History Main / YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord

21st Jan '16 1:42:11 PM Willbyr
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* The Dark Horse Comics re-release of ''LoneWolfAndCub'' uses this trope for several Japanese words, both for period flavor and to allow readers to learn the meaning of some Japanese terms from context after a brief English explanation. It also employs a glossary for other untranslated terms, possibly because there wasn't enough room to explain them on the page.
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* The Dark Horse Comics re-release of ''LoneWolfAndCub'' ''Manga/LoneWolfAndCub'' uses this trope for several Japanese words, both for period flavor and to allow readers to learn the meaning of some Japanese terms from context after a brief English explanation. It also employs a glossary for other untranslated terms, possibly because there wasn't enough room to explain them on the page.

* More recently this has often been happening to the ''[[TheForeignSubtitle titles]]'' of various anime/manga as a way to avoid confusing those who had become used to the untranslated title while still conveying what the title actually ''means''. For example ''[[Anime/MoribitoGuardianOfTheSpirit Seirei No Moribito]]'' roughly means "Guardian of the (Sacred) Spirit", so the English-language title is ''Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit'' and ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'' means "Ours" (or if you want to get ''really'' literal it means "of us") so Creator/VIZMedia is releasing the manga as ''Bokurano: Ours''. ** ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' got this treatment too, its manga being released under the name "Higurashi: When They Cry" (although this example is less redundant than most since 'higurashi' means 'cicada(s)') and the anime released as "When They Cry: Higurashi no Naku Koro ni" (which is redundant right there). Justified in that ''Franchise/WhenTheyCry'' is the franchise title, also encompassing ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'' and all spinoffs of both.
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* More recently this has often been happening to the ''[[TheForeignSubtitle titles]]'' of various anime/manga as a way to avoid confusing those who had become used to the untranslated title while still conveying what the title actually ''means''. For example ''[[Anime/MoribitoGuardianOfTheSpirit Seirei No no Moribito]]'' roughly means "Guardian of the (Sacred) Spirit", so the English-language title is ''Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit'' and ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'' means "Ours" (or if you want to get ''really'' literal it means "of us") so Creator/VIZMedia is releasing the manga as ''Bokurano: Ours''. ** ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' got this treatment too, its manga being released under the name "Higurashi: When They Cry" (although this example is less redundant than most since 'higurashi' means 'cicada(s)') and the anime released as "When They Cry: Higurashi no Naku Koro ni" (which is redundant right there). Justified in that ''Franchise/WhenTheyCry'' is the franchise title, also encompassing ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'' ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' and all spinoffs of both.
20th Jan '16 6:51:14 AM DaibhidC
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* In the ''Comicbook/{{Batman}}'' {{Elseworld}} ''Reign of Terror'', based on ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'', one rescued aristocrat calls Batman "Monsieur Chauve-Souris" and he replies "Yes, a bat is a kind of 'bald mouse', is he not?" This gets even weirder when you consider that everywhere else in the story, we're meant to understand that characters are speaking French and TranslationConvention is showing it as English (unlike the Pimpernel, this version of Bruce Wayne is French). So Bruce just said "Oui, une chauve-souris est une sorte de 'chauve souris', n'est-ce pas?"
15th Jan '16 10:30:08 PM jormis29
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* Featured heavily in ''{{Summoner}}''. Your character is referred to with a foreign name assumed to mean Summoner (Sahudani). [[spoiler: It is later revealed that the word everyone is using is not the good one. It means ''Man of the four rings'', while the proper Khosani term for summoner (Sahu'''g'''ani) translates to ''Man of the Eight Rings'' revealing the existence of 4 extra summoner's rings.]]
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* Featured heavily in ''{{Summoner}}''.''VideoGame/{{Summoner}}''. Your character is referred to with a foreign name assumed to mean Summoner (Sahudani). [[spoiler: It is later revealed that the word everyone is using is not the good one. It means ''Man of the four rings'', while the proper Khosani term for summoner (Sahu'''g'''ani) translates to ''Man of the Eight Rings'' revealing the existence of 4 extra summoner's rings.]]
1st Jan '16 8:07:34 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Smallville}}'': GirlOfTheWeek Kyla Willowbrook calls Clark the "Naman", and then tells him it means Messiah.
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* ''{{Smallville}}'': ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': GirlOfTheWeek Kyla Willowbrook calls Clark the "Naman", and then tells him it means Messiah.
12th Dec '15 5:34:03 PM nombretomado
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* In "The Krytos Trap", a book in the XWingSeries, it is explained to Wedge while he is trying to bargain with Twi'leks that if they pronounce his name Wedgean'tilles it sounds a little like their term for "[[AwesomeMcCoolname slayer of]] [[StellarName stars]]", but [[InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike if they pronounce it Wedge'antilles it's something like "so foul it would make a rancor sick"]] - and if they pronounce his name the human way, Wedge Antilles, they're basically saying that he has no clan and no family, which is highly insulting. Basically when trying to deal, they change pronunciation to be more respectful.
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* In "The Krytos Trap", a book in the XWingSeries, Literature/XWingSeries, it is explained to Wedge while he is trying to bargain with Twi'leks that if they pronounce his name Wedgean'tilles it sounds a little like their term for "[[AwesomeMcCoolname slayer of]] [[StellarName stars]]", but [[InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike if they pronounce it Wedge'antilles it's something like "so foul it would make a rancor sick"]] - and if they pronounce his name the human way, Wedge Antilles, they're basically saying that he has no clan and no family, which is highly insulting. Basically when trying to deal, they change pronunciation to be more respectful.
5th Nov '15 5:11:36 AM Sikon
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This gets even worse when combined with TranslationConvention, when characters translate words from the same language they're supposedly speaking at the moment. The distinction between the original word and the translation would exist in the reader's language that the foreign speech is rendered into, but not in the language being spoken in-story.
22nd Sep '15 9:49:44 PM xXNoMoreXsXx
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This is because, while a word may be translated simply, in this case as "sandwich", it doesn't necessarily mean "sandwich" in the way you are used to. Continuing the example, in Spain, while "bocadillo" does mean "sandwich", it's referring to a sandwich more similar to, but not necessarily the exact same thing as, what an American would call a "sub", "hoagie", "grinder", "hero", or whatever your local variation of the word is. In the end, 'bocadillo' can easily mean "snack", and apply in a wide variety of contexts, except there are some areas where "snack" is used to represent something more specific or entirely different from " a small portion of food eaten between meals" and there are some areas where "bocadillo" is also used to represent something completely different from even FOOD, such as a thin canvas or a simplified version of certain phrases made by an actor or a speech bubble in comics, or even where it is used to mean food, but more like a sweet than anything with bread or meat in it. [[note]]Other words for 'sandwich' in Spanish are emparedado, which is a balm cake (sort of like a soft burger bun) style sandwich and sándwich, or just sandwich, your typical sliced-loaf option. In case you were wondering.[[/note]]
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This is because, while a word may be translated simply, in this case as "sandwich", it doesn't necessarily mean "sandwich" in the way you are used to. Continuing the example, in Spain, while "bocadillo" does mean "sandwich", it's referring to a sandwich more similar to, but not necessarily the exact same thing as, what an American would call a "sub", "hoagie", "grinder", "hero", or whatever your local variation of the word is. In the end, 'bocadillo' can easily mean "snack", and apply in a wide variety of contexts, except there are some areas where "snack" is used to represent something more specific or entirely different from " a small portion of food eaten between meals" and there are some areas where "bocadillo" is also used to represent something completely different from even FOOD, such as a thin canvas or a simplified version of certain phrases made by an actor or a speech bubble in comics, or even where it is used to mean food, but more like a sweet than anything with bread or meat in it. [[note]]Other words for 'sandwich' in Spanish are emparedado, which is a balm cake (sort of like a soft burger bun) style sandwich and sándwich, or just sandwich, your typical sliced-loaf option. In case you were wondering.[[/note]] [[/note]] The same word, "sandwich" translated to Swedish, is smörgås... except it really isn't because smörgås actually refers to an open sandwich.
19th Sep '15 4:09:59 PM nombretomado
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* Done only ''once'' in ''ElfQuest'', with Tyleet's introduction. In all other instances, we only see either the Elvish word or the translation. Tyleet, said to mean "healer's gift", was the first real key the readers got to the Elven language (Tyl = gift, Leet = heal-, from which could then be concluded: Leetah = Healing Light, Tyldak = Gift Of Wings-[[GeniusBonus "dak" is similar to the Latin "dactyl" meaning "toe", as in pterodactyl, ("wing finger"), a creature which he heavily resembles]]). A minor example later on in the series is when Rayek refers to himself as the "Child Of The Rocks". It's a literal translation of his own name (Ray = child, Ek = rock). Ekuar, the name of his mentor, who is a rock shaper, presumably means something akin to... [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin rock shaper]].
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* Done only ''once'' in ''ElfQuest'', ''ComicBook/ElfQuest'', with Tyleet's introduction. In all other instances, we only see either the Elvish word or the translation. Tyleet, said to mean "healer's gift", was the first real key the readers got to the Elven language (Tyl = gift, Leet = heal-, from which could then be concluded: Leetah = Healing Light, Tyldak = Gift Of Wings-[[GeniusBonus "dak" is similar to the Latin "dactyl" meaning "toe", as in pterodactyl, ("wing finger"), a creature which he heavily resembles]]). A minor example later on in the series is when Rayek refers to himself as the "Child Of The Rocks". It's a literal translation of his own name (Ray = child, Ek = rock). Ekuar, the name of his mentor, who is a rock shaper, presumably means something akin to... [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin rock shaper]].
9th Sep '15 4:47:30 PM nombretomado
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* A Hispanic ghost in ''{{Batwoman}}'' declares "I am todos los muertos! All of the dead!"
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* A Hispanic ghost in ''{{Batwoman}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Batwoman}}'' declares "I am todos los muertos! All of the dead!"
26th Aug '15 9:51:20 AM nombretomado
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* More recently this has often been happening to the ''[[TheForeignSubtitle titles]]'' of various anime/manga as a way to avoid confusing those who had become used to the untranslated title while still conveying what the title actually ''means''. For example ''[[Anime/MoribitoGuardianOfTheSpirit SeireiNoMoribito]]'' roughly means "Guardian of the (Sacred) Spirit", so the English-language title is ''Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit'' and ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'' means "Ours" (or if you want to get ''really'' literal it means "of us") so Creator/VIZMedia is releasing the manga as ''Bokurano: Ours''.
to:
* More recently this has often been happening to the ''[[TheForeignSubtitle titles]]'' of various anime/manga as a way to avoid confusing those who had become used to the untranslated title while still conveying what the title actually ''means''. For example ''[[Anime/MoribitoGuardianOfTheSpirit SeireiNoMoribito]]'' Seirei No Moribito]]'' roughly means "Guardian of the (Sacred) Spirit", so the English-language title is ''Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit'' and ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'' means "Ours" (or if you want to get ''really'' literal it means "of us") so Creator/VIZMedia is releasing the manga as ''Bokurano: Ours''.
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