History NightmareFuel / TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening

12th Jul '16 10:42:11 AM rjd1922
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[[caption-width-right:160:The fate of all those who faced Moldorm.]]
12th Jul '16 10:42:11 AM rjd1922
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12th Jul '16 10:39:51 AM rjd1922
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[[quoteright:160:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tail_cave_execution_chamber.png]]
14th Dec '15 8:17:34 PM lalalei2001
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** Which means that if you're trying for [[spoiler:the best ending]], once you steal from him ''you can never return to the shop again, [[MarkOfShame THIEF]]''.
* If you get knocked off the edge of the arena by the first boss, you won't just respawn with half a heart missing like in the rest of the game, oh no. You'll find yourself in some kind of execution chamber with skeletons hanging by chains from the ceiling. Holy shit, Nintendo!
* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in ''A Link to the Past'' (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as [=DethI=] (pronunced "Death Eye"), wildly swinging in some vain hope of taking you down.
* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and of what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their villainous nature, become de facto guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]

to:

** Which means that if you're trying for [[spoiler:the the best ending]], ending, once you steal from him ''you can never return to the shop again, [[MarkOfShame THIEF]]''.
* If you get knocked off the edge of the arena by the first boss, you won't just respawn with half a heart missing like in the rest of the game, oh no. You'll find yourself in some kind of execution chamber with skeletons hanging by chains from the ceiling. Holy shit, Nintendo!
ceiling.
* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in ''A Link to the Past'' (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) reasonable?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as [=DethI=] (pronunced (pronounced "Death Eye"), wildly swinging in some vain hope of taking you down.
* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and of what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their villainous nature, become de facto guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]----
16th Oct '15 5:38:48 AM MGP87
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* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and of what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, become guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]

to:

* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and of what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, villainous nature, become de facto guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]
16th Oct '15 3:32:46 AM MGP87
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* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, become guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]

to:

* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and of what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, become guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]
16th Oct '15 2:29:33 AM MGP87
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* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and which you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, become guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]

to:

* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and which what you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, become guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]
16th Oct '15 2:27:16 AM MGP87
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in ''A Link to the Past'' (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as [=DethI=] (pronunced "Death Eye"), wildly swinging in some vain hope of taking you down.

to:

* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in ''A Link to the Past'' (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as [=DethI=] (pronunced "Death Eye"), wildly swinging in some vain hope of taking you down.down.
* If you think about it, the entire game becomes one massive exercise in Nightmare Fuel (no pun intended) once you have [[spoiler: examined the mural relief in the Face Shrine. This single episode changes the meaning of everything you had seen in the game, and which you have yet to experience. The Nightmares in the dungeons, in spite of their dubious morality, become guardians of their very reality. All the people, animals, fairies and the like who had been helping you out throughout the whole game had been unwittingly cooperating in their own annihilation. The silly owl, who had been giving you advice throughout the story and instructing you where to go next begins to look more like an angel of death than anything else. What is perhaps the most disturbing element of all, however, is Link himself, as he does not question the nature of his quest even after he learns the truth, and slavishly follows the instructions of first the owl, and then the Wind Fish itself. Once you realize the above, it becomes evident that it is the only game in the series wherein Link's death would have been in the best interest on the very world he inhabits. To add insult to injury, his only 'reward' for awakening the Jerkass God itself is being left on a drifting pile of wood remaining from his ship with no food, no drinkable water and no land in sight. Seen from this perspective, the game concludes with a borderline Kill'em All Downer Ending.]]
26th Jul '15 5:44:54 PM rjd1922
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* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in "Link to the Past" (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as Death Eye, wildly swinging in some vain hope of taking you down.

to:

* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in "Link ''A Link to the Past" Past'' (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as Death Eye, [=DethI=] (pronunced "Death Eye"), wildly swinging in some vain hope of taking you down.
21st Jul '15 2:17:20 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in "Link to the Past" (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as Death Eye, wildly swinging in some vein hope of taking you down.

to:

* The final battle with the Nightmares takes on an extra edge when you realize they're using the shape of Link's personal nightmares to fight back. This implies the battles with Agahnim and Ganon in "Link to the Past" (among others) had such an impact on you that deep down, you're still scared of them. And the Nightmares are exploiting that fear to defeat you. What's more, when you get to the final form, the Nightmares lose all shape and reason (though what Nightmares ARE reasonble?) and turn into the Lovecraftian mass known as Death Eye, wildly swinging in some vein vain hope of taking you down.
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