History Main / JustPlaneWrong

29th Jan '17 9:43:42 AM FracturedArtifact
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* In ''Literature/HarryPotter'', Mr. Weasley has made a flying car that can fly into the upper atmosphere. Why the driver doesn't freeze to death or asphyxiate at those altitudes is unclear (probably magic).
18th Jan '17 1:57:19 PM YT45
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*** Apaches ''can'' mount Sidewinders, but they never do because it makes more sense to carry four Stingers for the type of air-to-air engagement the Apache would likely (if at all) encounter.

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*** Apaches ''can'' mount Sidewinders, but they never do because it makes more sense to carry four Stingers instead of two Sidewinders for the type of air-to-air engagement the Apache would likely (if at all) encounter.



** Also, exactly how does Arnold avoid ''getting sucked into the intake & [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_object_damage FODing]]
the damn engine''?

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** Also, exactly how does Arnold avoid ''getting sucked into the intake & [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_object_damage FODing]]
FODing]] the damn engine''?
18th Jan '17 1:46:56 PM YT45
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* '''Cost and Availability of Aircraft:''' Sure, scoring a four-seater Cherokee or Cessna might be as easy as walking down to the nearest airfield and saying "Who wants to be in a movie?", but larger or older aircraft, especially UsefulNotes/WorldWarII era, are expensive, rare, and require special care and insurance. Before the advent of CG, most movie makers resorted to modifying or painting more commonly-available training aircraft to play the part of warbirds in movies (see WeaponsUnderstudies). Availability can also be affected by the period during which the work was filmed—it's not like the Air Force was just gonna give you the keys to their high-altitude spy planes during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. (The Soviets certainly weren't going to let you touch theirs.) As such, many films rely heavily on StockFootage.

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* '''Cost and Availability of Aircraft:''' Sure, scoring a four-seater Cherokee or Cessna might be as easy as walking down to the nearest airfield and saying "Who wants to be in a movie?", but larger or older aircraft, especially UsefulNotes/WorldWarII era, are expensive, rare, and require special care and insurance. Before the advent of CG, most movie makers resorted to modifying or painting more commonly-available training aircraft to play the part of warbirds in movies (see WeaponsUnderstudies). Availability can also be affected by the period during which the work was filmed—it's not like the Air Force was just gonna give you the keys to their high-altitude spy planes during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. UsefulNotes/ColdWar (The Soviets certainly weren't going to let you touch theirs.) theirs). As such, many films rely heavily on StockFootage.



* Any aircraft with one engine and two or four seats is a Cessna according to the news, regardless of its actual manufacturer, although this may have a lot to do with PopculturalOsmosis, in the same way that a vacuum cleaner is always referred to as a "hoover" in the UK, for instance.

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* Any aircraft with one engine and two or four seats is a Cessna according to the news, regardless of its actual manufacturer, although this may have a lot to do with PopculturalOsmosis, BrandNameTakeover, in the same way that a vacuum cleaner is always referred to as a "hoover" in the UK, for instance.



** Another example of this is the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar-era film ''The Hunters'', which uses repainted F-84 Thunderstreaks as "[=MiGs=]" for the good guys' F-86 Sabres to fight. Of course, F-84s fought real [=MiGs=] during the war.
** This also includes Russian helicopters. In a number of action movies filmed during the 80s, standard NATO-issue or civilian helicopters were modeled to look like Soviet helicopters, typically to look like Mi-24 "Hind" helicopters by adding wings with hardpoints and various bits and bobs. On occasion, they didn't even go that far, just slapping a red star decal on an unmodified Western-made helicopter.

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** Another example of this is the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar-era film ''The Hunters'', which uses repainted F-84 F-84F Thunderstreaks as "[=MiGs=]" "[=MiG-15s=]" for the good guys' F-86 Sabres to fight. Of course, F-84s (earlier models of them, anyway) fought real [=MiGs=] [=MiG-15s=] during the war.
** This also includes Russian helicopters. In a number of action movies filmed during the 80s, standard NATO-issue or civilian helicopters were modeled to look like Soviet helicopters, typically to look like Mi-24 "Hind" helicopters by adding wings with hardpoints and various bits and bobs. On occasion, they the lazy bastards didn't even go that far, just slapping a red star decal on an unmodified Western-made helicopter.helicopter with an obviously Western or civilian paint job.



* The Red Baron's red Fokker triplane is so iconic because it was already rare and he was the only person who painted his bright red. This fails to stop stories set in UsefulNotes/WW1 from using them as the standard German plane(extremely bad in Flyboys).
** While the Fokker Triplane was iconic, the entire Flying Circus was operating them at the time, having been one of the first squadrons to operate the type. In fact the Fokker [=Dr1=] was in widespread service in the spring of 1918 when Richthofen was killed and 320 were built before production ended due to their annoying habit of having Wing Failures.

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* The Red Baron's red Fokker triplane is so iconic because it was already rare and he was the only person who painted his bright red.red[[note]] There were in fact three DR.1 triplanes painted bright red, all of which were earmarked for the Baron's personal use (anytime one was down for maintenance or repair, he still had two spares). After his death, the other two were repainted[[/note]], specifically [[AndThisIsFor after the death of his mentor, Oswald Boelcke]]. This fails to stop stories set in UsefulNotes/WW1 from using them as the standard German plane(extremely bad in Flyboys).
** While the Fokker Triplane was iconic, the entire Flying Circus was operating them at the time, having been one of the first squadrons to operate the type. In fact the Fokker [=Dr1=] was in widespread service in the spring of 1918 when Richthofen was killed and 320 were built before production ended due to their annoying habit of having Wing Failures. Still, other fighters like the Albatros D.VII were much more common in German service.



* Blimps and airships in general are uncommon aircraft, which compounds the utter confusion Hollywood seems to have about them. Unlike an elastic balloon, a blimp simply ''does not pop'' if you shoot it or poke a hole in it. The gas inside is barely under any pressure, if it is pressurized at all. Disturbingly, the Goodyear Blimps get shot full of holes all the time (the tiny leaks are so minor they're usually only discovered during maintenance), by [[AxeCrazy yahoos]] who think that it ''will'' pop. Also, all modern blimps use inert Helium or hot air instead of explosive Hydrogen, specifically to avoid a repeat of UsefulNotes/TheHindenburg disaster. Even airships and balloons that used flammable hydrogen were notoriously difficult to shoot down because while the airships were full of hydrogen, they didn't contain any of the ''oxygen'' needed to ignite it, which meant explosions were extraordinarily rare (''Hindenberg's'' fiery destruction is infamous [[IfItBleedsItLeads because it was so unusual]]). Many hydrogen airships were able to limp back to friendly territory and land even after being shot up by Allied pilots.

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* Blimps and airships in general are uncommon aircraft, which compounds the utter confusion Hollywood seems to have about them. Unlike an elastic balloon, a blimp simply ''does not pop'' if you shoot it or poke a hole in it. The gas inside is barely under any pressure, if it is pressurized at all. Disturbingly, the Goodyear Blimps get shot full of holes all the time (the tiny leaks are so minor they're usually only discovered during maintenance), by [[AxeCrazy yahoos]] who think that it ''will'' pop. Also, all modern blimps use inert Helium or hot air instead of explosive Hydrogen, specifically to avoid a repeat of UsefulNotes/TheHindenburg disaster. Even airships and balloons that used flammable hydrogen were notoriously difficult to shoot down because while the airships were full of hydrogen, they didn't contain any of the ''oxygen'' needed to ignite it, sustain combustion, which meant explosions were extraordinarily rare (''Hindenberg's'' fiery destruction is infamous [[IfItBleedsItLeads because it was so unusual]]). Many hydrogen hydrogen-filled airships were able to limp back to friendly territory and land even after being shot up by Allied pilots.



** A pilot uses the missile release button on his control stick to fire his guns.

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** A pilot uses the missile release button on his control stick to fire his guns.guns, instead of the bright red gun trigger clearly visible any time one of the pilots is shown jerking the stick for a violent maneuver.
** The pilots evidently gain a missile lock by flying the lead-calculating reticle for the gun onto the target. Suffice it to say, anything in the missile seeker head's field of view (i.e. anything in front of the plane) can be locked simply by selecting the target and letting the missile's software do its thing for about a second, and on an F-14 would be done by the [[GuyInBack RIO]], not the pilot.
*** Additionally, the lock tones vary depending on the missile used. Radar-guided missiles like the AIM-7 Sparrow, AIM-120 AMRAAM, or the now-retired AIM-54 Phoenix (which only the F-14 could carry) indicate a lock with a continuous low-pitch ringing tone. For the AIM-9 Sidewinder, it's a continuous low-pitched "growl." The movie's "beep-beep-beep-beep-''booooooop''" is never heard in a real cockpit.



** The titular presidential 747 features an ''EscapePod'', something that the real plane used as UsefulNotes/AirForceOne does not, and could not possibly, have. [[UsefulNotes/BillClinton President Clinton]] is said to have commented on that inaccuracy when watching the movie.

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** The titular presidential 747 VC-25 features an ''EscapePod'', something that the real plane used as UsefulNotes/AirForceOne does not, and could not possibly, have. [[UsefulNotes/BillClinton President Clinton]] is said to have commented on that inaccuracy when watching the movie.



** When [=AF1=] charges through Ramstein AFB after the failed landing attempt, it not only wouldn't have gotten back in the air, it would have been torn apart by the overstressing of the landing gear and wings. 747s, especially E-4s, are tough, but they're not ''that'' tough.

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** When [=AF1=] charges through Ramstein AFB after the failed landing attempt, it not only wouldn't have gotten back in the air, it would have been torn apart by the overstressing of the landing gear and wings. 747s, especially E-4s, military E-4s and VC-25s, are tough, but they're not ''that'' tough.



* ''Film/IronEagle'':

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* ''Film/IronEagle'':''Film/IronEagle'': The lower-budget Air Force knockoff of ''Film/TopGun'', that, unlike the latter, wasn't BackedByThePentagon? But of course:



** At one point in the eponymous battle, a character states that "We can't outrun Zeros, we'll have to out-fly them!" The American P-40 could easily outrun the Zero, but didn't have a prayer if they tried to out-turn the Zero, one of the most amazingly maneuverable (but relatively slow) fighter aircraft of the war. Note however that U.S. Airmen were remarkably ignorant about the Zero's capabilities in 1941; accurate reports out of China were dismissed as exaggerated. About the only correct thing they did know about the Zero was its "Type 00" designation, the "Zeke" ReportingName not being issued until late 1942. And the Zero wasn't that much slower than the P-40 in level flight, only in a dive.

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** At one point in the eponymous battle, a character states that "We can't outrun Zeros, we'll have to out-fly them!" The American P-40 could easily outrun the Zero, but didn't have a prayer if they tried to out-turn the Zero, one of the most amazingly maneuverable (but relatively slow) fighter aircraft of the war. Note however that U.S. Airmen were remarkably ignorant about the Zero's capabilities in 1941; accurate reports out of China were dismissed as exaggerated. About the only correct thing they did know about the Zero was its "Type 00" designation, the "Zeke" ReportingName not being issued until late 1942. And the Zero wasn't that much slower than the P-40 in level flight, only in a dive. Basically, P-40s taking off under fire, in a low-energy state (low and slow) would be torn apart by Zeroes...which is exactly what happened in real life



** They got actual flying Zeroes with the proper engines and everything - then painted them ''with army markings.'' Moreover, the Zeroes present in the attack on Pearl Harbor (when they're not shifting into [=D3A1=] "Val" dive-bombers between camera angles) are painted green; the real Imperial Japanese Navy painted Zeroes grey in 1941, with the green paint scheme not being used until '43. %%Which army markings are they given, American or Japanese?
** The B-25s for the Doolittle raid are wrong too - in several scenes they have the dorsal turrets well towards the front as in all B-25s past the G model. The Doolittle raid used the earlier B model; the B-25G was not produced until a year after the raid. Also, while the B-25 is a fairly easy aircraft to fly, the pilots/copilots were all experienced bomber pilots, not fighter pilots. The takeoff sequence includes a dramatic scene of a B-25 dropping below view and almost crashing before lifting up. With one exception, every B-25 was lifting off before reaching the end of the flight deck (the one exception had the flaps set incorrectly), due to the aircraft carrier travelling at 25 MPH into a 40 MPH headwind; the B-25 has a stall speed of 80 MPH, meaning they only needed an additional speed of 15 MPH to take off.
** The "Battle of Britain" scene is full of glaring errors. The Spitfires used are clearly Mk.V or Mk.IX Spits, the former of which did not reach frontline service until 1941, by which time large-scale air raids such as the one depicted would have ceased. The cannons are a dead giveaway, especially since the Hispano II cannon was not introduced until 1941 either. Secondly, they are all marked with "RF", designation of No. 303 Squadron, one of the most prominent ''Polish'' squadrons in the Battle, yet here, there are multiple American and British pilots! Regarding the American pilots, only seven were officially active during the Battle, anyway, and they would likely have been split between several squadrons. At one point, an He-111s cockpit ''explodes'' after being hit with just 1 shell! None of the Spitfire pilots are actually wearing their oxygen masks, which contain their microphones, so any communication would be incredibly difficult. When Affleck fires his guns, he ''only'' uses the cannons despite standard practice being to correct your aim using expendable machinegun fire before spending cannon shells. The Bf-109s that attack them are clearly not the standard Bf-109 E, since the Bf-109 E had distinct flattened wingtips not seen on the plane in the film. A lot of the fighting is done at obscenely close range, when in reality, Spitfires generally fired between 200m to 400m from their target. Worst of all, in some cases, the Bf-109s fire out of their nose-mounted machineguns instead of their infamous propeller-mounted cannon!

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** They got actual flying Zeroes with the proper engines and everything - then painted them ''with army Imperial Army markings.'' The Japanese army ''never'' flew the Mitsubishi [=A6M=],instead favoring the lighter, [[UpToEleven even more maneuverable]], and not-very-similar looking Nakajima [=Ki-43=], called the ''Hayabusa'' (Peregrine Falcon) by the Japanese and [[ReportingNames "Oscar"]] by the Allies. Moreover, the Zeroes present in the attack on Pearl Harbor (when they're not shifting into [=D3A1=] "Val" dive-bombers between camera angles) are painted green; the real Imperial Japanese Navy painted Zeroes grey in 1941, with the green paint scheme not being used until '43. %%Which army markings are they given, American or Japanese?
** The B-25s for the Doolittle raid are wrong too - in several scenes they have the dorsal turrets well towards the front as in all B-25s past the G model. The Doolittle raid used the earlier B model; the B-25G was not produced until a year after the raid. Also, while the B-25 is a fairly easy aircraft to fly, the pilots/copilots were all experienced multi-engine bomber pilots, pilots with hundreds of hours in [=B-25s=] and a thorough knowledge of exactly how they flew and handled under every imaginable condition, not single-engine fighter pilots.pilots who didn't even bother with Type-Transition training. The takeoff sequence includes a dramatic scene of a B-25 dropping below view and almost crashing before lifting up. With one exception, every B-25 was lifting off before reaching the end of the flight deck (the one exception had the flaps set incorrectly), due to the aircraft carrier travelling at 25 MPH into a 40 MPH headwind; the B-25 has a stall speed of 80 MPH, meaning they only needed an additional speed of 15 MPH to take off.
** The "Battle of Britain" scene is full of glaring errors. The Spitfires used are clearly Mk.V or Mk.IX Spits, the former of which did not reach frontline service until 1941, by which time large-scale air raids such as the one depicted would have ceased. The cannons are a dead giveaway, especially since the Hispano II cannon was not introduced until 1941 either. Secondly, they are all marked with "RF", designation of No. 303 Squadron, one of the most prominent ''Polish'' squadrons in the Battle, yet here, there are multiple American and British pilots! Regarding the American pilots, only seven were officially active during the Battle, anyway, and they would likely have been split between several squadrons. At one point, an He-111s cockpit ''explodes'' after being hit with just 1 shell! None of the Spitfire pilots are actually wearing their oxygen masks, which contain their microphones, so any communication would be incredibly difficult. When Affleck fires his guns, he ''only'' uses the cannons despite standard practice being to correct your aim using expendable machinegun fire before spending cannon shells. The Bf-109s that attack them are clearly not the standard Bf-109 E, since the Bf-109 E had distinct flattened wingtips not seen on the plane in the film. A lot of the fighting is done at obscenely close range, when in reality, Spitfires generally fired RAF standard procedure was to open fire between 200m 250 and 500 yards (200m to 400m 400m) from their target.target, though the Free Polish airmen of 303 Squadron were noted for being more aggressive and got in closer (British pilots generally wanted to shoot down their German opponents, while the Polish exiles wanted to ''kill'' them all). Worst of all, in some cases, the Bf-109s fire out of their nose-mounted machineguns instead of their infamous propeller-mounted cannon!



*** Apaches ''can'' mount Sidewinders, but they never do because it makes more sense to carry four Stingers for the type of air-to-air engagement the Apache would likely (if at all) encounter.



*** In the teaser, when the Royal Navy frigate fires the cruise missile at the terrorist "flea market", M tells 007 he has four minutes to get clear. The target is 400 miles from the ship. A Tomahawk cruise missile (as shown) has a top speed of about 550 miles per hour. It should have taken the missile about ''43'' minutes to get there. The novelization blows it even more thoroughly, with a Harpoon missile being launched, and traveling ''800'' miles in 4 minutes 8 seconds. First of all, a Harpoon has a maximum range of less than 100 miles, and second, it travels at about the same (determinedly subsonic) speed as the Tomahawk. To do 800 miles in 248 seconds, it would have needed to achieve about 11,600 miles per hour, or about 3.2 miles per second - about half of Earth's ''escape velocity''. Also, any object traveling that fast at low altitude would burn up like a meteor hitting the lower atmosphere - plus what the shock wave effects would do to anything along its path on the ''ground''.

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*** In the teaser, when the Royal Navy frigate fires the cruise missile at the terrorist "flea market", M tells 007 he has four minutes to get clear. The target is 400 miles from the ship. A Tomahawk cruise missile (as shown) has a top speed of about 550 miles per hour. It should have taken the missile about ''43'' minutes to get there. The novelization blows it even more thoroughly, with a Harpoon missile being launched, and traveling ''800'' miles in 4 minutes 8 seconds. First of all, a Harpoon (an ''antiship'' missile) has a maximum range of less than 100 miles, and second, it travels at about the same (determinedly subsonic) speed as the Tomahawk. To do 800 miles in 248 seconds, it would have needed to achieve about 11,600 miles per hour, or about 3.2 miles per second - about half of Earth's ''escape velocity''. Also, any object traveling that fast at low altitude would burn up like a meteor hitting the lower atmosphere - plus what the shock wave effects would do to anything along its path on the ''ground''.



** ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard'''s F-35 sequence. [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0337978/goofs Just look at the list of goofs.]] The F-35 is shown with two guns, when it really has one. It also uses its VTOL capacity to make a hovering attack. You ''could'' do this, but you'd run out of fuel really fast. Also, in a few HUD shots, the MASTER-ARM is set switched to SIM, which means the F-35 couldn't actually fire its gun or missiles.

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** ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard'''s F-35 sequence. [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0337978/goofs Just look at the list of goofs.]] The F-35 is shown with two guns, when it really has one.one (and they haven't been able to make that one gun work yet). It also uses its VTOL capacity to make a hovering attack. You ''could'' do this, but you'd run out of fuel really fast. Also, in a few HUD shots, the MASTER-ARM is set switched to SIM, which means the F-35 couldn't actually fire its gun or missiles.



*** Never mind the question of whether or not the missiles' guidance systems (programmed to look for airplanes) could actually recognize the damn thing as a target to be engaged rather than a mountain to be avoided.



* ''Film/ExecutiveDecision'' features what is an F-117 stealth fighter that has somehow been modified to hold a sort of air-to-air docking collar while still having space for half a dozen armed commandos and the pilot, making the passenger compartment at least as large as the entire hull, leaving no space for engines, fuel tanks, or anything else. Apparently, the USAF has developed [[Series/DoctorWho TARDIS technology]].

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* ''Film/ExecutiveDecision'' features what is apparently an F-117 stealth fighter that has somehow been modified to hold a sort of air-to-air docking collar while still having space for half a dozen armed commandos and the pilot, making the passenger compartment at least as large as the entire hull, fuselage, leaving no space for engines, fuel tanks, or anything else. Apparently, the USAF has developed [[Series/DoctorWho TARDIS technology]].



** Also, exactly how does Arnold avoid ''getting sucked into the intake & fodding the damn engine''?

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** Also, exactly how does Arnold avoid ''getting sucked into the intake & fodding [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_object_damage FODing]]
the damn engine''?



* Averted in, of all things, ''Film/DrStrangelove'': not only was the B-52 correct in exterior shots (save for casting the shadow of a B-17), the B-52 arming console shown was so accurate that the Air Force freaked out (the design of the console was still classified). As it happened, [[Creator/StanleyKubrick Kubrick]] and his crew had simply done an amazing job of extrapolation.

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* Averted in, of all things, ''Film/DrStrangelove'': not only was the B-52 correct in exterior shots (save for casting the shadow of a B-17), the B-52 B-52's cockpit avionics, especially the arming console console, shown was were so accurate that the Air Force freaked out (the design of the console bomber's interior was still classified). As it happened, [[Creator/StanleyKubrick Kubrick]] and his crew had simply done an amazing job of extrapolation.



* Early on in ''Film/TheATeam'', Murdock flies a helicopter as if it were a plane, notably [[ImprobablePilotingSkills performing a barrel roll with apparent ease]], [[YouFailPhysicsForever angling the nose of the helicopter upward to "pull up"]] and stalling to the point of tumbling out of the air, but managing to recover. Which is precisely to point out how CrazyAwesome he is. The best part is, in order to evade a heat-seeking missile, Murdock switches off the engine of the helicopter for a moment — the fact that there would ''still'' be a significant heat signature notwithstanding.

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* Early on in ''Film/TheATeam'', Murdock flies a helicopter as if it were a plane, notably [[ImprobablePilotingSkills performing a barrel roll with apparent ease]], [[YouFailPhysicsForever ease]]--which the Huey ''[[RealityIsUnrealistic really can]]'' do, there's just no sane reason why you'd ever want to--,[[YouFailPhysicsForever angling the nose of the helicopter upward to "pull up"]] and stalling to the point of tumbling out of the air, but managing to recover. Which is precisely to point out how CrazyAwesome he is. The best part is, in order to evade a heat-seeking missile, Murdock switches off the engine of the helicopter for a moment — the fact that there would ''still'' be a significant heat signature notwithstanding.
15th Jan '17 11:31:11 AM dannybeans
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* In the "Crazy WorldWarII Weapons" episode of Series/WhiteRabbitProject, Tory says the proposed bat bombs were to be dropped by B-52s, which were only conceived after the war's end, and wouldn't see service until 1955. The plan actually called for B-24s.
2nd Jan '17 7:57:59 AM garthvader
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** The attack on the alien ship with [=AMRAAMs=] and Sidewinders in itself is another example, considering the sheer size of the target. Even the biggest air-to-air missiles in reality only have a 75-kilogram warhead - not much threat to a ship the size of a city. Air-to-ground weapons are closer to 500 kilos... or since the F/A-18 is cleared for the whole gamut of US Navy aircraft weapons, they could have led with something even ''[[NukeEm bigger]]''. Not that this would really have helped, since [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale the entire nuclear arsenal of the world could only vaporise less than 1% of the volume of ''one'' of the saucers]].

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** The attack on the alien ship with [=AMRAAMs=] and Sidewinders in itself is another example, considering the sheer size of the target. Even the biggest air-to-air missiles in reality only have a 75-kilogram warhead - not much threat to a ship the size of a city. Air-to-ground weapons are closer to 500 kilos... or since the F/A-18 is cleared for the whole gamut of US Navy aircraft weapons, they could have led with something even ''[[NukeEm bigger]]''. Not that this would really have helped, since [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale the entire nuclear arsenal of the world could only vaporise less than 1% of the volume of ''one'' one of the saucers]].
2nd Jan '17 7:57:04 AM garthvader
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** The attack on the alien ship with [=AMRAAMs=] and Sidewinders in itself is another example, considering the sheer size of the target. Even the biggest air-to-air missiles in reality only have a 75-kilogram warhead - not much threat to a ship the size of a city. Air-to-ground weapons are closer to 500 kilos... or since the F/A-18 is cleared for the whole gamut of US Navy aircraft weapons, they could have led with something even ''[[NukeEm bigger]]''.

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** The attack on the alien ship with [=AMRAAMs=] and Sidewinders in itself is another example, considering the sheer size of the target. Even the biggest air-to-air missiles in reality only have a 75-kilogram warhead - not much threat to a ship the size of a city. Air-to-ground weapons are closer to 500 kilos... or since the F/A-18 is cleared for the whole gamut of US Navy aircraft weapons, they could have led with something even ''[[NukeEm bigger]]''. Not that this would really have helped, since [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale the entire nuclear arsenal of the world could only vaporise less than 1% of the volume of ''one'' of the saucers]].
11th Dec '16 2:35:42 PM Kadorhal
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* Tim [=LaHaye=] and Jerry Jenkins had a little confusion about Air Force One in the ''Literature/LeftBehind'' series. Protagonist Rayford Steele laments that he's been turned down as pilot of Air Force One, and someone mentions that he's applied for the job with each new president. The problem is, he's a ''commercial'' airline pilot. Air Force One is a military aircraft operated by the USAF and has always been piloted by a colonel.

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* Tim [=LaHaye=] and Jerry Jenkins had a little confusion about Air Force One in the ''Literature/LeftBehind'' series. Protagonist Rayford Steele laments that he's been turned down as pilot of Air Force One, and someone mentions that he's applied for the job with each new president. The problem is, he's a ''commercial'' airline pilot. Air Force One is a military aircraft operated by the USAF and has always been piloted by by, at lowest rank, a lieutenant colonel. The President himself also laments at one point having to give up Air Force One, as if the designation is for a specific aircraft - "Air Force One" actually applies to any Air Force craft currently carrying the President, rather than specifically referring to the two VC-25s most commonly used for this purpose.
9th Dec '16 7:13:56 AM GuyIncog
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** Among the reasons for the West's familiarity with [=MiG=] designs are both their high production numbers and the extent to which they've been exported. The [=MiG=]-15 and [=MiG=]-21 hold the distinctions of being the world's most produced jet aircraft and supersonic aircraft, respectively.
*** Another reason why westerners wouldn't know about Sukhoi aircraft is that the Su-7 and Su-17 were both short-range single-engined ground attack aircraft that look very similar to both the twin-engined [=MiG=]-19 and the twin-engined British-built English Electric Lightning.
[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most-produced_aircraft]] Similarly, in both the Korean and Vietnam wars, the Communist-bloc fighters that Western pilots engaged were exclusively either [=MiG=] designs or Chinese copies thereof. Even in the Gulf War, of the 44 Iraqi aircraft - including helicopters and transports - claimed as kills by Coalition pilots, 21 were [=MiGs=].

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** Among the reasons for the West's familiarity with [=MiG=] designs are both their high production numbers and the extent to which they've been exported. The [=MiG=]-15 and [=MiG=]-21 hold the distinctions of being the world's most produced jet aircraft and supersonic aircraft, respectively.
*** Another reason why westerners wouldn't know about Sukhoi aircraft is that the Su-7 and Su-17 were both short-range single-engined ground attack aircraft that look very similar to both the twin-engined [=MiG=]-19 and the twin-engined British-built English Electric Lightning.
respectively.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most-produced_aircraft]] Similarly, in both the Korean and Vietnam wars, the Communist-bloc fighters that Western pilots engaged were exclusively either [=MiG=] designs or Chinese copies thereof. Even in the Gulf War, of the 44 Iraqi aircraft - including helicopters and transports - claimed as kills by Coalition pilots, 21 were [=MiGs=].[=MiGs=].
** Another reason why westerners wouldn't know about Sukhoi aircraft is that the Su-7 and Su-17 were both short-range single-engined ground attack aircraft that look very similar to both the twin-engined [=MiG=]-19 and the twin-engined British-built English Electric Lightning.
8th Dec '16 11:11:15 AM LtFedora
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* Tim [=LaHaye=] and Jerry Jenkins had a little confusion about Air Force One in the ''Literature/LeftBehind'' series. Protagonist Rayford Steele laments that he's been turned down as pilot of Air Force One, and someone mentions that he's applied for the job with each new president. The problem is, he's a ''commercial'' airline pilot. Air Force One is a military aircraft operated by the USAF and has always been piloted by a colonel.
27th Nov '16 3:54:02 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* A ''Comic/MortadeloYFilemon'' comic deals with the titular duo making tests on a plane designed by [[OmnidisciplinarScientist Professor Bacterio]] which, among other things, can completely stop in the air ''with the same sound a car makes when braking''. It is somewhat of a RunningGag that Mortadelo can actually ''sink'' a plane into an airport's runway - while trying to ''[[EpicFail lift off]]''. And there are several instances of them being given planes slow enough that an old sparrow can go faster than them.

to:

* A ''Comic/MortadeloYFilemon'' comic deals with the titular duo making tests on a plane designed by [[OmnidisciplinarScientist [[OmnidisciplinaryScientist Professor Bacterio]] which, among other things, can completely stop in the air ''with the same sound a car makes when braking''. It is somewhat of a RunningGag that Mortadelo can actually ''sink'' a plane into an airport's runway - while trying to ''[[EpicFail lift off]]''. And there are several instances of them being given planes slow enough that an old sparrow can go faster than them.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.JustPlaneWrong