History Main / TwoLinesNoWaiting

1st Dec '17 5:28:37 PM AuraXtreme
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A lighter version involves the protagonist's investigation running parallel to something more innocent. While the detective mom investigates the grisly subway killings, her kids investigate the mystery of the missing pizza slice. This allows for a [[EverybodyLaughsEnding freeze-framed laugh]] at the end when it's discovered the [[TheDogWastheMastermind dog did it]][[note]]ate the pizza not butchered the commuters[[/note]].

to:

A lighter version involves the protagonist's investigation running parallel to something more innocent. While the detective mom investigates the grisly subway killings, her kids investigate the mystery of the missing pizza slice. This allows for a [[EverybodyLaughsEnding freeze-framed laugh]] at the end when it's discovered the [[TheDogWastheMastermind dog did it]][[note]]ate the pizza pizza, not butchered the commuters[[/note]].
22nd Oct '17 4:12:43 PM Vidus
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* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' the later books fragment into ''several'' plotlines. This either creates a vivid, appealing world or makes the books hopelessly convoluted, depending on the reader.

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* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' the later books fragment into ''several'' plotlines. One book in fact is Book B to the previous. This either creates a vivid, appealing world or makes the books hopelessly convoluted, depending on the reader.
20th Oct '17 9:34:20 PM LaptopGuy
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** ''Series/LabRats'': Tends to vary. Usually, it's one plot for two of the Rats and another for the third Rat and Leo.

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** ''Series/LabRats'': Tends to vary. Usually, it's one plot for two of the Rats and another for the third Rat and Leo. With the adults it's usually Donald or Douglas in one plot and Perry in the other.



** ''Series/TheThundermans'': Phoebe and Max in the A-Plot; Nora and Billy in the B-Plot. The parents can be in either one, but tend to more often be in the B-plot. Occasionally Phoebe and Max are in separate plots. For the supporting cast, Cherry is always in Phoebe's plot, Dr. Colosso in the Max or Nora/Billy plot, and Chloe in the Nora/Billy plot.
** ''Series/HenryDanger'': Henry/Ray/Charlotte A-Plot; Jasper/Piper B-Plot.

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** ''Series/TheThundermans'': Phoebe and Max in the A-Plot; Nora and Billy in the B-Plot. The parents can be in either one, but tend to more often be in the B-plot. Occasionally Phoebe and Max are in separate plots.plots, with Phoebe almost always getting the main plot in that case and Max interacting with his younger siblings. For the supporting cast, Cherry is always in Phoebe's plot, Dr. Colosso in the Max or Nora/Billy plot, and Chloe in the Nora/Billy plot.
** ''Series/HenryDanger'': Henry/Ray/Charlotte A-Plot; Jasper/Piper B-Plot. Schwoz is usually involved providing support in the A-Plot and Henry and Piper's parents in the B-Plot.
17th Sep '17 2:07:52 PM nombretomado
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* ''Webcomic/RumorsOfWar'' begins its first StoryArc with the cast assembling, then follows two characters as they go about separate, unrelated activities. The first is an information-gathering trip that gets [[MysteryMagnet hijacked by a mystery]] and the other is a [[HowToGatherCharacters recruitment plot]] in the style of a ShortCon.

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* ''Webcomic/RumorsOfWar'' begins its first StoryArc with the cast assembling, then follows two characters as they go about separate, unrelated activities. The first is an information-gathering trip that gets [[MysteryMagnet hijacked by a mystery]] and the other is a [[HowToGatherCharacters [[JustForFun/HowToGatherCharacters recruitment plot]] in the style of a ShortCon.
12th Sep '17 7:26:10 AM BunnyStar
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A lighter version involves the protagonist's investigation running parallel to something more innocent. While the detective mom investigates the grisly subway killings, her kids investigate the mystery of the missing chocolate brownie. This allows for a [[EverybodyLaughsEnding freeze-framed laugh]] at the end when it's discovered the [[TheDogWastheMastermind dog did it]][[note]]ate the brownie not butchered the commuters[[/note]].

to:

A lighter version involves the protagonist's investigation running parallel to something more innocent. While the detective mom investigates the grisly subway killings, her kids investigate the mystery of the missing chocolate brownie. pizza slice. This allows for a [[EverybodyLaughsEnding freeze-framed laugh]] at the end when it's discovered the [[TheDogWastheMastermind dog did it]][[note]]ate the brownie pizza not butchered the commuters[[/note]].
25th Aug '17 11:31:14 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Literary example: ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' the later books fragment into ''several'' plotlines. This either creates a vivid, appealing world or makes the books hopelessly convoluted, depending on the reader.

to:

* Literary example: ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' the later books fragment into ''several'' plotlines. This either creates a vivid, appealing world or makes the books hopelessly convoluted, depending on the reader.


Added DiffLines:

* Each of the ''Literature/GentlemanBastard'' books intercuts the present storyline with a second storyline of {{flashback}}s to the Bastards' upbringing that relates in some way.
21st Aug '17 11:14:33 AM SeptimusHeap
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* Creator/TimothyZahn does this ''all the time'' in his ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' novels. All of his [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters many protagonists]] have plotlines that weave and diverge and intersect and merge constantly. In ''Literature/{{Allegiance}}'', chosen for an example because it has a smaller cast, the plotlines belong to Mara Jade and her mission to follow a pirate/corrupt Imperial connection, Daric [=LaRone=] and the Hand of Judgment with their efforts to do good and [[DesperatelyLookingForAPurposeInLife figure out what to do next]], Luke Skywalker and Han Solo fumbling with Han's reservations about the Rebellion while on a mission, Leia Organa and her quest to keep bits of the Rebellion together, [[HandOfThrawn Villim Disra's]] gambit to get more power, and Captain Ozzel with his increasingly desperate attempts to hide the fact that five stormtroopers defected from his ship. And all of these plotlines forms its own narrative, but is related somehow to all of the others. They rarely [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse get forgotten]], either. Zahn's awesome like that.

to:

* Creator/TimothyZahn does this ''all the time'' in his ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' novels. All of his [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters many protagonists]] have plotlines that weave and diverge and intersect and merge constantly. In ''Literature/{{Allegiance}}'', chosen for an example because it has a smaller cast, the plotlines belong to Mara Jade and her mission to follow a pirate/corrupt Imperial connection, Daric [=LaRone=] and the Hand of Judgment with their efforts to do good and [[DesperatelyLookingForAPurposeInLife figure out what to do next]], Luke Skywalker and Han Solo fumbling with Han's reservations about the Rebellion while on a mission, Leia Organa and her quest to keep bits of the Rebellion together, [[HandOfThrawn [[Literature/HandOfThrawn Villim Disra's]] gambit to get more power, and Captain Ozzel with his increasingly desperate attempts to hide the fact that five stormtroopers defected from his ship. And all of these plotlines forms its own narrative, but is related somehow to all of the others. They rarely [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse get forgotten]], either. Zahn's awesome like that.
21st May '17 5:23:24 PM nombretomado
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* WereAlive usually confines its storylines into separate chapters. But occasionally it will show two storylines within the same chapter or the same episode. For instance in chapters 17 and 18: Michael, Pegs and Kelly travelling to The Colony was split with Angel and Kalani going to the Army Reserve base to secure [=MREs=].

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* WereAlive ''AudioPlay/WereAlive'' usually confines its storylines into separate chapters. But occasionally it will show two storylines within the same chapter or the same episode. For instance in chapters 17 and 18: Michael, Pegs and Kelly travelling to The Colony was split with Angel and Kalani going to the Army Reserve base to secure [=MREs=].
21st May '17 1:58:46 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/ThirdRockFromTheSun'' usually goes with an A-story centering on Dick and a B-story featuring another character.



* ''Series/FantasyIsland'' juggles three or more plotlines per episode. In fact, the plotlines even have separate titles in the credits, and usually different writers. In fact, when it was offered up in syndication, the series had two formats, the original one hour episodes as well as an EditedForSyndication half hour format featuring only one story and Roarke's opening greeting "My dear guests, I am Mr Roarke, your host" dubbed to "My dear guest, I am Mr Roarke, your host".
%%* ''Series/TheLoveBoat''
* This device is used in the various ''Series/{{CSI}}'' shows (although much more often in the original than the spinoffs), and others in the current crop. Occasionally the characters will find out halfway through the episode that the [[WorkingTheSameCase crimes they are investigating are tied together.]] Some episodes pull this off better than others.
* This happens pretty often in ''Series/NewTricks''. Sandra normally goes off with one other member of the team about a quarter through the episode, with the other two members going off on their own plotline as well. Sometimes there are even three plotlines in one episode.
* ''Series/{{Elementary}}'' works and develops its story arc and characters this way. Even exposed in the [[WordOfGod writer's twitter]] as we can see [[https://twitter.com/ELEMENTARYStaff/status/351808007094550529 here]].
* ''Series/{{House}}'':
** The series often has this (particularly in the last few seasons), where plot A is the current medical drama and there's usually one or two sub-plots concerning House messing with his team and/or Wilson and/or Cuddy (or vice versa). Less frequently, an episode would have two medical plots: one case involving the entire team, and another that House would solve on his own. The second type becomes more common in the first few seasons where House has a minor recurring clinic case that often provides him with the inspiration to solve to main case.
** "One Day, One Room" has no medical mystery. Instead, it follows House treating a pregnant rape victim who refuses an abortion, while Cameron tries to help a dying homeless man who refuses treatment.
* Very common in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' spin-offs.
** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'''s early seasons suffered badly from a sense that the writers felt ''obligated'' to have multiple plotlines, and events that should have been the centerpiece of an entire episode were relegated to the BStory (''e.g.'', the re-introduction of the Romulans). Through the remainder of the series there was usually one plot line where the Enterprise was in danger even if it only came up in a few scenes.
** The ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Silent Enemy." The A plot is a strong, tense plot where the Enterprise is face with an enemy that outclasses their ship in every way. The ship is boarded, lives are lost, and in order to even survive, the Enterprise has to risk blowing half the ship apart. The B plot is centered around Hoshi finding out Reed's favorite food. HilarityEnsues, despite, you know, the ''ship endangering crisis'' going on. Needless to say, the A plot is horribly undermined by the thematic discontinuity, and gross stupidity, of the B plot.
** This structure is seen in ''every'' episode of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', with the notable exception of [[GrowingTheBeard the late-first-season episode]] "Duet".
** Also used in the movie ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''. Oddly, the movie's title came from the "B" plot.

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* ''Series/FantasyIsland'' juggles three or more ''Series/{{Awake}}'' does this as part of the show's premise: the main detective character lives in two realities that constantly react to each other. Thus whenever he starts a case in one reality, another case (somehow linked to the first one) starts in the other, resulting in at least two plotlines per episode. In fact, the plotlines even have separate titles in the credits, and usually different writers. In fact, when it was offered up in syndication, the series had two formats, the original one hour episodes as well as an EditedForSyndication half hour format featuring only one story and Roarke's opening greeting "My dear guests, I am Mr Roarke, your host" dubbed to "My dear guest, I am Mr Roarke, your host".
%%* ''Series/TheLoveBoat''
* This device is used in the various ''Series/{{CSI}}'' shows (although much more often in the original than the spinoffs), and others in the current crop. Occasionally the characters will find out halfway through the episode that the [[WorkingTheSameCase crimes they are investigating are tied together.]] Some episodes pull this off better than others.
* This happens pretty often in ''Series/NewTricks''. Sandra normally goes off with one other member of the team about a quarter through the episode, with the other two members going off on their own plotline as well. Sometimes there are even three plotlines in one episode.
* ''Series/{{Elementary}}'' works and develops its story arc and characters this way. Even exposed in the [[WordOfGod writer's twitter]] as we can see [[https://twitter.com/ELEMENTARYStaff/status/351808007094550529 here]].
* ''Series/{{House}}'':
** The series often has this (particularly in the last few seasons), where plot A is the current medical drama and there's usually one or two sub-plots concerning House messing with his team and/or Wilson and/or Cuddy (or vice versa). Less frequently, an episode would have two medical plots: one case involving the entire team, and another that House would solve on his own. The second type becomes more common in the first few seasons where House has a minor recurring clinic case that often provides him with the inspiration to solve to main case.
** "One Day, One Room" has no medical mystery. Instead, it follows House treating a pregnant rape victim who refuses an abortion, while Cameron tries to help a dying homeless man who refuses treatment.
* Very common in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' spin-offs.
** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'''s early seasons suffered badly from a sense that the writers felt ''obligated'' to have multiple plotlines, and events that should have been the centerpiece of an entire episode were relegated to the BStory (''e.g.'', the re-introduction of the Romulans). Through the remainder of the series there was usually one plot line where the Enterprise was in danger even if it only came up in a few scenes.
** The ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Silent Enemy." The A plot is a strong, tense plot where the Enterprise is face with an enemy that outclasses their ship in every way. The ship is boarded, lives are lost, and in order to even survive, the Enterprise has to risk blowing half the ship apart. The B plot is centered around Hoshi finding out Reed's favorite food. HilarityEnsues, despite, you know, the ''ship endangering crisis'' going on. Needless to say, the A plot is horribly undermined by the thematic discontinuity, and gross stupidity, of the B plot.
** This structure is seen in ''every'' episode of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', with the notable exception of [[GrowingTheBeard the late-first-season episode]] "Duet".
** Also used in the movie ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''. Oddly, the movie's title came from the "B" plot.
episode.



* Very recurring on any sit-com on Creator/DisneyChannel does this:

to:

* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'': After Amy and Bernadette joined the cast, there were several episodes that featured one storyline for the men and one for the women with little if any overlap.
%%* ''Series/TheBill'' often does this.
* This became the standard for ''Series/BlakesSeven''. With several main characters the writers needed to find something for all of them to do, and so the plot would often split up into two lines: the first for the ones who make planetfall Down There, and the other for the ones who run into trouble Up There on the ''Liberator'' (and later on ''Scorpio'').
* Happened quite a lot in ''Series/BostonLegal'', as different characters are taking different cases, usually with one case being the serious one with a CharacterFilibuster or AuthorFilibuster in it, and the other case being the slightly light-hearted one (usually involved Denny Crane).
* In ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'', most episodes had an A plotline with Cory, Shawn and Topanga and a B plotline with Eric (and Jack starting in season 5 and Rachel starting in season 6), though this varied a good bit. In many of the later season episodes [[MoodWhiplash one plotline was serious while one was comedic]].
** In ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'', the A plot is about Riley, Maya, Farkle, and Lucas and the B plot about Topanga and Auggie; Cory could be in either one or both.
* ''Series/BurnNotice'' does this in practically every single episode. One storyline will involve tracking down the people who burned Michael or, in season 5 [[spoiler: whoever framed him for murder]]. This will invariably bring Michael one step closer, but won't result in a major development unless the episode is a season finale. The other will be generally involve saving an innocent victim from the MonsterOfTheWeek. Seriously, this formula is used so consistently, one has to wonder how none of the characters ever [[GenreBlindness seem to notice that its happening]].
* ''Series/{{Castle}}'' has this as well. The A Story centers around the crime drama, and the B Story centers around Richard Castle's family drama.
* Very common in ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' - the A story revolved around Chuck, Sarah and Casey, while the B story revolved around Chuck's friends at Buy More.
* Most episodes of ''Series/TheCloser'' have the investigation as the A plot and something involving Johnson's personal life as the B plot. Usually they're tied together thematically and/or the B plot provides the weekly EurekaMoment. In addition, the B plots often stretch for more than one episode.
* ''Series/{{Community}}'' sometimes has subplots spanning every member of the study group. If there are two friends in an A plot (say Jeff and Britta), some of the other members (Abed and Troy for example) will have a B plot together.
* ''Series/CornerGas'':
** The series has two or three storylines per episode, which is merely one of the reasons it's often compared to ''Seinfeld''. Its larger main cast (more than four) divides up pretty evenly among the storylines. This is most interesting when the divvying of the storylines ''doesn't'' happen according to the common pattern (the two police officers, the old married couple, the gas station workers--Hank functions as a wildcard, who may have his own storyline like a Good Hair Day).
** "The Littlest Yarbo" where Hank discusses his plot, and Brent randomly starts talking about his own:
--->'''Hank''': Maybe Series/TheLittlestHobo was the first ever reality show, did you ever think of that?\\
'''Brent''': Hold on here! If I can see my logo, then her logo is on the outside all the while giving her free advertising!\\
'''Wanda''': Come on, guys! I can only handle one weird obsession at a time!
* Lampshaded on ''Series/CougarTown'' which usually sticks to A and B-plots but occasionally works in a C as well. When they are trying to think of a name for Bobby's (landlocked) boat, one suggestion is ''The Sea Story'' because "everything that happens on this boat is kind of a [[{{Pun}} sea story]]".
* ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has done this on a few occasions, most notably in "Damaged" when the main story saw Morgan, Prentiss and JJ help Rossi solve his cold case, with the "B" story featuring Hotch and Reid interview a serial killer looking for a way to stave off execution.
* This device is used in the various ''Series/{{CSI}}'' shows (although much more often in the original than the spinoffs), and others in the current crop. Occasionally the characters will find out halfway through the episode that the [[WorkingTheSameCase crimes they are investigating are tied together.]] Some episodes pull this off better than others.
* Season 2 of ''Series/{{Daredevil|2015}}'' is pretty evenly split between the Punisher and Elektra storylines.
* The Canadian drama series ''Series/DaVincisInquest'' was cancelled in part because of this trope. At the end of the series, the main character, a coroner living in Vancouver, successfully announces his bid to become the Mayor of the city. In the spin-off/sequel, ''Da Vinci's City Hall'', the story balances the problems he has while in office, his quest to get a "red light district" up and running, his bid to create safe-injection sites for drug users, the trials and tribulations of his former partner working at the city morgue, events happening at a police station...if you missed one episode, you were lost. The show suffered in the ratings, and was cancelled as a result (although there may have been other motives).
* ''Series/DawsonsCreek'' always had more than one storyline but for much of the post HighSchool 5th and 6th seasons (especially the latter), interaction between the storylines was minimal, or non-existent.
* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' usually has 5 plots running simultaneously; one for each of the four main housewives and one involving the season's BigBad or creepy/mysterious neighbor. These plotlines will mesh in the big catastrophe episodes, but generally stay apart.
* Very recurring on any sit-com sitcom on Creator/DisneyChannel does this:



* Recurring on Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} shows:
** ''Series/ICarly'': Carly/Sam/Freddie A plot, Spencer (and later Gibby) B-Plot. Formula for dozens of episodes. Occasionally one of the trio jumps into Spencer's plot whilst the other two deal with the A-plot.
** ''Series/{{Victorious}}'': Tori in the A-Plot, and a B-Plot which uses cast not required for the A-Plot. Trina is often what the b-plot revolves around.
** Carly and Victorious have later a crossover special, leading to an epic 10 Lines, No Waiting: Carly's time with Steven, Tori's time with Steven(which later intertwine), Andre and later Kenan trying to catch the panda, Robbie/Rex in an epic rap battle, Cat having to use a headband to talk, Trina babysitting for Lane, Sikowitz trying to scare Beck, Spencer, Beck, Jade and Sikowitz in the hot tub, Sinjin video game surfing, and Gibby trying to find his mole. Eventually all the plots build into one another leading to everyone singing karaoke.
** ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'': The titular brothers in the A-Plot, Megan in a B-Plot when not directly involved in screwing up the A-Plot for the boys.
** ''Series/{{Zoey 101}}'': Same thing as Victorious except Zoey in place of Tori.
** ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'': A-plot with the main character that may involve one of his friends, and a B-plot that involves the other friend (or two B-plots when Ned is alone in the A-plot).
** ''Series/TheThundermans'': Phoebe and Max in the A-Plot; Nora and Billy in the B-Plot. The parents can be in either one, but tend to more often be in the B-plot. Occasionally Phoebe and Max are in separate plots. For the supporting cast, Cherry is always in Phoebe's plot, Dr. Colosso in the Max or Nora/Billy plot, and Chloe in the Nora/Billy plot.
** ''Series/HenryDanger'': Henry/Ray/Charlotte A-Plot; Jasper/Piper B-Plot.
* HBO's ''Series/{{Oz}}'' featured several continuing plotlines in more of a serial format (starting and ending with the season), as well as single-episode plots.
* Often seen in the British mystery series ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey''. A typical ''Rumpole'' episode involves two plots: the case of the week Rumpole is defending, and a plot involving either some intrigue back in chambers or some intrigue in Rumpole's household.
* Over in non-fiction land, ''Series/MythBusters'' does this too. Partially justified in that a single myth is generally too short to provide a sixty minute (including commercials) show. However, it is the presentation of each myth in parts that qualifies ''Series/MythBusters'' as an example.

to:

* Recurring on Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} shows:
** ''Series/ICarly'': Carly/Sam/Freddie A plot, Spencer (and later Gibby) B-Plot. Formula for dozens of episodes. Occasionally one
''Series/DoctorWho'': [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E6Extremis "Extremis"]] switches between Missy's execution in the past, and the situation with ''[[TomeOfEldritchLore The Veritas]]'' in the present. [[spoiler:Or, rather, the Doctor watching the recording of the trio jumps into Spencer's plot whilst last several hours of the other two deal with Prophets of Truth's most recent simulation while guarding the A-plot.
** ''Series/{{Victorious}}'': Tori
Vault in the A-Plot, present day.]]
* ''Series/{{Elementary}}'' works
and a B-Plot which uses cast not required develops its story arc and characters this way. Even exposed in the [[WordOfGod writer's twitter]] as we can see [[https://twitter.com/ELEMENTARYStaff/status/351808007094550529 here]].
* Exception: ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' is unique in the sense that every episode followed one storyline, there were no subplots. Yet it was still very successful and ran
for nine seasons. They did have minor inter-episode stories as running gags, such as periodically reverting to the A-Plot. Trina is often arguments between Marie and Frank (over things like what constitutes something as "fork-split", who will die first and what the b-plot revolves around.
** Carly and Victorious have later a crossover special, leading to an epic 10 Lines, No Waiting: Carly's time with Steven, Tori's time with Steven(which later intertwine), Andre and later Kenan trying to catch
remaining one will do, etc.) throughout the panda, Robbie/Rex in episode.
* ''Series/FamilyMatters'' generally had
an epic rap battle, Cat having to use a headband to talk, Trina babysitting for Lane, Sikowitz trying to scare Beck, Spencer, Beck, Jade and Sikowitz in A-story centering on the hot tub, Sinjin video game surfing, and Gibby trying to find his mole. Eventually all the plots build into one another leading to everyone singing karaoke.
** ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'': The titular brothers in the A-Plot, Megan in a B-Plot when not directly involved in screwing up the A-Plot for the boys.
** ''Series/{{Zoey 101}}'': Same thing as Victorious except Zoey in place of Tori.
** ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'': A-plot with the main character that may involve one of his friends,
children and a B-plot that involves B-story centering on the other friend (or two B-plots when Ned is alone in parents. However, being a KidCom, the A-plot).
** ''Series/TheThundermans'': Phoebe and Max in the A-Plot; Nora and Billy in the B-Plot. The parents can be in either one, but tend to
children's storylines were predictably far more often be in interesting than the B-plot. Occasionally Phoebe and Max are in separate plots. For the supporting cast, Cherry is always in Phoebe's plot, Dr. Colosso in the Max parents' storylines.
* ''Series/FantasyIsland'' juggles three
or Nora/Billy plot, and Chloe in the Nora/Billy plot.
** ''Series/HenryDanger'': Henry/Ray/Charlotte A-Plot; Jasper/Piper B-Plot.
* HBO's ''Series/{{Oz}}'' featured several continuing
more plotlines per episode. In fact, the plotlines even have separate titles in more of a serial format (starting the credits, and ending with usually different writers. In fact, when it was offered up in syndication, the season), series had two formats, the original one hour episodes as well as single-episode plots.
* Often seen in the British mystery series ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey''. A typical ''Rumpole'' episode involves two plots: the case of the week Rumpole is defending,
an EditedForSyndication half hour format featuring only one story and a plot involving either some intrigue back in chambers or some intrigue in Rumpole's household.
* Over in non-fiction land, ''Series/MythBusters'' does this too. Partially justified in that a single myth is generally too short
Roarke's opening greeting "My dear guests, I am Mr. Roarke, your host" dubbed to provide a sixty minute (including commercials) show. However, it is the presentation of each myth in parts that qualifies ''Series/MythBusters'' as an example."My dear guest, I am Mr. Roarke, your host".



* ''Intervention'' follows two families coping with addictions, cutting back and forth.

to:

* ''Intervention'' follows two families coping ''Series/{{Frasier}}'':
** The majority of the episodes have this structure. Typically, there's the main A plot and the secondary B plot, one of them focusing on Frasier and the other on one of the four other major characters. The main plot isn't necessarily about Frasier, though: Niles especially gets plenty of A plots as his character becomes more rounded.
** One episode ("Death and the Dog", Season 4) hanging a lampshade on it. The events of the episode are being told as a WholeEpisodeFlashback to a caller, and Roz wonders why Frasier is telling the caller about her date in the episode.
* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' does this quite often, usually preferring the three-storyline model. The relationships between the characters allowed some fluidity in the pairings.
** "The One Where They're Going to Party" - Ross, Chandler, and Joey in Plot A, Monica and Rachel in Plot B, and Phoebe in Plot C.
** "The One Where Ross and Rachel... You Know" - Ross and Rachel in Plot A, Monica and Phoebe in Plot B, and Chandler and Joey in Plot C.
** Particularly in later seasons, episodes frequently split along
with addictions, cutting back the {{Ship|ping}}s: Ross and Rachel, Chandler and Monica, Phoebe and an outside cast member or love interest (Duncan, Eric, Mike, and so forth.)
** "The One with the Routine" had Monica, Ross, Joey, and guest character Janine in Plot A, with Chandler, Phoebe, and Rachel in Plot B; "The One with the Blackout" had Chandler by himself in Story B, while everybody else was in Story A.
** "The One Where They're Up All Night" featured a whopping number of four storylines: Ross and Joey, Chandler and Monica, Rachel and Tag, and Phoebe vs. the fire alarm.
* ''Series/GoOn'' does this in most episodes, generally with one plot centering around Ryan King, and another plot focusing on someone else from the support group.
* ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' does this in a way similar to ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' but usually a lot less contrived and there is almost always a real struggle with morality that Meredith references when she does the voice over in the beginning and end of an episode. If the plots are too separated, the writers link it together with a more broad aesop... like "trust your closest friends" or something. Clever!
* On ''Series/{{Haven}}'', especially in seasons 1 and 2, there typically was an A-plot with Audrey and Nathan investigating a Trouble(superpower) related crime and a B-plot with Duke, sometimes intersecting with the A-plot (often Duke would find himself involved in the Trouble somehow), and sometimes a C-plot involving finding Audrey's past. As the other characters were fleshed out more, there started being a C-plot involving the Teagues, Dwight and/or the Guard. In season 5, there usually is an A-plot with one character and [[spoiler: Mara]] and a B-plot involving the other characters dealing with a Trouble.
* After the first few series, ''Series/{{Heartbeat}}'' always divided its episodes between an A plot of the police investigating something serious and a comedy B plot of whoever the LoveableRogue was at the time (Greengrass, Vernon or Peggy, or occasionally their supporting cast if they weren't in the episode) getting involved in some sort of light-hearted shenanigans.



* ''Series/MySoCalledLife'' usually had a B story involving Angela's parents, thanks to child labor laws (Clare Danes and Devon Gummersall couldn't be in every scene of the show.)
* Exception: ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' is unique in the sense that every episode followed one storyline, there were no subplots. Yet it was still very successful and ran for nine seasons. They did have minor inter-episode stories as running gags, such as periodically reverting to the arguments between Marie and Frank (over things like what constitutes something as 'fork-split,' who will die first and what the remaining one will do, etc) throughout the episode.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' perfected this tactic, with a twist. The two story lines would turn out to be physically (not just thematically) interrelated through some absurd coincidence or twist. Larry David has mentioned in several DVD commentaries that he had the idea to interweave the separate plotlines early on in the show's run, but didn't perfect the practice until Season 4.

to:

* ''Series/MySoCalledLife'' ''Series/{{House}}'':
** The series often has this (particularly in the last few seasons), where plot A is the current medical drama and there's
usually had a B story one or two sub-plots concerning House messing with his team and/or Wilson and/or Cuddy (or vice versa). Less frequently, an episode would have two medical plots: one case involving Angela's parents, thanks to child labor laws (Clare Danes the entire team, and Devon Gummersall couldn't be another that House would solve on his own. The second type becomes more common in every scene the first few seasons where House has a minor recurring clinic case that often provides him with the inspiration to solve to main case.
** "One Day, One Room" has no medical mystery. Instead, it follows House treating a pregnant rape victim who refuses an abortion, while Cameron tries to help a dying homeless man who refuses treatment.
* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
** The A Story usually runs through Ted, while the B Story tends to involve the stable couple of Marshall and Lily. Barney and Robin sometimes end up in their own plotlines, but are more often part
of the show.)
* Exception: ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' is unique in
A Story or B Story.
** Season 5 places
the sense that every episode followed one storyline, there were no subplots. Yet it was still very successful main focus away from Ted more often than not; Barney and ran for nine seasons. They did have minor inter-episode stories as running gags, such as periodically reverting to Robin's romantic subplot takes up most of the arguments between Marie first half of the season, Robin and Don take up the second half, with Marshall and Lily's attempts at having a baby the standard B-plot. Ted himself rarely stars, but is always the FramingDevice.
* ''Intervention'' follows two families coping with addictions, cutting back and forth.
* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' usually begins with the gang getting to an argument and then splitting off into two or three groups with different objectives as the result of the argument, which form the plots of the episode. The entire concept is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in "The Gang Exploit the Mortgage Crisis" which begins with Dee
and Frank (over things like what constitutes something as 'fork-split,' who will die first explaining their individual schemes and what the remaining one will do, etc) throughout rest of the episode.
gang actually voting on which plot they want to be a part of.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' perfected this tactic, with a twist. The two story lines ''Series/JeevesAndWooster'' would turn out to be physically (not just thematically) interrelated through some absurd coincidence or twist. Larry David has mentioned in several DVD commentaries that he had the idea to interweave the quite often have two separate plotlines early on that Bertie Wooster got involved in. This was due the screenwriter, Clive Exton, often combining two different short stories into one episode.
* ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'', a season of Franchise/KamenRider with RuleOfThree as its central premise, would often advertise its unique concept of ''Three'' Lines No Waiting across every two episodes, complete with a PreviouslyOn segment recounting "these three things" - as the series went on, they would often seperate a plotline's cause and effect to make up the number.
* One particularly memorable ''Series/LawAndOrder'' episode actually screwed with the long established premise of one case, one episode, by showing a day
in the show's run, but didn't perfect life of the practice until Season 4.police officers and their relations with the DAs. Rather than the one case followed from crime to verdict, one principal case is brought up, and several other minor cases crop up to plague the detective's concentration.
* Most episodes of ''Series/LieToMe'' involve two different investigations going on at the same time. In a standard episode Cal and Ria will be investigating a death or a murder while Gillian and Eli are investigating a scandal.



%%* ''Series/TheLoveBoat''
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' did this every episode, typically with three storylines running at once or more. The most common one was the A Story being about Malcolm and one other family member, and the other stories revolving around the other family members and Francis always had his own story, until he [[DemotedToExtra became a part-time cast member]].
* This became increasingly common in later seasons of ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'', with some members of the cast getting involved in their own side adventures away from the main plot.
* The delicate balancing of sitcom hijinks and medical/war drama seen throughout ''Series/{{MASH}}'' appeared to be a little too much for the writers to handle in the last few seasons, so instead every episode was given two storylines, one funny and one serious. It was rather obvious that they were putting all their effort into the serious storylines and the "funny" storylines tended to fall flat as a result.
* Used in nearly every episode of ''Series/TheMentalist''. Plot A follows Jane with the murder mystery and whoever happens to be his sidekick this week, usually Lisbon or Cho. Plot B follows the more exciting cop business with Rigsby and his sidekick of the week. Sometimes the plots are related, and sometimes they're not.
* ''Series/MySoCalledLife'' usually had a B story involving Angela's parents, thanks to child labor laws (Clare Danes and Devon Gummersall couldn't be in every scene of the show).
* Over in non-fiction land, ''Series/MythBusters'' does this too. Partially justified in that a single myth is generally too short to provide a sixty minute (including commercials) show. However, it is the presentation of each myth in parts that qualifies ''Series/MythBusters'' as an example.
* Every episode of season one of ''Series/NaturallySadie'' would have one 'Sadie' plot and one 'Rain' plot, except one where the plots merged. This was less common for the second and third season.
* This happens pretty often in ''Series/NewTricks''. Sandra normally goes off with one other member of the team about a quarter through the episode, with the other two members going off on their own plotline as well. Sometimes there are even three plotlines in one episode.
* Recurring on Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} shows:
** ''Series/ICarly'': Carly/Sam/Freddie A plot, Spencer (and later Gibby) B-Plot. Formula for dozens of episodes. Occasionally one of the trio jumps into Spencer's plot whilst the other two deal with the A-plot.
** ''Series/{{Victorious}}'': Tori in the A-Plot, and a B-Plot which uses cast not required for the A-Plot. Trina is often what the b-plot revolves around.
** Carly and Victorious have later a crossover special, leading to an epic 10 Lines, No Waiting: Carly's time with Steven, Tori's time with Steven(which later intertwine), Andre and later Kenan trying to catch the panda, Robbie/Rex in an epic rap battle, Cat having to use a headband to talk, Trina babysitting for Lane, Sikowitz trying to scare Beck, Spencer, Beck, Jade and Sikowitz in the hot tub, Sinjin video game surfing, and Gibby trying to find his mole. Eventually all the plots build into one another leading to everyone singing karaoke.
** ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'': The titular brothers in the A-Plot, Megan in a B-Plot when not directly involved in screwing up the A-Plot for the boys.
** ''Series/{{Zoey 101}}'': Same thing as Victorious except Zoey in place of Tori.
** ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'': A-plot with the main character that may involve one of his friends, and a B-plot that involves the other friend (or two B-plots when Ned is alone in the A-plot).
** ''Series/TheThundermans'': Phoebe and Max in the A-Plot; Nora and Billy in the B-Plot. The parents can be in either one, but tend to more often be in the B-plot. Occasionally Phoebe and Max are in separate plots. For the supporting cast, Cherry is always in Phoebe's plot, Dr. Colosso in the Max or Nora/Billy plot, and Chloe in the Nora/Billy plot.
** ''Series/HenryDanger'': Henry/Ray/Charlotte A-Plot; Jasper/Piper B-Plot.



%%* ''Series/TheBill'' often does this.
* After the first few series, ''Series/{{Heartbeat}}'' always divided its episodes between an A plot of the police investigating something serious and a comedy B plot of whoever the LoveableRogue was at the time (Greengrass, Vernon or Peggy, or occasionally their supporting cast if they weren't in the episode) getting involved in some sort of light-hearted shenanigans.

to:

%%* ''Series/TheBill'' often does this.
* After This was the basic storytelling method in the first few series, ''Series/{{Heartbeat}}'' always divided its episodes between an A plot season of ''Series/OnceUponATime''. Every episode featured a story in the cursed community of Storybrooke and a story in the past of the police investigating Enchanted Forest, with the flashback story usually shedding narrative light on the characters in Storybrooke. The second season added a [[ThirdLineSomeWaiting third plot thread]].
* HBO's ''Series/{{Oz}}'' featured several continuing plotlines in more of a serial format (starting and ending with the season), as well as single-episode plots.
* ''Series/PushingDaisies'' usually only has one actual murder mystery per episode, but there are other personal plots for the characters to deal with at the same time. In some of the later episodes, two of the main characters would investigate the case while the others had
something serious and a comedy B plot of whoever the LoveableRogue was at the time (Greengrass, Vernon or Peggy, or occasionally their supporting cast if they weren't else to do.
* Often seen
in the episode) getting involved in British mystery series ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey''. A typical ''Rumpole'' episode involves two plots: the case of the week Rumpole is defending, and a plot involving either some sort of light-hearted shenanigans.intrigue back in chambers or some intrigue in Rumpole's household.



** In ''My Waste of Time'', J.D. {{lampshade|Hanging}}d this practice by saying his moral out loud in front of others after having an epiphany:
-->'''Dr. Cox:''' What in the hell are you talking about?
-->'''J.D.:''' Oh, I'm just doing this thing where I use a slice of wisdom from someone else's life to solve a problem in my own life.
-->'''Jordan:''' Seems coincidental.
-->'''J.D.:''' And yet I do it almost every week.

to:

** In ''My "My Waste of Time'', Time", J.D. {{lampshade|Hanging}}d this practice by saying his moral out loud in front of others after having an epiphany:
-->'''Dr. --->'''Dr. Cox:''' What in the hell are you talking about?
-->'''J.
about?\\
'''J.
D.:''' Oh, I'm just doing this thing where I use a slice of wisdom from someone else's life to solve a problem in my own life.
-->'''Jordan:'''
life.\\
'''Jordan:'''
Seems coincidental.
-->'''J.
coincidental.\\
'''J.
D.:''' And yet I do it almost every week.



** "My Lunch" is has a high drama factor. The A plot deals with organ transplants to several patients, almost all of whom won't survive without immediate surgery. The B plot consists of [[MoodWhiplash Carla and Elliot trying to convince Todd that he should admit to being gay, leading to him harassing both male and female characters from that point on.]]

to:

** "My Lunch" is has a high drama factor. The A plot deals with organ transplants to several patients, almost all of whom won't survive without immediate surgery. The B plot consists of [[MoodWhiplash Carla and Elliot trying to convince Todd that he should admit to being gay, leading to him harassing both male and female characters from that point on.]]



* ''Series/DawsonsCreek'' always had more than one storyline but for much of the post HighSchool 5th and 6th seasons (especially the latter), interaction between the storylines was minimal, or non-existent.
* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' does this quite often, usually preferring the three-storyline model. The relationships between the characters allowed some fluidity in the pairings.
** "The One Where They're Going to Party" - Ross, Chandler, and Joey in Plot A, Monica and Rachel in Plot B, and Phoebe in Plot C.
** "The One Where Ross and Rachel... You Know" - Ross and Rachel in Plot A, Monica and Phoebe in Plot B, and Chandler and Joey in Plot C.
** Particularly in later seasons, episodes frequently split along with the {{Ship|ping}}s: Ross and Rachel, Chandler and Monica, Phoebe and an outside cast member or love interest (Duncan, Eric, Mike, and so forth.)
** "The One with the Routine" had Monica, Ross, Joey, and guest character Janine in Plot A, with Chandler, Phoebe, and Rachel in Plot B; "The One with the Blackout" had Chandler by himself in Story B, while everybody else was in Story A.
** "The One Where They're Up All Night" featured a whopping number of four storylines: Ross and Joey, Chandler and Monica, Rachel and Tag, and Phoebe vs. the fire alarm.
* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
** The A Story usually runs through Ted, while the B Story tends to involve the stable couple of Marshall and Lily. Barney and Robin sometimes end up in their own plotlines, but are more often part of the A Story or B Story.
** Season 5 places the main focus away from Ted more often than not; Barney and Robin's romantic subplot takes up most of the first half of the season, Robin and Don take up the second half, with Marshall and Lily's attempts at having a baby the standard B-plot. Ted himself rarely stars, but is always the FramingDevice.
* The delicate balancing of sitcom hijinks and medical/war drama seen throughout ''Series/{{MASH}}'' appeared to be a little too much for the writers to handle in the last few seasons, so instead every episode was given two storylines, one funny and one serious. It was rather obvious that they were putting all their effort into the serious storylines and the "funny" storylines tended to fall flat as a result.
* ''Series/CornerGas'':
** The series has two or three storylines per episode, which is merely one of the reasons it's often compared to ''Seinfeld''. Its larger main cast (more than four) divides up pretty evenly among the storylines. This is most interesting when the divvying of the storylines ''doesn't'' happen according to the common pattern (the two police officers, the old married couple, the gas station workers--Hank functions as a wildcard, who may have his own storyline like a Good Hair Day).
** ''The Littlest Yarbo'' where Hank discusses his plot, and Brent randomly starts talking about his own:
--->'''Hank''': Maybe Series/TheLittlestHobo was the first ever reality show, did you ever think of that?
--->'''Brent''': Hold on here! If I can see my logo, then her logo is on the outside all the while giving her free advertising!
--->'''Wanda''': Come on, guys! I can only handle one weird obsession at a time!
* This became increasingly common in later seasons of ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'', with some members of the cast getting involved in their own side adventures away from the main plot.
* The Canadian drama series ''Series/DaVincisInquest'' was cancelled in part because of this trope. At the end of the series, the main character, a coroner living in Vancouver, successfully announces his bid to become the Mayor of the city. In the spin-off/sequel, ''Da Vinci's City Hall'', the story balances the problems he has while in office, his quest to get a "red light district" up and running, his bid to create safe-injection sites for drug users, the trials and tribulations of his former partner working at the city morgue, events happening at a police station...if you missed one episode, you were lost. The show suffered in the ratings, and was cancelled as a result (although there may have been other motives).
* In ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' and ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', most episodes revolve around two plots: A MonsterOfTheWeek and some real-life challenge for one or more of the main characters. In many cases, the two get interwoven, with the everyday plot ending up teaching one of the Rangers a [[{{Anvilicious}} valuable]] [[{{Aesop}} lesson]] which then becomes instrumental in defeating the MonsterOfTheWeek.
* One particularly memorable ''Series/LawAndOrder'' episode actually screwed with the long established premise of one case, one episode, by showing a day in the life of the police officers and their relations with the DAs. Rather than the one case followed from crime to verdict, one principal case is brought up, and several other minor cases crop up to plague the detective's concentration.
* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'':
** The majority of the episodes have this structure. Typically, there's the main A plot and the secondary B plot, one of them focusing on Frasier and the other on one of the four other major characters. The main plot isn't necessarily about Frasier, though: Niles especially gets plenty of A plots as his character becomes more rounded.
** One episode ("Death and the Dog", Season 4) hanging a lampshade on it. The events of the episode are being told as a WholeEpisodeFlashback to a caller, and Roz wonders why Frasier is telling the caller about her date in the episode.

to:

* ''Series/DawsonsCreek'' always had more than one storyline but for much of the post HighSchool 5th and 6th seasons (especially the latter), interaction between the storylines was minimal, or non-existent.
* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' does
''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' perfected this quite often, usually preferring the three-storyline model. The relationships between the characters allowed some fluidity in the pairings.
** "The One Where They're Going to Party" - Ross, Chandler, and Joey in Plot A, Monica and Rachel in Plot B, and Phoebe in Plot C.
** "The One Where Ross and Rachel... You Know" - Ross and Rachel in Plot A, Monica and Phoebe in Plot B, and Chandler and Joey in Plot C.
** Particularly in later seasons, episodes frequently split along
tactic, with the {{Ship|ping}}s: Ross and Rachel, Chandler and Monica, Phoebe and an outside cast member or love interest (Duncan, Eric, Mike, and so forth.)
** "The One with the Routine" had Monica, Ross, Joey, and guest character Janine in Plot A, with Chandler, Phoebe, and Rachel in Plot B; "The One with the Blackout" had Chandler by himself in Story B, while everybody else was in Story A.
** "The One Where They're Up All Night" featured
a whopping number of four storylines: Ross and Joey, Chandler and Monica, Rachel and Tag, and Phoebe vs. the fire alarm.
* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'':
**
twist. The A Story usually runs two story lines would turn out to be physically (not just thematically) interrelated through Ted, while the B Story tends to involve the stable couple of Marshall and Lily. Barney and Robin sometimes end up in their own plotlines, but are more often part of the A Story or B Story.
** Season 5 places the main focus away from Ted more often than not; Barney and Robin's romantic subplot takes up most of the first half of the season, Robin and Don take up the second half, with Marshall and Lily's attempts at having a baby the standard B-plot. Ted himself rarely stars, but is always the FramingDevice.
* The delicate balancing of sitcom hijinks and medical/war drama seen throughout ''Series/{{MASH}}'' appeared to be a little too much for the writers to handle in the last few seasons, so instead every episode was given two storylines, one funny and one serious. It was rather obvious that they were putting all their effort into the serious storylines and the "funny" storylines tended to fall flat as a result.
* ''Series/CornerGas'':
** The series has two or three storylines per episode, which is merely one of the reasons it's often compared to ''Seinfeld''. Its larger main cast (more than four) divides up pretty evenly among the storylines. This is most interesting when the divvying of the storylines ''doesn't'' happen according to the common pattern (the two police officers, the old married couple, the gas station workers--Hank functions as a wildcard, who may have his own storyline like a Good Hair Day).
** ''The Littlest Yarbo'' where Hank discusses his plot, and Brent randomly starts talking about his own:
--->'''Hank''': Maybe Series/TheLittlestHobo was the first ever reality show, did you ever think of that?
--->'''Brent''': Hold on here! If I can see my logo, then her logo is on the outside all the while giving her free advertising!
--->'''Wanda''': Come on, guys! I can only handle one weird obsession at a time!
* This became increasingly common in later seasons of ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'', with
some members of the cast getting involved in their own side adventures away from the main plot.
* The Canadian drama series ''Series/DaVincisInquest'' was cancelled in part because of this trope. At the end of the series, the main character, a coroner living in Vancouver, successfully announces his bid to become the Mayor of the city. In the spin-off/sequel, ''Da Vinci's City Hall'', the story balances the problems he
absurd coincidence or twist. Larry David has while mentioned in office, his quest to get a "red light district" up and running, his bid to create safe-injection sites for drug users, the trials and tribulations of his former partner working at the city morgue, events happening at a police station...if you missed one episode, you were lost. The show suffered in the ratings, and was cancelled as a result (although there may have been other motives).
* In ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' and ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', most episodes revolve around two plots: A MonsterOfTheWeek and some real-life challenge for one or more of the main characters. In many cases, the two get interwoven, with the everyday plot ending up teaching one of the Rangers a [[{{Anvilicious}} valuable]] [[{{Aesop}} lesson]] which then becomes instrumental in defeating the MonsterOfTheWeek.
* One particularly memorable ''Series/LawAndOrder'' episode actually screwed with the long established premise of one case, one episode, by showing a day in the life of the police officers and their relations with the DAs. Rather than the one case followed from crime to verdict, one principal case is brought up, and
several other minor cases crop up to plague DVD commentaries that he had the detective's concentration.
* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'':
** The majority of
idea to interweave the episodes have this structure. Typically, there's separate plotlines early on in the main A plot and show's run, but didn't perfect the secondary B plot, one of them focusing on Frasier and the other on one of the four other major characters. The main plot isn't necessarily about Frasier, though: Niles especially gets plenty of A plots as his character becomes more rounded.
** One episode ("Death and the Dog",
practice until Season 4) hanging a lampshade on it. The events of the episode are being told as a WholeEpisodeFlashback to a caller, and Roz wonders why Frasier is telling the caller about her date in the episode.4.



* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' did this every episode, typically with three storylines running at once or more. The most common one was the A Story being about Malcolm and one other family member, and the other stories revolving around the other family members and Francis always had his own story, until he [[DemotedToExtra became a part-time cast member]].
* ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' does this in a way similar to ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' but usually a lot less contrived and there is almost always a real struggle with morality that Meredith references when she does the voice over in the beginning and end of an episode. If the plots are too separated, the writers link it together with a more broad aesop... like "trust your closest friends" or something. Clever!

to:

* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' did this every episode, typically with three storylines running at once or more. The most Very common one was the A Story being about Malcolm and one other family member, and the other stories revolving around the other family members and Francis always had his own story, until he [[DemotedToExtra became a part-time cast member]].
* ''Series/GreysAnatomy'' does this
in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' spin-offs.
** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'''s early seasons suffered badly from
a way similar to ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' but usually a lot less contrived and there is almost always a real struggle with morality sense that Meredith references when she does the voice over in the beginning and end of an episode. If the plots are too separated, the writers link felt ''obligated'' to have multiple plotlines, and events that should have been the centerpiece of an entire episode were relegated to the BStory (''e.g.'', the re-introduction of the Romulans). Through the remainder of the series there was usually one plot line where the Enterprise was in danger even if it together only came up in a few scenes.
** The ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Silent Enemy." The A plot is a strong, tense plot where the Enterprise is face
with a an enemy that outclasses their ship in every way. The ship is boarded, lives are lost, and in order to even survive, the Enterprise has to risk blowing half the ship apart. The B plot is centered around Hoshi finding out Reed's favorite food. HilarityEnsues, despite, you know, the ''ship endangering crisis'' going on. Needless to say, the A plot is horribly undermined by the thematic discontinuity, and gross stupidity, of the B plot.
** This structure is seen in ''every'' episode of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', with the notable exception of [[GrowingTheBeard the late-first-season episode]] "Duet".
** Also used in the movie ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''. Oddly, the movie's title came from the "B" plot.
* In ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' and ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', most episodes revolve around two plots: A MonsterOfTheWeek and some real-life challenge for one or
more broad aesop... of the main characters. In many cases, the two get interwoven, with the everyday plot ending up teaching one of the Rangers a [[{{Anvilicious}} valuable]] [[{{Aesop}} lesson]] which then becomes instrumental in defeating the MonsterOfTheWeek.
* ''Series/TrueBlood'' is setup
like "trust your closest friends" or something. Clever!this. The main story is usually focused on Sookie and Bill. Sam and Tara have their own subplots which cross with each other and Sookie's from time to time. Lafayette and Andy show up regularly with their own problems, but not as much time is dedicated to them. Meanwhile Jason is off doing his own thing.
* ''Series/{{Warehouse 13}}'' has seemingly switched to this in Season 3. With the addition of Jinks, the pattern (so far) is that Pete and Myka search for artifact A, Claudia and Jinks search for artifact B.



* Happened quite a lot in ''Series/BostonLegal'', as different characters are taking different cases, usually with one case being the serious one with a CharacterFilibuster or AuthorFilibuster in it, and the other case being the slightly light-hearted one (usually involved Denny Crane)
* ''Series/PushingDaisies'' usually only has one actual murder mystery per episode, but there are other personal plots for the characters to deal with at the same time. In some of the later episodes, two of the main characters would investigate the case while the others had something else to do.
* ''Series/TrueBlood'' is setup like this. The main story is usually focused on Sookie and Bill. Sam and Tara have their own subplots which cross with each other and Sookies from time to time. Lafayette and Andy show up regularly with their own problems, but not as much time is dedicated to them. Meanwhile Jason is off doing his own thing.
* Most episodes in the new series ''LieToMe'' involve two different investigations going on at the same time. In a standard episode Cal and Ria will be investigating a death or a murder while Gillian and Eli are investigating a scandal.
* Every episode of season one of ''Series/NaturallySadie'' would have one 'Sadie' plot and one 'Rain' plot, except one where the plots merged. This was less common for the second and third season.
* This became the standard for ''Series/BlakesSeven''. With several main characters the writers needed to find something for all of them to do, and so the plot would often split up into two lines: the first for the ones who make planetfall Down There, and the other for the ones who run into trouble Up There on the ''Liberator'' (and later on ''Scorpio'').
* Most episodes of ''Series/TheCloser'' have the investigation as the A plot and something involving Johnson's personal life as the B plot. Usually they're tied together thematically and/or the B plot provides the weekly EurekaMoment. In addition, the B plots often stretch for more than one episode.
* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' usually has 5 plots running simultaneously; one for each of the four main housewives and one involving the season's BigBad or creepy/mysterious neighbor. These plotlines will mesh in the big catastrophe episodes, but generally stay apart.
* Used in nearly every episode of ''Series/TheMentalist''. Plot A follows Jane with the murder mystery and whoever happens to be his sidekick this week, usually Lisbon or Cho. Plot B follows the more exciting cop business with Rigsby and his sidekick of the week. Sometimes the plots are related, and sometimes they're not.
* ''Series/{{Warehouse 13}}'' has seemingly switched to this in Season 3. With the addition of Jinks, the pattern (so far) is that Pete and Myka search for artifact A, Claudia and Jinks search for artifact B.
* ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'' usually begins with the gang getting to an argument and then splitting off into two or three groups with different objectives as the result of the argument, which form the plots of the episode. The entire concept is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in "The Gang Exploit the Mortgage Crisis" which begins with Dee and Frank explaining their individual schemes and the rest of the gang actually voting on which plot they want to be a part of.
* ''Series/{{Castle}}'' has this as well. The A Story centers around the crime drama, and the B Story centers around Richard Castle's family drama.
* In ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'', most episodes had an A plotline with Cory, Shawn and Topanga and a B plotline with Eric (and Jack starting in season 5 and Rachel starting in season 6), though this varied a good bit. In many of the later season episodes [[MoodWhiplash one plotline was serious while one was comedic]].
* In ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'', the A plot is about Riley, Maya, Farkle, and Lucas and the B plot about Topanga and Auggie; Cory could be in either one or both.
* Very common in ''Series/{{Chuck}}'' - the A story revolved around Chuck, Sarah and Casey, while the B story revolved around Chuck's friends at Buy More.
* ''Series/BurnNotice'' does this in practically every single episode. One storyline will involve tracking down the people who burned Michael or, in season 5 [[spoiler: whoever framed him for murder]]. This will invariably bring Michael one step closer, but won't result in a major development unless the episode is a season finale. The other will be generally involve saving an innocent victim from the MonsterOfTheWeek. Seriously, this formula is used so consistently, one has to wonder how none of the characters ever [[GenreBlindness seem to notice that its happening]].
* ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'', a season of Franchise/KamenRider with RuleOfThree as its central premise, would often advertise its unique concept of ''Three'' Lines No Waiting across every two episodes, complete with a PreviouslyOn segment recounting "these three things" - as the series went on, they would often seperate a plotline's cause and effect to make up the number.
* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'': After Amy and Bernadette joined the cast, there were several episodes that featured one storyline for the men and one for the women with little if any overlap.
* ''Series/JeevesAndWooster'' would quite often have two separate plotlines that Bertie Wooster got involved in. This was due the screenwriter, Clive Exton, often combining two different short stories into one episode.
* ''Series/{{Awake}}'' does this as part of the show's premise: the main detective character lives in two realities that constantly react to each other. Thus whenever he starts a case in one reality, another case (somehow linked to the first one) starts in the other, resulting in at least two plotlines per episode.
* ''Series/{{Community}}'' sometimes has subplots spanning every member of the study group. If there are two friends in an A plot (say Jeff and Britta), some of the other members (Abed and Troy for example) will have a B plot together.
* This was the basic storytelling method in the first season of ''Series/OnceUponATime''. Every episode featured a story in the cursed community of Storybrooke and a story in the past of the Enchanted Forest, with the flashback story usually shedding narrative light on the characters in Storybrooke. The second season added a [[ThirdLineSomeWaiting third plot thread]].
* ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has done this on a few occasions, most notably in "Damaged" when the main story saw Morgan, Prentiss and JJ help Rossi solve his cold case, with the "B" story featuring Hotch and Reid interview a serial killer looking for a way to stave off execution.
* ''Series/GoOn'' does this in most episodes, generally with one plot centering around Ryan King, and another plot focusing on someone else from the support group.
* ''Series/FamilyMatters'' generally had an A-story centering on the children and a B-story centering on the parents. However, being a KidCom, the childrens' storylines were predictably far more interesting than the parents' storylines.
* ''Series/ThirdRockFromTheSun'' usually goes with an A-story centering on Dick and a B-story featuring another character.
* Lampshaded on ''Series/CougarTown'' which usually sticks to A and B-plots but occasionally works in a C as well. When they are trying to think of a name for Bobby's (landlocked) boat, one suggestion is ''The Sea Story'' because "everything that happens on this boat is kind of a [[{{Pun}} sea story]]"
* On ''Series/{{Haven}}'', especially in seasons 1 and 2, there typically was an A-plot with Audrey and Nathan investigating a Trouble(superpower) related crime and a B-plot with Duke, sometimes intersecting with the A-plot (often Duke would find himself involved in the Trouble somehow), and sometimes a C-plot involving finding Audrey's past. As the other characters were fleshed out more, there started being a C-plot involving the Teagues, Dwight and/or the Guard. In season 5, there usually is an A-plot with one character and [[spoiler: Mara]] and a B-plot involving the other characters dealing with a Trouble.
* Season 2 of ''Series/{{Daredevil|2015}}'' is pretty evenly split between the Punisher and Elektra storylines.



[[folder:Theater]]
* Shakespeare's ''MuchAdoAboutNothing'' has two love plots -- Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick. ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' has the "lovers from Athens" and the Oberon-Titania plots. ''Theatre/KingLear'' has the plot about the King, and the plot about the Duke and his two sons.

to:

[[folder:Theater]]
[[folder:Theatre]]
* Shakespeare's ''MuchAdoAboutNothing'' ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'' has two love plots -- Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick. ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' has the "lovers from Athens" and the Oberon-Titania plots. ''Theatre/KingLear'' has the plot about the King, and the plot about the Duke and his two sons.
12th May '17 11:02:28 AM Mr.Bubbles
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Blog/ThePredespairKids'': There are a lot of story arcs going on at the same time, ranging from personal quests to investigations to just people goofing around. While there are times where they can feel like [[ThreeLinesSomeWaiting three]] or [[FourLinesAllWaiting four lines]], or just [[AbortedArc end abruptly]] [[note]] It really depends on whether or not the askers themselves continue their story lines or if the blog's ask box decides to be uncooperative[[/note]], the author, Mod J, is fortunately pretty good about keeping things moving and answering questions at the same time without everything devolving into a KudzuPlot.
This list shows the last 10 events of 200. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TwoLinesNoWaiting