History Main / ItIsPronouncedTroPay

27th Apr '16 1:28:02 AM CassandraLeo
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* Composer Richard Wagner's name is pronounced "REE-card VAHG-ner".

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* Composer Richard Wagner's Music/RichardWagner's name is pronounced "REE-card VAHG-ner".VAHG-ner".
* Music/{{Rush}}: Neil Peart’s name is pronounced “Peert”, not “Pert”. (One fan’s reaction was, “Neil is not a brand of shampoo”). Also, their most famous {{instrumental}} is pronounced “why why zed”, not “why why zee”, since the band is Canadian. Getting either of these wrong qualifies as a FandomBerserkButton.
26th Apr '16 5:19:36 PM IAmNotAFunguy
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/SesameStreet'' had a recurring segment in the late 1990's called "Cooking by the Numbers" hosted by Ruth Buzzi in character as Chef Rutheé. At the start and end of every segment she would correct the announcer by saying her name was "Ru-thay". The exception is the number 9 segment. As Rutheé mispronounces her own name in the middle of freaking out over the over-use of lemons in her recipe, the announcer corrects her with "ru-thay".
26th Apr '16 5:07:52 PM escamilla
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Someone tries to class up something by "pronouncing it poshly". Most commonly this is done as response to other people pronouncing the word in such a way that it sounds much sillier. Whether the fancy pronunciation or the obvious yet silly one is "correct" is usually beside the point. The point is, that for some people, keeping a name filled with aristocratic airs is SeriousBusiness.

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Someone tries to class up something by "pronouncing it poshly". Most commonly this is done as a response to other people pronouncing the word in such a way that it sounds much sillier. Whether the fancy pronunciation or the obvious yet silly one is "correct" is usually beside the point. The point is, that for some people, keeping a name filled with aristocratic airs is SeriousBusiness.



* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKfU_5jgupo This ad for the Hyundai Genesis luxury sedan]] ends with "Win one little award, and everyone gets your name right. It's pronounced "HOHN-day", like Sunday." In the UK, the adverts actually pronounce it "High-OON-die". Australians split the difference, pronouncing it "hee-UN-day". In Korean, it's "HYUN-dae." ("Hyun" being one syllable, kind of like "Fun" but actually a vowel sound that's halfway between "ah" and "oh", and the "dae" being pronounced the same as "day", though Koreans have heard foreigners used to Japanese names say it as "die" so often, they occasionally say it that way, too, at least when speaking English).

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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKfU_5jgupo This ad for the Hyundai Genesis luxury sedan]] ends with "Win one little award, and everyone gets your name right. It's pronounced "HOHN-day", like Sunday." In the UK, the adverts actually pronounce it "High-OON-die"."High-OON-dye". Australians split the difference, pronouncing it "hee-UN-day". In (In Korean, it's "HYUN-dae." ("Hyun" being one syllable, kind of like "Fun" but actually "HYUN-dae," "Hyun" with a rounded vowel sound that's halfway between "ah" and "oh", and the similar to "fun", "dae" being pronounced the same as "day", though similar to "day". However, Koreans have heard foreigners used to Japanese names say it pronounce the second syllable as "die" so often, they occasionally say it that way, too, at least when speaking English).



* An advert in Sweden for Swedish clothes manufacturer Blåkläder (pronounced "Bloh-klay-der") featured an American who consistently mispronounced it as "Black-lah-der". After about 30 seconds of this, a Swedish guy approaches him and says "Say after me: Blåkläder!" The guy responds "That's what I said. Black-lah-der!"

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* An Averted in an advert in Sweden for Swedish clothes manufacturer Blåkläder (pronounced "Bloh-klay-der") featured an American who consistently mispronounced it as "Black-lah-der". After about 30 seconds of this, a Swedish guy approaches him and says "Say after me: Blåkläder!" The guy responds "That's what I said. Black-lah-der!"



** The most common American pronunciation still gets it wrong, by putting the AcCENTUponTheWrongSylLABle. The 2013 commercials where they're actually saying his family name pronounce it slightly differently than the brand name (basically boy-AR-dee vs. BOY-ar-DEE).



* In ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'', French readers are usually baffled when they hear Ange's name pronounced "enjeh". You normally pronounce it ɑ̃ʒ, which in Japanese should have given something like "anju" (no, not [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask that one]]). Maybe it was less pretty.

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* In ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'', French readers are usually baffled when they hear Ange's name pronounced "enjeh". You normally pronounce it ɑ̃ʒ, which in Japanese should have given something like would be rendered "anju" (no, not [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask that one]]). Maybe it was less pretty.



* The words anime and manga themselves get this. In Japan, anime would be pronounced "AH-nee-meh" not "ANN-im-ay" and manga would be pronounced "MAHN-guh" not "MANG-guh." In North America, while the correct pronunciation of "manga" is pretty common (it's about half-and-half with the incorrect pronunciation among fans), "anime" is almost universally pronounced incorrectly (even among fans pronouncing "manga" correctly). Although it's mostly out of habit, since the pronunciation is so ingrained in North American anime culture, the "correct" pronunciation can sound unusual.



** A character whose name is either Lotten or Rotten (even the series itself spells it both ways) is actually pronounced "LAW-tun" (or "RAW-tun", since R and L sound the same in Japanese) in the Japanese dub. English media actually spells it Lawton.



*** What is causing the confusion is that the writers are mixing up the Arabic letter Ra's with the ''Hebrew'' letter Resh, both corresponding to the letter r. In Hebrew, the Resh letter is also a variant of the word rosh meaning head. (The first word in the Torah is b'reshith commonly translated as In the beginning).



* An let's not forget Hedley Lamarr from ''Film/BlazingSaddles''. People tend to leave off the l in his first name.

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* An let's not forget Hedley Lamarr from ''Film/BlazingSaddles''. People tend to leave off the l in his first name.



* At the end of ''Film/MyFellowAmericans'', the Vice President, whom everybody thought was a bumbling idiot, reveals that it was all an act. Specifically, he calls that it was a "façade" but pronounces it "fah-KAY-d" instead of "fah-SAH-d".



*** Amusingly, many of the cast in Sky One's ''Hogfather'' miniseries find more than one way to pronounce "Te-ah-ti-meh" each, including Marc Warren (Mr. Teatime himself).
*** This is [[{{Woolseyism}} brilliantly translated]] in French: Mr. Teatime is called M. Lheureduthé (which means exactly ''Teatime'') but wants people to pronounce it like "Le Redouté" -- ("The Dreaded").

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*** Amusingly, many of the cast in Sky One's ''Hogfather'' miniseries find more than one way to pronounce "Te-ah-ti-meh" each, including Marc Warren (Mr. Teatime himself).
***
himself). This is [[{{Woolseyism}} brilliantly translated]] in French: Mr. Teatime is called M. Lheureduthé (which means exactly ''Teatime'') but wants people to pronounce it like "Le Redouté" -- ("The Dreaded").



* In ''Series/{{Community}}'', Britta insists the proper pronunciation for bagel is "BAG-uhl". This is in a Minnesota accent

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* In ''Series/{{Community}}'', Britta insists the proper pronunciation for bagel is "BAG-uhl". This is in a Minnesota accent accent.



** Kelly seems to have a lot of trouble with pronunciation generally. In the episode where a fitness guru tries to get the Bundys to exercise and eat more healthily, she looks at his jar of "wheat germ" and pronounces it with a hard ''g''.



* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] has an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_names_in_English_with_counterintuitive_pronunciations article]] about names like these.



** Writers for ''D&D'' tend to have lots of pronunciation misconceptions. It's listed in the Player's Handbook that the coup de grace action (correctly pronounced coo-duh-grahss, meaning strike of mercy) should be pronounced "coo-day-grah" (translated roughly as "bowl of fat"). You'd think they would check before printing it in the book. Not to mention that this particular mistake has been repeated over several editions of the game.
*** One larp system dealt with the constant mispronunciation by introducing "coo-de-grah" as an actual call (as well as coup de grace) -- effect: "your target is covered in butter and cannot be grappled for the remainder of combat, now stop being a moron and get your calls right!" Sadly this rule was open to abuse and had to be removed.

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** Writers for ''D&D'' tend to have lots of pronunciation misconceptions. It's listed in the Player's Handbook that the coup de grace action (correctly pronounced coo-duh-grahss, meaning strike of mercy) should be pronounced "coo-day-grah" (translated roughly as "bowl of fat"). You'd think they would check before printing it in the book. Not to mention that this particular mistake has been repeated over several editions of the game.
***
game. One larp system dealt with the constant mispronunciation by introducing "coo-de-grah" as an actual call (as well as coup de grace) -- effect: "your target is covered in butter and cannot be grappled for the remainder of combat, now stop being a moron and get your calls right!" Sadly this rule was open to abuse and had to be removed.



* William Barfée ("it's Bar-FAY") from the musical ''Theatre/TheTwentyFifthAnnualPutnamCountySpellingBee'' often has his name mispronounced as "Barfy", and he is always quick to correct such instances. Well, Barfée in French would indeed be pronounced Bar-FAY

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* William Barfée ("it's Bar-FAY") from the musical ''Theatre/TheTwentyFifthAnnualPutnamCountySpellingBee'' often has his name mispronounced as "Barfy", and he is always quick to correct such instances. Well, Barfée in French would indeed be pronounced Bar-FAY



* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''. The name of this very franchise (and the general term for the species) is mispronounced frequently.
** The reason for this is probably because of the e-acute (é) in the word. The correct pronounciation is (as spelled on [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]]) "POH-kay-mon". To elaborate each syllable:
*** "Po" as in the red, smallest [[Series/{{Teletubbies}} Teletubby]].
*** "ké" as in a small, low sandy island on top of a coral reef, which is called a "cay".[[note]]Although, as The Other Wiki notes, "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cay cay]]" can also pronounced the same as "key", and can even be spelled "key" (as in the Florida Keys), so go figure.[[/note]] If that doesn't help you with the é, then you may remember that it is also found in words like "café", "[[{{cliche}} cliché]]", "touché", and "Music/{{Beyonce}}". Either way, "é" is pronounced the same as the name of the letter "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A A]]".
*** "mon" as in the first syllable of the second word in the franchise's original name, "''Mon''ster". Obviously.
** The most common mispronunciation is "POH-kē-mon"; even the animé makes this mistake from time to time.
** And the most stupid is "POH-kē-[[StupidGood Man]]. Mostly people who don't know what they're doing say this.
** Another mispronunciation is "Poh-KUH-mon", which is common among the British as well as a good portion of North American fans. However, it's become a semi-official pronunciation in recent years. (Listen carefully to the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'' announcer [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWYQx0SvVOI in this video]] when he gets to "Pokémon Trainer".[[note]]The pronunciations for each name/phrase are English release followed by Japanese release, by the way.[[/note]] FlipFlopOfGod, perhaps?)
*** However, ''Super Smash Bros. for Wii U'' has seem to shifted it away from "Poh-KUH-mon" back towards (mostly) "POH-kay-mon" thanks to the [[VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising Palutena's Guidance]] dialogue when Pit, Palutena and Viridi cover the Pokémon that are playable in ''Smash Bros.'', especially [[SeriesMascot Pikachu]]. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrlHPDx-LRQ Watch and listen here.]]
** Then there are some of the Pokémon species themselves whom people from the games and anime have trouble deciding pronunciation on. For example, Bonsly alternated on being called "bonz-lee" or "bonz-lie", before it seemed settled on the latter. Arceus was either "Ar-see-us", "Ar-say-us" or "Ar-kee-us" at times. Then there are other glaring mistakes, such as how the announcer in ''Stadium'' can call Ekans "Ee-kenz" when the mini-game featuring Ekans in ''Stadium'' 1[[labelnote:*]]Japanese ''2''[[/labelnote]] and the characters in the anime referred to it as "eh-kanz". ([[WildMassGuessing Or perhaps there's an in-universe potayto-potahto dialect difference]].)
26th Apr '16 2:50:49 PM WillKeaton
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* ''Webcomic/SamAndFuzzy'': "[[http://samandfuzzy.com/1062 It's Too-che-sto-nay instead of Touch Stone.]]"

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* ''Webcomic/SamAndFuzzy'': "[[http://samandfuzzy.[[http://samandfuzzy.com/1062 It's "It's Too-che-sto-nay instead of Touch Stone.]]""]]
26th Apr '16 2:49:57 PM WillKeaton
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* In ''Webcomic/CucumberQuest'', [[http://cucumber.gigidigi.com/archive/page-298/ it's not Peri-DOT]], [[http://cucumber.gigidigi.com/archive/page-299/ it's Peri-DOH]]!.

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* In ''Webcomic/CucumberQuest'', [[http://cucumber.gigidigi.com/archive/page-298/ it's not Peri-DOT]], Peri-DOT,]] [[http://cucumber.gigidigi.com/archive/page-299/ it's Peri-DOH]]!.Peri-DOH!]]
26th Apr '16 2:48:26 PM WillKeaton
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** Mr. Looney ("Loo-NAY. It's French."). This one actually ''would'' be pronounced like that in French[[note]]Just like WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse is pronounced "Mee-kay"[[/note]], though the French dub simply uses the US pronunciation for all names anyway.

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** Mr. Looney ("Loo-NAY. It's French."). This one actually ''would'' be pronounced like that in French[[note]]Just French,[[note]]just like WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse is pronounced "Mee-kay"[[/note]], "Mee-kay,"[[/note]] though the French dub simply uses the US pronunciation for all names anyway.
26th Apr '16 2:45:43 PM WillKeaton
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** Now if only we can resolve whether it's "RAYSH" or [[ComicBook/RasAlGhul "RAZZ"-al-Ghul]]. {{Word of God}} pronounces it "RAYSH" on one of the DC animated movie special features. And in this case, it's the character's actual creator: Denny O'Neil. And yet, the actual Arabic pronunciation is "RAZZ," which makes things confusing. ''Film/BatmanBegins'' follows this loosely and goes with "RAHZ". The people at DC are confusing the word "Ra's" with the letter "Resh", which is not even used in the spelling. Considering the character is from the Middle East/South Asia, has a name that is an actual Arabic phrase (with both correct spelling and grammar) and the foreign letter (represented by a ' in western writing) is barely audible when followed by a consonant[[note]]The character (called the Hamza), is pronounced like a click in the throat and is mainly used to separate vowels the same way the letter N does in the English phrase "an apple".[[/note]], pronouncing his name as "Raysh" is comparable to calling a South American character "el Hombre Roja" and pronouncing his name as "Al Khom-bre Row-ya".

to:

** Now if only we can resolve whether it's "RAYSH" or [[ComicBook/RasAlGhul "RAZZ"-al-Ghul]]. {{Word of God}} pronounces it "RAYSH" on one of the DC animated movie special features. And in this case, it's the character's actual creator: Denny O'Neil. And yet, the actual Arabic pronunciation is "RAZZ," which makes things confusing. ''Film/BatmanBegins'' follows this loosely and goes with "RAHZ". The people at DC are confusing the word "Ra's" with the letter "Resh", which is not even used in the spelling. Considering the character is from the Middle East/South Asia, has a name that is an actual Arabic phrase (with both correct spelling and grammar) and the foreign letter (represented by a ' in western writing) is barely audible when followed by a consonant[[note]]The consonant,[[note]]The character (called the Hamza), is pronounced like a click in the throat and is mainly used to separate vowels the same way the letter N does in the English phrase "an apple".[[/note]], [[/note]] pronouncing his name as "Raysh" is comparable to calling a South American character "el Hombre Roja" and pronouncing his name as "Al Khom-bre Row-ya".
26th Apr '16 2:44:51 PM WillKeaton
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Usually the "high-class pronunciation" uses French pronunciation, [[RealityIsUnrealistic with varying accuracy]]. Today this is probably because EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench and as we all know sexy people can't be made fun of. The original reason for this is likely because from the 17th Century all the way until the mid 20th century, French was considered the CommonTongue of European diplomacy[[note]]also, the Norman Conquest in the 11th century meant that a substantial fraction of the English nobility ''did'' have French (well, Norman, so French''ish'') names and ancestors who spoke French[[/note]].

This trope is related to the linguistic phenomenon known as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperforeignism hyperforeignism]].

to:

Usually the "high-class pronunciation" uses French pronunciation, [[RealityIsUnrealistic with varying accuracy]]. Today this is probably because EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench and as we all know sexy people can't be made fun of. The original reason for this is likely because from the 17th Century all the way until the mid 20th century, French was considered the CommonTongue of European diplomacy[[note]]also, diplomacy.[[note]]Also, the Norman Conquest in the 11th century meant that a substantial fraction of the English nobility ''did'' have French (well, Norman, so French''ish'') names and ancestors who spoke French[[/note]].

French.[[/note]]

This trope is related to the linguistic phenomenon known as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperforeignism hyperforeignism]].
hyperforeignism.]]
26th Apr '16 2:44:19 PM WillKeaton
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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMe3WDmxBEI One A&W rootbeer commercial]] features a particularly clueless job candidate repeatedly referring to his interviewer as Mr. "Dumbass". Eventually, the interviewer states that his name (clearly visible on a nameplate as "Mr. [=DuMass=]") is actually pronounced "DOO-Mahss"[[note]]Which is itself incorrect, according to French-language rules. The final consonant is almost always silent; so in order to be pronounced the way the interviewer claimed, the name would have to be spelled "[=DuMasse=]".[[/note]]. Then he says behind the candidate's back, "What a dumbass."

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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMe3WDmxBEI One A&W rootbeer commercial]] features a particularly clueless job candidate repeatedly referring to his interviewer as Mr. "Dumbass". Eventually, the interviewer states that his name (clearly visible on a nameplate as "Mr. [=DuMass=]") is actually pronounced "DOO-Mahss"[[note]]Which "DOO-Mahss."[[note]]Which is itself incorrect, according to French-language rules. The final consonant is almost always silent; so in order to be pronounced the way the interviewer claimed, the name would have to be spelled "[=DuMasse=]".[[/note]]. [[/note]] Then he says behind the candidate's back, "What a dumbass."
25th Apr '16 7:43:11 PM escamilla
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** Unlike English and many other languages, Japanese doesn't place emphasis on one particular syllable in a word. Instead, each syllable is supposed to be pronounced clearly and with emphasis.
** Yes and no. Japanese doesn't have loud stressed syllables (the "emphasis" part) or vowel reduction (the "clear" part) as in English. But it does have a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_pitch_accent pitch accent]] ("stressed" syllables are a downstep in the pitch of the sentence). In an English pronunciation of a Japanese word it'd be only natural to render the pitch accent as a normal English stress.

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** Unlike English and many other languages, Japanese doesn't place emphasis on one particular syllable in a word. Instead, each syllable is supposed to be pronounced clearly and with emphasis.
** Yes and no. Japanese doesn't
have loud stressed syllables (the "emphasis" part) or vowel reduction (the "clear" part) as in English. But reduction. However, it does have a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_pitch_accent pitch accent]] ("stressed" syllables are a downstep in the pitch of the sentence). In an the English pronunciation of a Japanese word it'd be only word, it's natural to render the pitch accent as a normal English stress.



* The villain of the third season of Creator/TelltaleGames ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' is an albino gorilla from space named General Skun-ka'pe (skoon-KAH-pay), so naturally our heroes call him "Skunk Ape". However, everyone understands who they mean, and no one corrects them.

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* The Inverted with the villain of the third season of Creator/TelltaleGames ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' is ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice''. He's an albino gorilla from space named General Skun-ka'pe (skoon-KAH-pay), so naturally our heroes call him "Skunk Ape". However, everyone understands who they mean, and no one corrects them.



** Also, in ''VideoGame/TalesOfMonkeyIsland'' the Marquis De Singe (and Joaquin D'Oro) pronounces his own name as "''deh SANJ''" (with the short "a" sound in "apple"), and the Voodoo Lady and Hemlock [=McGee=] pronounce the name as "''day SAHNJ''" (with the "a" pronunciation in "father"). Guybrush and Morgan [=LeFlay=], on the other hand, pronounce De Singe's name poorly, coming out only as "''deh SIHNJ''", like the word "''SIHN-jee''" without the "ee", or like the English word "singe". It's possible this may have been them pulling a MaliciousMisnaming with him, though. The correct pronunciation, incidentally, is how he says it himself, and it means "of Monkey" (not "of the Monkey", that would be "du Singe") in French.

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** Also, in ''VideoGame/TalesOfMonkeyIsland'' the Marquis De Singe (and Joaquin D'Oro) pronounces his own name as "''deh SANJ''" (with the short "a" sound in "apple"), and the Voodoo Lady and Hemlock [=McGee=] pronounce the name as "''day SAHNJ''" (with the "a" pronunciation in "father"). Guybrush and Morgan [=LeFlay=], on the other hand, pronounce De Singe's name poorly, coming out only as "''deh SIHNJ''", like the word "''SIHN-jee''" without the "ee", or like the English word "singe". It's possible this may have been them pulling a MaliciousMisnaming with him, though. The correct pronunciation, incidentally, is how he says it himself, and it means "of Monkey" (not "of the Monkey", that would be "du Singe") in French.
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