name Game", resulting in Gary winning more episodes than David, was probably just as well. By contrast, Gary and especially Rory [=McGrath=] placed so much emphasis on winning that they frequently resorted to cheating; as detailed under CheatersNeverProsper, this backfired on many occasions, so that David won almost as often through Gary's disqualification as he did through his team's own merits. The team captains from Series 16 onwards took the competitive aspect more seriously.

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* ThePointsMeanNothing: David Gower certainly thought so, as he had a much more casual attitude toward the competitive side of the show for most of his appearances than Gary Lineker, to the point of blithely admitting that he neither knew nor cared about the answers to some questions - which, as Lee Hurst and especially Jonathan Ross were poor clue givers during "The Name Game", resulting in Gary winning more episodes than David, was probably just as well. By contrast, Gary and especially Rory [=McGrath=] placed so much emphasis on winning that they frequently resorted to cheating; as detailed under CheatersNeverProsper, [[CheatersNeverProsper this backfired on many occasions, occasions]], so that David won almost as often through Gary's disqualification as he did through his team's own merits. The team captains from Series 16 onwards took the competitive aspect more seriously.



* PuttingThePeeInPool: Referenced in a Series 16 episode with Anthony Worrall-Thompson and James Gibson. During "The Treble", Jonathan brought up the rumour that pools were treated with chemicals that would change colour in the presence of urine, and eventually the conversation turned to whether or not champion swimmer Gibson had ever relieved himself while swimming. He cheerfully admitted that he had done so all around the world.
-->'''Nick Hancock:''' And people say that youngsters in this country have nothing to offer! There's a young man who's been ''around the world'' pissing in other people's swimming pools!

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* PuttingThePeeInPool: PuttingThePeeInPool:
**
Referenced in a Series 16 episode with Anthony Worrall-Thompson and James Gibson. During "The Treble", Jonathan Ross brought up the rumour that pools were treated with chemicals that would change colour in the presence of urine, and eventually the conversation turned to whether or not champion swimmer Gibson James had ever relieved himself while swimming. He cheerfully admitted that he had done so all around the world.
-->'''Nick --->'''Nick Hancock:''' And people say that youngsters in this country have nothing to offer! There's a young man who's been ''around the world'' pissing in other people's swimming pools!pools!
** Referenced again in a Series 18 episode with Andrew Castle and Phill Jupitus in which Phil Tufnell and Jonathan Ross' "Feel the Sportsman" guest was world record shallow diver Danny Higginbottom, who made his entrance by diving from a high platform above the studio into a shallow swimming pool, thoroughly soaking Phil and Jonathan. At one point, Jonathan waggled his hands in the water of the pool, and Phil commented that the splashing noise made him want to relieve himself...
--->'''Phil Tufnell:''' It's just like, when you're in the swimming pool, always dying for a piss, aren't you.\\
'''Nick Hancock:''' No, Phil! Actually! I'm 41!
7th Jun '16 2:38:08 PM mlsmithca
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** In a Series 18 episode with Jodie Kidd and Suzi Perry, Ian Wright complained about the bizarre spelling of "yacht", asking why it wasn't spelled the way it sounded: "yot". Suzi pointed out that someone whose surname contained ''three'' silent letters had no room to complain, and asked if he thought his name should be spelled "Rite". Rory [=McGrath=] joked that that was how Ian ''did'' spell his name.
2nd Jun '16 6:09:12 PM mlsmithca
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*** In a Series 6 episode with Jo Brand, Greg Rusedski, and Fred [=MacAulay=], the Scottish FA were so convinced that the programme would use footage of Alloa Athletic in action as a source of mockery that they tried to charge them double the going rate. The producers responded by using free archive footage of embarrassing gaffes by Scotland in FIFA World Cup tournaments, conceding easy goals to Peru in 1978, Brazil in 1990, and Brazil (again) and Morocco in 1998, with Hancock saying they didn't need to mock Scottish football: they could just let it speak for itself.
*** Even Scottish panellists joined in the mockery. In a Series 2 episode with John Gordon Sinclair and Kriss Akabusi, Sinclair said that Scotland's 7-0 defeat by Uruguay in the 1954 FIFA World Cup was technically a win by Scottish standards, while in the Series 6 episode with Jo Brand, Greg Rusedski, and Fred [=MacAulay=], the montage of Scotland's World Cup blunders prompted [=MacAulay=] to joke that those were some of their better games.

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*** In a Series 6 episode with Jo Brand, Greg Rusedski, and Fred [=MacAulay=], the Scottish FA were so convinced that the programme would use footage of Alloa Athletic in action as a source of mockery that they tried to charge them double the going rate. The producers responded by using free archive footage of embarrassing gaffes by Scotland in FIFA World Cup tournaments, conceding easy goals to Peru in 1978, Brazil in 1990, and Brazil (again) and Morocco in 1998, with Nick Hancock saying they didn't need to mock Scottish football: they could just let it speak for itself.
*** Even Scottish panellists joined in the mockery. In a Series 2 episode with John Gordon Sinclair and Kriss Akabusi, Sinclair John said that Scotland's 7-0 defeat by Uruguay in the 1954 FIFA World Cup was technically a win by Scottish standards, while in the Series 6 episode with Jo Brand, Greg Rusedski, and Fred [=MacAulay=], the montage of Scotland's World Cup blunders prompted [=MacAulay=] Fred to joke that those were some of their better games.
1st Jun '16 6:11:58 PM mlsmithca
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* {{Spoonerism}}: In a Series 18 episode with Michael Johnson and Dickie Davies, Dickie told a story of his unfortunate collision with spoonerisms while presenting ''World of Sport''. He was giving a preview of the football results of the next ''Big Match'', which were cup ties, and instead of "Cup soccer", he introduced viewers to the "Cop sucker", to his producer's horror. Jonathan Ross joked that the next item involved [[CountryMatters a stunt kite display]].
30th May '16 8:49:42 AM mlsmithca
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*** In a Series 3 episode with Nick Owen and Phill Jupitus in which David's team had to explain how a police dog named Ginger had prevented Torquay United's Jim [=McNicol=] from playing.[[note]] Ginger bit [=McNicol=] during Torquay's final match of the 1986-87 season against Crewe Alexandra, from which they needed a point to avoid being relegated to the Conference; the time added on for the incident was enough for them to score an equaliser, leading Lincoln City to be relegated instead.[[/note]] David suggested Ginger had given [=McNicol=] fleas, and looked a bit sheepish as he explained that this was what is known in the business as a "flea transfer". An unimpressed Nick Hancock said there would be sighs of relief nationwide when ''Series/OhDoctorBeeching'' took over their time slot the following week.

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*** In a Series 3 episode with Nick Owen and Phill Jupitus in which David's team had to explain how a police dog named Ginger had prevented Torquay United's Jim [=McNicol=] from playing.[[note]] playing,[[note]] Ginger bit [=McNicol=] during Torquay's final match of the 1986-87 season against Crewe Alexandra, from which they needed a point to avoid being relegated to the Conference; the time added on for the incident was enough for them to score an equaliser, leading Lincoln City to be relegated instead.[[/note]] David suggested Ginger had given [=McNicol=] fleas, and looked a bit sheepish as he explained that this was what is known in the business as a "flea transfer". An unimpressed Nick Hancock said there would be sighs of relief nationwide when ''Series/OhDoctorBeeching'' took over their time slot the following week.
28th May '16 7:10:07 AM mlsmithca
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* '''Physical Challenge:''' The panellists would engage in a physical activity such as pedalling an exercise bike, their efforts in which would cause pictures of sporting figures or equipment to be revealed piece by piece; they had to identify the subject of as many pictures as they could in the time limit.
27th May '16 12:44:14 PM mlsmithca
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* BrainBleach: In the Series 18 opener with Tommy Docherty and Adam Woodyatt, a tangent during the opening quickfire question round about then-England manager Sven-Goran Eriksson led to Tommy describing Sven's then-girlfriend, Nancy Dell'Olio, as "Jack Palance with boobs." Nick Hancock said he'd never be able to get that image out of his mind.
19th May '16 3:43:36 PM mlsmithca
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* VerbalTic: The Series 2 opener with Neil Morrissey and Ian Wright finished level after "The Name Game", so Nick Hancock cued a 30-second clip from a pre-match interview with Ian's Arsenal teammate Ray Parlour before the 1993 FA Cup final against Sheffield Wednesday. He then asked the teams how many times Parlour had used the word "obviously", a word he had been using like a comma during the interview; the correct answer was seven.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.TheyThinkItsAllOver