History Main / StockAmericanPhrases

16th Aug '17 7:22:59 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** "Sick" is analogous to "radical" but sees far greater usage nowadays.
23rd Jun '17 5:05:43 PM FranksGirl
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** "You'enz"" is similar to "yinz", though distinctly two-syllables. It's associated with the Ohio River Valley between Ohio and West Virginia, as well as some parts of Appalachia.
24th Sep '16 10:32:15 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** "Yo" is commonly associated with blue-collar New Yorkers and more generally African-Americans.


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** "Mad" is its largely identical New York sibling (due to geographical overlap, it has also migrated up to New England) with one key difference: it can also be used to signify great abundance (e.g., "mad people here"). It's also very common in New Jersey and parts of Pennsylvania.
11th Aug '16 3:59:01 AM Morgenthaler
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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New Orleans}}.

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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New UsefulNotes/{{New Orleans}}.
16th Aug '15 4:45:18 PM nombretomado
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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.

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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.
26th Nov '14 8:33:55 PM SpacemanSam7
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** "Where Y'at?" is a common greeting in {{New Orleans}}.
22nd Sep '14 5:32:05 AM SpacemanSpoof
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** Interestingly, North Florida (especially the Panhandle region) is more Southern, while Central and South Florida is more Northern. This is largely due to the "snowbirds" (wealthy Northerners) who migrate there in the winter and the relatively large number of retirees who prefer the warm climate to that of their home states.


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** Also used as a LastSecondWordSwap. When "goddammit" would be inappropriate, you frequently hear "God... bless America!"
1st Mar '14 2:40:42 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Cowboy slang is generally considered some of the most prototypically American:
** "Tarnation" is a euphemism for "damnation" when used as profanity.
** "Varmint" is a small creature or vermin
** "Dogie" is a cow, usually a small or lost one.
** "Sam Hill" is a euphemism for "hell," usually used in the phrase "What in Sam Hill..."
1st Mar '14 1:05:20 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* "Man" is the earlier version of "dude." Peppering your speech with "man" like a VerbalTic started with the beatniks and carried on from there.
1st Mar '14 12:58:46 PM CaptainCrawdad
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See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.

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TotallyRadical tends to use traditional (and out-dated) American surfer slang. See also AmericanAccents and UsefulNotes/AmericanEnglish.


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* TotallyRadical slang is generally rooted in using grandiose adjectives as hyperbole. It originated among surfers in Hawaii and the West Coast before becoming a fad of the 1980s and early 1990s:
** "Totally." Used by itself, it's an affirmation. It can also be used as an intensifier to an adjective, such as "totally radical."
** "Radical" and its abbreviation "rad" mean that something is good, stylish or impressive.
** "Awesome" is used identically to "radical," but is still in common usage.
** "Righteous" is used identically to "radical"
** "Tubular." Originally a description of an ideal wave to surf on, it briefly became an adjective for anything good or ideal.
** "As if." Used as a response to a statement to express dubiousness or disagreement.
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