History Main / StockAmericanPhrases

11th Aug '16 3:59:01 AM Morgenthaler
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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New Orleans}}.

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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New UsefulNotes/{{New Orleans}}.
16th Aug '15 4:45:18 PM nombretomado
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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.

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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.
26th Nov '14 8:33:55 PM SpacemanSam7
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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New Orleans}}.
22nd Sep '14 5:32:05 AM SpacemanSpoof
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** Interestingly, North Florida (especially the Panhandle region) is more Southern, while Central and South Florida is more Northern. This is largely due to the "snowbirds" (wealthy Northerners) who migrate there in the winter and the relatively large number of retirees who prefer the warm climate to that of their home states.


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** Also used as a LastSecondWordSwap. When "goddammit" would be inappropriate, you frequently hear "God... bless America!"
1st Mar '14 2:40:42 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Cowboy slang is generally considered some of the most prototypically American:
** "Tarnation" is a euphemism for "damnation" when used as profanity.
** "Varmint" is a small creature or vermin
** "Dogie" is a cow, usually a small or lost one.
** "Sam Hill" is a euphemism for "hell," usually used in the phrase "What in Sam Hill..."
1st Mar '14 1:05:20 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* "Man" is the earlier version of "dude." Peppering your speech with "man" like a VerbalTic started with the beatniks and carried on from there.
1st Mar '14 12:58:46 PM CaptainCrawdad
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See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.

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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.


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* TotallyRadical slang is generally rooted in using grandiose adjectives as hyperbole. It originated among surfers in Hawaii and the West Coast before becoming a fad of the 1980s and early 1990s:
** "Totally." Used by itself, it's an affirmation. It can also be used as an intensifier to an adjective, such as "totally radical."
** "Radical" and its abbreviation "rad" mean that something is good, stylish or impressive.
** "Awesome" is used identically to "radical," but is still in common usage.
** "Righteous" is used identically to "radical"
** "Tubular." Originally a description of an ideal wave to surf on, it briefly became an adjective for anything good or ideal.
** "As if." Used as a response to a statement to express dubiousness or disagreement.
1st Mar '14 12:44:34 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* "Fuhgeddaboudit" is "forget about it" said in a Northeastern, Italian-American accent, most heavily associated with [[BigApplesauce Brooklyn]]. The phrase has a number of uses, from the literal, to "[[BigOMG oh my God!]]" to "shut up!"
** Also stereotypically said by gangsters, in similar context to [[DeadlyEuphemism "I took care of him."]]
* "Mason-Dixon Line." A demarcation line that initially marked the northern border of Maryland, it was later stretched west to denote the traditional boundary between Northern culture and Southern (Dixie) culture, running along the northern borders of Virginia (including what is now West Virginia) and Kentucky. Thus, "north of the Mason-Dixon line" would be Northern, and vice-versa. Today, the distinction between North and South has become more vague. Maryland and northern Virginia (the UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC suburbs) are now generally seen as being more Northern than Southern, while parts of southern Illinois and Indiana are often treated as an extension of the South.
** And then there's Florida, where the demarcation is ''inverted''. The northern part of the state is Southern in culture, whereas the more southern and central parts have taken on Northern sensibilities, thanks to snowbirds from the Northeast, the Cuban exile community, the tourism industry, and NASA.

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* "Fuhgeddaboudit" is "forget about it" said in a Northeastern, Italian-American accent, most heavily associated with [[BigApplesauce Brooklyn]]. The phrase has a number of uses, from the literal, to "[[BigOMG oh my God!]]" to "shut up!"
** Also stereotypically said by gangsters,
up!" Because the culture is so strongly associated with TheMafia in similar context to [[DeadlyEuphemism "I took care of him."]]
pop culture, the phrase can take on darker connotations.
* "Mason-Dixon Line." A demarcation line that initially marked the northern border of Maryland, it was later stretched west to denote the traditional boundary between Northern culture and Southern (Dixie) culture, running along the northern borders of Virginia (including what is now West Virginia) and Kentucky. Thus, "north of the Mason-Dixon line" would be Northern, and vice-versa. Today, the distinction between North and South has become more vague. Maryland and northern Virginia (the UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC suburbs) are now generally seen as being more Northern than Southern, while parts of southern Illinois and Indiana are often treated as an extension of the South.
** And then there's Florida, where the demarcation
South. Florida is ''inverted''. The northern part a mash-up of the state is Northern and Southern in culture, whereas the more southern and central parts have taken on Northern sensibilities, thanks to snowbirds from the Northeast, the Cuban exile community, the tourism industry, and NASA.cultures.



* "Yankee". To non-Americans, this (along with the shortened form, "Yank", which is almost never heard in the US) is a catch-all term for Americans in general. In the US, however, it refers strictly to people from the Northeast (especially New England) and, sometimes, the Midwest and the West. It is ''never'' used in reference to people from the South; call a Southerner a Yankee, and [[BerserkButton you will receive a]] [[AmericanCivilWar long rant on the subject]].
** To quote E. B. White:

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* "Yankee". To non-Americans, this (along with the shortened form, "Yank", which is almost never heard in the US) is a catch-all term for Americans in general. In the US, however, it refers strictly to people from the Northeast (especially New England) and, sometimes, the Midwest and the West. It is ''never'' used in reference to people from the South; call a Southerner a Yankee, and [[BerserkButton you will receive a]] [[AmericanCivilWar long rant on the subject]].
**
South. To quote E. B. White:



** Can also indicate proper construction. As in "Waxed and wicked as a candle."



** "Sure", when drawn out, expresses doubt or disbelief, à la SarcasmMode. For example, if someone says, "I totally kicked that guy's ass" and the other person doesn't believe them, they might say, "Sure" or "Sure you did." Drawing out the word "Right" can also mean the same thing (think Dr. Evil from ''AustinPowers'').
1st Mar '14 12:40:29 PM CaptainCrawdad
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*** This one has infested Ireland to the point where people who know they are almost certainly never going to lay eyes on you again in their life will say "see you soon" instead of "bye".



*** When someone takes a formulaic greeting as a conversation starter, much [[HilarityEnsues awkwardness ensues,]] as illustrated [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffUDDYYIX04 in this commercial.]]



** "Hey" by itself is a very informal greeting, and can be considered somewhat rude, especially when used with your elders or social betters.

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** "Hey" by itself is a very informal greeting, greeting and can be considered somewhat rude, especially when used with your elders or social betters.



** "Y'all," short for "you all," is strongly associated with the South, and to a lesser extent the West. For additional emphasis that every single person is included in the statement, the speaker might say "all y'all."

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** "Y'all," short for "you all," is strongly associated with the South, South and to a lesser extent the West.Texas. For additional emphasis that every single person is included in the statement, the speaker might say "all y'all."
28th Dec '13 12:38:49 PM Prfnoff
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** "Have a nice day" or "Have a good one." A generic farewell. Note that "Have a nice day" in particular is associated with service personnel (cashiers, clerks, receptionists, etc.) almost to the point of cliche, so using it with people you know will feel distant and rigid.[[note]] PeterUstinov used to respond to "Have a nice day" with "Sorry, I've made other plans."[[/note]]

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** "Have a nice day" or "Have a good one." A generic farewell. Note that "Have a nice day" in particular is associated with service personnel (cashiers, clerks, receptionists, etc.) almost to the point of cliche, so using it with people you know will feel distant and rigid.[[note]] PeterUstinov Creator/PeterUstinov used to respond to "Have a nice day" with "Sorry, I've made other plans."[[/note]]
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