History Main / WeAllLiveInAmerica

16th May '16 2:18:06 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' has characters from all the around the world, but many still use expressions that are rather specifically Japanese. For example, Polnareff is French, but tells a villain that he will be judged in hell by ''Yama'' and mentions the RedStringOfFate when hoping to find a girlfriend.

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* ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has characters from all the around the world, but many still use expressions that are rather specifically Japanese. For example, Polnareff is French, but tells a villain that he will be judged in hell by ''Yama'' and mentions the RedStringOfFate when hoping to find a girlfriend.
11th May '16 3:31:03 PM Soufriere
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Related to CultureChopSuey, which is about ''fictional'' locations that are based on cultures of several different real-life locales, often accidentally including the author's own. When a dub attempts to make it seems like the series takes place elsewhere, but the numerous set pieces make it apparent it's not the case, see ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange.

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Related to CultureChopSuey, which is about ''fictional'' locations that are based on cultures of several different real-life locales, often accidentally including the author's own. When a dub attempts to make it seems like the series takes place elsewhere, but the numerous set pieces make it apparent it's that's not the case, see ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange.



* In the {{Chri|stmas Episode}}, er, [[{{You Mean XMas}} Heaven's Day]] episode of ''Anime/{{The Big O}}'', despite Paradigm City clearly being future New York, the celebrations do seem to emphasize romance more than family.
* The OpeningMonologue of ''Anime/CodeGeass'' makes a big deal about how the Britannian Empire has suppressed Japanese culture. However, the school system we see has almost nothing in common with the British or American systems; it's really just the Japanese system with funny uniforms.

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* In the {{Chri|stmas Episode}}, er, [[{{You Mean XMas}} [[YouMeanXMas Heaven's Day]] episode of ''Anime/{{The Big O}}'', ''Anime/TheBigO'', despite Paradigm City clearly being future New York, the celebrations do seem to emphasize romance more than family.
* The OpeningMonologue of ''Anime/CodeGeass'' makes a big deal about how the Britannian Empire has suppressed Japanese culture. However, the school system we see has almost nothing in common with the British or ''or'' American systems; it's really just the Japanese system with funny uniforms.



* In ''Anime/EdenOfTheEast'', at least one American uses "Johnny" as a euphemism for a man's special organ. (It's also used by a Japanese person in ''Literature/TheTatamiGalaxy'', so it's apparently not [[UnusualEuphemism a made-up euphemism]].) Americans have...''numerous'' common ways to say "penis," but "Johnny" isn't one of them (although "Johnson" is, and "Johnny" is somewhat outdated British English slang for "condom" but still not a word for a penis itself).

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* In ''Anime/EdenOfTheEast'', at least one American uses "Johnny" as a euphemism for a man's special organ. (It's organ (it's also used by a Japanese person in ''Literature/TheTatamiGalaxy'', so it's apparently not [[UnusualEuphemism a made-up euphemism]].) euphemism]]). Americans have...have… ''numerous'' common ways to say "penis," "penis", but "Johnny" isn't one of them (although "Johnson" is, and "Johnny" is somewhat outdated British English slang for "condom" but still not a word for a penis itself).



* In the ''Anime/IronMan'' manga, Tony Stark works hard to curtail his American sensibilities (especially his womanizing) while in Japan, knowing it won't win him any points with the locals. His behavior, however, more closely resembles what a Japanese writer would ''guess'' an American hotshot would act like. For example, at one point, he is sparring with a Japanese fighter and compliments the man on his JapaneseSpirit...before [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty cheating]] and then proclaiming that as an American, he instead has "Pioneer Spirit". Not only is JapaneseSpirit something most Americans have ''vaguely'' heard of, at best, but no American would ever use the term "Pioneer Spirit". The "American Way", maybe, but in this context, even that's a stretch.

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* In the ''Anime/IronMan'' manga, Tony Stark works hard to curtail his American sensibilities (especially his womanizing) while in Japan, knowing it won't win him any points with the locals. His behavior, however, more closely resembles what a Japanese writer would ''guess'' an American hotshot would act like. For example, at one point, he is sparring with a Japanese fighter and compliments the man on his JapaneseSpirit...JapaneseSpirit… before [[TryingToCatchMeFightingDirty cheating]] and then proclaiming that as an American, he instead has "Pioneer Spirit". Not only is JapaneseSpirit something most Americans have ''vaguely'' heard of, at best, but no American would ever use the term "Pioneer Spirit". The "American Way", Way" maybe, but in this context, even that's a stretch.



* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' occasionally shows people driving on the left side of the road in America. Also, background text tends to use U.K. spellings.

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* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' occasionally shows people driving on the left side of the road in America.America[[labelnote:*]] (there ''is'' one part of America that drives on the left: The U.S. Virgin Islands, which drove that way before America bought them in 1917 and just never bothered switching)[[/labelnote]]. Also, background text tends to use U.K. spellings.



* ''El Libro Vaquero'' is an erotic Mexican graphic anthology of stories that take place in the American WildWest, and most of the characters are Americans. The problem is, most of the American characters act and behave like ''Mexicans'' and this was completely deliberate, according with the [[WordOfGod creators]], as they didn't like the way how American creators of WildWest stories write them. Basically, the WildWest depicted in ''El Libro Vaquero'' is basically the Mexico from the same time period, with more romance, [[FanService and soft-core erotism]].

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* ''El Libro Vaquero'' is an erotic Mexican graphic anthology of stories that take place in the American WildWest, and most of the characters are Americans. The problem is, most of the American characters act and behave like ''Mexicans'' and this was completely deliberate, according with to the [[WordOfGod creators]], as they didn't like the way how American creators of WildWest stories write them. Basically, the WildWest depicted in ''El Libro Vaquero'' is basically the Mexico from the same time period, with more romance, romance [[FanService and soft-core erotism]].eroticism]].



* The comic book ''ComicBook/{{WITCH}}'' tends to hint it's set in America (currency, American flags, law enforcement with US-like uniforms and cars and, in one vacation town, being led by a sheriff). The problem is, the human members of the cast act as generic Europeans (with a light leaning on how Italians act), and the traffic signs are obviously European.

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* The comic book ''ComicBook/{{WITCH}}'' tends to hint it's set in America (currency, American flags, law enforcement with US-like uniforms and cars and, in one vacation town, being led by a sheriff). The problem is, is the human members of the cast act as generic Europeans (with a light leaning on how Italians act), and the traffic signs are obviously European.



* In ''ComicBook/WonderWoman'' Vol 4 #50, a young boy in England, whose father died of cancer, is worried about how his mum would pay the medical bills. Nobody in the UK who was uncertain about how they can pay their medical bills would bother incurring any; going private is a choice.

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* In ''ComicBook/WonderWoman'' Vol 4 #50, a young boy in England, England whose father died of cancer, cancer is worried about how his mum would pay the medical bills. Nobody in the UK who was uncertain about how they can pay their medical bills would bother incurring any; going actually has this worry thanks to the NHS, which (usually) covers stuff like this. Britain ''does'' have private is healthcare with higher out-of-pocket cost, but it's a choice.choice rather than the default.



** British ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' {{fanfiction}} often has the Winchesters speaking in British slang and claiming that their small Indiana town is 30 minutes away from the Canadian border. Problem is, Great Britain is ''much'' smaller than the United States -- "from Land's End to John o' Groats", the longest distance in the isle, means 874 miles by road, whereas "coast to coast" in the USA means at least 2,460 miles depending on where one is measuring from.[[note]]The drive from Jacksonville, UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} to UsefulNotes/LosAngeles along Interstate 10, the shortest coast-to-coast highway, is 2,460 miles; the drive from UsefulNotes/{{Boston}} to UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} on I-90, the longest, is 3,101 miles.[[/note]] In RealLife, ''anywhere'' in Indiana is at least three hours from Canada by car, and that's just going from the northern extremes of the state to Windsor, the closest Canadian city. From Indianapolis, it's closer to five hours, and from Evansville, seven and a half. For anywhere ''of note'' in Canada, tack at least a few more hours on to that.

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** British ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' {{fanfiction}} often has the Winchesters speaking in British slang and claiming that their small Indiana town is 30 minutes away from the Canadian border. Problem is, Great Britain is ''much'' smaller than the United States -- "from Land's End to John o' Groats", the longest distance in the isle, means 874 miles by road, whereas "coast to coast" in the USA means at least 2,460 miles depending on where one is measuring from.[[note]]The [[note]] The drive from Jacksonville, UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} to UsefulNotes/LosAngeles along Interstate 10, the shortest coast-to-coast highway, is 2,460 miles; the drive from UsefulNotes/{{Boston}} to UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} on I-90, the longest, is 3,101 miles.[[/note]] In RealLife, ''anywhere'' in Indiana is at least three hours from Canada by car, and that's just going from the northern extremes of the state to Windsor, Ontario, the closest Canadian city. From Indianapolis, it's closer to five hours, and from Evansville, seven and a half. For anywhere ''of note'' in Canada, tack at least a few more hours on to that.



** A pair of German ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' fans wrote a fic in which Xander and Faith drive from Boston to California in 8 hours.[[note]]The actual drive would take about 46 hours, or almost two days.[[/note]]
** And then there's the story set in rural northern Canada, where the protagonist keeps himself warm through the winter by raiding the local used book store for Harlequin romance novels and by digging through his neighbour's recycling for their old phone books. Putting aside the fact that books don't burn very well, rural northern Canada ''doesn't have'' used book stores, recycling, or large telephone books (some phone "books" up North are the size of magazines). Even if books were a practical fuel for heating, the number of books and other paper products you could scare up within 50 miles would probably keep you warm for two or three ''hours''; you need cubic yards of wood to get through a winter where it gets down to -40 or lower for weeks on end. Did we mention that they were going to pick these books up via car, even though vast areas of northern Canada ''have no roads''?
*** On the other hand, Americans have the whole "but it looks so small on the map!" thing - which ''really'' winds up most people in Europe when they regard the multiple regions of European countries - or even groups of countries - as all one, resulting in the BritainIsOnlyLondon trope. (Actually, most Americans from more thinly populated areas of the US have the same issue when writing about populous areas of their own country, resulting in, say, New York Is Only Manhattan and L.A. Is Only Malibu. It isn't.)

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** A pair of German ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' fans wrote a fic in which Xander and Faith drive from Boston to California in 8 hours.[[note]]The [[note]] The actual drive would take about 46 hours, or almost two days.days. That's nonstop, by the way.[[/note]]
** And then there's the story set in rural northern Canada, where the protagonist keeps himself warm through the winter by raiding the local used book store for Harlequin romance novels and by digging through his neighbour's recycling for their old phone books. Putting aside the fact that books don't burn very well, rural northern Canada ''doesn't have'' used book stores, recycling, or large telephone books (some phone "books" up North are the size of magazines). Even if books were a practical fuel for heating, the number of books and other paper products you could scare up within 50 miles would probably keep you warm for two or three ''hours''; you need cubic yards of wood to get through a winter where it gets down to -40 -40º or lower for weeks on end. Did we mention that they were going to pick these books up via car, even though vast areas of northern Canada ''have no roads''?
*** On the other hand, Americans have the whole "but it looks so small on the map!" thing - which ''really'' winds up most people in Europe when they regard the multiple regions of European countries - or even groups of countries - as all one, resulting in the BritainIsOnlyLondon trope. (Actually, most Americans from more thinly populated areas of the US have the same issue when writing about populous areas of their own country, resulting in, say, New York Is Only Manhattan and L.A. Is Only Malibu. It isn't.They aren't.)



--> '''one of the answers''': Do they even have a ''[[AlternativeCalendar July]]''? [[note]]Yes - at least in the English localization - but there's still no reason for the Fourth of July as we know it to be a holiday in a setting that doesn't have a USA.[[/note]]

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--> '''one of the answers''': Do they even have a ''[[AlternativeCalendar July]]''? [[note]]Yes [[note]] Yes - at least in the English localization - but there's still no reason for the Fourth of July as we know it to be a holiday in a setting that doesn't have a USA.[[/note]]



*** It sadly wasn't. The canon in question? ''NightsIntoDreams''. Which almost completely takes place in a DreamLand.

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*** It sadly wasn't. The canon in question? ''NightsIntoDreams''.''VideoGame/NightsIntoDreams''. Which almost completely takes place in a DreamLand. [[note]] However, the artist wasn't completely ''wrong'' on this one. The main human characters in [=NiGHTS=] aren't Japanese – they have English names, and the waking-world setting is meant to be either explicitly or at least vaguely American. This makes sense considering creator Yuji Naka had just spent years living in the USA. No excuse for [=NiGHTS=] itself though.[[/note]]



** The vast majority of British schools have uniforms. This includes Hogwarts. Most American schools, especially public schools, don't bother with uniforms.

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** The vast majority of British schools have uniforms. This includes Hogwarts. Most American schools, especially public (i.e. state-run) schools, don't bother with uniforms.



** It's easy to get mad at ''MyImmortal'' but this is rather common with Franchise/HarryPotter fanfic written by American fans. The "American exchange student" (or Japanese, for otaku fans) in HP SelfInsertFic could be a trope all its own. It's to the point where some HP roleplaying communities require that all characters be born in the UK or Ireland, not just to keep with the established canon but also to remove this tendency.
* [[http://yourfaveispoc.tumblr.com/ Your Fave Is PoC]], a comm for headcanon races of non-specified or non-human characters, is an interesting idea but almost every headcanon is from an American perspective, resulting in things such as Mexican characters apparently going unremarked in revolution-era France.
* The {{Real Person Fic}}s written by Polish teenage girls and [[{{MST}} sporked]] at [[http://niezatapialna-armada.blogspot.com/ this Polish blog]] tend to embody this to an absurd degree. In the weird world of these fics, Americans such as MileyCyrus go to schools that use the UsefulNotes/PolishEducationalSystem; there they attend Polish classes, then they go back home to talk to their friends via Polish instant messaging clients, and buy stuff on Polish auction websites.
* One Manga/YuGiOh fic that took place in Ancient Egypt had a scene where a royal party is a ball with people dancing in Western-style dances. And the Pharaoh's proposal to his love by kneeling down and holding up a ring.

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** It's easy to get mad at ''MyImmortal'' ''Fanfic/MyImmortal'' but this is rather common with Franchise/HarryPotter ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' fanfic written by American fans. The "American exchange student" (or Japanese, for otaku fans) in HP SelfInsertFic could be a trope all its own. It's to the point where some HP roleplaying communities require that all characters be born in the UK or Ireland, not just to keep with the established canon but also to remove this tendency.
* [[http://yourfaveispoc.tumblr.com/ Your Fave Is PoC]], a comm community for headcanon races of non-specified or non-human characters, is an interesting idea but almost every headcanon is from an American perspective, resulting in things such as Mexican characters apparently going unremarked in revolution-era France.
* The {{Real Person Fic}}s written by Polish teenage girls and [[{{MST}} sporked]] at [[http://niezatapialna-armada.blogspot.com/ this Polish blog]] tend to embody this to an absurd degree. In the weird world of these fics, Americans such as MileyCyrus Creator/MileyCyrus go to schools that use the UsefulNotes/PolishEducationalSystem; there they attend Polish classes, then they go back home to talk to their friends via Polish instant messaging clients, and buy stuff on Polish auction websites.
* One Manga/YuGiOh ''Manga/YuGiOh'' fic that took place in Ancient Egypt had a scene where a royal party is a ball with people dancing in Western-style dances. And the Pharaoh's proposal to his love by kneeling down and holding up a ring.



* Despite being ostensibly an American film, Creator/TimBurton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' (which was shot at London's Pinewood Studios) comes off as British. The Joker holds up a bottle of "moisturi'''s'''ing" shampoo in one scene, and at the end of the film Alfred can be seen driving an automobile whose steering wheel is on the right side.
** That car is however a Rolls Royce Silver Wraith so it's most likely meant to be an import. According to the Internet Movie Database all the other cars in the film are American models with the steering wheel on the left.
* ''Film/BestOfTheBest'': The South-Korean Tae Kwon Do team cheered for their country as "Korea, Korea!", but "Korea" is an exonym. It should've been "Hanguk, Hanguk!" (Korea) or "Daehan Minguk!" (South Korea).

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* Despite being ostensibly an American film, Creator/TimBurton's ''Film/{{Batman}}'' (which ''Film/{{Batman}}'', which was shot at London's Pinewood Studios) Studios, comes off as British. The Joker holds up a bottle of "moisturi'''s'''ing" shampoo in one scene, scene (rather than the American "moisturi'''z'''ing"), and at the end of the film Alfred can be seen driving an automobile whose steering wheel is on the right side.
** That car is however a Rolls Royce Silver Wraith so it's most likely meant to be an import. According to the Internet Movie Database all All the other cars in the film are American models with the steering wheel on the left.
left. [[note]] Right-hand drive cars are perfectly legal to own in the US, and the uber-wealthy occasionally import them unconverted as a status symbol. Cheaper RHD models also find their way over sometimes, usually for use as rural-route postal vehicles (USPS's own mail carrier cars are always RHD).[[/note]]
* ''Film/BestOfTheBest'': The South-Korean Tae Kwon Do South Korean Tae-Kwon-Do team cheered for their country as "Korea, Korea!", but "Korea" is an exonym. It should've been "Hanguk, Hanguk!" (Korea) or "Daehan Minguk!" (South Korea).



* ''Film/TheGreatMuppetCaper'' is pretty good about this. Yes, the take on London is a bit touristy, and all the Muppets who supposedly live there still have the same accents as they did on ''The Muppet Show'' (this also happens in ''Film/TheMuppetChristmasCarol'' and ''Film/MuppetTreasureIsland''). And then Beauregard shows up driving the only yellow cab in the city. It's particularly confusing and distressing for Sam the Eagle, who is an in-universe [[MoralGuardians moral guardian]] who is [[EagleLand deeply patriotic... toward America.]]

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* ''Film/TheGreatMuppetCaper'' is pretty good about this. Yes, the take on London is a bit touristy, and all the Muppets who supposedly live there still have the same accents as they did on ''The Muppet Show'' (this also happens in ''Film/TheMuppetChristmasCarol'' and ''Film/MuppetTreasureIsland''). And then Beauregard shows up driving the only yellow cab in the city. It's particularly confusing and distressing for Sam the Eagle, who is an in-universe [[MoralGuardians moral guardian]] who is [[EagleLand deeply patriotic... toward America.]]America]].



* ''Film/VantagePoint'': It's set in Spain, yet the Secret Service (the U.S. President's bodyguards) are seen seizing cars from the locals, as well as chasing, arresting and ''shooting'' them, even cops. Plenty of wars have started over much less.

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* ''Film/VantagePoint'': It's set in Spain, yet the Secret Service (the U.S. President's bodyguards) are seen seizing cars from the locals, as well as chasing, arresting arresting, and ''shooting'' them, even cops. Plenty of wars have started over much less.



* The original ''Literature/{{Aladdin}}'' is often said to be set in China, as this was the most distant and magical land that most Arabs had heard of. The character's names, the genies and so forth all seem Arabian, however. Almost every single character is a Muslim (except for one Jew), even though Muslims then - as now - made up a ''phenomenally'' small minority in China.

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* The original ''Literature/{{Aladdin}}'' is often said to be set in China, as this was the most distant and magical land that most Arabs had heard of. The character's names, the genies genies, and so forth all seem Arabian, however. Almost every single character is a Muslim (except for one Jew), even though Muslims then - as now - made up a ''phenomenally'' small minority in China. [[note]] A good argument can be made that ''Aladdin'' takes place in East Turkestan, a Muslim area which is today mostly in China (the famously restive Xinjiang province), or possibly somewhere a little farther west on the Silk Road, like Afghanistan or Samarkand.[[/note]]



* It's a minor point, but the American character in Nick Hornby's ''A Long Way Down'' refers to his apartment as a "bedsit," a very British term. It is set in England, so it's possible he just picked up the term, from his real estate agent or neighbours, perhaps.
* DanBrown's ''Literature/AngelsAndDemons'' for some reason has a British camerawoman for the [[Creator/TheBBC British Broadcasting Corporation]] referred to as "African American". Her partner is also allegedly British, but seems to think and speak using an awful lot of American terminology and in an ImagineSpot he likens himself to Dan Rather -- who is almost totally unknown in Britain. Even if the reporter has heard of Rather, if he were really British he would have likened himself to Trevor [=McDonald=].
* ''Literature/ArtemisFowl and the Eternity Code'' has Chicago Police Officers referring to an elevator as a "lift."
* Perhaps the most ridiculous claim about Spain in ''Literature/DigitalFortress'''s long list of gross misrepresentations of Spain, [[DanBrowned also by Dan Brown]], is that cranberry juice is a very popular drink in the country. Not only is cranberry a crop mainly grown and consumed in the United States, Spain is chiefly one of the few European countries where cranberry[[note]]or similar plants like blueberry and bilberry[[/note]] is neither grown nor consumed, nor does the plant [[MisplacedVegetation even grow in the wild there!]]

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* It's a minor point, but the American character in Nick Hornby's ''A Long Way Down'' refers to his apartment as a "bedsit," "bedsit", a very British term. It is set in England, so it's possible he just picked up the term, from his real estate agent or neighbours, perhaps.
* DanBrown's ''Literature/AngelsAndDemons'' for some reason has a British camerawoman for the [[Creator/TheBBC British Broadcasting Corporation]] referred to as "African American". Her partner is also allegedly British, but seems to think and speak using an awful lot of American terminology and in an ImagineSpot he likens himself to Dan Rather -- who is almost totally unknown in Britain. Even if the reporter has heard of Rather, if he were really British he would have likened himself to Trevor [=McDonald=].
[=McDonald=]. [[note]] American reporters are hardwired by their training to '''''always''''' use the term "African American" to refer to any Black person who isn't outright a citizen of an African country (and sometimes even if they are), to avoid causing offense; one could also call it a mild form of PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. Either way, their tendency to do this ''really'' annoys Black Britons/Canadians/etc.[[/note]]
* ''Literature/ArtemisFowl and the Eternity Code'' has Chicago Police Officers referring to an elevator as a "lift."
"lift". [[note]] The term "lift" most definitely exists in America, but it tends to be used for simpler "open" or portable systems (not enclosed cars), like for moving equipment or the disabled a small amount.[[/note]]
* Perhaps the most ridiculous claim about Spain in ''Literature/DigitalFortress'''s long list of gross misrepresentations of Spain, [[DanBrowned also by Dan Brown]], is that cranberry juice is a very popular drink in the country. Not only is cranberry a crop mainly grown and consumed in the United States, but Spain is chiefly one of the few European countries where cranberry[[note]]or cranberry[[note]] (or similar plants like blueberry and bilberry[[/note]] bilberry)[[/note]] is neither grown nor consumed, nor does the plant [[MisplacedVegetation even grow in the wild there!]]



** People refer to "exams" (not "finals").
** The very British "do go through" shows up.

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** People refer to "exams" (not "finals").
"finals"). [[note]] The former term is used for non-finals at US colleges.[[/note]]
** The very British "do go through" shows up.



*** It gets a bit funny in Chapter Nine, when one of Ana's bodyguards, realizing that someone has smashed a lot of furniture and knick-knacks in the hall outside the penthouse elevator, yells, "Code Blue!" In the U.K., that's a common general code for "Emergency!" In America, that's a common ''hospital'' code for "cardiopulmonary arrest."
*** Chapter Ten talks about the villain being "released from hospital." An American would be more likely to say "released from THE hospital." This mistake recurs throughout the book, too. Earlier in that chapter, a bodyguard says the villain will "have an aching skull when he wakes" instead of "...when he wakes UP."
*** In Chapter Thirteen, Ana refers to Grey leading her from the main floor of his Aspen mansion to the first floor. In the U.K., that would be correct. However, in America, the main floor IS the first floor. Ana and Grey would be headed up to the ''second'' floor.
*** In Chapter Fourteen, Ana, her friend Kate Kavanagh, and Ana's sister-in-law Mia all refer to dancing as "throwing some shapes"--which is [[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/throw_shapes Irish slang for both dancing and acting tough]].
* ''Literature/ForWantOfANail'' is an AlternateHistory by American author Robert Sobel that depicts the world after a failed AmericanRevolution. The British government sets up their colonies as the Confederacy of North America, which possesses a parliamentary government. Nonetheless, later on in the book, articles of impeachment are drawn up against this system's equivalent of a Prime Minister [[FridgeLogic despite the earlier confirmed existence of a vote of no confidence.]]

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*** It gets a bit funny in Chapter Nine, when one of Ana's bodyguards, realizing that someone has smashed a lot of furniture and knick-knacks in the hall outside the penthouse elevator, yells, "Code Blue!" Blue!". In the U.K., that's a common general code for "Emergency!" In America, that's a common ''hospital'' code for "cardiopulmonary arrest."
arrest".
*** Chapter Ten talks about the villain being "released from hospital." hospital". An American would be more likely to say "released from THE hospital." hospital". This mistake recurs throughout the book, too. Earlier in that chapter, a bodyguard says the villain will "have an aching skull when he wakes" instead of "...when he wakes UP."
*** In Chapter Thirteen, Ana refers to Grey leading her from the main floor of his Aspen mansion to the first floor. In the U.K., that would be correct. However, in America, the main floor IS the first floor.floor[[labelnote:*]] (exceptions exist, usually if the main entrance is not on the ground floor and the ground floor isn't really a basement)[[/labelnote]]. Ana and Grey would be headed up to the ''second'' floor.
*** In Chapter Fourteen, Ana, her friend Kate Kavanagh, and Ana's sister-in-law Mia all refer to dancing as "throwing some shapes"--which shapes" – which is [[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/throw_shapes Irish slang for both dancing and acting tough]].
tough.]]
* ''Literature/ForWantOfANail'' is an AlternateHistory by American author Robert Sobel that depicts the world after a failed AmericanRevolution. The British government sets up their colonies as the Confederacy of North America, which possesses a parliamentary government. Nonetheless, later on in the book, articles of impeachment are drawn up against this system's equivalent of a Prime Minister [[FridgeLogic despite the earlier confirmed existence of a vote of no confidence.]]confidence]]. [[note]] Could technically still work, as these are two distinct things – a no-confidence vote merely forces a PM to step down; an impeachment, by contrast, is a legal trial presided over by a judge where conviction typically results in the accused being banned from ever holding public office again.[[/note]]



* In his first appearance on ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Spike suffers from a little of this: the phrase '[[CategoryTraitor Uncle Tom]]', although widely used as an insult towards black males in the US, is usually used outside of it only to refer to avuncular male relatives named Thomas. This is justified in that he's been traveling the world for over a hundred years and has spent a considerable portion of that time in the United States. One tends to pick up stuff from other cultures that way. In fact a German newspaper[[note]] Die Tageszeitung, or "taz", very much to the left of the political spectrum[[/note]] got some flak for a title page showing the White House under the headline "Onkel Barack's Hütte" (Uncle Barack's hut), which was intended as a reference to the title of the book (which is well known in Germany) not to the insult, which seems to have been unknown even to the people working at the newspaper
* In the ''CSINewYork'' episode "Unfriendly Chat", Adam slacks at work by chatting with a girl who is [[AlwaysMurder promptly murdered on camera]]. The only clue about where the murder took place is a TV in the background noting what temperature is outside, so the team checks climate reports from all over the world to know what place had that temperature at the time. At no point do they notice that the temperature is marked in Fahrenheit, which is only used in the United States and four small island countries ([[ContrivedCoincidence the murder turns out to have happened in the very same Manhattan]]).

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* In his first appearance on ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Spike suffers from a little of this: the phrase '[[CategoryTraitor Uncle Tom]]', although widely used as an insult towards black males in the US, is usually used outside of it only to refer to avuncular male relatives named Thomas. This is justified in that he's been traveling the world for over a hundred years and has spent a considerable portion of that time in the United States. One tends to pick up stuff from other cultures that way. In fact a German newspaper[[note]] Die Tageszeitung, or "taz", very much to the left of the political spectrum[[/note]] got some flak for a title page showing the White House under the headline "Onkel Barack's Hütte" (Uncle Barack's hut), which was intended as a reference to the title of the book (which is well known in Germany) not to the insult, which seems to have been unknown even to the people working at the newspaper
newspaper.
* In the ''CSINewYork'' ''Series/CSINewYork'' episode "Unfriendly Chat", Adam slacks at work by chatting with a girl who is [[AlwaysMurder promptly murdered on camera]]. The only clue about where the murder took place is a TV in the background noting what temperature is outside, so the team checks climate reports from all over the world to know what place had that temperature at the time. At no point do they notice that the temperature is marked in Fahrenheit, which is only used in the United States and four small island countries ([[ContrivedCoincidence the murder turns out to have happened in the very same Manhattan]]). [[note]] Some American news sources geared towards jet-setters give weather reports for various world cities using Fahrenheit; they may or may not also give the metric equivalent that would actually be used in those places.[[/note]]



* The ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' series of games is, in theory, set in America, but is made by Scottish developer DMA Design/Rockstar North; Americans who play it can tell this is neither real America nor quite [[EagleLand Hollywood America.]] A lot of place-names in San Andreas are thinly-disguised ones from Scottish cities, and there's even an exact replica of the Forth Rail Bridge. Rockstar are based in Edinburgh and Dundee, and evidently like their CreatorProvincialism in-jokes.

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* The ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' series of games is, in theory, set in America, but is made by Scottish developer DMA Design/Rockstar North; Americans who play it can tell this is neither real America nor quite [[EagleLand Hollywood America.]] America]]. A lot of place-names in San Andreas are thinly-disguised ones from Scottish cities, and there's even an exact replica of the Forth Rail Bridge. Rockstar are based in Edinburgh and Dundee, and evidently like their CreatorProvincialism in-jokes.



* The ''Franchise/HarvestMoon'' games are apparently set in Europe or America, but the characters retain certain Japanese mannerisms such as bowing, a lot of the characters love Japanese foods, and some of the plants are native to Japan. The fact Muffy from ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'' is having severe difficulties keeping a man due to [[ChristmasCake being 30]] is [[ValuesDissonance confusing]] in a western setting.

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* The ''Franchise/HarvestMoon'' games are apparently set in Europe or America, but the characters retain certain Japanese mannerisms such as bowing, a lot of the characters love Japanese foods, and some of the plants are native to Japan. The fact Muffy from ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'' is having severe difficulties keeping a man due to [[ChristmasCake being 30]] is [[ValuesDissonance confusing]] confusing in a western setting.setting]].



* While ''VideoGame/ObsCure'' is set in an American high school, it was made by a French developer, and it shows. Metric measurements are frequently used in place of UsefulNotes/AmericanCustomaryMeasurements, the parking lot has a large bike shed (most American schools have, at most, a small rack to park bicycles), dates are rendered in the form of "DD/MM" rather than the "MM/DD" format used in the US, British spellings are employed frequently, and a notice makes reference to the "Ministry of Health" (the US' equivalent is the ''Department'' of Health and Human Services). On top of that, one of the calendars still has the French names for the months of the year (octobre, janvier, avril), though that could just be something that the translators overlooked. If it weren't for the American flag in the gymnasium, one might guess that the game took place in Quebec rather than the US.
* Raccoon City in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil3Nemesis'' is a supposed to be a modern, Midwestern, American city, but the size of the streets and presence of extensive back-alleys and shopping arcades are clear evidence that Raccoon was based on a contemporary Japanese city. For reference, many of the streets are blocked by a single, longitudinal car across the road. In America, the only roads that narrow are called "back alleys". Further games in the series that revisit Raccoon City, however, seem to retcon them to a more American layout.

to:

* While ''VideoGame/ObsCure'' is set in an American high school, it was made by a French developer, and it shows. Metric measurements are frequently used in place of UsefulNotes/AmericanCustomaryMeasurements, the parking lot has a large bike shed (most American schools have, at most, a small rack to park bicycles), dates are rendered in the form of "DD/MM" rather than the "MM/DD" format used in the US, U.S., British spellings are employed frequently, and a notice makes reference to the "Ministry of Health" (the US' U.S. equivalent is the ''Department'' of Health and Human Services). On top of that, one of the calendars still has the French names for the months of the year (octobre, janvier, avril), though that could just be something that the translators overlooked. If it weren't for the American flag in the gymnasium, one might guess assume that the game took place in Quebec rather than the US.
U.S.
* Raccoon City in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil3Nemesis'' is a supposed to be a modern, Midwestern, modern Midwestern American city, but the size of the streets and presence of extensive back-alleys alleys and shopping arcades are clear evidence that Raccoon was based on a contemporary Japanese city. For reference, many of the streets are blocked by a single, single longitudinal car across the road. In America, the only roads that narrow are called "back alleys". alleys", and you're not likely to see them outside of the downtown cores of larger older cities. Further games in the series that revisit Raccoon City, however, seem to retcon them it to a more American layout.



** There is a very mild--and entirely justified (though not [[JustifiedTrope Justified]])--version of this by having the police be run and funded by the city government. On one hand, this just isn't true in many places, where either the national (as in France) or state/provincial/what have you government (as in Germany) is responsible for the police. On the other hand, this is ''VideoGame/SimCity'' we're talking about. ''What'' national government? [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder Simnation's,]] [[MathematiciansAnswer of course]].

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** There is a very mild--and mild – and entirely justified (though not [[JustifiedTrope Justified]])--version Justified]]) – version of this by having the police be run and funded by the city government. On the one hand, this just isn't true in many places, where either the national (as in France) or state/provincial/what have you state/provincial/what-have-you government (as in Germany) is responsible for the police. On the other hand, this is ''VideoGame/SimCity'' we're talking about. ''What'' national government? [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder Simnation's,]] Simnation's]], [[MathematiciansAnswer of course]].



* Having been made in the UK, all the cars in ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters: Future Perfect'' have their steering wheels on the right side. However, one of the missions takes place in Russia, where cars should have their steering wheels on the left side.

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* Having been made in the UK, all the cars in ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters: Future Perfect'' have their steering wheels on the right side. However, one of the missions takes place in Russia, where cars should have their steering wheels on the left side. [[note]] It's actually fairly common to see right-hand-drive cars in the Russian Far East due to its proximity to Japan. Japanese import vehicles are easier to obtain (thus cheaper) and more reliable than domestic models. A move by Moscow to ban them led to protests.[[/note]]



* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'' set in Australia featured a sign in miles (not kilometres), and a character with a thick "Australian" accent talking about putting something up in aluminum (not alumin''ium'' as any Australian would say).
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' is made in Europe, mostly London, but set in the United States--Elmore is eventually shown to occupy the space that is taken up in real life by Vallejo, California (the place where most of the show's [[MediumBlending photographic backgrounds]] come from). It's convincing enough that the majority of ''American'' viewers don't notice this, but several things slip by, mostly background details like cars sometimes driving on the left or signs using British word spellings.

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'' set in Australia featured a sign in miles (not kilometres), rather than kilometres[[labelnote:*]] (Australia metricated in the late-70s, and usage of Imperial measurements is banned there)[[/labelnote]], and a character with a thick "Australian" accent talking about putting something up in aluminum (not alumin''ium'' alumin'''''i'''''um as any Australian would say).
say).
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' is made in Europe, mostly London, but set in the United States--Elmore States – Elmore is eventually shown to occupy the space that is taken up in real life by Vallejo, California (the place where most of the show's [[MediumBlending photographic backgrounds]] come from). It's convincing enough that the majority of ''American'' viewers don't notice this, but several things slip by, mostly background details like cars sometimes driving on the left or signs using British word spellings.
8th May '16 7:17:13 AM dmeagher13
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* ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'' takes place in a human settlement on an alien planet. Despite the fact it is New Los Angeles and most characters are American you can see weather in Celsius and characters bow to each other.

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* ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'' takes place in a human settlement on an alien planet. Despite the fact it is New Los Angeles and most characters are American you can [[TheMetricSystemIsHereToStay see weather in Celsius Celsius]] and characters bow to each other.
29th Apr '16 11:50:39 AM MichaelKatsuro
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Added DiffLines:

* In Manga/BlackButler, there's a scene where Sieglinde Sullivan inflates her cheeks to show she's annoyed, even though a European like her wouldn't be familiar with that Japanese custom.
28th Apr '16 3:58:24 PM Kid
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*** On the other hand, Americans have the whole "but it looks so small on the map!" thing - which ''really'' winds up most people in Europe when they regard the multiple regions of European countries- or even groups of countries - as all one, resulting in the BritainIsOnlyLondon trope. (Actually, most Americans from more thinly populated areas of the US have the same issue when writing about populous areas of their own country, resulting in, say, New York Is Only Manhattan and L.A. Is Only Malibu. It isn't.)

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*** On the other hand, Americans have the whole "but it looks so small on the map!" thing - which ''really'' winds up most people in Europe when they regard the multiple regions of European countries- countries - or even groups of countries - as all one, resulting in the BritainIsOnlyLondon trope. (Actually, most Americans from more thinly populated areas of the US have the same issue when writing about populous areas of their own country, resulting in, say, New York Is Only Manhattan and L.A. Is Only Malibu. It isn't.)
28th Apr '16 3:49:15 PM Kid
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* Parodied in the troll fic ''FanFiction/LightandDarkTheAdventuresofDarkYagami'' as it only says America, and even the city is "Light's City"

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* Parodied in the troll fic ''FanFiction/LightandDarkTheAdventuresofDarkYagami'' ''FanFiction/LightAndDarkTheAdventuresOfDarkYagami'' as it only says America, and even the city is "Light's City"
17th Apr '16 10:48:35 PM Adept
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* In ''ComicBook/WonderWoman'' Vol 4 #50, a young boy in England, who's father died of cancer, is worried about how his mum would pay the medical bills. Nobody in the UK who was uncertain about how they can pay their medical bills would bother incurring any; going private is a choice.

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* In ''ComicBook/WonderWoman'' Vol 4 #50, a young boy in England, who's whose father died of cancer, is worried about how his mum would pay the medical bills. Nobody in the UK who was uncertain about how they can pay their medical bills would bother incurring any; going private is a choice.
17th Apr '16 10:17:45 PM Adept
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* In about every AU fanfiction where [[EveryoneWentToSchoolTogether the characters go to the same school]], the school is very American. They use lockers, which most countries only have for the gym class, they change classes and friends get to meet only in some subjects. In most countries all the students stay in the same class for all the time with the same people, they rarely carry books in their backpacks, they carry binders, etc. It's not a big problem until it's mentioned that characters wear SailorFuku. Or they're students at [[Franchise/HarryPotter Hogwarts]].
** Most American high schools don't even use lockers. Passing periods are never long enough and lockers are generally in inconvenient places.
** Most Japanese schools don't have proms either, instead they have Sport or Cultural Festivals. Group dancing may involve in those events but no prom or homecoming dance.
** Justified in the ''Series/DoctorWho fanfic Fanfic/ThisTimeRound'' HighSchoolAU setting "Then Do That Over", in which the school is established as ''changing'', more or less at random, so that sometimes it's TheGoodOldBritishComp, sometimes it's an American HighSchool, and sometimes it's got elements of both (and a bit of BoardingSchool as well). Since the whole TTR setting is a MetaFic with NoFourthWall, it's specifically noted by the characters that this is based on whatever the writers are familiar with.
9th Apr '16 6:04:58 PM HowlingSnail
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Added DiffLines:

* Happens a lot on this very wiki.
6th Apr '16 2:52:43 PM thatother1dude
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[[folder:Magazines]]
* An article in ''Writer's Digest'' describes a literary street map as featuring "more than 600 British classics" including ''Literature/CatcherInTheRye'' and ''Literature/LakeWobegonDays''. (The [[https://www.wearedorothy.com/shop/book-map-original-open-edition actual map]] includes many other non-British titles.)
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WeAllLiveInAmerica