History Main / YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe

15th Feb '17 6:53:07 AM jamespolk
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* Averted, or rather, practiced in-universe by the characters, in ''Film/FriendlyPersuasion''. The Quakers use the old-timey ''thee'' instead of ''you'' in speech. However, they consistently misuse it, saying "thee" both as the subject (correct) and also as the object in sentences, when they should be using "thou." This is how Quakers habitually talked in the 19th-century, although latter-day Quakers have fallen out of this habit.

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* Averted, or rather, practiced in-universe by the characters, in ''Film/FriendlyPersuasion''. The Quakers use the old-timey ''thee'' instead of ''you'' in speech. However, they consistently misuse it, saying "thee" both as the subject object (correct) and also as the object subject (incorrect) in sentences, when they should be using "thou." This is how Quakers habitually talked in the 19th-century, although latter-day Quakers have fallen out of this habit.


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* The 1922 ''Film/{{Robin Hood|1922}}'' has characters mixing and matching "thou" and "you", like when Friar Tuck says to Robin, "Prepare thyself. Within these walls there is someone dear to you."
14th Feb '17 2:49:00 PM ILikeRobots
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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]

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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]
14th Feb '17 1:25:41 PM ILikeRobots
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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]

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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]
10th Feb '17 1:26:11 AM NhazUl
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** Tony, of course, mocks him right away:
---> '''Tony Stark''': What's that? Shakespeare in the park? Doth Mother know you weareth her drapes?
9th Feb '17 12:56:37 AM luisedgarf
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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, albeit it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game".[[/note]]

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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, albeit default, it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game"."game" and it uses Spaniard politeness by default, rather than Latin American, when people with higher social or military standing are addressed in casual terms. [[ValuesDissonance Doing this in Latin America]], depending of the country and region, can be a '''very serious''' and sometimes in extreme cases, ''[[TooDumbToLive deadly]]'' faux pas.[[/note]]
3rd Feb '17 12:42:28 AM luisedgarf
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*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use.

to:

*** The European Spanish translation of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' features one of the most archaic (and justified) uses of this trope. Unlike other translations used for both Spain and Latin America, the Spanish translation is exclusive for the European release, as it was not included in the American version, possibly because the translation is too old-fashioned for Latin American use. On the other hand, this is averted hard in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'', when both Spain and Latin America has their own translations in their own dialects.[[note]]Albeit the Latin American translation uses polite Mexican Spanish by default, albeit it uses some Spaniard words, like "partida" instead of "juego" for the translation of "game".[[/note]]



*** Until the 2000s, most of the ''VideoGame/{{FIFA}}'' games were translated into the European dialect exclusively, and at least in the earlier games, it even used some very archaic spellings for some countries, being the biggest offender the spelling of UsefulNotes/{{Mexico}}, who was spelled as ''Mejico'', an archaic spelling used exclusively in Spain until the 90s and it's considered as a borderline BerserkButton for Mexicans. Luckily, they corrected this in later games.

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*** Until the 2000s, most of the ''VideoGame/{{FIFA}}'' ''VideoGame/FIFASoccer'' games were translated into the European dialect exclusively, and at least in the earlier games, it even used some very archaic spellings for some countries, being the biggest offender the spelling of UsefulNotes/{{Mexico}}, who was spelled as ''Mejico'', an archaic spelling used exclusively in Spain until the 90s and it's considered as a borderline BerserkButton for Mexicans. Luckily, they corrected this in later games.
20th Jan '17 12:28:16 PM Steven
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* Cyan in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' talks the same way, making grievous errors like "I art" (though in Cyan's case he spoke in faux-historic Japanese in the Japanese version as well).

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* Cyan in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' talks the same way, making grievous errors like "I art" (though in Cyan's case he spoke in faux-historic Japanese in the Japanese version as well). Gau mimics Cyan and calls him Mr. Thou, much to his dismay.
11th Jan '17 11:21:22 PM Trying2CIt
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English being a Germanic language, "thou" corresponds to German singular second person ''du'', and verbs in the second-person singular are conjugated the same way: du hast - thou hast[[note]]Really a shortened version of "havest"[[/note]], the suffix being ''-est'' (thou goest, thou makest, thou stayest). If you know any German, you may infer that "thou" and "du" are cognates. The nominative case is "thou" (thou art a king). The objective is "thee" (he loves [or loveth] thee). The genitive is "thy" (thy pen) or "thine" (see with thine eyes that this house is thine)[[note]]More precisely, "thy" is a possessive adjective before consonants, while "thine" is a possessive pronoun and a possessive adjective before vowels[[/note]]. The reflexive is "thyself" (thou talkest to thyself).

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English being a Germanic language, "thou" corresponds to German singular second person ''du'', and verbs in the second-person singular are conjugated the same way: du hast - thou hast[[note]]Really a shortened version of "havest"[[/note]], the suffix being ''-est'' (thou goest, thou makest, thou stayest). If you know any German, you may infer that "thou" and "du" are cognates. The nominative case is "thou" (thou art a king). The objective is "thee" (he loves [or loveth] thee). The genitive And the possessive is "thy" (thy pen) or "thine" (see with thine eyes that this house is thine)[[note]]More precisely, "thy" is a possessive adjective before consonants, while "thine" is a possessive pronoun and a possessive adjective before vowels[[/note]]. The As for the reflexive pronoun, it is "thyself" (thou talkest to thyself).



If the emphasis isn't so much on generic Olde-Worlde gimmicks like "zounds" and "forsooth" and the "-eth" suffix, and instead is more on the language being poetically ornate and old-fashioned in a Shakespearean and/or King James Bible style, then the trope you're looking for is probably FloweryElizabethanEnglish (especially if the characters are not people one might ''expect'' to be speaking something like Middle English). Admittedly, there can be considerable overlap between the two.

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If the emphasis isn't so much on generic Olde-Worlde gimmicks like "zounds" and "forsooth" and the "-eth" suffix, and instead is more on the language language's being poetically ornate and old-fashioned in a Shakespearean and/or King James Bible style, then the trope you're looking for is probably FloweryElizabethanEnglish (especially if the characters are not people one might ''expect'' to be speaking something like Middle Elizabethan English). Admittedly, there can be considerable overlap between the two.
7th Jan '17 6:10:58 PM MiddleEighth
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*In ''Fanfic/TheKeysStandAlone: The Soft World'', Terb the bard speaks this way in public, though he gets a lot of the words wrong.
-->“Prithee, knavish louts who maketh mock, couldst thou doest any better?”
**And George maketh more mock by saying “Well, leth giveth them a chanceth to theeth if I liveth up to thoth thtandards, thall we?”
5th Jan '17 6:55:47 PM Trying2CIt
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* [[http://alt-usage-english.org/pronoun_paradigms.html Thou, Thee, and Archaic Grammar]]
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