History Main / SpotOfTea

24th Jun '17 9:38:25 AM nombretomado
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* JudgeDee downs ''gallons'' of tea in the course of his cases. In fact he hits the teapot the way Sam Spade hits the bottle. This being ImperialChina everybody else is equally addicted (except for his faithful Lieutenants Ma Joon and Chiao Tai who prefer 'the amber liquid', i.e. wine). A cuppa is even offered to witnesses and criminals in court, to revive them after a round of beating or being overpowered by emotion.

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* JudgeDee Literature/JudgeDee downs ''gallons'' of tea in the course of his cases. In fact he hits the teapot the way Sam Spade hits the bottle. This being ImperialChina everybody else is equally addicted (except for his faithful Lieutenants Ma Joon and Chiao Tai who prefer 'the amber liquid', i.e. wine). A cuppa is even offered to witnesses and criminals in court, to revive them after a round of beating or being overpowered by emotion.
13th Jun '17 9:26:42 PM nombretomado
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** He has "Everything Stops For Tea", featuring the lyrics "Oh the soldiers may be fighting, in the [[WorldWarOne Trenches]] or a Battleship at sea, but there isn't any war when the clock strikes four, everything stops for tea."

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** He has "Everything Stops For Tea", featuring the lyrics "Oh the soldiers may be fighting, in the [[WorldWarOne [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Trenches]] or a Battleship at sea, but there isn't any war when the clock strikes four, everything stops for tea."



* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne: Mix the hell of trench warfare and cold, wet conditions with massive, water-cooled machine guns. Guns would fire, water keeps them from overheating, water gets nice and hot in the process. Leave it to the British Army to figure out that firing off a few rounds to make tea was a valid MundaneUtility.
* During UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, the British Army in North Africa found that, because of the poor quality of metal used in the cans transporting their drinking water, it had an unfortunate tendency to taste metallic and bitter, not to mention tepid due to the desert heat. The only way to make it palatable was to add tea. Recognizing the importance of tea to her fighting forces, in 1942 Britain decided to buy it all. As in, all the tea in the world: that's right, the British government bought ''the '''entire world's''' tea crop'' in 1942. Presumably just because it could, and because they had to do it once.

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* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne: UsefulNotes/WorldWarI: Mix the hell of trench warfare and cold, wet conditions with massive, water-cooled machine guns. Guns would fire, water keeps them from overheating, water gets nice and hot in the process. Leave it to the British Army to figure out that firing off a few rounds to make tea was a valid MundaneUtility.
* During UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the British Army in North Africa found that, because of the poor quality of metal used in the cans transporting their drinking water, it had an unfortunate tendency to taste metallic and bitter, not to mention tepid due to the desert heat. The only way to make it palatable was to add tea. Recognizing the importance of tea to her fighting forces, in 1942 Britain decided to buy it all. As in, all the tea in the world: that's right, the British government bought ''the '''entire world's''' tea crop'' in 1942. Presumably just because it could, and because they had to do it once.
13th Jun '17 8:30:29 PM nombretomado
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--> ''[[YoutubePoop I just love sharing a cosy hot cup of lapsang souchong tea.]]''

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--> ''[[YoutubePoop ''[[WebAnimation/YouTubePoop I just love sharing a cosy hot cup of lapsang souchong tea.]]''
7th Jun '17 9:54:03 PM unclebubba62
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* Tea was also used as an instrument of wartime diplomacy. The Irish Free State had no mercantile marine of its own and was utterly dependent on re-importing exotic foreign goods (just about everything it couldn't produce itself) through Britain. The Irish were one of a handful of European states to remain neutral and relatively untouched by war, despite heavy pressure and downright intimidation from both Britain and the Axis. The Irish also drink ''at least'' as much tea as the British, perhaps more. Britain won several grudging concessions from Ireland during the war years by 1) threatening to vastly increase export tariffs on tea; and 2) cutting off the supply completely to force deValera to comply. This was still preferable to the German idea of "persuasion" - after the Free State violated neutrality by sending all available medical personnel North as a humanitarian gesture, and opened its hospitals to treat victims of German bombing in Northern Ireland, Dublin was bombed "by accident" for three straight nights. The Luftwaffe claimed it had been aiming at Liverpool. Hmm..

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* Tea was also used as an instrument of wartime diplomacy. The Irish Free State had no mercantile merchant marine of its own and was utterly dependent on re-importing exotic foreign goods (just about everything it couldn't produce itself) through Britain. The Irish were one of a handful of European states to remain neutral and relatively untouched by the war, despite heavy pressure and downright intimidation from both Britain and the Axis. The Irish also drink ''at least'' as much tea as the British, perhaps more. Britain won several grudging concessions from Ireland during the war years by 1) threatening to vastly increase export tariffs on tea; and 2) cutting off the supply completely to force deValera Taoiseach (prime minister) Eamon de Valera to comply. This was still preferable to the German idea of "persuasion" - after the Free State violated neutrality by sending all available medical personnel North as a humanitarian gesture, and opened its hospitals to treat victims of German bombing in Northern Ireland, Dublin was bombed "by accident" for three straight nights. The Luftwaffe claimed it had been aiming at Liverpool. Hmm..
7th Jun '17 9:50:38 PM unclebubba62
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* Infamously, during D-Day, where the Americans at Omaha Beach, the Canadians at Juno Beach, and the British at Gold Beach were met with fierce resistance, the British at Sword Beach were faced with perhaps the lightest resistance (possible tie with the Americans at Utah Beach), and the German panzer divisions were yet to arrive. Caen was as good as theirs. That is, if they didn't ''take a tea break on the as soon as they'd got across the beach'', giving German forces enough time to reinforce the entirety of their route forwards.

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* Infamously, during D-Day, where the Americans at Omaha Beach, the Canadians at Juno Beach, and the British at Gold Beach were met with fierce resistance, the British at Sword Beach were faced with perhaps the lightest resistance (possible tie with the Americans at Utah Beach), and the German panzer divisions were yet to arrive. Caen was as good as theirs. That is, if they didn't ''take a tea break on the as soon as they'd got across the beach'', giving German forces enough time to reinforce the entirety of their route forwards.
7th Jun '17 9:49:47 PM unclebubba62
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* Infamously, during D-day, where the Americans at Omaha and Utah, and the Canadians at Juno were met with fierce resistance, the British at sword beach.......were faced with perhaps the lightest defenses, and the Panzer Divisions were yet to arrive. Caen was as good as theirs. That is, if they didn't ''take a Tea break on the first day of the invasion'', giving German forces enough time to reinforce the entirety of their route forwards.

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* Infamously, during D-day, D-Day, where the Americans at Omaha and Utah, and Beach, the Canadians at Juno Beach, and the British at Gold Beach were met with fierce resistance, the British at sword beach.......Sword Beach were faced with perhaps the lightest defenses, resistance (possible tie with the Americans at Utah Beach), and the Panzer Divisions German panzer divisions were yet to arrive. Caen was as good as theirs. That is, if they didn't ''take a Tea tea break on the first day of as soon as they'd got across the invasion'', beach'', giving German forces enough time to reinforce the entirety of their route forwards.
2nd Jun '17 5:58:41 PM TonyG
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Added DiffLines:

* In WesternAnimation/TheFoxAndTheCrow'' cartoon "Robin Hoodlum", Robin Hood's Merry Men are StiffUpperLip types who spend the whole time drinking tea. When Robin is kidnapped by Prince John, they don't seem that concerned, until they realize he's late for tea. They go to the castle and give Robin his cup, which has the same effect as spinach has on WesternAnimation/PopeyeTheSailor.
18th May '17 6:28:41 PM 2GreyCats
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* In the pilot episode for ''Series/TheRatPatrol'', "The Chase of Fire Raid", Jack Moffitt, the British sergeant who has just been reassigned to the Rat Patrol, asks permission of the squad's leader, Sgt. Sam Troy, to "brew up" tea for himself. Troy tells him to go ahead, and to shave off some of the TNT to start the fire with as it burns so hot. Moffitt says diffidently, "Great booster for the morale, tea--even under the most difficult circumstances," and offers to make a cup for Troy as sort of an olive branch to smooth over an earlier disagreement. Troy politely declines (in a tone that implies he can't stand the stuff, but he's not saying so).

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* In the pilot episode for ''Series/TheRatPatrol'', "The Chase of Fire Raid", Jack Moffitt, the British sergeant who has just been reassigned to the Rat Patrol, asks permission of the squad's American leader, Sgt. Sam Troy, to "brew up" tea for himself. Troy tells him to go ahead, and to shave off some of the TNT to start the fire with as it burns so hot. Moffitt says diffidently, "Great booster for the morale, tea--even under the most difficult circumstances," and offers to make a cup for Troy as sort of an olive branch to smooth over an earlier disagreement. Troy politely declines (in a tone that implies he can't stand the stuff, but he's not saying so).
18th May '17 12:33:39 PM 2GreyCats
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Added DiffLines:

* In the pilot episode for ''Series/TheRatPatrol'', "The Chase of Fire Raid", Jack Moffitt, the British sergeant who has just been reassigned to the Rat Patrol, asks permission of the squad's leader, Sgt. Sam Troy, to "brew up" tea for himself. Troy tells him to go ahead, and to shave off some of the TNT to start the fire with as it burns so hot. Moffitt says diffidently, "Great booster for the morale, tea--even under the most difficult circumstances," and offers to make a cup for Troy as sort of an olive branch to smooth over an earlier disagreement. Troy politely declines (in a tone that implies he can't stand the stuff, but he's not saying so).
16th May '17 5:40:16 PM nombretomado
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* A RunningGag in TheTwoRonnies sketch "Tinker, Tailor, Smiley, Doyle" involves George Smiley's fondness for tea.

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* A RunningGag in TheTwoRonnies Series/TheTwoRonnies sketch "Tinker, Tailor, Smiley, Doyle" involves George Smiley's fondness for tea.
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