History Main / TheatricsOfPain

13th Jul '17 5:12:49 PM Eksekk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A common place to find ''unscripted'' TheatricsOfPain is in UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball (which goes by its surname "football" in most places and its nickname "soccer" in several countries). The injury is usually vaguely real, but typically so minor that even a five-year-old would laugh it off in normal circumstances. However, since injuries get penalties for the other team, and potentially get your team the advantage, many players sell even the most minor injuries with shrieks of pain, theatrical rocking, and, if possible, rivers of tears, in order to convince the referees that they're serious. Why referees haven't adopted a rule of "If you're not bleeding profusely/can't walk/can still play, you don't deserve the foul" is beyond many fans of the sport (particularly English-speaking ones; the tactic is perceived as a hallmark of non-Anglo, and specifically Latin American/European play). [[note]]That's because fouls are there to prevent not only injury, but unsportsmanlike behavior and cheating: e.g. a player lifting his lega above his waist will get a whistle, even if he didn't actually hit anyone, because such a move is dangerous; so will grabbing an opponent's shirt, which isn't dangerous but dirty.[[/note]]

to:

A common place to find ''unscripted'' TheatricsOfPain Theatrics of Pain is in UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball (which goes by its surname "football" in most places and its nickname "soccer" in several countries). The injury is usually vaguely real, but typically so minor that even a five-year-old would laugh it off in normal circumstances. However, since injuries get penalties for the other team, and potentially get your team the advantage, many players sell even the most minor injuries with shrieks of pain, theatrical rocking, and, if possible, rivers of tears, in order to convince the referees that they're serious. Why referees haven't adopted a rule of "If you're not bleeding profusely/can't walk/can still play, you don't deserve the foul" is beyond many fans of the sport (particularly English-speaking ones; the tactic is perceived as a hallmark of non-Anglo, and specifically Latin American/European play). [[note]]That's because fouls are there to prevent not only injury, but unsportsmanlike behavior and cheating: e.g. a player lifting his lega above his waist will get a whistle, even if he didn't actually hit anyone, because such a move is dangerous; so will grabbing an opponent's shirt, which isn't dangerous but dirty.[[/note]]
2nd Jun '17 6:24:37 AM IndirectActiveTransport
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* [[Wrestling/CurtHennig Mr. Perfect]]'s legendary career of bouncing around like a pinball for his opponents cannot be overstated. Perfect was nimble and dexterous enough that he would practically pirouette off of a simple punch.
* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps [[FacePlant and falling on his face]]. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]
** If Wrestling/RicFlair wants to blade[[note]]Wrestling lingo for self-induced bleeding, typically done by slicing open your own forehead after a spot with a concealed razor blade or the like[[/note]], ''Ric Flair will fucking '''blade'''''. His bleached blond hair will quickly turn orange-red, and his entire face will be caked in blood in moments. Even a simple knockdown punch will have him banging his own fist against his forehead until he's more bloody face than man.



* Mr. Perfect's legendary career of bouncing around like a pinball for his opponents cannot be overstated. Perfect was nimble and dexterous enough that he would practically pirouette off of a simple punch.
* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps [[FacePlant and falling on his face]]. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]
** If Wrestling/RicFlair wants to blade[[note]]Wrestling lingo for self-induced bleeding, typically done by slicing open your own forehead after a spot with a concealed razor blade or the like[[/note]], ''Ric Flair will fucking '''blade'''''. His bleached blond hair will quickly turn orange-red, and his entire face will be caked in blood in moments. Even a simple knockdown punch will have him banging his own fist against his forehead until he's more bloody face than man.
10th Mar '17 4:23:47 PM AriRockefeller
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** If Wrestling/RicFlair wants to blade[[note]]Wrestling lingo for self-induced bleeding, typically done by slicing open your own forehead after a spot with a concealed razor blade or the like[[/blade]], ''Ric Flair will fucking '''blade'''''. His bleached blond hair will quickly turn orange-red, and his entire face will be caked in blood in moments. Even a simple knockdown punch will have him banging his own fist against his forehead until he's more bloody face than man.

to:

** If Wrestling/RicFlair wants to blade[[note]]Wrestling lingo for self-induced bleeding, typically done by slicing open your own forehead after a spot with a concealed razor blade or the like[[/blade]], like[[/note]], ''Ric Flair will fucking '''blade'''''. His bleached blond hair will quickly turn orange-red, and his entire face will be caked in blood in moments. Even a simple knockdown punch will have him banging his own fist against his forehead until he's more bloody face than man.
10th Mar '17 4:23:32 PM AriRockefeller
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** If Wrestling/RicFlair wants to blade[[note]]Wrestling lingo for self-induced bleeding, typically done by slicing open your own forehead after a spot with a concealed razor blade or the like[[/blade]], ''Ric Flair will fucking '''blade'''''. His bleached blond hair will quickly turn orange-red, and his entire face will be caked in blood in moments. Even a simple knockdown punch will have him banging his own fist against his forehead until he's more bloody face than man.
13th Feb '17 4:26:16 PM ironballs16
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps [[FaceFault and falling on his face]]. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]

to:

* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps [[FaceFault [[FacePlant and falling on his face]]. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]
13th Feb '17 4:25:13 PM ironballs16
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps and falling on his face. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]

to:

* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps [[FaceFault and falling on his face.face]]. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]
27th Nov '16 3:09:57 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Demonstrated in ''RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' when Guildenstern seizes the Player's dagger and tries to stab him to death. Guildenstern thinks the Player has been KilledOffForReal, when the Tragedians start applauding and congratulating the Player on a death scene well played. (He considers his own performance "merely competent.")

to:

* Demonstrated in ''RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' ''Theatre/RosencrantzAndGuildensternAreDead'' when Guildenstern seizes the Player's dagger and tries to stab him to death. Guildenstern thinks the Player has been KilledOffForReal, when the Tragedians start applauding and congratulating the Player on a death scene well played. (He considers his own performance "merely competent.")



* In PunchOut, especially the Wii version, boxers react in differing degrees to punches; depending on how you hit them, they'll either stand there stunned and take a flurry, take one hit and back off, or, depending on if you knock them down with a jab or a body blow, get sent flying or twirling backwards instead of merely falling over as real boxers usually do. Of course, the comical reactions are there to help the player [[CatharsisFactor and give them a rush from clobbering their opponent]].

to:

* In PunchOut, ''VideoGame/PunchOut'', especially the Wii version, boxers react in differing degrees to punches; depending on how you hit them, they'll either stand there stunned and take a flurry, take one hit and back off, or, depending on if you knock them down with a jab or a body blow, get sent flying or twirling backwards instead of merely falling over as real boxers usually do. Of course, the comical reactions are there to help the player [[CatharsisFactor and give them a rush from clobbering their opponent]].
9th Aug '16 9:18:39 PM ThatBitterTase
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Wrestling has the most literal version; the theatrics of pain is called "selling" in that medium. Many wrestlers find themselves praised or derided based on their ability (or lack thereof) to sell an opponent's attacks.

to:

Wrestling has the most literal version; the theatrics of pain is called "selling" in that medium. Many wrestlers find themselves praised or derided based on their ability (or lack thereof) to sell an opponent's attacks.
attacks. See also WrestlingPsychology.
6th Jun '16 2:16:30 PM wyattte
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Wrestling has the most literal version; the theatrics of pain is called "selling" in that medium. Many wrestlers find themselves praised or derided based on their ability (or lack thereof) to sell an opponent's attacks.
** One of the most memorable examples of a wrestler ''over''-selling is the Wrestling/ShawnMichaels vs Wrestling/HulkHogan match at Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s Summerslam 2005.
** And a great example of a wrestler [[NoSell no-selling]] is Wrestling/HulkHogan no selling Wrestling/TheUndertaker's chokeslam so badly that Undertaker actually has to remind Hogan he needs to jump for the move to work.
** Wrestling/HulkHogan often refuses to sell hit. Sitting up seconds after taking what was supposed to be a knockout blow is one of his trademarks.
** Wrestling/DolphZiggler is probably one of the best sellers in WWE history, to the point where there are montages on YouTube on him doing nothing but selling. Although sometimes he gets criticised for taking crazy bumps such that they look cartoony, still others like him for emulating the likes of [[Wrestling/CurtHennig Mr. Perfect]] and Wrestling/RicFlair who revolutionised how entertaining selling could be and for making his opponents look strong.
** Wrestling/TripleH. For all the flak he gets for his burials and metaphorical shovel, when Hunter wants to get a guy over, ''he will get that guy over''. His selling is as good as Ziggler's -- as shown when Wrestling/RomanReigns beat him down at the end of ''TLC 2015''.

to:

* Wrestling has the most literal version; the theatrics of pain is called "selling" in that medium. Many wrestlers find themselves praised or derided based on their ability (or lack thereof) to sell an opponent's attacks.
**
attacks.

*
One of the most memorable examples of a wrestler ''over''-selling is the Wrestling/ShawnMichaels vs Wrestling/HulkHogan match at Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s Summerslam 2005.
** And [[AvertedTrope Speaking of which,]] a great example of a wrestler [[NoSell no-selling]] is Wrestling/HulkHogan no selling Wrestling/TheUndertaker's chokeslam so badly that Undertaker actually has to remind Hogan he needs to jump for the move to work.
** Wrestling/HulkHogan often refuses
work. Frankly, Hogan is notorious for refusing to sell hit. hits. [[PunchPunchPunchUhOh Sitting up seconds after taking what was supposed to be a knockout blow blow]] is one of his trademarks.
** * Wrestling/DolphZiggler is probably one of the best sellers in WWE history, to the point where there are montages on YouTube on him doing nothing but selling. Although sometimes he gets criticised criticized for taking crazy bumps such that they look cartoony, still others like him for emulating the likes of [[Wrestling/CurtHennig Mr. Perfect]] and Wrestling/RicFlair who revolutionised revolutionized how entertaining selling could be and for making his opponents look strong.
**
strong. Speaking of which...
* Mr. Perfect's legendary career of bouncing around like a pinball for his opponents cannot be overstated. Perfect was nimble and dexterous enough that he would practically pirouette off of a simple punch.
* Ric Flair sold like he'd been ''shot.'' One of his trademark bits is getting the crap beat out of him, then getting up, taking a few dizzy, awkward steps and falling on his face. Longtime fans call it the [[https://youtu.be/XNfDSnX2mDw?t=6s Flair Flop.]]
*
Wrestling/TripleH. For all the flak he gets for his burials and metaphorical shovel, when Hunter wants to get a guy over, ''he will get that guy over''. His selling is as good as Ziggler's -- as shown when Wrestling/RomanReigns beat him down at the end of ''TLC 2015''.
5th May '16 7:16:33 PM LadySugarQuill
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Usually, it is quite easy to tell in wrestling if someone has been injured for real or is "selling" the move by its absence. It is harder in film and television because the stuntmen (whose job it is to do all the dangerous maneuvers) are trained to handle such situations professionally in a contained environment--and such things are all behind the scene anyway.[[note]] Which isn't surprising, as many professional wrestlers are former stuntmen and many stuntmen are failed professional wrestlers. (Successful professional wrestlers are more often the ''actors'' in the role, and usually do require the use of a stuntman.)[[/note]]

to:

Usually, it is quite easy to tell in wrestling if someone has been injured for real or is "selling" the move by its absence. It is harder in film and television because the stuntmen (whose job it is to do all the dangerous maneuvers) are trained to handle such situations professionally in a contained environment--and such things are all behind the scene anyway. [[note]] Which isn't surprising, as many professional wrestlers are former stuntmen and many stuntmen are failed professional wrestlers. (Successful professional wrestlers are more often the ''actors'' in the role, and usually do require the use of a stuntman.)[[/note]]



A common place to find ''unscripted'' TheatricsOfPain is in UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball (which goes by its surname "football" in most places and its nickname "soccer" in several countries). The injury is usually vaguely real, but typically so minor that even a five-year-old would laugh it off in normal circumstances. However, since injuries get penalties for the other team, and potentially get your team the advantage, many players sell even the most minor injuries with shrieks of pain, theatrical rocking, and, if possible, rivers of tears, in order to convince the referees that they're serious. Why referees haven't adopted a rule of "If you're not bleeding profusely/can't walk/can still play, you don't deserve the foul" is beyond many fans of the sport (particularly English-speaking ones; the tactic is perceived as a hallmark of non-Anglo, and specifically Latin American/European play).[[note]That's because fouls are there to prevent not only injury, but unsportsmanlike behavior and cheating: e.g. a player lifting his lega above his waist will get a whistle, even if he didn't actually hit anyone, because such a move is dangerous; so will grabbing an opponent's shirt, which isn't dangerous but dirty.[[/note]]

to:

A common place to find ''unscripted'' TheatricsOfPain is in UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball (which goes by its surname "football" in most places and its nickname "soccer" in several countries). The injury is usually vaguely real, but typically so minor that even a five-year-old would laugh it off in normal circumstances. However, since injuries get penalties for the other team, and potentially get your team the advantage, many players sell even the most minor injuries with shrieks of pain, theatrical rocking, and, if possible, rivers of tears, in order to convince the referees that they're serious. Why referees haven't adopted a rule of "If you're not bleeding profusely/can't walk/can still play, you don't deserve the foul" is beyond many fans of the sport (particularly English-speaking ones; the tactic is perceived as a hallmark of non-Anglo, and specifically Latin American/European play).[[note]That's [[note]]That's because fouls are there to prevent not only injury, but unsportsmanlike behavior and cheating: e.g. a player lifting his lega above his waist will get a whistle, even if he didn't actually hit anyone, because such a move is dangerous; so will grabbing an opponent's shirt, which isn't dangerous but dirty.[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 59. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheatricsOfPain