History Music / BobDylan

26th Nov '17 9:52:13 PM Ezclee4050
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His most famous song from this "electric" period is "Like A Rolling Stone". Twice as long or loud as anything else on the radio at the time, with snarling lyrics about chrome horses and cat-loving diplomats, the song somehow rose to number two on the U.S. charts (number one was "Eve of Destruction," now widely seen as a knockoff of Dylan's style whose creator ended up as a OneHitWonder). It's worth noting here that he has ''never had a number one hit in the United States,'' almost certainly making him the most popular and influential songwriter in the entire English language with that distinction.

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His most famous song from this "electric" period is "Like A Rolling Stone". Twice as long or loud as anything else on the radio at the time, with snarling lyrics about chrome horses and cat-loving diplomats, the song somehow rose to number two on the U.S. charts (number one was "Eve of Destruction," now widely seen as a knockoff of Dylan's style whose creator ended up as a OneHitWonder). It's worth noting here that he has ''never had a number one hit on the'' Billboard ''Hot 100'', the chart of record in the United States,'' States,[[note]]"Like a Rolling Stone" ''did'' hit the top, for one week, on ''Billboard'''s main rival, the ''Cashbox'' Top Pop Singles chart[[/note]] almost certainly making him the most popular and influential songwriter in the entire English language with that distinction.
26th Nov '17 9:26:50 PM Ezclee4050
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The other major Bob Dylan reference you might encounter is to his "born again phase", which began with his conversion from Judaism to (Evangelical Protestant) Christianity in 1979. Attendant to this were [[PanderingToTheBase a few nostalgic, audience-baiting tours]] and some angry, but lyrically intricate, ChristianRock albums. Dylan eventually returned to more secular themes, but has never quite abandoned the doomsaying [[TheEndIsNigh street preacher]] point of view. On the other hand, in his personal life, he's been seen celebrating the [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays High Holidays]] at various [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Chabad Lubavich]] Hasidic congregations; make of that what you will.

to:

The other major Bob Dylan reference you might encounter is to his "born again phase", which began with his conversion from Judaism to (Evangelical Protestant) Christianity Christianity[[note]]Specifically the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_of_Vineyard_Churches Vineyard]] movement[[/note]] in 1979. Attendant to this were [[PanderingToTheBase a few nostalgic, audience-baiting tours]] and some angry, but lyrically intricate, ChristianRock albums. Dylan eventually returned to more secular themes, but has never quite abandoned the doomsaying [[TheEndIsNigh street preacher]] point of view. On the other hand, in his personal life, he's been seen celebrating the [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays High Holidays]] at various [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Chabad Lubavich]] Hasidic congregations; make of that what you will.
26th Nov '17 9:23:25 PM Ezclee4050
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The other major Bob Dylan reference you might encounter is to his "born again phase", which began with his conversion to Christianity in the late 70s (he was born into a Jewish family and raised Jewish). Attendant to this were [[PanderingToTheBase a few nostalgic, audience-baiting tours]] and some angry, but lyrically intricate, ChristianRock albums. Dylan eventually returned to more secular themes, but has never quite abandoned the doomsaying [[TheEndIsNigh street preacher]] point of view. On the other hand, in his personal life, he's been seen celebrating the [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays High Holidays]] at various [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Chabad Lubavich]] Hasidic congregations; make of that what you will.

to:

The other major Bob Dylan reference you might encounter is to his "born again phase", which began with his conversion from Judaism to (Evangelical Protestant) Christianity in the late 70s (he was born into a Jewish family and raised Jewish).1979. Attendant to this were [[PanderingToTheBase a few nostalgic, audience-baiting tours]] and some angry, but lyrically intricate, ChristianRock albums. Dylan eventually returned to more secular themes, but has never quite abandoned the doomsaying [[TheEndIsNigh street preacher]] point of view. On the other hand, in his personal life, he's been seen celebrating the [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays High Holidays]] at various [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Chabad Lubavich]] Hasidic congregations; make of that what you will.
26th Nov '17 9:21:03 PM Ezclee4050
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* EpicRocking: "Desolation Row", "Highlands", "Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands", "Joey", "Brownsville Girl" and "Tempest" are all longer than ten minutes!

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* EpicRocking: He's basically the guy who invented the notion that rock songs could be really long. "Desolation Row", "Highlands", "Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands", "Joey", "Brownsville Girl" and "Tempest" are all longer than ten minutes!
2nd Nov '17 6:28:58 PM Ezclee4050
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* HarshVocals: A trademark, though his voice didn't get really guttural until around ''Under the Red Sky'' in 1990, and it wasn't until ''Music/TimeOutOfMind'' that he went full-Music/TomWaits with it.
29th Oct '17 12:38:34 PM nombretomado
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Bob Dylan (born May 24, 1941) was born Robert Allen Zimmerman ([[DoNotCallMePaul no, you can't call him that]]) in Duluth, Minnesota to an electrical-supplies shopkeeper and a homemaker. Growing up in Northern Minnesota's small, tight-knit Jewish community (the Zimmermans moved from Duluth to Hibbing, an hour's drive away, in 1947), young Bobby was a somewhat shy boy who showed interest in literature, art and music. He dropped out of the University of Minnesota at [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]] after completing his freshman year in spring 1960, and, at the age of 19, moved to UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity the following January with a guitar, some flannel shirts, [[TheDrifter and not much else]]. Adapting his new surname in homage to Creator/DylanThomas, he performed folk songs in bohemian Greenwich Village coffee shops and bars with an affected accent, inspired by Music/WoodyGuthrie, and became a fixture of the local "folk scene"—which doubled as a leftist political circle deeply interested in the CivilRightsMovement. Dylan wrote songs specifically for this group, the most famous being "Blowin' In The Wind" and "The Times They Are A-Changin'". Although these two {{protest song}}s are still his biggest claim to fame today—he's the guy who "brought politics" into music, somehow—this "topical" phase of his career lasted little more than twelve months.

to:

Bob Dylan (born May 24, 1941) was born Robert Allen Zimmerman ([[DoNotCallMePaul no, you can't call him that]]) in Duluth, Minnesota to an electrical-supplies shopkeeper and a homemaker. Growing up in Northern Minnesota's small, tight-knit Jewish community (the Zimmermans moved from Duluth to Hibbing, an hour's drive away, in 1947), young Bobby was a somewhat shy boy who showed interest in literature, art and music. He dropped out of the University of Minnesota at [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]] after completing his freshman year in spring 1960, and, at the age of 19, moved to UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity the following January with a guitar, some flannel shirts, [[TheDrifter and not much else]]. Adapting his new surname in homage to Creator/DylanThomas, he performed folk songs in bohemian Greenwich Village coffee shops and bars with an affected accent, inspired by Music/WoodyGuthrie, and became a fixture of the local "folk scene"—which doubled as a leftist political circle deeply interested in the CivilRightsMovement.UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement. Dylan wrote songs specifically for this group, the most famous being "Blowin' In The Wind" and "The Times They Are A-Changin'". Although these two {{protest song}}s are still his biggest claim to fame today—he's the guy who "brought politics" into music, somehow—this "topical" phase of his career lasted little more than twelve months.
14th Oct '17 11:40:20 AM DustSnitch
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6th Oct '17 9:28:54 AM bt8257
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* 2017 - ''The Bootleg Series Vol. 13 - Trouble No More 1979-1981''

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* 2017 - ''The Bootleg Series Vol. 13 - Trouble No More 1979-1981''
1979–1981''
6th Oct '17 9:28:09 AM bt8257
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Bob Dylan (born 24 May 1941) was born Robert Allen Zimmerman ([[DoNotCallMePaul no, you can't call him that]]) in Duluth, Minnesota to an electrical-supplies shopkeeper and a homemaker. Growing up in Northern Minnesota's small, tight-knit Jewish community (the Zimmermans moved from Duluth to Hibbing, an hour's drive away, in 1947), young Bobby was a somewhat shy boy who showed interest in literature, art and music. He dropped out of the University of Minnesota at [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]] after completing his freshman year in spring 1960, and, at the age of 19, moved to UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity the following January with a guitar, some flannel shirts, [[TheDrifter and not much else]]. Adapting his new surname in homage to Creator/DylanThomas, he performed folk songs in bohemian Greenwich Village coffee shops and bars with an affected accent, inspired by Music/WoodyGuthrie, and became a fixture of the local "folk scene"—which doubled as a leftist political circle deeply interested in the CivilRightsMovement. Dylan wrote songs specifically for this group, the most famous being "Blowin' In The Wind" and "The Times They Are A-Changin'". Although these two {{protest song}}s are still his biggest claim to fame today—he's the guy who "brought politics" into music, somehow—this "topical" phase of his career lasted little more than twelve months.

to:

Bob Dylan (born 24 May 24, 1941) was born Robert Allen Zimmerman ([[DoNotCallMePaul no, you can't call him that]]) in Duluth, Minnesota to an electrical-supplies shopkeeper and a homemaker. Growing up in Northern Minnesota's small, tight-knit Jewish community (the Zimmermans moved from Duluth to Hibbing, an hour's drive away, in 1947), young Bobby was a somewhat shy boy who showed interest in literature, art and music. He dropped out of the University of Minnesota at [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]] after completing his freshman year in spring 1960, and, at the age of 19, moved to UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity the following January with a guitar, some flannel shirts, [[TheDrifter and not much else]]. Adapting his new surname in homage to Creator/DylanThomas, he performed folk songs in bohemian Greenwich Village coffee shops and bars with an affected accent, inspired by Music/WoodyGuthrie, and became a fixture of the local "folk scene"—which doubled as a leftist political circle deeply interested in the CivilRightsMovement. Dylan wrote songs specifically for this group, the most famous being "Blowin' In The Wind" and "The Times They Are A-Changin'". Although these two {{protest song}}s are still his biggest claim to fame today—he's the guy who "brought politics" into music, somehow—this "topical" phase of his career lasted little more than twelve months.



The other major Bob Dylan reference you might encounter is to his "born again phase", which began with his conversion to Christianity in the late 70s (he was born into a Jewish family and raised Jewish). Attendant to this were [[PanderingToTheBase a few nostalgic, audience-baiting tours]] and some angry but lyrically intricate ChristianRock albums. Dylan eventually returned to more secular themes, but has never quite abandoned the doomsaying [[TheEndIsNigh street preacher]] point of view. On the other hand, in his personal life, he's been seen celebrating the [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays High Holidays]] at various [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Chabad Lubavich]] Hasidic congregations; make of that what you will.

to:

The other major Bob Dylan reference you might encounter is to his "born again phase", which began with his conversion to Christianity in the late 70s (he was born into a Jewish family and raised Jewish). Attendant to this were [[PanderingToTheBase a few nostalgic, audience-baiting tours]] and some angry angry, but lyrically intricate intricate, ChristianRock albums. Dylan eventually returned to more secular themes, but has never quite abandoned the doomsaying [[TheEndIsNigh street preacher]] point of view. On the other hand, in his personal life, he's been seen celebrating the [[UsefulNotes/JewishHolidays High Holidays]] at various [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} Chabad Lubavich]] Hasidic congregations; make of that what you will.
26th Sep '17 9:00:18 AM jamespolk
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!!Bob Dylan in film:

* ''Film/DontLookBack'' (1967) (documentary of Dylan's 1965 British tour)
* ''Film/PatGarrettAndBillyTheKid'' (1973) (Dylan composed the soundtrack and acted in a supporting role)
* ''Film/TheLastWaltz'' (1978) (farewell concert of Music/TheBand; Dylan makes a memorable appearance near the end)

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