History Main / TwoLinesNoWaiting

22nd Apr '17 8:59:44 PM nombretomado
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* ''SurvivalOfTheFittest''. One for [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters every. Last. Character.]] Of course, there are intersections, but essentially every character has their own story. Some of the time, these stories are ''part'' of ''another'' character's story.

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* ''SurvivalOfTheFittest''.''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest''. One for [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters every. Last. Character.]] Of course, there are intersections, but essentially every character has their own story. Some of the time, these stories are ''part'' of ''another'' character's story.
7th Apr '17 7:37:23 AM MyFinalEdits
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** Actually, you get to the see the endings in the very first episode. It's just that none of it makes any sense until the rest of the series puts it in context.
* An episode of ''Anime/YuGiOh'' from early season 2 had gone through this in the form of a DayInTheLimelight episode. The A Story focused on [[TheRival Kaiba]] learning about his and Yugi's collective pasts in Ancient Egypt, while the B story focused on [[BreakTheCutie Yugi lamenting about his near-death experience in the previous episode, fearing that he would lose his other self forever]] [[{{Bowdlerise}} (or in the dub, feeling anxious about facing Marik)]].
** The rest of Season 2 qualifies as well, with the A Story being Yugi facing the Rare Hunters and uncovering Marik's plan, while the B Story focuses on Jonouchi coming into his own as a duelist without Yugi's help. The two plots converge when Marik has Jonouchi kidnapped and [[BrainwashedAndCrazy mind-controlled]] to duel Yugi.

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* ''Anime/YuGiOh'':
** Actually, you get to the see the endings in the very first episode. It's just that none of it makes any sense until the rest of the series puts it in context.
*
An episode of ''Anime/YuGiOh'' from early season 2 had gone goes through this in the form of a DayInTheLimelight episode. The A Story focused focuses on [[TheRival Kaiba]] learning about his and Yugi's collective pasts in Ancient Egypt, while the B story focused focuses on [[BreakTheCutie Yugi lamenting about his near-death experience in the previous episode, fearing that he would lose his other self forever]] [[{{Bowdlerise}} (or in the dub, feeling anxious about facing Marik)]].
** The rest of Season 2 qualifies as well, with has the A Story being Yugi facing the Rare Hunters and uncovering Marik's plan, while the B Story focuses on Jonouchi coming into his own as a duelist without Yugi's help. The two plots converge when Marik has Jonouchi kidnapped and [[BrainwashedAndCrazy mind-controlled]] to duel Yugi.



* The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' ''Best Wishes'' anime series has done this, with the Team Rocket trio occasionally stopping their usual pursuit of Ash's group and instead operating a long-term mission elsewhere. Their plotline progresses while Ash's does, and eventually the two merge together for a finish.
** Ash didn't meet Dawn and Serena right away in the Sinnoh and Kalos arcs respectively. The first few episodes of each partially focused on the start of the girls' journeys.

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* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' ''Best Wishes'' anime series has done this, with the Team Rocket trio occasionally stopping their usual pursuit of Ash's group and instead operating a long-term mission elsewhere. Their plotline progresses while Ash's does, and eventually the two merge together for a finish.
** Ash didn't doesn't meet Dawn and Serena right away in the Sinnoh and Kalos arcs respectively. The first few episodes of each partially focused focus on the start of the girls' journeys.



** In ''[[LightNovel/DotHackAIBuster AI Buster]]'', the depiction of the infamous "One Sin" event that keeps getting referenced everywhere else in the series is the subplot.

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** * In ''[[LightNovel/DotHackAIBuster AI Buster]]'', ''LightNovel/DotHackAIBuster'', the depiction of the infamous "One Sin" event that keeps getting referenced everywhere else in the series is the subplot.



** Unfortunately, its [[ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis follow-up]] was...[[KudzuPlot not so tightly crafted.]]



* ''Fanfic/WithStringsAttached'' tells two parallel stories: that of the four and their adventures on a variety of worlds, and that of the Fans who put them in this situation and who are watching/commenting on/empowering/manipulating them. The two lines are semi-separate (the Fans are aware of the four, but not vice-versa) until the end of the Second Movement, when the Fans speak directly to the four for the first time. The threads intersect a few more times in the book but mostly remain separate.
** There are also several chapters, notably the New Zork chapter, where the four get split up and have individual adventures, or which focus on only one of the four.

to:

* ''Fanfic/WithStringsAttached'' tells two parallel stories: that of the four and their adventures on a variety of worlds, and that of the Fans who put them in this situation and who are watching/commenting on/empowering/manipulating them. The two lines are semi-separate (the Fans are aware of the four, but not vice-versa) until the end of the Second Movement, when the Fans speak directly to the four for the first time. The threads intersect a few more times in the book but mostly remain separate.
**
separate. There are also several chapters, notably the New Zork chapter, where the four get split up and have individual adventures, or which focus on only one of the four.



* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is a particularly strong example of it. In the first book, it starts with three plots - basically one following Eddard Stark, one following Jon Snow, and the third following Daenerys. Over the course of the first book the characters end up getting really spread out and by the second book there are a huge number of interwoven plots, plus Daenerys who has spawned no other point of view characters and has really had minimal interaction with the rest of the cast. The plot is incredibly convoluted with dozens of characters and more than a dozen different point of view characters. Of course, given that Daenerys has gotten so much time, and yet is on the other side of an ocean, we all know something very important is going to happen with her in the last book...

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is a particularly strong example of it. ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
**
In the first book, it starts with three plots - basically one following Eddard Stark, one following Jon Snow, and the third following Daenerys. Over the course of the first book the characters end up getting really spread out and by the second book there are a huge number of interwoven plots, plus Daenerys who has spawned no other point of view characters and has really had minimal interaction with the rest of the cast. The plot is incredibly convoluted with dozens of characters and more than a dozen different point of view characters. Of course, given that Daenerys has gotten so much time, and yet is on the other side of an ocean, we all know something very important is going to happen with her in the last book...



* Creator/MercedesLackey - in her ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms]]'' trilogy, the main plot gets interwoven with machiavellian scheming in a distant and uber-powerful empire. The B plot gives the readers insight into one of the major characters as well as answering several questions that any smart reader would be asking and couldn't be properly answered any other way.
** Same with ''Literature/TheObsidianTrilogy'', which has the main plot with the main characters and another equally important plot happening back in the city.

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* Creator/MercedesLackey - in her ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms]]'' trilogy, the main plot gets interwoven with machiavellian scheming in a distant and uber-powerful empire. The B plot gives the readers insight into one of the major characters as well as answering several questions that any smart reader would be asking and couldn't be properly answered any other way.
**
way. Same goes with ''Literature/TheObsidianTrilogy'', which has the main plot with the main characters and another equally important plot happening back in the city.



** This is done less impressively in the multi-author ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'' series. It's loosely based on ''Literature/TheOdyssey'', with Luke and his son exploring strange places and meeting exotic force-using organizations. But, there's also a murder trial, a power struggle between the government and the Jedi Order, a conspiracy right out of [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare's]] ''Julius Caesar'', a little girl ChosenOne who gets into trouble, and a big sub-plot about slavery. [[OnceanEpisode Each book shows]] some Jedi falling into a paranoid psychosis and causing trouble. Can you remember all of these?... Well, the authors have ignored the investigation into Jacen for a new plot involving an EldritchAbomination for several books (though they still visit strange places/groups), and a group of Jedi got sent out to fight slavery, only to be ignored the next book.

to:

** This is done less impressively in the * The multi-author ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'' series. It's loosely based on ''Literature/TheOdyssey'', with Luke and his son exploring strange places and meeting exotic force-using organizations. But, there's also a murder trial, a power struggle between the government and the Jedi Order, a conspiracy right out of [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare's]] ''Julius Caesar'', a little girl ChosenOne who gets into trouble, and a big sub-plot about slavery. [[OnceanEpisode Each book shows]] some Jedi falling into a paranoid psychosis and causing trouble. Can you remember all of these?... Well, the authors have ignored the investigation into Jacen for a new plot involving an EldritchAbomination for several books (though they still visit strange places/groups), and a group of Jedi got sent out to fight slavery, only to be ignored the next book.



* Brandon Sanderson's ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'' series. The first book starts with Kelsier, Vin, and Elend as viewpoint characters. When their plots diverge, each of them tends to be given a chapter at a time, which helps things move smoothly along. The even spread of viewpoints chapter-by-chapter becomes very noticeable by book three when several secondary characters have become viewpoint characters and they all have their own plots.
** This is also present in his book ''The Way of Kings,'' where he has multiple parts in the book, and around 3 viewpoints per part. Each of these has their own storyline.

to:

* Brandon Sanderson's ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'' series. The first book starts with Kelsier, Vin, and Elend as viewpoint characters. When their plots diverge, each of them tends to be given a chapter at a time, which helps things move smoothly along. The even spread of viewpoints chapter-by-chapter becomes very noticeable by book three when several secondary characters have become viewpoint characters and they all have their own plots.
**
plots. This is also present in his book ''The Way of Kings,'' where he has multiple parts in the book, and around 3 viewpoints per part. Each of these has their own storyline.



* The most obvious examples would have to be ''Series/FantasyIsland'' and ''Series/TheLoveBoat'', each of which juggled three or more plotlines per episode. In fact, the plotlines even had separate titles in the credits, and usually different writers!
** In fact, when it was offered up in syndication, ''Series/FantasyIsland'' had two formats, the original one hour episodes as well as an EditedForSyndication half hour format featuring only one story and Roarke's opening greeting "My dear guests, I am Mr Roarke, your host" dubbed to "My dear guest, I am Mr Roarke, your host".
* This device is used in the various ''Series/{{CSI}}'' shows (although much more often in the original than the spinoffs), and others in the current crop.
** Occasionally the characters will find out halfway through the episode that the [[WorkingTheSameCase crimes they are investigating are tied together.]] Some episodes pull this off better than others.

to:

* The most obvious examples would have to be ''Series/FantasyIsland'' and ''Series/TheLoveBoat'', each of which juggled juggles three or more plotlines per episode. In fact, the plotlines even had have separate titles in the credits, and usually different writers!
**
writers. In fact, when it was offered up in syndication, ''Series/FantasyIsland'' the series had two formats, the original one hour episodes as well as an EditedForSyndication half hour format featuring only one story and Roarke's opening greeting "My dear guests, I am Mr Roarke, your host" dubbed to "My dear guest, I am Mr Roarke, your host".
%%* ''Series/TheLoveBoat''
* This device is used in the various ''Series/{{CSI}}'' shows (although much more often in the original than the spinoffs), and others in the current crop.
**
crop. Occasionally the characters will find out halfway through the episode that the [[WorkingTheSameCase crimes they are investigating are tied together.]] Some episodes pull this off better than others.



* ''Series/{{Elementary}}'' works and develops its story arc and characters this way.
** Even exposed in the [[WordOfGod writer's twitter]] as we can see [[https://twitter.com/ELEMENTARYStaff/status/351808007094550529 here]].
* ''Series/{{House}}'' often has this (particularly in the last few seasons), where plot A is the current medical drama and there's usually one or two sub-plots concerning House messing with his team and/or Wilson and/or Cuddy (or vice versa). Less frequently, an episode would have two medical plots: one case involving the entire team, and another that House would solve on his own.
** The second was more common in the first few seasons where House would have a minor recurring clinic case that would often provide him with the inspiration to solve to main case.
** "One Day, One Room" is a particularly good example of this trope, as it has no medical mystery. Instead, it follows House treating a pregnant rape victim who refuses an abortion, while Cameron tries to help a dying homeless man who refuses treatment.
* Very common in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' spin-offs. ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'''s early seasons suffered badly from a sense that the writers felt ''obligated'' to have multiple plotlines, and events that should have been the centerpiece of an entire episode were relegated to the BStory (''e.g.'', the re-introduction of the Romulans). Through the remainder of the series there was usually one plot line where the Enterprise was in danger even if it only came up in a few scenes.
** The most {{egregious}} example coming from a ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Silent Enemy." The A plot is a strong, tense plot where the Enterprise is face with an enemy that outclasses their ship in every way. The ship is boarded, lives are lost, and in order to even survive, the Enterprise has to risk blowing half the ship apart. The B plot is centered around Hoshi finding out Reed's favorite food. HilarityEnsues, despite, you know, the ''ship endangering crisis'' going on. Needless to say, the A plot is horribly undermined by the thematic discontinuity, and gross stupidity, of the B plot.
** This structure was used in basically ''every'' episode of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', with the notable exception of [[GrowingTheBeard the late-first-season episode]] "Duet".

to:

* ''Series/{{Elementary}}'' works and develops its story arc and characters this way. \n** Even exposed in the [[WordOfGod writer's twitter]] as we can see [[https://twitter.com/ELEMENTARYStaff/status/351808007094550529 here]].
* ''Series/{{House}}'' ''Series/{{House}}'':
** The series
often has this (particularly in the last few seasons), where plot A is the current medical drama and there's usually one or two sub-plots concerning House messing with his team and/or Wilson and/or Cuddy (or vice versa). Less frequently, an episode would have two medical plots: one case involving the entire team, and another that House would solve on his own.
**
own. The second was type becomes more common in the first few seasons where House would have has a minor recurring clinic case that would often provide provides him with the inspiration to solve to main case.
** "One Day, One Room" is a particularly good example of this trope, as it has no medical mystery. Instead, it follows House treating a pregnant rape victim who refuses an abortion, while Cameron tries to help a dying homeless man who refuses treatment.
* Very common in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' spin-offs. spin-offs.
**
''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'''s early seasons suffered badly from a sense that the writers felt ''obligated'' to have multiple plotlines, and events that should have been the centerpiece of an entire episode were relegated to the BStory (''e.g.'', the re-introduction of the Romulans). Through the remainder of the series there was usually one plot line where the Enterprise was in danger even if it only came up in a few scenes.
** The most {{egregious}} example coming from a ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Silent Enemy." The A plot is a strong, tense plot where the Enterprise is face with an enemy that outclasses their ship in every way. The ship is boarded, lives are lost, and in order to even survive, the Enterprise has to risk blowing half the ship apart. The B plot is centered around Hoshi finding out Reed's favorite food. HilarityEnsues, despite, you know, the ''ship endangering crisis'' going on. Needless to say, the A plot is horribly undermined by the thematic discontinuity, and gross stupidity, of the B plot.
** This structure was used is seen in basically ''every'' episode of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', with the notable exception of [[GrowingTheBeard the late-first-season episode]] "Duet".



* In its first season, ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' did a very interesting bit with this in the long-[[StoryArc arc]] scenario. It has multiple long arcs -- Nikki/[[FanNickname Ikkin]], Petrelli Bros., The Bennets, Hiro's Quest, and Sylar (roughly) -- with an encapsulating long-arc. Each sub-arc gets some screen time every episode, with the emphasis (length) shifting from arc to arc. Fascinating bit of juggling.
** Less obvious is the title names for each episode. They're metaphoric and (usually) can apply to any and all events that occur in a single episode.
** Later seasons tried similar juggling, but [[KudzuPlot balls got dropped]], and things [[RandomEventsPlot sprang out of nowhere]] and ''didn't'' always connect to the other threads, and it generally exemplified how to ''not'' do this. The last season got back on track (though not ''quite'' as adept - there wasn't room for ''everything'' to prove terribly important, and characters went absent longer than they would in S1, but it was a marked improvement.) but not in time to save the show.

to:

* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'':
**
In its first season, ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' did the series does a very interesting bit with this in the long-[[StoryArc arc]] scenario. It has multiple long arcs -- Nikki/[[FanNickname Ikkin]], Petrelli Bros., The Bennets, Hiro's Quest, and Sylar (roughly) -- with an encapsulating long-arc. Each sub-arc gets some screen time every episode, with the emphasis (length) shifting from arc to arc. Fascinating bit of juggling.
**
Less obvious is the title names for each episode. They're metaphoric and (usually) can apply to any and all events that occur in a single episode.
** Later seasons tried similar juggling, but [[KudzuPlot balls got dropped]], and things [[RandomEventsPlot sprang out of nowhere]] and ''didn't'' always connect to the other threads, and it generally exemplified how to ''not'' do this. threads. The last season got back on track (though not ''quite'' as adept - there wasn't room for ''everything'' to prove terribly important, and characters went absent longer than they would in S1, but it was a marked improvement.) improvement), but not in time to save the show.



* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' does a variant on this pretty much every episode: one {{Backstory}}-revealing plot told in a series of {{FlashBack}}s, usually thematically related to the primary "present day" plot.
** And now in the fifth season, the flashbacks are gone and instead the episodes are split between the group of people on the island and the Oceanic Six.
*** The second half went back to the flashback format, but abandoned the "two present day stories" for, at-episode 10, 12, and 13 were centered on only a single plotline, 11 only featured a brief scene from another, and 14's b plot was only a few scenes at the start and end.

to:

* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' ''Series/{{Lost}}'':
** The series
does a variant on this pretty much in every episode: one {{Backstory}}-revealing plot told in a series of {{FlashBack}}s, usually thematically related to the primary "present day" plot.
** And now in
plot. By the first half of the fifth season, the flashbacks are gone and instead the episodes are split between the group of people on the island and the Oceanic Six.
***
Six. The second half went back to retrieves the flashback format, but abandoned abandons the "two present day stories" for, at-episode 10, 12, and 13 were are centered on only a single plotline, 11 only featured features a brief scene from another, and 14's b plot was is only a few scenes at the start and end.



** ''Lost'' might actually be a better example of ThirdLineSomeWaiting, as there was almost always a secondary subplot going on, in addition to the spotlight character's plot-lines on the Island and in flashbacks.
* ''Series/NorthernExposure'' typically had three or four plotlines per episode.
* ''Series/TheBill'' often does this.

to:

** ''Lost'' might actually be a better example of ThirdLineSomeWaiting, as there was almost always a secondary subplot going on, in addition to the spotlight character's plot-lines on the Island and in flashbacks.
* ''Series/NorthernExposure'' typically had has three or four plotlines per episode.
* %%* ''Series/TheBill'' often does this.



** This really hurt some of the more dramatic episodes near the middle of the series' run. "My Lunch" is a commonly lauded episode with a high drama factor. The A plot deals with organ transplants to several patients, almost all of whom won't survive without immediate surgery. The B plot consists of [[MoodWhiplash Carla and Elliot trying to convince Todd that he should admit to being gay, leading to him harassing both male and female characters from that point on.]]

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** This really hurt some of the more dramatic episodes near the middle of the series' run. "My Lunch" is a commonly lauded episode with has a high drama factor. The A plot deals with organ transplants to several patients, almost all of whom won't survive without immediate surgery. The B plot consists of [[MoodWhiplash Carla and Elliot trying to convince Todd that he should admit to being gay, leading to him harassing both male and female characters from that point on.]]



* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' did this quite often, usually preferring the three-storyline model. The relationships between the characters allowed some fluidity in the pairings.

to:

* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' did does this quite often, usually preferring the three-storyline model. The relationships between the characters allowed some fluidity in the pairings.



** Two-story episodes were still common, though: "The One with the Routine" had Monica, Ross, Joey, and guest character Janine in Plot A, with Chandler, Phoebe, and Rachel in Plot B; "The One with the Blackout" had Chandler by himself in Story B, while everybody else was in Story A.

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** Two-story episodes were still common, though: "The One with the Routine" had Monica, Ross, Joey, and guest character Janine in Plot A, with Chandler, Phoebe, and Rachel in Plot B; "The One with the Blackout" had Chandler by himself in Story B, while everybody else was in Story A.



* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' works this trope similarly to ''Series/{{Friends}}''. The A Story usually runs through Ted, while the B Story tends to involve the stable couple of Marshall and Lily. Barney and Robin sometimes end up in their own plotlines, but are more often part of the A Story or B Story.

to:

* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' works this trope similarly to ''Series/{{Friends}}''. ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
**
The A Story usually runs through Ted, while the B Story tends to involve the stable couple of Marshall and Lily. Barney and Robin sometimes end up in their own plotlines, but are more often part of the A Story or B Story.



* ''Series/CornerGas'' has two or three storylines per episode, which is merely one of the reasons it's often compared to ''Seinfeld''. Its larger main cast (more than four) divides up pretty evenly among the storylines. This is most interesting when the divvying of the storylines ''doesn't'' happen according to the common pattern (the two police officers, the old married couple, the gas station workers--Hank functions as a wildcard, who may have his own storyline like a Good Hair Day).

to:

* ''Series/CornerGas'' ''Series/CornerGas'':
** The series
has two or three storylines per episode, which is merely one of the reasons it's often compared to ''Seinfeld''. Its larger main cast (more than four) divides up pretty evenly among the storylines. This is most interesting when the divvying of the storylines ''doesn't'' happen according to the common pattern (the two police officers, the old married couple, the gas station workers--Hank functions as a wildcard, who may have his own storyline like a Good Hair Day).



** A rare case of a show being submarined by its own TruthInTelevision: the Da Vinci character was based on real-life Vancouver mayor Larry Campbell.



* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'': The majority of the episodes have this structure. Typically, there's the main A plot and the secondary B plot, one of them focusing on Frasier and the other on one of the four other major characters. The main plot isn't necessarily about Frasier, though: Niles especially gets plenty of A plots as his character becomes more rounded.

to:

* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'': ''Series/{{Frasier}}'':
**
The majority of the episodes have this structure. Typically, there's the main A plot and the secondary B plot, one of them focusing on Frasier and the other on one of the four other major characters. The main plot isn't necessarily about Frasier, though: Niles especially gets plenty of A plots as his character becomes more rounded.



** To be fair, Grey's hasn't been on the air as long as Scrubs. The plot device didn't feel all that contrived on Scrubs in the earlier seasons. Scrubs even pointed out when Grey's started losing the edge too and going for the broader aesops with a little bit of a TakeThat.



* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' usually begins with the gang getting to an argument and then splitting off into two or three groups with different objectives as the result of the argument, which form the plots of the episode.
** The entire concept is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] mercilessly in "The Gang Exploit the Mortgage Crisis" which begins with Dee and Frank explaining their individual schemes and the rest of the gang actually voting on which plot they want to be a part of.

to:

* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' usually begins with the gang getting to an argument and then splitting off into two or three groups with different objectives as the result of the argument, which form the plots of the episode.
**
episode. The entire concept is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] mercilessly in "The Gang Exploit the Mortgage Crisis" which begins with Dee and Frank explaining their individual schemes and the rest of the gang actually voting on which plot they want to be a part of.



** In ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'', the A plot is about Riley, Maya, Farkle, and Lucas and the B plot about Topanga and Auggie; Cory could be in either one or both.

to:

** * In ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'', the A plot is about Riley, Maya, Farkle, and Lucas and the B plot about Topanga and Auggie; Cory could be in either one or both.



* Disk 3 of ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' has the party forced to split up. The plot then follows: Cooke and Mack as they attempt to follow the Aurora Borealis, Kaim and Sarah as they try to stop the kids from getting in too much trouble, Seth and [[spoiler: Tolten]] being warped to Uhra and meeting up with [[spoiler: Sed]], Jansen and Ming stuck on a train that's becoming an icy coffin. Despite being split four ways, the story doesn't suffer. It's arguably one of the most enjoyable parts, story-wise, because every party member gets their moment in the limelight. They are all [[spoiler: reunited at the end of Disk 3.]]

to:

* Disk 3 of ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' has the party forced to split up. The plot then follows: Cooke and Mack as they attempt to follow the Aurora Borealis, Kaim and Sarah as they try to stop the kids from getting in too much trouble, Seth and [[spoiler: Tolten]] being warped to Uhra and meeting up with [[spoiler: Sed]], Jansen and Ming stuck on a train that's becoming an icy coffin. Despite being split four ways, the story doesn't suffer. It's arguably one of the most enjoyable parts, story-wise, because every Every party member gets their moment in the limelight. They are all [[spoiler: reunited at the end of Disk 3.]]



* ''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic'' is entirely made up of B storylines! There's no main plot, except for crossover between plots, so at any given moment there's seventeen different stories going on simultaneously (plus the Miscellaneous theme, which doesn't have a coherent plot or characters), although of late the primary ones are Steve & Terry, Fantasy, Space, and Cliffhangers, with secondary (but still important!) ones being Series/MythBusters and Scientific Revolution. And something's happening with the Shakespeare theme, and I guess the Nigerian Finance Minister and Pirates are still out there somewhere... Anyway, with so many themes, there are frequent crossovers; at one time, ''fourteen'' of the different themes converged for the destruction of the universe! (not included were Miscellaneous, which doesn't have a storyline; Supers and Espionage, which exist in a totally separate continuity (OK, so there were a couple of Espionage crossovers, but for the most part it's separate!); and Scientific Revolution, which is a relatively new theme.)
** Oddly enough, the Me theme was originally self-contained, dealing with the author living his life, producing the webcomic, or making very meta gags. That was, until he [[ItMakesSenseInContext kills himself off]] and finds himself actually involved with the characters themselves (mainly the Deaths and the Scientific Revolution characters).

to:

* ''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic'' is entirely made up of B storylines! There's has no main plot, except for crossover between plots, so at any given moment there's seventeen different stories going on simultaneously (plus the Miscellaneous theme, which doesn't have a coherent plot or characters), although of late the primary ones are Steve & Terry, Fantasy, Space, and Cliffhangers, with secondary (but still important!) ones being Series/MythBusters and Scientific Revolution. And something's happening with the Shakespeare theme, and I guess the Nigerian Finance Minister and Pirates are still out there somewhere... Anyway, with somewhere, and so on. With so many themes, there are frequent crossovers; at one time, ''fourteen'' of the different themes converged for the destruction of the universe! universe (not included were Miscellaneous, which doesn't have a storyline; Supers and Espionage, which exist in a totally separate continuity (OK, so there were a couple of Espionage crossovers, but for the most part it's separate!); and Scientific Revolution, which is a relatively new theme.)
**
continuity). Oddly enough, the Me theme was originally self-contained, dealing with the author living his life, producing the webcomic, or making very meta gags. That was, until he [[ItMakesSenseInContext kills himself off]] and finds himself actually involved with the characters themselves (mainly the Deaths and the Scientific Revolution characters).



* The ''Literature/BraveNewWorldUniverse'' has this in almost every story. The original ''Brave New World'' had this for nearly every character, which resulted in a lot of SwitchingPOV. Later in the story, it tended to focus mainly on Charlie's story.

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* The ''Literature/BraveNewWorldUniverse'' has this in almost every story. story.
**
The original ''Brave New World'' had has this for nearly every character, which resulted in a lot of SwitchingPOV. Later in the story, it tended to focus mainly on Charlie's story.



* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' is constantly using this usually by introducing a side plot loosely connected to the main plot at the beginning but letting it go its own way instantly. Sometimes they intersect again at the end but not always. Klaus {{lampshade|Hanging}}d it when he was TheNarrator for his grandson and introduced the Steve subplot while the focus was on Stan and Francine ice skating.
** Not to mention that ''Finances with Wolves'' is an episode with Five Lines No Waiting, with Francine, Roger, Klaus, Hayley, and Steve each get plots with equal merit.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad''
** The series
is constantly using this usually by introducing a side plot loosely connected to the main plot at the beginning but letting it go its own way instantly. Sometimes they intersect again at the end but not always. Klaus {{lampshade|Hanging}}d it when he was TheNarrator for his grandson and introduced the Steve subplot while the focus was on Stan and Francine ice skating.
** Not to mention that ''Finances with Wolves'' is an episode with Five Lines No Waiting, with Francine, Roger, Klaus, Hayley, and Steve each get plots with equal merit.



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' used to do this every episode (or close to it). It still happens on occasion. Usually one plot influences or causes the other in some way but they aren't necessarily tied back together (for example, in "Krazy Kripples," Timmy and Jimmy joining the crips is directly caused by Creator/ChristopherReeve's appearance in South Park, but they never end up meeting him)

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' used to do this every episode (or close to it). It still happens on occasion. Usually one plot influences or causes the other in some way but they aren't necessarily tied back together (for example, in together:
** In
"Krazy Kripples," Timmy and Jimmy joining the crips is directly caused by Creator/ChristopherReeve's appearance in South Park, but they never end up meeting him)him.
7th Apr '17 7:16:13 AM MyFinalEdits
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'': The episode "Let's Play Hot-Cold" had a plot where Kaeloo tried to find someone to play with her and a side-plot where Stumpy tried to make himself look attractive.
** Another episode had a plot revolving around Kaeloo forcing Mr. Cat to see a psychotherapist and another plot where the rest of the cast got into a fight.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'': ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'':
**
The episode "Let's Play Hot-Cold" had has a plot where Kaeloo tried tries to find someone to play with her and a side-plot where Stumpy tried tries to make himself look attractive.
** Another episode had has a plot revolving around Kaeloo forcing Mr. Cat to see a psychotherapist and another plot where the rest of the cast got gets into a fight.
7th Apr '17 4:16:40 AM Troperinik
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'': The episode "Let's Play Hot-Cold" had a plot where Kaeloo tried to find someone to play with her and a side-plot where Stumpy tried to make himself look attractive.
** Another episode had a plot revolving around Kaeloo forcing Mr. Cat to see a psychotherapist and another plot where the rest of the cast got into a fight.
31st Mar '17 9:11:52 AM Gosicrystal
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** ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' did this with the Master Chief and the Arbiter. [[BrokenBase Opinions varied]] on whether it was a good idea or not, though it seems to have been VindicatedByHistory, if the Arbiter's later popularity is any indication.
** ''VideoGame/Halo5Guardians'' did this with Master Chief's Blue Team and Jameson Locke's Fireteam Osiris. Opinions also varied on whether it was a good idea or not.
* Some of the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games, most notably ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', make use of this trope. At one point in ''Final Fantasy VI'', the characters [[LetsSplitUpGang splits up into three groups]], and the player plays [[ArbitrarilySerializedSimultaneousAdventures through each of their stories in turn]], before they all reunite in Narshe. In ''Final Fantasy IX'', the party members split up halfway through Disk 1 to comply with the game's ArbitraryHeadcountLimit, and the story shifts back and forth between them until they reunite halfway through Disk 2. ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' does this for most of the game- it's only 25 hours in where you finally get all six party members together.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' did does this with the Master Chief and the Arbiter. [[BrokenBase Opinions varied]] on whether it was a good idea or not, though it seems to have been VindicatedByHistory, if the Arbiter's later popularity is any indication.
Arbiter.
** ''VideoGame/Halo5Guardians'' did does this with Master Chief's Blue Team and Jameson Locke's Fireteam Osiris. Opinions also varied on whether it was a good idea or not.
Osiris.
* Some of the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games, most notably ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', make use of this trope. ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
**
At one point in ''Final Fantasy VI'', the characters [[LetsSplitUpGang splits split up into three groups]], and the player plays [[ArbitrarilySerializedSimultaneousAdventures through each of their stories in turn]], before they all reunite in Narshe. Narshe.
**
In ''Final Fantasy IX'', the party members split up halfway through Disk 1 to comply with the game's ArbitraryHeadcountLimit, and the story shifts back and forth between them until they reunite halfway through Disk 2. 2.
**
''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' does this for most of the game- game - it's only 25 hours in where you finally get all six party members together.



** The first two ''VideoGame/SaintsRow'' games did this as well, with the separate gang storylines being entirely independent. Which lead to characters involved in them only appearing in one of the three, as [[spoiler:they frequently get injured or even killed]] and the game has no way to determine in which order you've completed missions up until the final stretch. ''The Third'' changed this around a bit, where missions overall follow one plotline, and most times where you have a choice of two or more missions they're just one of your lieutenants asking you to play an activity.

to:

** * The first two ''VideoGame/SaintsRow'' games did this as well, with have the separate gang storylines being entirely independent. Which lead to characters involved in them only appearing in one of the three, as [[spoiler:they frequently get injured or even killed]] and the game has no way to determine in which order you've completed missions up until the final stretch. ''The Third'' changed this around a bit, where missions overall follow one plotline, and most times where you have a choice of two or more missions they're just one of your lieutenants asking you to play an activity.



* Done twice, in ''VideoGame/SonicChronicles''. First, Chapter 5 has Sonic, Knuckles, and two other characters make their way to Angel Island, while simultaneously Tails and [[spoiler:Eggman]] head up another team trying to gather pieces to build a weapon. Chapter 10 has Sonic and Tails lead a team after one of Ix's [[TheDragon dragons]] while Knuckles and [[spoiler:Shade]] go after the other.
** This was done in both ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' and ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2''. The second having two (Three if you count Knuckles' subplot) intertwining stories, the first having ''six'' (Seven if you count Tikal's subplot), that all come together in the end.

to:

* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':
**
Done twice, twice in ''VideoGame/SonicChronicles''. First, Chapter 5 has Sonic, Knuckles, and two other characters make their way to Angel Island, while simultaneously Tails and [[spoiler:Eggman]] head up another team trying to gather pieces to build a weapon. Chapter 10 has Sonic and Tails lead a team after one of Ix's [[TheDragon dragons]] while Knuckles and [[spoiler:Shade]] go after the other.
** This was done in both ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' and ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2''. The second having ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' has two (Three (three if you count Knuckles' subplot) intertwining stories, the first having and ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' has ''six'' (Seven (seven if you count Tikal's subplot), that all come together in the end.



* ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'' does this, with each of the three playable characters' stories happening at the same time, and meeting up on occasion.
** ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories Chain of Memories]]'' as well, with [[TheHero Sora]] and [[TheLancer Riku]] running two unrelated plots that happen to take place in the same castle.
** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' also does this, with the jump to the other line being able to occur in the middle of a battle. [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Thankfully you don't need to worry about the other one getting knocked out while you were forced to drop.]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV'' had five chapters. Chapter 1 followed Ragnar, a knight trying to find missing children. Chapter 2 followed Alena, a RebelliousPrincess who wanted to fight in a tournament, and her advisers Clift (the healer) and Brey (the wizard). Chapter 3 followed a merchant named Torneko who wants to start his own shop in the kingdom of [[ShoutOut Endor]]. Chapter 4 followed Manya and Minea, two magical sisters (a glass cannon and a healer) trying to avenge their father's death. Finally, chapter 5 followed you, the hero, and you get the entire party together, but you can only control yourself directly. In the new DS version, there's a sixth chapter where the BigBad joins your party.
* ''SuikodenIII'' makes use of this trope through the Trinity Site System, allowing the player to tackle the story of three to [[spoiler:five]] different protagonists that happen roughly at the same time. [[spoiler:Up until you finish chapter 3 with the original three, at which point one must be chosen to become the true protagonist and their stories converge from there]]. Originally there was going to be a [[spoiler:sixth]] storyline included, but the developers decided it would have revealed information they wanted to keep secret.

to:

* ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'' does this, with ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'':
** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'',
each of the three playable characters' stories happening happen at the same time, and meeting meet up on occasion.
** In ''[[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories Chain of Memories]]'' as well, with Memories]]'', [[TheHero Sora]] and [[TheLancer Riku]] running run two unrelated plots that happen to take place in the same castle.
** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' also does this, with In ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'', the jump to the other line being is able to occur in the middle of a battle. [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality Thankfully you don't need to worry about the other one getting knocked out while you were forced to drop.]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV'' had has five chapters. Chapter 1 followed follows Ragnar, a knight trying to find missing children. Chapter 2 followed follows Alena, a RebelliousPrincess who wanted wants to fight in a tournament, and her advisers Clift (the healer) and Brey (the wizard). Chapter 3 followed follows a merchant named Torneko who wants to start his own shop in the kingdom of [[ShoutOut Endor]]. Chapter 4 followed follows Manya and Minea, two magical sisters (a glass cannon GlassCannon and a healer) trying to avenge their father's death. Finally, chapter 5 followed follows you, the hero, and you get the entire party together, but you can only control yourself directly. In the new DS version, there's a sixth chapter where the BigBad joins your party.
* ''SuikodenIII'' ''VideoGame/SuikodenIII'' makes use of this trope through the Trinity Site System, allowing the player to tackle the story of three to [[spoiler:five]] different protagonists that happen roughly at the same time. [[spoiler:Up until you finish chapter 3 with the original three, at which point one must be chosen to become the true protagonist and their stories converge from there]]. Originally there was going to be a [[spoiler:sixth]] storyline included, but the developers decided it would have revealed information they wanted to keep secret.



* ''Infinity'' series:
** ''VisualNovel/{{Ever17}}'' does this during the prologue of the game, switching between Takeshi and [[NoNameGiven The Kid]]. It drops this shortly into the game, at which point the player is locked into one of the two characters. [[spoiler: This trope returns during [[GoldenEnding Coco's path]], which begins switching back and forth between the two characters again]]
** ''VisualNovel/{{Remember11}}'' has its prologue set up the same way, with Kokoro and Satoru being the viewpoint characters. While this game does force the player into one of the two characters after the prologue finishes, it continues to use this trope throughout its entirety during the [[FreakyFridayFlip personality transfer phenomena]], resulting in part of each story being seen no matter which character the player is.



* ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry 5''.

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* %%* ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry 5''.


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''VisualNovel/{{Infinity}}'' series:
** ''VisualNovel/{{Ever17}}'' does this during the prologue of the game, switching between Takeshi and [[NoNameGiven The Kid]]. It drops this shortly into the game, at which point the player is locked into one of the two characters. [[spoiler: This trope returns during [[GoldenEnding Coco's path]], which begins switching back and forth between the two characters again]]
** ''VisualNovel/{{Remember11}}'' has its prologue set up the same way, with Kokoro and Satoru being the viewpoint characters. While this game does force the player into one of the two characters after the prologue finishes, it continues to use this trope throughout its entirety during the [[FreakyFridayFlip personality transfer phenomena]], resulting in part of each story being seen no matter which character the player is.
[[/folder]]
23rd Mar '17 4:56:10 AM Adept
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* Disk 3 of LostOdyssey has the party forced to split up. The plot then follows: Cooke and Mack as they attempt to follow the Aurora Borealis, Kaim and Sarah as they try to stop the kids from getting in too much trouble, Seth and [[spoiler: Tolten]] being warped to Uhra and meeting up with [[spoiler: Sed]], Jansen and Ming stuck on a train that's becoming an icy coffin. Despite being split four ways, the story doesn't suffer. It's arguably one of the most enjoyable parts, story-wise, because every party member gets their moment in the limelight. They are all [[spoiler: reunited at the end of Disk 3.]]

to:

* Disk 3 of LostOdyssey ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' has the party forced to split up. The plot then follows: Cooke and Mack as they attempt to follow the Aurora Borealis, Kaim and Sarah as they try to stop the kids from getting in too much trouble, Seth and [[spoiler: Tolten]] being warped to Uhra and meeting up with [[spoiler: Sed]], Jansen and Ming stuck on a train that's becoming an icy coffin. Despite being split four ways, the story doesn't suffer. It's arguably one of the most enjoyable parts, story-wise, because every party member gets their moment in the limelight. They are all [[spoiler: reunited at the end of Disk 3.]]
11th Mar '17 4:08:03 PM nombretomado
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* Shakespeare's ''MuchAdoAboutNothing'' has two love plots -- Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick. ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' has the "lovers from Athens" and the Oberon-Titania plots. ''Theatre/KingLear'' has the plot about the King, and the plot about the Duke and his two sons.

to:

* Shakespeare's ''MuchAdoAboutNothing'' has two love plots -- Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick. ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' has the "lovers from Athens" and the Oberon-Titania plots. ''Theatre/KingLear'' has the plot about the King, and the plot about the Duke and his two sons.
1st Feb '17 9:09:20 AM ZimFan89
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Added DiffLines:

* Season 2 of ''Series/{{Daredevil|2015}}'' is pretty evenly split between the Punisher and Elektra storylines.
26th Dec '16 10:24:29 AM Galemp
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Added DiffLines:

* The film of ''Film/CloudAtlas'' has *six* lines, across different eras in the past, present, and future.
3rd Nov '16 3:12:37 PM dasuberkaiser
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* Most episodes in the new series ''LietoMe'' involve two different investigations going on at the same time. In a standard episode Cal and Ria will be investigating a death or a murder while Gillian and Eli are investigating a scandal.

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* Most episodes in the new series ''LietoMe'' ''LieToMe'' involve two different investigations going on at the same time. In a standard episode Cal and Ria will be investigating a death or a murder while Gillian and Eli are investigating a scandal.
This list shows the last 10 events of 190. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TwoLinesNoWaiting