History Main / YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe

25th Apr '17 8:34:57 AM drwhom
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* ''Film/ReeferMadnessTheMusical'': Jimmy tries to speak Shakespearean English to Mary.



20th Apr '17 8:33:00 AM FF32
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* In ''VideoGame/Persona2InnocentSin'', the part-time clerk at Peace Burger talks like this in the english translation, despite being a modern Japanese girl. It turns out one of the regulars spread a rumor about it (since rumors have the supernatural power to come true) because she thought it would be funny.

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* In ''VideoGame/Persona2InnocentSin'', ''[[VideoGame/Persona2 Persona 2: Innocent Sin]]'', the part-time clerk at Peace Burger talks like this in the english translation, despite being a modern Japanese girl. It turns out one of the regulars spread a rumor about it (since rumors have the supernatural power to come true) because she thought it would be funny.
15th Apr '17 12:00:26 PM CaptEquinox
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* ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' misuses archaic English in "Amok Time". Writer Creator/TheodoreSturgeon apparently wanted to show that the Vulcan language, or at least an older form of it, had separate second-person singular and plural forms (as French does with "tu" and "vous"). They showed this by using the archaic second-person familiar pronoun "thee" for "you". But T'Pau, the one character to use these formal archaisms, used "thee" even when "thou" would have been the correct word. Even if Vulcan used the same word for both pronouns (as modern English does with "you"), the translator should have been programmed to recognize the difference between subjective and objective pronouns. As it was, formal Vulcan as rendered by Celia Lovsky sounded more like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou#Religious_uses Quaker 'plain speech.']] ''If thou art the subject of a sentence then the object of the sentence wouldst be thee.''

to:

* ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' misuses archaic English in "Amok Time". Writer Creator/TheodoreSturgeon apparently wanted to show that the Vulcan language, or at least an older form of it, had separate second-person singular and plural forms (as French does with "tu" and "vous"). They showed this by using the archaic second-person familiar pronoun "thee" for "you". But T'Pau, the one character to use both T'Pau and Spock, when using these formal archaisms, used "thee" even when "thou" would have been the correct word. word.[[note]]Spock says "Thee has the power, T'Pau" when he means "Thou hast."[[/note]] Even if Vulcan used the same word for both pronouns (as modern English does with "you"), the translator should have been programmed to recognize the difference between subjective and objective pronouns. As it was, formal Vulcan as rendered by Celia Lovsky and Leonard Nimoy sounded more like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou#Religious_uses Quaker 'plain speech.']] ''If thou art the subject of a sentence then the object of the sentence wouldst be thee.''
11th Apr '17 2:49:56 PM WillKeaton
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* ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' misuses archaic English in "Amok Time". Writer Creator/TheodoreSturgeon apparently wanted to show that the Vulcan language, or at least an older form of it, had separate second-person singular and plural forms (as French does with "tu" and "vous"). They showed this by using the archaic second-person familiar pronoun "thee" for "you". But T'Pau, the one character to use these formal archaisms, used "thee" even when "thou" would have been the correct word. Even if Vulcan used the same word for both pronouns (as modern English does with "you"), the translator should have been programmed to recognize the difference between subjective and objective pronouns. As it was, formal Vulcan as rendered by Celia Lovsky sounded more like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou#Religious_uses Quaker 'plain speech']]. ''If thou art the subject of a sentence then the object of the sentence wouldst be thee.''

to:

* ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}}'' misuses archaic English in "Amok Time". Writer Creator/TheodoreSturgeon apparently wanted to show that the Vulcan language, or at least an older form of it, had separate second-person singular and plural forms (as French does with "tu" and "vous"). They showed this by using the archaic second-person familiar pronoun "thee" for "you". But T'Pau, the one character to use these formal archaisms, used "thee" even when "thou" would have been the correct word. Even if Vulcan used the same word for both pronouns (as modern English does with "you"), the translator should have been programmed to recognize the difference between subjective and objective pronouns. As it was, formal Vulcan as rendered by Celia Lovsky sounded more like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou#Religious_uses Quaker 'plain speech']]. speech.']] ''If thou art the subject of a sentence then the object of the sentence wouldst be thee.''
11th Apr '17 2:49:22 PM WillKeaton
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* A Geico commercial depicts TheOldestTricksInTheBook as a man saying "Look!". When the victim looks, the man says "Ha-ha! Madest thou look" instead of "Made thee look".

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* A Geico commercial depicts TheOldestTricksInTheBook as a man saying "Look!". "Look!" When the victim looks, the man says "Ha-ha! Madest thou look" instead of "Made thee look".
11th Apr '17 2:48:42 PM WillKeaton
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English being a Germanic language, "thou" corresponds to German singular second person ''du'', and verbs in the second-person singular are conjugated the same way: du hast - thou hast[[note]]Really a shortened version of "havest"[[/note]], the suffix being ''-est'' (thou goest, thou makest, thou stayest). If you know any German, you may infer that "thou" and "du" are cognates. The nominative case is "thou" (thou art a king). The objective is "thee" (he loves [or loveth] thee). And the possessive is "thy" (thy pen) or "thine" (see with thine eyes that this house is thine)[[note]]More precisely, "thy" is a possessive adjective before consonants, while "thine" is a possessive pronoun and a possessive adjective before vowels[[/note]]. As for the reflexive pronoun, it is "thyself" (thou talkest to thyself).

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English being a Germanic language, "thou" corresponds to German singular second person ''du'', and verbs in the second-person singular are conjugated the same way: du hast - thou hast[[note]]Really hast,[[note]]Really a shortened version of "havest"[[/note]], "havest"[[/note]] the suffix being ''-est'' (thou goest, thou makest, thou stayest). If you know any German, you may infer that "thou" and "du" are cognates. The nominative case is "thou" (thou art a king). The objective is "thee" (he loves [or loveth] thee). And the possessive is "thy" (thy pen) or "thine" (see with thine eyes that this house is thine)[[note]]More thine).[[note]]More precisely, "thy" is a possessive adjective before consonants, while "thine" is a possessive pronoun and a possessive adjective before vowels[[/note]]. vowels.[[/note]] As for the reflexive pronoun, it is "thyself" (thou talkest to thyself).
4th Apr '17 10:44:23 AM ReikoKazama
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* PlayedForLaughs in ''Film/TheAvengers2012'' with Tony Stark throwing this line towards Thor in their first encounter:
--> '''Stark''' (in his Iron Man suit): Uh... Shakespeare in the park? "Doth mother know you weareth her drapes?"



** Tony, of course, mocks him right away:
---> '''Tony Stark''': What's that? Shakespeare in the park? Doth Mother know you weareth her drapes?

to:

** Tony, of course, mocks him right away:
---> '''Tony Stark''': What's that?
PlayedForLaughs in ''Film/TheAvengers2012'' with [[ComicBook.IronMan Tony Stark]] throwing this line towards Thor in their first encounter:
--> '''Stark''' (in his Iron Man suit): Uh...
Shakespeare in the park? Doth Mother "Doth mother know you weareth her drapes?drapes?"
23rd Mar '17 3:51:15 PM Hallucination
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/{{Filth Biscuit}}'': [[http://www.filthbiscuit.com/rob-ho-and-his-merry-bros/ "Rob Ho & His Merry Bros"]] correctly utilizes certain conjugations of archaic English (which is more Elizabethan English than Middle English) while totally ignoring others in its punishing mash-up of goofy medieval-ish prose and obnoxious modern [[{{Fratbro}} fratbro]]-speak.
15th Feb '17 6:53:07 AM jamespolk
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* Averted, or rather, practiced in-universe by the characters, in ''Film/FriendlyPersuasion''. The Quakers use the old-timey ''thee'' instead of ''you'' in speech. However, they consistently misuse it, saying "thee" both as the subject (correct) and also as the object in sentences, when they should be using "thou." This is how Quakers habitually talked in the 19th-century, although latter-day Quakers have fallen out of this habit.

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* Averted, or rather, practiced in-universe by the characters, in ''Film/FriendlyPersuasion''. The Quakers use the old-timey ''thee'' instead of ''you'' in speech. However, they consistently misuse it, saying "thee" both as the subject object (correct) and also as the object subject (incorrect) in sentences, when they should be using "thou." This is how Quakers habitually talked in the 19th-century, although latter-day Quakers have fallen out of this habit.


Added DiffLines:

* The 1922 ''Film/{{Robin Hood|1922}}'' has characters mixing and matching "thou" and "you", like when Friar Tuck says to Robin, "Prepare thyself. Within these walls there is someone dear to you."
14th Feb '17 2:49:00 PM ILikeRobots
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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]

to:

*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]
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