History Main / PointofView

3rd Oct '17 11:09:37 AM DustSnitch
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The PointOfView of a book is the type of narration a writer uses to convey a story to the reader. There are several types:

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The PointOfView Point Of View of a book is the type of narration a writer uses to convey a story to the reader. There are several types:
2nd Oct '17 4:55:59 PM FordPrefect
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** Multiple narrators: the story describes the actions and thoughts of more than one character. The different points of view might be separated by section breaks (Creator/StephenKing's ''Franchise/TheDarkTower''), by chapters (George R. R. Martin's '''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''), or even just by shifting to a new paragraph (Frank Herbert's ''Franchise/{{Dune}}''; warning: DontTryThisAtHome). This gives the reader a ''much'' wider breadth and depth of knowledge, by allowing the reader to see multiple events, or the same event through a number of different eyes; if used carefully, it can even [[TheRashomon make the reader doubt what they saw in the first place]]. However, it can be difficult for the reader to decide who the main character is (if there ''is'' one), which some readers dislike, and the switching can break WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief if handled badly.

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** Multiple narrators: the story describes the actions and thoughts of more than one character. The different points of view might be separated by section breaks (Creator/StephenKing's ''Franchise/TheDarkTower''), by chapters (George R. R. Martin's '''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''), ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''), or even just by shifting to a new paragraph (Frank Herbert's ''Franchise/{{Dune}}''; warning: DontTryThisAtHome). This gives the reader a ''much'' wider breadth and depth of knowledge, by allowing the reader to see multiple events, or the same event through a number of different eyes; if used carefully, it can even [[TheRashomon make the reader doubt what they saw in the first place]]. However, it can be difficult for the reader to decide who the main character is (if there ''is'' one), which some readers dislike, and the switching can break WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief if handled badly.
4th May '17 8:59:58 AM sheika
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* '''[[CharacterNarrator First-Person Narration:''' I, me, we, us. A story told in first-person is written as if the SympatheticPOV were narrating directly to the reader. We get to know this narrator very well, but are limited by the fact that we can't see what the narrator doesn't. If something important is happening on the other side of the world and there's no way to get the narrator there, then it can't be witnessed first-hand; they'll have to hear about it from somebody else after the fact. Furthermore, this opens up the possibility of an UnreliableNarrator: a narrator who isn't telling the truth, either due to [[InnocentInaccurate lack of awareness]] ("Why do people always react to me like that??") or deliberate lying. In addition, it also raises the question of how the narrator remembered the events in such detail, down to the exact dialogue, unless they explicitly have photographic memory. In a first-person story, the narrator is normally the main character; aversions are covered by the trope FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator. See ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', ''Literature/TheVirginSuicides'' (a rare example of a novel told entirely in the first-person plural), ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'', and ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.

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* '''[[CharacterNarrator First-Person Narration:''' Narration]]:''' I, me, we, us. A story told in first-person is written as if the SympatheticPOV were narrating directly to the reader. We get to know this narrator very well, but are limited by the fact that we can't see what the narrator doesn't. If something important is happening on the other side of the world and there's no way to get the narrator there, then it can't be witnessed first-hand; they'll have to hear about it from somebody else after the fact. Furthermore, this opens up the possibility of an UnreliableNarrator: a narrator who isn't telling the truth, either due to [[InnocentInaccurate lack of awareness]] ("Why do people always react to me like that??") or deliberate lying. In addition, it also raises the question of how the narrator remembered the events in such detail, down to the exact dialogue, unless they explicitly have photographic memory. In a first-person story, the narrator is normally the main character; aversions are covered by the trope FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator. See ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', ''Literature/TheVirginSuicides'' (a rare example of a novel told entirely in the first-person plural), ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'', and ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.
4th May '17 8:59:30 AM sheika
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* '''First-Person Narration:''' I, me, we, us. A story told in first-person is written as if the SympatheticPOV were narrating directly to the reader. We get to know this narrator very well, but are limited by the fact that we can't see what the narrator doesn't. If something important is happening on the other side of the world and there's no way to get the narrator there, then it can't be witnessed first-hand; they'll have to hear about it from somebody else after the fact. Furthermore, this opens up the possibility of an UnreliableNarrator: a narrator who isn't telling the truth, either due to [[InnocentInaccurate lack of awareness]] ("Why do people always react to me like that??") or deliberate lying. In addition, it also raises the question of how the narrator remembered the events in such detail, down to the exact dialogue, unless they explicitly have photographic memory. In a first-person story, the narrator is normally the main character; aversions are covered by the trope FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator. See ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', ''Literature/TheVirginSuicides'' (a rare example of a novel told entirely in the first-person plural), ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'', and ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.

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* '''First-Person '''[[CharacterNarrator First-Person Narration:''' I, me, we, us. A story told in first-person is written as if the SympatheticPOV were narrating directly to the reader. We get to know this narrator very well, but are limited by the fact that we can't see what the narrator doesn't. If something important is happening on the other side of the world and there's no way to get the narrator there, then it can't be witnessed first-hand; they'll have to hear about it from somebody else after the fact. Furthermore, this opens up the possibility of an UnreliableNarrator: a narrator who isn't telling the truth, either due to [[InnocentInaccurate lack of awareness]] ("Why do people always react to me like that??") or deliberate lying. In addition, it also raises the question of how the narrator remembered the events in such detail, down to the exact dialogue, unless they explicitly have photographic memory. In a first-person story, the narrator is normally the main character; aversions are covered by the trope FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator. See ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', ''Literature/TheVirginSuicides'' (a rare example of a novel told entirely in the first-person plural), ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'', and ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.
28th Oct '16 12:47:15 PM Morgenthaler
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** Multiple narrators: the story describes the actions and thoughts of more than one character. The different points of view might be separated by section breaks (Creator/StephenKing's ''Franchise/TheDarkTower''), by chapters (George R. R. Martin's ''ASongOfIceAndFire''), or even just by shifting to a new paragraph (Frank Herbert's ''Franchise/{{Dune}}''; warning: DontTryThisAtHome). This gives the reader a ''much'' wider breadth and depth of knowledge, by allowing the reader to see multiple events, or the same event through a number of different eyes; if used carefully, it can even [[TheRashomon make the reader doubt what they saw in the first place]]. However, it can be difficult for the reader to decide who the main character is (if there ''is'' one), which some readers dislike, and the switching can break WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief if handled badly.

to:

** Multiple narrators: the story describes the actions and thoughts of more than one character. The different points of view might be separated by section breaks (Creator/StephenKing's ''Franchise/TheDarkTower''), by chapters (George R. R. Martin's ''ASongOfIceAndFire''), '''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''), or even just by shifting to a new paragraph (Frank Herbert's ''Franchise/{{Dune}}''; warning: DontTryThisAtHome). This gives the reader a ''much'' wider breadth and depth of knowledge, by allowing the reader to see multiple events, or the same event through a number of different eyes; if used carefully, it can even [[TheRashomon make the reader doubt what they saw in the first place]]. However, it can be difficult for the reader to decide who the main character is (if there ''is'' one), which some readers dislike, and the switching can break WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief if handled badly.
3rd Oct '16 11:42:47 AM joshuagager
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** Objective/Dramatic is an infrequently-used mode in which the story only relates ''observable'' phenomena, without ever delving into any character's thoughts or feelings (ConfessionCam notwithstanding). Makes the piece feel like a documentary.

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** Objective/Dramatic is an infrequently-used mode in which the story only relates ''observable'' phenomena, without ever delving into any character's thoughts or feelings (ConfessionCam notwithstanding). Makes the piece feel like a documentary. Often used in [[ComicBooks graphic novels]].
2nd Jun '16 8:57:17 AM Narsil
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* '''First-Person Narration:''' I, me, we, us. A story told in first-person is written as if the SympatheticPOV were narrating directly to the reader. We get to know this narrator very well, but are limited by the fact that we can't see what the narrator doesn't. If something important is happening on the other side of the world and there's no way to get the narrator there, then it can't be witnessed first-hand; they'll have to hear about it from somebody else after the fact. Furthermore, this opens up the possibility of an UnreliableNarrator: a narrator who isn't telling the truth, either due to [[InnocentInaccurate lack of awareness]] ("Why do people always react to me like that??") or deliberate lying. In addition, it also raises the question of how the narrator remembered the events in such detail, down to the exact dialogue, unless they explicitly have photographic memory. In a first-person story, the narrator is normally the main character; aversions are covered by the trope FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator. See ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', ''Literature/TheVirginSuicides'' (a rare example of a novel told entirely in the first-person plural), ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' and (if you really must) ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.

to:

* '''First-Person Narration:''' I, me, we, us. A story told in first-person is written as if the SympatheticPOV were narrating directly to the reader. We get to know this narrator very well, but are limited by the fact that we can't see what the narrator doesn't. If something important is happening on the other side of the world and there's no way to get the narrator there, then it can't be witnessed first-hand; they'll have to hear about it from somebody else after the fact. Furthermore, this opens up the possibility of an UnreliableNarrator: a narrator who isn't telling the truth, either due to [[InnocentInaccurate lack of awareness]] ("Why do people always react to me like that??") or deliberate lying. In addition, it also raises the question of how the narrator remembered the events in such detail, down to the exact dialogue, unless they explicitly have photographic memory. In a first-person story, the narrator is normally the main character; aversions are covered by the trope FirstPersonPeripheralNarrator. See ''Literature/TheGreatGatsby'', ''Literature/TheCatcherInTheRye'', ''Literature/TheVirginSuicides'' (a rare example of a novel told entirely in the first-person plural), ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'', and (if you really must) ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.
29th Apr '16 11:14:45 AM TVRulezAgain
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*** Universal omniscient, in which the narrator has access to information that nobody in the story could logically know ("Little did they know that the dog was actually Count Basingdorfer in disguise!!"). See [[LemonyNarrator Lemony Snicket's]] interjections in ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents.

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*** Universal omniscient, in which the narrator has access to information that nobody in the story could logically know ("Little did they know that the dog was actually Count Basingdorfer in disguise!!"). See [[LemonyNarrator Lemony Snicket's]] interjections in ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents.Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents.
1st Feb '16 6:20:16 PM nombretomado
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* '''[[MultipleNarrativeModes Multiple-viewpoint]]:''' This is any story which ''combines'' any or all of the above narrative modes (TadWilliams' ''Literature/{{Otherland}}'').

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* '''[[MultipleNarrativeModes Multiple-viewpoint]]:''' This is any story which ''combines'' any or all of the above narrative modes (TadWilliams' (Creator/TadWilliams' ''Literature/{{Otherland}}'').
21st Jul '15 12:00:11 PM Folamh3
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** UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective is a special case.

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** UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective is a special case.case in which a single first-person perspective is adhered to for the entire length of a game.
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