History Main / StockAmericanPhrases

4th Oct '17 8:29:56 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* "Catch these hands" is a New York City phrase that refers to inflicting physical violence upon someone or otherwise stating an intention to fight them. It can also function in a more dismissive manner with the threat being more implied than stated outright; "_____ can catch these hands" means that the speaker doesn't care what they have to say and may inflict harm upon them if they want to push the issue, whereas "_____ is gonna catch these hands" is a direct threat and/or invitation to fight.
30th Sep '17 8:12:49 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* "Guy" is analogous in usage to the above two, though it is mostly relegated to New England and more specifically to blue-collar townies.



* "Jagoff" is Pittsburghese for an undesirable person, though it can also be used as a rough but good-natured greeting for one's friends. Elsewhere in the United States, "jack-off" or "jerk-off" ''only'' refers to a person the speaker views with contempt (e.g., "That jack-off stole my wallet!") or as a synonym for masturbation. Compare "wank/wanker" for those across the pond.

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* "Jagoff" is Pittsburghese for an undesirable person, though it can also be used as a rough but good-natured greeting epithet for one's friends. Elsewhere in the United States, "jack-off" or "jerk-off" ''only'' refers to a person the speaker views with contempt (e.g., "That jack-off stole my wallet!") or as a synonym for masturbation. Compare "wank/wanker" for those across the pond.


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** "Hella" is an intensifier that is roughly analogous to New England's "wicked" or New York's "mad". Originated in Northern California before proliferating throughout the state.
29th Sep '17 11:36:55 AM RampinUp46
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* "Jagoff" is Pittsburghese for an undesirable person, though it can also be used as a rough but good-natured greeting for one's friends.

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* "Jagoff" is Pittsburghese for an undesirable person, though it can also be used as a rough but good-natured greeting for one's friends. Elsewhere in the United States, "jack-off" or "jerk-off" ''only'' refers to a person the speaker views with contempt (e.g., "That jack-off stole my wallet!") or as a synonym for masturbation. Compare "wank/wanker" for those across the pond.
29th Sep '17 8:55:09 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* "Jawn" is an almost exclusively Philadeliphian and Southern New Jersey all-purpose placeholder noun that is used for any noun that the speaker either can't think of or doesn't feel like saying.

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* "Jawn" is an almost exclusively Philadeliphian Philadelphian and Southern New Jersey all-purpose placeholder noun that is used for any noun that the speaker either can't think of or doesn't feel like saying.
29th Sep '17 8:53:57 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** "Yo" is commonly associated with blue-collar New Yorkers and more generally African-Americans.

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** "Where you at?" is also a common New York greeting, though it is generally uttered in a somewhat more brusque fashion (owing to the relatively fast-paced nature of New York City English and its ambiguously aggressive tone).
** "Yo" is commonly associated with blue-collar New Yorkers and Philadelphians (and less commonly South Jersey) and more generally African-Americans.



** Yinz, associated with Pittsburgh and some surrounding areas.

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** Yinz, "Yinz", associated with Pittsburgh and some surrounding areas.


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** "Awright awready", or "alright already" said in a Noo Yawk accent. Generally also means "shut up" or "stop talking", usually either in response to a MotorMouth or a large amount of chatter when trying to get a word in, especially when another speaker is obviously going to ask a question or state a point but is belaboring it with a long-winded story or irrelevant information.
* "And shit" is a rather vulgar general extender and occasional sentence-ender when the speaker wants to indicate that a list or category continues on in a similar fashion and doesn't wish to belabor it.
** "N'at" ("and that") is its more family-friendly Pittsburghese counterpart and is used in the exact same context. Like "yinz", it smooths out to "and that" as you head away from the Pittsburgh area.
* "Jagoff" is Pittsburghese for an undesirable person, though it can also be used as a rough but good-natured greeting for one's friends.


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* "Jawn" is an almost exclusively Philadeliphian and Southern New Jersey all-purpose placeholder noun that is used for any noun that the speaker either can't think of or doesn't feel like saying.
** "Da kine" ("the thing") is a Hawaii Pidgin phrase that, like "jawn", is a placeholder noun, with the only real difference being that "da kine" is typically more contextual, whereas "jawn" can be said at any time, anywhere, for anything.
16th Aug '17 7:22:59 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** "Sick" is analogous to "radical" but sees far greater usage nowadays.
23rd Jun '17 5:05:43 PM FranksGirl
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** "You'enz"" is similar to "yinz", though distinctly two-syllables. It's associated with the Ohio River Valley between Ohio and West Virginia, as well as some parts of Appalachia.
24th Sep '16 10:32:15 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** "Yo" is commonly associated with blue-collar New Yorkers and more generally African-Americans.


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** "Mad" is its largely identical New York sibling (due to geographical overlap, it has also migrated up to New England) with one key difference: it can also be used to signify great abundance (e.g., "mad people here"). It's also very common in New Jersey and parts of Pennsylvania.
11th Aug '16 3:59:01 AM Morgenthaler
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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New Orleans}}.

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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New UsefulNotes/{{New Orleans}}.
16th Aug '15 4:45:18 PM nombretomado
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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.

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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.
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