History Main / ItIsPronouncedTroPay

17th Jul '16 9:13:18 PM dmcreif
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* Several small towns in the Midwest United States are named for more famous world cities and pronounced differently, such as Cairo, Illinois (pronounced KAY-row) and Cairo, Ohio (pronounced "CARE-oh") and [[Film/{{Hoosiers}} Milan, Indiana]], Milan, Illinois,and Milan, Ohio (all pronounced "MY-lun"). Also in Ohio there is a town called Vienna, pronounced Vye-ANN-ah... which contrasts with Vienna, Illinois (vye-ENN-uh).

to:

* Several small towns in the Midwest United States are named for more famous world cities and pronounced differently, such as Cairo, Illinois (pronounced KAY-row) and Cairo, Ohio (pronounced "CARE-oh") and [[Film/{{Hoosiers}} Milan, Indiana]], Milan, Illinois,and Illinois, Milan, Michigan and Milan, Ohio (all pronounced "MY-lun"). Also in Ohio there is a town called Vienna, pronounced Vye-ANN-ah... which contrasts with Vienna, Illinois (vye-ENN-uh).



* Martinez, GA (a suburb of Augusta). The middle syllable is pronounced like "tin" with very little stress on it (it could almost be "Mart'nez, GA). Also Louisville, GA, unlike Kentucky, pronounces the -s.

to:

* Martinez, GA Georgia (a suburb of Augusta). The middle syllable is pronounced like "tin" with very little stress on it (it could almost be "Mart'nez, GA). Also Louisville, GA, Georgia, unlike Kentucky, pronounces the -s.


Added DiffLines:

* [=DeKalb=] County, east of the part of Fulton County that contains Atlanta, is pronounced as "De KAB" County.
8th Jul '16 7:59:37 PM Chytus
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* Done in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheProudFamily'', where Penny gains a case

to:

* Done in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheProudFamily'', where Penny gains a casecase of AcquiredSituationalNarcissism and insists on "Penn-AY".
* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' has George Avocados who always corrects the pronunciation to "ah-VAW-ca-dos". It doesn't stick.
* This was done in ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic'', too. Jay goes to a fast food restaurant and addresses the clerk by the name on his nametag, "Pizzaface." The clerk of course responds with, "Hey, that's Pizza-fah-CHAY!"
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TaleSpin'' features a shifty client named Weezelle. Although he is an actual weasel, he insists that his name be properly pronounced ("''wee-ZEL!''", accent on the third "e") at all times. Naturally, everyone just called him "Weasel". Eventually, this annoys him so much that he refuses to do anymore work for his boss "until you call me by my correct name." His boss, mind you, is the most feared and ruthless crime lord in the city, and has probably killed people for less than that. Clearly, Weezelle's name is ''important'' to him.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987'' also has a one-shot villain with that name (although he was not a literal weasel -- only a figurative one).
* WesternAnimation/TimonAndPumbaa once met a suspicious-looking raccoon named Thief who insists that his name is pronounced "thife" (rhymes with "life").
* ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitchTheSeries'' has the villainous Dr. Hämsterviel. Pronounced HOHM-ster-vheel, although many pronounce it like "hamster wheel". The fact that Hämsterviel is in fact a literal IntelligentGerbil doesn't help the situation. Of course, the actual way to pronounce it in German would be "Hame-ster-feel". The umlaut works in the same way the silent "e" does in English, and in German "v" makes an "f" sound and "w" makes what is in English a "v" sound.
* ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'' got one under the [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar radar]] featuring the Ahz-Wee-Pay tribe.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Metalocalypse}}'' has a band therapist called "Jonathan Twinkletits" pronounced "Twink-LET-its" instead.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks''
** It's not "Uncle Ruckus", it's "Uncle Ruckuu". [[BlatantLies Because it's French.]]
** Also an inversion: Robert is pulled over by one Officer Douche. Despite being high, Robert has the presence of mind to call him "Doo-shay." Except the officer's name is pronounced the way it looks.
* There was a {{lampshade|Hanging}} parody in the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Margaritaville," starting out with a clerk in a store called ''Sur La Table,'' which he pronounced tāb-lé, and {{running|Gag}} with it the whole episode whenever various words ending in 'able' were used by that character. Which is wrong, since in French (the store's name meaning "on the table") the correct pronunciation is something like "tabla," but with the final ''a''-sound abruptly bitten off (thus, "tabl' ").
* On ''Literature/CliffordTheBigRedDog'', there was a story in which Jetta read Emily Elizabeth's private journal and was led to believe that Emily Elizabeth was going to Hawaii by reading one of her made-up stories. She kept dropping all sorts of hints about Hawaii to Emily Elizabeth, but kept pronouncing it in a really pompous way, with the accent heavily on the second syllable.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'', Doug was trying to impress Patty by trying to look sophisticated and play classical music, only to be shot down by Judy when she corrected him on the pronunciation of the name, Chopin (pronounced SHO-pan).
* In the ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' episode Operation B.R.I.D.G.E. there's a clothing store that sell extremely embarrassing kids' clothing called Les Sissy (It's pronounced Sis-SAY)
* In the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS1E26TheBestNightEver "The Best Night Ever"]], Pinkie Pie tries to adapt to an upper class party.
-->'''Pinkie Pie:''' Ooooh. They don't want to party. These ponies want to par-TAY!
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' uses the "Fra-Gee-Lay" pronunciation joke.
* An accidental instance of this happened in ''WesternAnimation/{{Superjail}}'', when a LittlestCancerPatient accidentally got into Superjail, the resident pyro reads her diagnosis on her hospital bracelet and mistakes it for her name, calling her 'San-ser'.
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'' had Goofy taking a class at the local community center to learn how to be a mime. His instructor, who spoke with an affected New England-type accent, insisted on pronouncing the word "mimes" as "meems" (which, in his defense, ''is'' the correct pronunciation in French, with the exception of the ''s'' being {{s|tealthPun}}ilent).
* In ''WesternAnimation/FantasticMax'', a character is named "Fatso" but insists on his name being pronounced "Fah-ZO", as the T is silent.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', when the Titans meet Kole and Gnarrk, Cyborg calls him "Narrk" (which is technically the correct way of pronouncing it). Everybody corrects him that it is pronounced "Guh-narrk", much to Cyborg's confusion.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' gives us the Dathomirian Nightbrother Savage Opress, with the first part of his name being pronounced "Sa-VAHJ" and the last part being pronounced just like "oppress". When a bounty hunter reads Savage's wanted poster, he mispronounces his name as "Sa-vidge (just like "savage") Oh-priss".
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''; the two {{Jerkass}} detectives in Season 2 pronounce Mako's name as "May-Ko" (like the shark) instead of "Mah-Ko" (like [[Creator/{{Mako}} the late actor]]) when making fun of him.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AllHailKingJulien'', everyone mispronounces "[[SeldomSeenSpecies fossa]]" as "foosa". It's understandable for King Julien, as his syntax is notably convoluted, but the other lemurs have no excuse.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'':
** In the episode "Squid Plus One" Squidward gets an invitation to a party where he can invite one guest. The invitation says "Squidward Tentacles plus one" which he pronounces as "Ploo-zon-ay" and figures the sender got his name wrong with extra words tacked on.
** Of course there is Spongebob's pronunciation of "karate" as "kay-ra-tae".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- People]]
* Allegedly actress Jean Harlow was at dinner with Margot Asquith (wife of the UK Prime Minister at the time) and kept pronouncing her name with the "t". Eventually Asquith told her "No, Jean, the 'T' is silent, [[StealthPun like in 'Harlow']]".
* In England...
** The surname Berkley is pronounced B'''ar'''kley.
** Similarly, Derby is "Darby" (surname and [[strike: county]] city. The county is Derbyshire (DAR-bee-shur)). And the word 'clerk' is "clark". There's something going on there.
*** A [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift Great Vowel Shift]] during the settlement of the New World, perhaps?
** And "Berkshire" is pronounced "Bark-shire". But the abbreviated form "berk" (rhyming slang: berk = Berkshire Hunt = cunt; usage: insult) is still pronounced "berk", not "bark".
*** Actually, it's pronounced "Burk", like Americans pronounce "Derp" as "Durp".
*** The rhyming slang takes its name from the Berkeley Hunt. Which is, of course, pronounced "BARK-lee".
** No one is quite sure how to pronounce the name "Wriothesley," the surname of the former Earls of Southampton. Interpretations include: "ROTTS-lee," "RYE-es-lee," "Wri-oth-es-ley," and the almost certainly incorrect "Risley."
* Possible case: Creator/NicolasCage pronounces his son [[Franchise/{{Superman}} Kal-El's]] name as ka-LELL, despite the hyphen making the correct pronunciation perfectly obvious. More likely he simply pronounces it the same way as Brando did in ''Superman''.
* Ralph ("Rafe") Fiennes ("Fines") definitely falls into this category while at the same time being a terrible example as the two F sounds blend into one if said without thinking about it.
** Also the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.
** However, it should be noted that /ˈreɪf/ is the traditional English pronunciation, which was replaced with the typical German pronunciation /ˈrælf/ (which is of course what it looks like to modern English-speakers, which is why it falls under this trope).
*** Similar to Henry ("Harry", which is now an official alternate spelling) and Agnes ("ANN-iss")
* Scottish actor Gerard (JAYR-id) Butler played King Leonidas in ''Film/ThreeHundred'', whereas {{Joisey}}-born Gerard (juh-RAWRD) Way is the lead singer of Music/MyChemicalRomance.
* The Welsh girls' name Siân is pronounced "shahn". Outside the UK, many people will pronounce it how it's spelt.
* John Boehner, who retired from his post as Speaker of the (U.S.) House in 2015. His last name is pronounced BAY-ner, not [[UnfortunateNames "boner"]].
** Anyone trying to search [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] for "John Bayner" will get redirected to the correct page.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jared_Lee_Loughner Jared Lee Loughner's]] last name is pronounced LOFF-ner, not "{{loner|sAreFreaks}}".
** Same for actor [[Series/HawaiiFive0 Alex]] [[Series/{{Moonlight}} O'Loughlin]].
* After winning the Heisman Trophy, Tony Dorsett announced that his last name should be pronounced "Dor-SETT" rather than "DOR-set". The next year, Earl Campbell won the award and joked that his last name was "Cam-BELL".
** In his senior season, Joe Theismann (originally pronounced THEES-man) changed the pronunciation of his name so that it'd rhyme with Heisman, thinking he'd get more votes that way. He failed; Jim Plunkett won that year.
* Former Rice halfback Dicky Moegle later one changed the spelling of his last name to Maegle the look the way it's pronounced since many people said it as "MOH-gle".
* The printing method known as Giclee is pronounced "Zhee-clay". Go figure.
** Because it's correctly spelt ''giclée'' and pronounced as such. It was taken from the French verb, "gicler" meaning "to squirt, spurt or spray".
* Remember... Guy Forget? (Ghee FOR-zhay)
** Another case of a French pronunciation.
*** Hardly noticeable since, you know, he's French.
* Mike Krzyzewski, coach of the Duke Blue Devils basketball team. Apparently, "Krzyzewski" is pronounced "Sheshefski".
** It's much easier for Americans to try "Sheshefski" than the actual Polish. This is understandable, seeing as it's [[TheUnpronounceable Polish]].[[note]]For the curious, the Polish pronunciation is (approximately) "kzhy-zev-ski".[[/note]]
* Many non-Polish citizens have trouble pronouncing the surname "Szczepaniak", opting instead to write it as "Stepaniak" and pronounce it as "Steh-paw-nic".
* The last name of NHL player Miroslav Satan? Try sha-TAHN.
** Pronounced as in his native Slovak, in which the name is written Šatan (note the difference in the first letter).
* Dallas Mavericks guard Monta Ellis' first name is pronounced "MON-tay."
* Creator/KirstenDunst is pronounced KEER-stuhn, not KUR-stuhn. This is the German and Scandinavian pronunciation of the name, not completely surprising as her father is German and her mother is of German-Swedish extraction. (However, she apparently does not go so far as to insist on her surname being given the proper German pronunciation, which would be more like "doonst").
* Music/LouisArmstrong disliked being called "Louie", as he saw the nickname demeaning and dismissive of his achievements and talents. Even today, the pronunciation of his first name is SeriousBusiness to jazz aficionados.
* While most people say "Carnegie" with the first syllable emphasized, "CAR-neh-gee", Andrew Carnegie himself pronounced his last name with the stress on the second syllable, i.e. "Car-NAY-gee".
** In Pittsburgh, it and the many things with his name have always been pronounced Carnegie's way, to the extent of re-recording a recent bus announcement.
* Thandie Newton's first name is pronounced "Tandy", like the computer.
* One of Oxford's most famous colleges is 'Magdalen'. However, it is not pronounced as it's spelt, it's pronounced 'maudlin'. Same in Cambridge.
** A case of French pronunciation over Latinate orthography. Latin Magdalena, (Old and Modern) French Madeleine; indeed, the English adjective "maudlin" is derived from the name in its medieval pronunciation -- spelled phonetically.
* Halley's Comet. "Hay-lees" used to be a common mispronunciation; it's now usually pronounced "Hah-lees", but if you're following the man it's named after, it should be pronounced "Haw-lees".[[note]]Maybe. Nobody is quite sure exactly how Edmond himself pronounced his last name; orthography was not yet fully standardized in the 17th century, and contemporary spellings included Hailey, Hayley, Haly, Hawly, and Hawley in addition to the now-standard Halley.[[/note]]
* Also, Walter Raleigh. It's "Raw-Lee", not "Rah-lee".
** The capital of North Carolina, however, is definitely "Rah-lee." Or "Rah-luh"; the city of Rolla, MO was named after Raleigh, NC except the settlers (many of whom were from North Carolina) decided to spell it so that it would be pronounced "correctly" by their neighbors. Which led to some people pronouncing it "Row-lay"; you just can't win.
* Creator/CharlizeTheron has stated in interviews that she finds it amusing that people pronounce her last name in the media as "Tha-Rown" to make it sound fancy, saying that it's simply pronounced "thair-in". The sound of it is actually quite different and almost impossible to transcribe even phonetically in English. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3TTi_gAS5c]]
* Arab is supposed to be pronounced "Air-rib," not "A-RAB" like the way [[Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn Huckleberry Finn]] pronounces it. In British English it's pronounced "A-rəb".
* Stephen J. Cannell (rhymes with "channel")
* Creator/MattGroening (rhymes with "raining")
* There is an actress named Karen Cliche ("kleesh")
* George Dzundza ("zoonza")
* "Deborah Kerr is the star."
** "But [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Steve Kerr]] rhymes with 'sir'".
* The "Seuss" in Creator/DrSeuss is pronounced Soyce (rhymes with voice). Dr. Seuss himself has stated this, but nobody seems to remember or care.
** A collaborator of Seuss's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss#Pen_names_and_pronunciations wrote of him:]]
-->You're wrong as the deuce\\
And you shouldn't rejoice\\
If you're calling him "Seuss."\\
He pronounces it "Soice."
* Similarly, the first name of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, being Italian in origin, should be pronounced "cone-doh-leet-zuh" (rhyming with "pizza"). But most people shorten the first "o" and leave out the "t" sound.
** The name is derived from the musical term "con dolcezza", which is pronounced "con dol-chets-tsuh", with the main stress on the (short) "e".
* Scandinavian tongues have weird pronunciation rules, for example the Norwegian name Kjerstine is pronounced "cher-steen-uh".
** Pretty standard across Germanic languages. English is the ugly duckling rather than the rest.
* Creator/SteveBlum pronounces his last name as "bloom". He isn't known to get annoyed about it too often, though.
* Many people pronounce Creator/VicMignogna as it is written, which is wrong. It's pronounced something like min-nya-na.
** It's pronounced Min-yon-na. You can hear him pronounce it himself in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOrpFLetvrU this]] Website/YouTube video. If you don't want to watch the whole thing, he says his name at 1:50. However, if you want to see the hysterical [[MemeticMutation Mustang-miniskirt]] bit, fast forward to 6:30.
* A German living in England named her daughter Caroline, but spells it (unofficially) as Caro-Lynne to force the German pronunciation.
** German pronunciation would be "caro-lee-nuh".
* Can be subverted. Depending on where one lives, a person can officially change their name, or the spelling of their name.
* There is an Israeli talk show host named Guy Pines. For you non-Israelis: it’s a corruption of the German surname Pins, since Hebrew doesn’t have word-final consonant clusters[[note]]unless it’s a consonant that isn’t t/d and a morphemic -t[[/note]], pronounced PEA-ness, but we all know what that ''really'' sounds like. To avoid awkwardness abroad[[note]]He has often interviewed foreign celebrities, and yes, it’s gotten awkward; when he told Creator/JuliaRoberts his name, she said hers was ‘Woman Vagina’.[[/note]], he often claims it’s pronounced like the plural tree type.
* Maurice Gibb of Music/TheBeeGees pronounced his first name "Morris". As did Maurice Evans.
* English novelist Oliver Onions would have you pronounce it "oh-NYE-onz."
* Creator/{{Cillian|Murphy}} (KIL-ian, [[BerserkButton not SIL-ian]]) Murphy definitely qualifies. (Names starting with C are ''always'' a hard C in Irish.)
* Major League Baseball outfielder Matt Diaz, who has gone on record to state that yes, it's pronounced "DIE-az".
** A jarring example is former Major League Baseball catcher Jorge Fábregas, who pronounces his name "George Fabber-gass".
* Creator/TaylorLautner pronounces his surname as "LOWT-ner" instead of "LAHT-ner".
* Inverted by Creator/RickyGervais -- he insists on the Anglicised pronunciation of his surname ("ger-VASE") despite the fact that it's of French origin and historically pronounced "ger-VAY". And by "historically", we mean "his father, probably, and if not his grandfather": his dad was a Franco-Ontarian (i.e. French-Canadian from Ontario) from [[NamesTheSame London]] (the one halfway between Windsor/Detroit and Toronto) who came to Britain as part of [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks the forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and settled there after the war.
* The second-to-last person to rule China during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) was the Empress Dowager Cixi (pinyin transliteration), who was a contemporary of Queen Victoria and was sometimes compared to her. Most English speakers would probably pronounce her name "Seezee", but in Mandarin it was the much less feminine-sounding [[ValuesDissonance (to English ears, anyway)]] "zuh-SHEE."
* Retired American Football quarterback Brett Favre (pronounced far-v)
* Actor [[Series/SportsNight Peter]] [[Series/SixFeetUnder Krause]] pronounces his surname "KRAU-zuh," rather than the more-common-in-America single-syllable pronunciation.
* The American Civil Rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois supposedly insisted that people pronounce his surname "duh-BOYSE", rather than the standard French "doo-BWAH", because he hated the racism of French society in the early 20th century.
* Music/{{Nickelback}}'s Chad and Mike Kroeger's last name is pronounced Kroo-ger like Freddy, but Americans seem to say it as Kroger like the grocery store
* Music/{{Rammstein}} keyboardist Flake Lorenz (his real first name is Christian, but no one calls him that) pronounces his nickname as 'Flah-kuh' rather than 'Flayke'.
* The writer Creator/JamesBranchCabell pronounced his last name CAB-ble, not ca-BELL. To correct the mispronunciation, he came up with a rhyming couplet: "Tell the rabble his name is Cabell."
* Gyllenhaal, of Jake and Maggie fame, is ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=K6nXIdx1hFw#t=110 apparently]]) pronounced "Yillenhoolihay".
* In an instance that takes this trope UpToEleven, the old Southern surname "Enroughty" is pronounced "Darby." No, seriously. A newspaper clipping from [[OlderThanRadio ''The Nation'' in 1887]] offers a more detailed explanation:
-->It is related that the first Enroughty who settled in Henrico County became so incensed and resentful at the mispronunciation of his surname--some calling it Enr-itjfty, others Enrooty, and others again Enrowty—that he insisted, whenever spoken to, that he should be called "Darby." ... The family has ever been tenacious of the name of Enroughty and equally tenacious of the name of "Darby," and if a stranger should happen to call any of them by any name other than that last given, he would immediately be requested to say "Darby." In all writings, bank accounts, and poll-books—indeed, wherever it is necessary to write the true name—it is spelled Enroughty, but invariably pronounced "Darby." We read, in official reports of the operations of Grant's and Lee's armies below Richmond, of "the battle of Darbytown," but, in truth, the locality was Enroughtytown.
* The Chicago Blackhawks' Jonathan Toews falls into this. It's "Tayves", despite the spelling.
** More NHL Examples, Toews' ex teammate Dustin Byfuglin is pronounced Buff-lin.
* The surname of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueBaseball player Kevin Pillar is pronounced like the feminine Spanish name "Pilar".
* Prince Rainier of Monaco's name was pronounced "rahn-YAY", unlike Mt. Rainier (see under Places below).
* There is a famous singer in Russia named Nikolai Baskov. Normally, his last name is pronounced "bus-KOFF" and means "of small and low voice". When he became famous, he changed the pronunciation to "BAHS-kuff" ("of Basque descent").
* The band Music/{{Sade}}, which takes its name from the lead singer Sade Adu (Sade being short for Folasade), is pronounced "Sha-DAY", not "Sahd" as in the Marquis du Sade. Another common mispronounciation is "SHAR-day", which has even led to several children being named Sharde after the band.
* Kim Jong Un's name is regularly mispronounced in British media, creating a hyperforeignism by pronouncing "Jong" as "Yong," when really it's just plain old "Jong." Strangely less of a problem in American media.
* The winemaking Mondavi family of Napa Valley originally used the Americanized pronunciation of "mon-DAY-vee". Then in 1965 amid family turmoil, eldest son Robert left to start his own winery, and began pronouncing it "mon-DAH-vee".
* The name "Koch" is normally pronounced like "Coke" with a softer K at the end. Former UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Mayor Ed Koch pronounced his last name as "Kotch" and Ravens punter Sam Koch is pronounced as "Cook", which actually is the literal translation of Koch.
* Linguist Noam Chomsky’s last name is a common Russian one, and is supposed to be pronounced with a Russian kh-sound. It seems he doesn’t care, though, and even in the linguistic community they pronounce it with an English ch-sound.
* Some English-speaking people with the last name of Benoit, which is French, give it the traditional French pronunciation of "ben-WAH." Others pronounce it the way it looks to English speakers, "Ben-OYT."
** See: Wrestler Wrestling/ChrisBenoit (ben-WAH) versus bowler Bob Benoit (ben-OYT).
* Patrick Brontë, father of the famous Brontë Sisters was Anglo-Irish and born as Patrick Brunty. At some point, he decided to change the spelling of his name to Brontë, which indicates the pronunciation of the root word Gaelic surname (as well as of course sounding "posher"). It's also been speculated that the change was inspired by UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson being awarded the title Duke of Bronté.
* [[Series/BeverlyHills90210 Ian]] [[Film/{{Sharknado}} Ziering's]] first name is pronounced "Eye-An" rather than the more usual pronunciation, though weirdly enough his surname is pronounced the way you'd expect it to be. He lampshaded this while on ''[[Series/TheApprentice Celebrity Apprentice]]'', when Geraldo Rivera completely mangled his name during an all-important presentation, causing Ian to snark "Maybe you should just call me 'Eee-an,' it'd be easier for everyone."
* Creator/MelBlanc (pronounced "blank") and Creator/JBBlanc (pronounced "blonk"). Mel's surname was spelled with a "K" originally, but he later changed the spelling because one of his teachers said that he was just like his name: blank. "Blonk" approximates the correct pronounciaton of B-L-A-N-C, it is a French surname (a nasalised "blah") and JB was born in France despite being English.
* The two US presidents with the last name Roosevelt both pronounced it slightly differently. Teddy said roʊzəvɛlt (roh-zuh-velt), whereas FDR went by roʊzəvəlt (roh-zuh-vuhlt).
* It's a running gag among mathematicians that if you can pronounce "Constantin Carathéodory" correctly then you are one yourself. (Actually, it isn't that hard, just lay the stress on the -ry. But if it comes out like [[Music/BillyJoel "He works at Mr. Carathéodory's down on Sullivan Street"]]...you failed.)
* Beatrice Rana doesn't look hard, but if you're not Italian, it gets confusing. While Americans say "BEE-uh-tris", Rana and most Italians prefer "Bee-uh-TREE-chay". [[http://www.theaterjones.com/ntx/2013vancliburninternationalpianocompetition/20130517072132/2013-05-17/Meet-the-Pianists-Beatrice-Rana One interviewer]] felt they had to include a pronunciation guide at the beginning.
* Most English-speakers nowadays call the famous Roman JOO-lee-us SEE-zer. This can cause consternation for Latin scholars, who either go along with this pronunciation (which sounds completely ridiculous in Latin), or risk sounding pretentious by talking about YOO-lee-us KAI-sar.
* NBA player Stephen Curry pronounces his first name as "Steffen".
* Former NBA player Mark Aguirre's last name is pronounced as "A-gwyre", instead of the traditional Spanish pronunciation "Ah-gi-rre"
* Comedian Creator/DavidKoechner pronounces his surname "Keck-ner" not "Coke-ner".
* The [=McCaughey=] family of Iowa, which includes the first set of septuplets that all survived infancy (born in 1997), pronounces its name "[=McCoy=]".
* Filipino volleyball player Alyssa Valdez. You pronounce her first name as "A-lye-sa", not like you would the first name of Alyssa Milano.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- Places]]
* Québec, Canada. Is it KWI-beck or KEH-beck?
** Neither. In French it's "keh-BECK". In French "qu" renders a hard /k/, and as there is an acute accent on the first syllable, it is pronounced with a clear "eh". Pronouncing the "Qu" as in English is still common and accepted in English-speaking Canada, although here too second syllable is stressed, so there are two "correct" English pronunciations, "kwi-BECK" and "kuh-BECK" (in the first one the vowel is a short "i", in the second a schwa).
* During WWI, there were proposals to change the name of Berlin, NH due to anti-German sentiment at the time. This was dropped when it was pointed out that Berlin, NH is pronounced as BER-lin instead of the German Ber-LIN. Ironically, Berlin, NH has a high population of French Americans and French Canadians.
* Creator/{{ESPN}} guys love to pronounce Detroit as if it were still a French word ("Day-twa"), just for a joke.
** And you're free to fight amongst yourselves as to whether it's pronounced "Duh-TROIT" or "DEE-troit."
*** Or "De-TROH-wit", if you're [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada Bob Cole]].
*** Having lived within a few hours of it for most of a lifetime, it's Dtroit.
*** As to the Mackinac Bridge - Mackin''aw'', that's the law. Mackin''ac'', that's just wack!
* The working class suburb Mangere in Auckland, New Zealand (pronounced MAH-NGE-RE according to the Maori or MAN-gerry in common use), is sometimes fondly referred to as "Mon-ZHER" by its inhabitants.
* Louisville: If you live in Louisville you pronounce it as lul-vul. If you are from anywhere else you may pronounce it as Lou-is-ville, Lou-ie-ville or Low-ville.
** Kentucky, at least. The other Louisvilles are pretty straightforward in their "Lewie-vill" pronunciation.
*** Except for Ohio (Lew-is-ville). But then, Ohio is sort of wonky with its place names: Lima = LIE-ma; Rio Grande = RYE-o Grand; Bellefontaine = Bell Fountain; etc. The former Georgia state capital uses this pronunciation as well.
*** Don't forget Versailles (ver-SALES), Campbell (CAM-ell), Russia (RUE-she), Milan (MY-lan), Conneaut (KAHN-ee-awt), Mantua (MAN-a-way), and Berlin (BER-lin). Not to mention that Ohio has both Louisville and Lewisville, and they're both pronounced as LEW-iss-vihl.
*** Colorado also falls firmly into the Lou-is-ville camp, as does Nebraska.
* Also in Nebraska:
** Beatrice: the stress goes on the second syllable (bee-A-tris). Rumor has it, we can thank train stations, back before amplification: the flat "AAA" is easier to hear over a crowd than "EEE".
** Norfolk: pronounced nor-''fork''. The town was named after the North Fork River, but the United States Postal Service assumed they meant "Norfolk".
** Papillion: "pa-PILL-yon". Originally a French name, ''papillon'' (butterfly), which would be pronounced ''papyo(n)''. The nearby river is called "Papio".
* Nevada: If you live either there or in surrounding states, chances are you say "neh-VA-duh" with the vowel in the middle syllable pronounced like the vowel in "flat." If you don't, you probably say "neh-VAH-duh" with the "a" pronounced like the "o" in "bother." (which, for English English pronouncers, is like the "ar" in "larder"). In at least parts of the deep South, it can even be "NEH-vuh-duh".
** It's a bit of a BerserkButton for them, actually. Michelle Obama pronounced it wrong at a rally for her [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama husband]], back when he was running for president. She [[SeriousBusiness was lucky to correct herself in time.]]
*** Again, Missouri, Ohio, and Iowa as well, are backward on this. Their little towns of the same name are pronounced "Ne-VAY-da".
* The (somewhat fairy-tale) name of the village of Appletreewick in North Yorkshire, UK is pronounced "Ap-trick" by locals.
** Similarly, the locals pronounce the town of Worcester, Massachusetts, "WOO-stah".
*** That is how the original Worcester in England is pronounced - "WORCE-ster".
*** It gets better: locals pronounce Worcestershire, England as "Wistasha".
*** Same goes for Gloucester (GLOSS-ter), Leicester (Lester), and Leominster (Lemon-ster). All named after places in England (though the English Leominster is pronounced "Lem-ster").
*** The Gloucestershire Airplane Corporation (one of the predecessors of British Aerospace) changed its name into Gloster as it expected foreign contracts. "Gloster" is pretty much the phonetic ortography for "Gloucester".
*** Also on "Gloucester"s: there's a Gloucester County in UsefulNotes/NewJersey, as well as a Gloucester City and Gloucester Township. All three are pronounced "GLOSS-ter"--but confusingly, Gloucester City and Gloucester Township are (1) not particularly near each other (a good seven or eight miles apart) and (2) in neighboring Camden County.
** The village of Athelstaneford in Scotland is pronounced "EL-shen-ferd", at least by locals. What makes it slightly more bizarre is that the village is named after the medieval king Athelstan, whose name is pronounced as it looks.
* Great Britain is full of this sort of thing, both in personal names and place names. For example...
** Mr. Featherstonehaugh (FAN-shaw)
** Mr. Menzies (MING-iss). Can also be used as a first name, as in politician Menzies Campbell (MING-iss CAM-ble)
*** Partly because it wasn't originally a 'z' in the middle there, but the old Middle Scots letter 'yogh'. Early Scots printers didn't have a handy yogh in their fonts, so used the similarly shaped 'z' instead.
** Stiffkey (STOO-kee), Cley (CLY) and Wymondham (WIND-um) in Norfolk
** Leicester (LES-tuh) and its attendand -shire (LES-tuh-shuh).
** Cholmondeley is pronounced like "Chumley" (/ˈtʃʌmli/).
** The town of Hednesford in the West Midlands, pronounced "Hens-fud", in a similar manner to Wednesday - not Head-Nes-Ford.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marylebone Marylebone]] in London. [[http://www.fodors.com/community/europe/two-london-questions-one-of-which-is-really-dumb.cfm Which can be said quite a few ways.]] Mary-le-bone, Marry-le-bone, Marleybun (the right one, says Wiki), Mairbun, Mbn.
** In any place name ending in 'wick' or 'wich', such as Chiswick and Greenwich, the 'W' is silent. So Chiswick is 'chiz-ick' not 'chiz-wick', Greenwich is 'gren-itch' not 'green-witch'. Also Southwark is 'Suthuk'
*** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in an '80s beer commercial voiced by Creator/JohnCleese -- where he deliberately mispronounced Greenwich, Connecticut as "Green Witch, Connect-i-cut"
*** The upstate New York town of Greenwich ''is'' pronounced 'green-wich'. You know, just to be different.
*** In the opening scene of ''Theatre/OnTheTown'', Chip demonstrates that he knows UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity only from a guidebook by pronouncing the name of one neighborhood "Green-witch Village."
** And Norwich is pronounced "Norrich"
** Towcester. As in the thing you use to make toast.
** Also, the town Worsley (War-sley) and the surname Worsley (Wurss-ley) are both pronounced differently.
** Should the 'l' in Holme be silent or not?
** The surname St John is pronounced "Sinjin." St Mary Axe, a street in the [[UsefulNotes/OneLondonThirtyThreeBoroughs City of London]], is likewise pronounced "Simmery Axe," as in the PatterSong from ''Theatre/TheSorcerer''.
* Newfoundland is not, in fact, New-Found-Land, it's Newfin-LAND.
** That's it. Oh, and it's not to be pronounced as "New Finland" either. Many a tourist have made that mistake.
** To add to the confusion, Leif Eriksson discovered "Vinland" (Wineland), which is thought to be the southern tip of Newfoundland.
** Though some people pronounce it more like Newfun-land.
* It's illegal in Arkansas to pronounce the final "s".
*** Speaking of which, the pronounciation of "Arkansas" is an easy way to tell if a speaker's from the state itself or Kansas. Arkansans say "AR-kan-saw", and Kansans use the "Ar" as a prefix, something like "ar-KAN-sas".
*** Then there's the Arkansas River, which begins in Colorado and is often pronounced with a final "s" outside the state of the same name.
* Downtown [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Manhattan]] has Houston (HOW-sten) Street. It is not pronounced the same as the city of Houston (HYOO-stin), Texas. The former was named after William Houstoun, and the latter named after Sam Houston.
** Similarly, Houston County, GA, is also pronounced HOW-sten. HYOO-stin may start a fight.
* Several small towns in the Midwest United States are named for more famous world cities and pronounced differently, such as Cairo, Illinois (pronounced KAY-row) and Cairo, Ohio (pronounced "CARE-oh") and [[Film/{{Hoosiers}} Milan, Indiana]], Milan, Illinois,and Milan, Ohio (all pronounced "MY-lun"). Also in Ohio there is a town called Vienna, pronounced Vye-ANN-ah... which contrasts with Vienna, Illinois (vye-ENN-uh).
** In Iowa, you'll find both Madrid (MAD-rid) and Nevada (ne-VAY-da).
** Same with Missouri, with New Madrid instead of simply Madrid. Missouri also has Versailles ("ver-SAILS") and Vichy (somewhere between "vit-shee" and "vishee", definitely ''not'' "VEE-shee"). There's also Rolla, pronounced "RAH-luh", named after Raleigh NC but spelled phonetically.
* Many non-native Minnesotans have trouble pronouncing "Mahtomedi", "wayzata", "Duluth" and "Shakopee".
** In New Mexico, there's a small artsy town between Albuquerque and Santa Fe pronounced "MAH-drid". (seen in the film ''Wild Hogs'')
* And one more for Ohio: {{UsefulNotes/Toledo|Ohio}}. The Northwest Ohio city is pronounced Toe-LEE-doh, as opposed to the Spanish city (its official sister city), pronounced Toe-LAY-doh.
* Sorta subverted in Louisiana where half the places and surnames actually ''are'' French.
** And on the subject of New Orleans, it's only Nawlins if you can say it Yat otherwise it's NEW-or-lins (pronounced as one word), not New-or-leans
*** It's impossible to phoneticize as one word, but it's an unaccented 'nuh oe linz' with the vowels schwa'd together. But then you have street names with spellings in familiar English that locals will insist on pronouncing "Bur-GUN-dee".
** Played straight with the local pronunciation of Chartres Street, which natives will insist on pronouncing like "charters." In actual French, it's "shart."
*** No. In actual French it's "shartr", but I might as well write Chartres as only the S doesn't count. Chartres is a city (and possibly a title linked to whoever the street was named after), a charte is... a charter.
** It became fairly easy to see who was a native of the region and who arrived after Hurricane Katrina thanks to pronunciations of words like Fortier (FOR-shay, not for-TEE-air) and Calliope (CAL-ee-oh, not the Greek daughter-of-Zeus cuh-LIE-oh-pee)
** Not to mention the region called Plaquemines Parish (parishes are the equivalent in Louisiana of counties), pronounced "PLACK-er-mans"
* Burnet, TX is pronounced so that the mnemonic "It's Burnet; Durn it! Learn it!" rhymes.
* The small town of Welsh, Louisiana, is pronounced "welch."
* Also in Texas, Montague County is pronounced "Mon-TAYG," instead of the European "MON-Tuh-Gyu."
* Trevor, WI is pronounced "TREE-ver," not like the name Trevor. Folks from the southern half of Milwaukee County frequently leave the L out of Milwaukee (ma-WAWK-ee). Many French city names in Wisconsin are deliberately mispronounced. If you, for example, pronounce "Prairie du Chien" (means "Dog's Prairie", after the local Indian chief) in the proper French as "Pra-RIE du Shee-ohn," you'll be corrected to "Prarie du Sheen." Likewise, Fond du Lac (literally, "bottom of the lake" - it's at the southern tip of Lake Winnebago) is "Fondle-ack." Oddly, other places like Lac du Flambeaux ("Lake of Torches") and Eau Claire ("Clear Water") are pronounced as they would be in French. With Indian names in the upper Midwest, good luck. We'll be sure to make fun of you for mispronouncing "Oconomowoc." BTW, "Racine" is either "ray-SEEN" or "ra-SEEN," about 50-50 each way. Don't let the locals snow you.
** Yet another Wisconsin hint: It's "New BER-lin," not "New Ber-LIN." Even though it's named after the city in Germany, the pronunciation has shifted for some odd reason. And the second "A" is silent in "Shawano." (it's NOT "sha-WA-no" - it properly has only two syllables ("SHAW-no"), not three!)
** Speaking of Fond du Lac, there is an elementary school there that is named Pier but is pronounced "pi-er" but people calling some times pronounce it as "pe-er".
** And then there's Waupun, pronounced "wuh-PAHN," because of course it is.
* People of Prescott, Arizona (and probably by extension, Prescott valley) say the town's name is pronounced PRES-skit, not PRES-cott.
* Tooele, Utah. It may take visitors a while to realize it is the town referred to when people said, "tuh-WILL-uh." The spelling actually got changed from the closer-to-the-mark Tuilla in the 19th Century.
* Hurricane, Utah, is pronounced HURR-kin (two syllables). Hurricane, West Virginia, on the other hand, is pronounced HURR-i-kin (three syllables).
* Spanish Fork (Utah [again]) is said just like it looks unless you're from there, in which case it is Spanish Fark.
* Weber County, Utah (and Weber State University located there) is pronounced WEE-ber.
* Pierre the capitol of South Dakota is pronounced PEER Not PEA-AIR.
* The western Colorado town of Ouray is pronounced "YOU-ray" It's named after a Ute Indian Chief.
* A major road in Houston, TX is Kuykendahl. Pronounced KIRK-en-doll.
** The H at the beginning of the name of the Houston suburb Humble is silent.
* Head north from Houston towards Dallas, head west when you're a couple hours away, and you'll come to Mexia. Pronounced "Muh-HEY-uh".
* As you're starting to enter South Texas, not far from Corpus Christi, there's a town called Refugio. It was originally pronounced as in Spanish (roughly "reh-FOO-hee-oh"), but a large group of Irish settlers came in the 1830s and had difficulty with the name. They ended up saying it "re-FURY-oh", which became the local pronunciation to this day. Even local Spanish-speakers pronounce it "re-FURY-oh".
* Then in west Texas, you have Colorado City. That's "Caw-luh-RAY-doh City" (made confusing by the fact it's on the "Caw-luh-RAH-doh" River).
* The city of Beaufort, South Carolina is pronounced "Buew-fert", while Beaufort, North Carolina is pronounced "Bow-fert". NC also has the town of Bahama (Ba-HAY-ma).
* People who aren't British seem to have trouble pronouncing Worcestershire Sauce (WORCE-ster-shire). Even though most Brits know how to say it correctly it mostly tends to get referred to as Lea and Perrins.
* Missourians are [[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/13/us/politics/missouree-missouruh-to-be-politic-in-missouri-say-both.html?_r=0 slightly divided on this issue]]. Most of us pronounce it "Missour-EE", but a small number of people, primarily from the southern part of the state, pronounce it "Missour-AH".
* People who live in or near UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} tend to pronounce the city's name as something rather like "Tronno". Toronto, New South Wales is pronounced the same way.
* UsefulNotes/{{Vancouver}} is pronounced as "Vangcouver" by locals, while outsiders tend to say it like two distinct words[[note]]Which, to be fair, it is in the original Dutch origins of the name[[/note]], in other words "Van" rather than "Vang". While this matches the spelling, it is actually the locals who are following standard English phonetic rules of assimilation (e.g. "ingcome" for "income").
* UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}}, in Canadian English, is pronounced "mun-tree-ALL", while Americans use "mon-tree-ALL" - neither is an exact match for the original French ("mon-HAY-ah-le").
** It's subject to debate among ourselves, with "Mon-rayhal", "Mont-rehal" and "Mon-treal" being the most common way to pronounce it
* The street "Dalhousie" in Ottawa is pronounced "Dal-HOO-zee" (as per a Scottish accent) while the university in Nova Scotia says "Dal-HOW-zie".
* Speaking of streets in Canada, Dundas St. in Toronto rhymes with "class," not "bus."
* The Canberra suburb of Manuka is pronounced 'mahn-NAH-ka', not 'mah-NU-ka' like the plant.
* The town of Florida, Colorado pronounces its name the Spanish way: fla - REE - da.
* UK place names again: Edinburgh, Middlesbrough and Loughborough are in wildly different parts of the country (Scotland, North Yorkshire and Leicestershire respectively) and all pronounce the section of their names after the B as Borough despite the different spelling. Even weirder is the town of Brough which doesn't pronounce it like the similarly spelt Middlesbrough, but pronounces it as Bruff.
** Arguably, the end of all of these is pronounced as "brə" with a schwa, rather than as "bərə" although it depends on where you reside. Loughborough (Luf-brə) uses the Brough pronunciation above in it's first half as well.
* The Couch in Couch St. in Portland, OR is pronounced "Cooch," not "Couch."
* The "correct" pronunciations of Oregon include: OR-uh-gun, OR-uh-gin, OR-ih-gun, or Or-ih-gin (not Orry-gone, Orry-gun, Or-gone, or Or-ray-gone).
** Unless you're talking about the suburb of Toledo, Ohio, where it's OR-ih-gone or orry-GONE. Yes, Ohio has a pathological inability to pronounce place names the same as where they were borrowed from.
* In something of an inversion: North Versailles, Pennsylvania was intended to be named for the French palace. However, the name is pronounced "North Vur-SAYLZ".
* The Rainier in Mt. Rainier is pronounced "Rai-NEER," not "Rai-ni-er." [[{{Pun}} It's only pronounced "Rai-ni-er" if you're camping on the west side of the mountain.]]
* Aloha, Oregon is pronounced with a silent H, unlike the Hawaiian word.
* Boise, Idaho. Newscasters call it Boy-ZEE, but its Boy-SEE, to the irritation of its residents and repeated corrections.
** And the small town of Boise City, Oklahoma is "Boyce City" (more often slurred into "boycity").
* Many people pronounce Tokyo with three syllables (toh-kee-oh); it's more accurately pronounced toh-kyo, with the "kyo" one syllable (its name translates to "Eastern Capital"). To make matters more confusing, it's four "beats" in Japanese, as both O's are "long" vowels.
* Spokane, Washington. It is not spo-KAYN (as in cane), it is spo-KAN (as in can). The musical ''Love Life'' got this wrong.
* Schuylerville, New York is pronounced (SKY-ler-ville) while the Schuylkill River in Pennsylvania is pronounced (SKOO-kull). The accident-prone Philadelphia freeway next to and named after the Schuylkill river, however, is sometimes called the "Surekill Expressway", especially when discussing the "Conshohocken Curve" (note that "Conshohocken" is pronounced as spelled but can be a tongue-twister anyway).
** Also in New York: The town near Rochester called Chili is pronounced CHY-ly, not "chilly" as it is commonly mispronounced by non-locals.
* The East-Central PA city named after the country in the Middle East "Lebanon" (Leb-a-non) is pronounced locally as "LEB-nen" As a twofer, one famous product of the area is a kind of sweet spicy lunchmeat Lebanon Bologna, which the locals pronounce "LEB-nen bal-LOW-ee"
* In Vermont, Charlotte is pronounced "shar-lot" and Calais rhymes with palace, instead of the French pronounciation Cal-lay.
* In Rhode Island "Coventry" is "Cawventry" instead of "Cuhventry"
* Yarmouth, Falmouth, and many other old fishing villages in New England are properly pronounces YAR-mit, FAL-mit, and so on.
* "Duquesne" is pronounced "Du-KANE". But in "North Versailles", it's "ver-SALES", not "ver-SIGH". Because why should Western Pennsylvania be consistent?
* Versailles, Kentucky is also pronounced "ver-SALES". The Lexington, Kentucky community of Athens is historically pronounced AY-thenz.
* People from Illinois will jump down your throat if you make the mistake of pronouncing the "S".
* The Virginia cities Portsmouth, Norfolk, Huguenot, and Suffolk get this too.
** Portsmouth: Ports-smith or Ports-smuhth, not Ports-mouth
** Norfolk: Nohr-fick, Nohr-fuhk, or Naw-fick, but not Nohr-fohlk
** Huguenot: Hue-ge-not, not huh-gway-not or hoo-ge-no (or variations of the two)
** Suffolk: Suhf-fick or Suhf-fuhk, but not Suhf-fohlk
** Norfolk, Nebraska is pronounced "nor-''fork''". (It's named after the North Fork River and was supposed to be ''spelled'' "Norfork.")
* People like to pronounce the city of Kobe (written in Japanese as "Koube"), Japan, and the steak that takes its name from the city, like Kobe Bryant ("koh-bee"), when it's actually "kohh-beh." In Japanese, "Koubi" (交尾) means "animal mating," and when applied to human intercourse means "very rough sex."
* Probably unintentional, but [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada Don Cherry]] tends to pronounce Toronto as "trah-na".
* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking,_Austria makes note]] that the name of ''that'' town in Austria rhymes with "booking". That still doesn't stop them stealing the town sign just so they could say [[{{Pun}} that they got to Fucking]] - what does is that the signs were replaced with theft-proof versions after the old ones were swiped too many times.
* Washington state has a few of these, besides Spokane and Mt. Rainier noted above. Most famous are Cle Elum (pronounced "Clellum"), Puyallup (pronounced "pyoo-WALL-up"), and Sequim (pronounced "Squim").
** Yakima is pronounced "YAK-uh-maw," not "Yuh-KEEM-uh." The tribe name is spelled Yakama because they realized settlers got it wrong.
* The Australian city of Brisbane is pronounced Briz-bin, not Briz-bain.
** Same with other Australian cities, Melbourne is Melbin, not Mel-born, and Canberra is Canbra not Can-bear-ra.
* Butte, Montana is pronounced Beaut not [[UranusIsShowing Butt]]
* Hobart,IN is usually pronounced "Ho-burt" by residents rather than "Ho-bart" like the one in Tasmania (note it wasn't named for that one)
* Newark, Delaware is pronounced "New-ARK", while Newark, New Jersey is pronounced more like "Nork" (1 syllable). Neither is pronounced "NEW-erk".
** But Newark, Ohio, ''is'' NEW-erk.
* Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills is pronounced "roh-DAY-oh." There's also a suburb of San Francisco called Rodeo with the same pronunciation.
* The African nation of Niger is pronounced "nee-ZHAIR", not "NI-jer" or [[NWordPrivileges that other pronunciation]]. This is justified since it had been colonized by the French.
* Martinez, GA (a suburb of Augusta). The middle syllable is pronounced like "tin" with very little stress on it (it could almost be "Mart'nez, GA). Also Louisville, GA, unlike Kentucky, pronounces the -s.
* One of Atlanta's main thoroughfares is Ponce de Leon Avenue, but locals pronounce it "PONTS duh LEE-on."
* The town of Saint Helena in California's Napa Valley is traditionally pronounced "Saint Hel-EEN-uh", but possibly due to French influence as Napa's winemaking prestige has grown, it's shifting to something more like "santa-LAY-na", sounding like it's just one word.
* Beijing is regularly mispronounced by English speakers as "Beizhing" (like the "s" in "measure") rather than the Chinese pronunciation, which is exactly how it looks (with a soft "g" like in "gin").
* During the 2014 Winter Olympics, some even pronounced the Russian city Sochi (again, pronounced exactly how it looks) as "Soshi."
* A street in UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} is spelled Kuykendall. Locals pronounce it "Kirk-end-all", but visitors may pronounce that first syllable to rhyme with "guy", "boy", or even "buoy", and the last two may be changed to "[[Franchise/{{Barbie}} Ken doll]]".
* In the Brazilian city of Belo Horizonte, there is a Raja Gabaglia Avenue. It's commonly referred as "Raja", but the surname is usually pronounced the way it's spelled instead of the proper Italian ("gab-alley-ah").
* Whereas the Thames River that flows through London is pronounced "temms," the Thames River of New London, Connecticut is pronounced "thayms."
* UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}}:
** Grand Blanc is pronounced as if it were the English phrase "Grand Blank," rather than the Frenchy "Gron Blon''.
** Lake Orion, Orion Township, and associated roads, etc., are pronounced "OR-ee-uhn," rather than "oh-RY-an" like the constellation.
** Canton is pronounce "CAN-tuhn" even though it is named after the old name for Guangzhou (pronounced "can-TON"). (That region of Wayne County also had townships named [[LocationlThemeNaming Pekin and Nankin]], which have since split off into a number of other municipalities.)
** Saline is pronounced "Sah-leen," not "Say-leen" like the nasal spray. (The derivation is from French: there are salty springs in the area historically used for salt production.)
** In the UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} area, Dequindre Road is always pronounced "De-KWIN-der" (rather than the French, which is more like "deh-KANDR''), and Livernois Road/Street/Avenue is universally pronounced "Liver-noy" (a sort of half-French, half-English compromise). However, the pronunciation of Lahser Rd., five miles to the west of Livernois, is the subject of frequent disagreement among area residents.
* The well-known French city of Nice is pronounced "Neese" (rhymes with geese), not "Nice" (rhymes with ice).
* While Sydney's pronunciation is fairly straightforward, some of its suburbs can get a bit confusing. It's gotten so bad that in some cases, no two people from different ends of Sydney can really agree on pronunciation:
** La Perouse is universally "La Pe-RUSE" rather than "La Pe-ROWSE"
** Sans Succi is universally "San SOO-chi" instead of the French "Sun Soo-SI"
** Campbelltown is universally called "CAM-bull-town"
** Here's the fun part: For Mosman, is it "MOSS-man" or "MOZ-mun"?
** Minto, much like the Toronto example above, is pronounced with a silent T, sounding like "Minno"
* Welcome to Maine. It's "BANG-gore", not "Banger" (Bangor). It's "CAL-us", not "cal-LAY" (Calais). If you want to go to "MY-KNOT", head for the Dakotas because this is "MY-nut" (and neither is ever "min-NOH").
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- Other]]
* [[CaptainObvious "Cache" and "stash" aren't just synonyms; they rhyme as well.]] If you say "cashay" you mean social prestige (cachet).
* The M1 Garand, the signature rifle of the US armed forces in WWII, was named after it's designer, John Garand. Very often, laymen and even firearms experts pronounce it as "Guh-RAND". But in his life, Garand preferred "GAIR-und".
* "Tarzhay" (Target), normally as a humorous jab at the store.
** Some people think that the company is French, despite Target being headquartered in [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]].
* People who shop at "Tarzhay" also tend to shop at Jacques Penne (J.C. Penney).
** aka "Jean Claude Penn-YAY". There was also a smaller mass merchandiser in the Upper Midwest called "Venture", aka "Ven-TUR-a"
** In a bit of FridgeBrilliance, the "JC" in the store's name stands for "James Cash," of which ''Jacques'' is the French form (of "James," that is).
* Orion America Inc. used to have a factory in Princeton, IN, USA, which manufactured cathode-ray tubes for televisions. The most common way for locals to pronounce the name was "or-ree-on", despite the word actually being pronounced "oh-ryan".
** Same thing with Lake Orion and Orion Township, Michigan.
** And Farm Report host Orion Samuelson.
** Evidently, it is pronounced that way in the 23rd century as well, demonstrated by the "Star Trek" animated episode "The Pirates of Orion," when all the Starfleet personnel pronounce it "or-ree-on," despite the long history of pronouncing it correctly in the live-action series.
** There's a Okinawan brand of beer called Orion Beer. However, it's pronounced similarly (oh-ree-on). You might get weird looks from the locals if you pronounce it oh-rye-on. See the Japanese pronunciation guide below.
** That's because Orion in a ''Greek'' word originally, where it was indeed pronounced "oh-ree-on". "Oh-rye-on" is an artifact of the attempt to read its Roman spelling by the English rules.
* People who don't like Kwanzaa or don't feel it's a real holiday will often pronounce it as "Kwan-zaa," rhyming with "can."
* Stereotypically, people who went to Ivy League schools say "RAHW-thuh" or "RAHW-thur."
** Amusingly, this is pretty much the only word on which George W. Bush does not appear to have a Texas accent. Hooray for Yale?
* Cornell University is universally pronounced "cor-NELL" now, but Ezra Cornell, its founder, pronounced it "Corn'l."
* Dr. Jekyll was originally pronounced "JEE-kull".
* "Karaoke" (kah-rah-O-keh) is perhaps the most mispronounced word of all time.
** It's actually made up of two words: "kara" (Japanese for "empty") and the English word "orchestra". Of course, it's not easy for most English-speakers to pronounce Japanese words they way they're meant to be (i.e. without emphasis on any one syllable).
* "Ouija" is pronounced just as it looks like, yet many still refer to them as "Wee-gee" boards.
** It technically should be pronounced "wee-yah," as in the French and German words for "yes." Admittedly, this pronunciation is quite cumbersome for English speakers, who would be apt to conflate it to simply "weeuh." Some English-speaking kids, seeing ''ouija'' for the first time, pronounce it "oyjuh."
* Americans tend to pronounce sake, the Japanese rice wine, as "sah-kee". However, the actual pronunciation is more like "sah-kay".
** Or even "sah-KEH".
** Extra-quick pronunciation course for the Japanese-challenged Yanks: in Japanese words romanized by the Hepburn system (the one you meet most of the time) consonants are read as in English, but the vowels as in Spanish, NO stress. So "sake" is really pronounced just "sah-keh".
* The word "meme" mentioned above is typically pronounced "meem"--which makes sense given its purpose (to transmit ideas and belief information, as genes transmit biological information). Some pronounce it "may-may".
* Creator/StudioGhibli's name is pronounced with a soft G, which is as it would not be in Italian.
* The Navy: it's not Boatswain, it's Bosun. It's not Forecastle, it's Fo'c'sle.
** Inversion: But if you're a Navy man or woman in Louisville and you call the city's summer alternative music festival "Fo'c'sle", you'll mostly get odd looks, and might get a verbal chewing-out. It's the Forecastle Festival, pronounced as the words "fore" and "castle" joined together.
* This one's probably too far gone for rescue, but pronouncing "forte" as "for-tay" is straight affectation. Until the mid-20th century it was pronounced the same way in English as it is in French (where the "e" is silent).
** Possibly borrowed from musical terminology (i.e. Italian), in which "forte" is, in fact, pronounced "FOR-tay."
** It may also be a side effect of "fort" already being a word in English, forcing "forte" to adopt a different unambiguous pronunciation.
* There are a surprisingly large number of people from England's East Midlands who are blessed with the name ''Shitehead''. According to one member of the clan, the approved pronunciation is SHEETH – ead.
* Jaguar cars and the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar and Jaguar CD...the ads always pronounce it "Jag-you-are" (which is the standard British and Australian pronounciation) despite the American pronounciation being "Jag-wahr".
* Creator/{{Sega}} is pronounced as "SEEGA" in Australia, New Zealand, and in the Italian language. It is pronounced this way by some Brits (initially used in advertising), but the correct pronounciation quickly became known to those who played ''VideoGame/{{Sonic the Hedgehog|1}}'' where it is in the intro (basically, the majority of Mega Drive players). Hint: it stands for '''Se'''rvice '''Ga'''mes.
* Many people humorously pronounce "garbage" as "gar-BAHJ".
* Bologna (both the Italian city, and the food) is really supposed to be pronounced "Bo-LON-ya"[[note]]And that's no "baloney"[[/note]]. Music/WeirdAlYankovic however, pronounces it "bolohna" in order to make it sound like "Sharona" (since his song "My Bologna" is a parody of "My Sharona" by The Knack).
* Celtic is supposed to be pronounced "KEL-tic", but that doesn't stop the [[{{UsefulNotes/Basketball}} Boston Celtics]] (or their fans) from pronouncing it "SEL-tic".
** Or indeed the Scottish football team Celtic, who also pronounce it SEL-tic.
* The Native American tribe and the Illinois University team are the "Ill-eye-nigh",not "Ill-ee-nee"...apparently in the past, a few announcers screwed it up and roused some ire.
* A bit of local trivia at Texas A&M University is that Sbisa Dining Hall, on of several large student cafeterias on the main campus, is properly pronounced "Sbeezah", as it was for the person it was named for, and not "Suh-bee-sah", as most Texas A&M students will invariably say it.
* Santander, the Spanish banking conglomerate which has in recent years expanded to the UK and US, has kept the Spanish pronunciation of its name: "sahn-tahn-DEHR".
* Notably since it's from the UK, the Z in UsefulNotes/ZX81 and UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum should be zed, not zee.
* Infamously, the term Chorizo. The word is officially pronounced by Spaniards as "Chor-ees-oh", but widely accepted as "Chor-eetz-oh". Some foreigners who buy it think that "Chor-eee-tho" is the correct way to say it (mimicking the Spanish lisp), which it isn't. The less educated pronounce it "Cho-RIH-zoh". Everyone will insist that theirs is the correct way.
* Scots, and some English people get very annoyed by 'liquorice' (liquoriss) being pronounced 'liquorish', feeling it is emblematic of lower class people.
* The Finnish city of Tampere is often pronounced "Tam-PAIR" by visiting Anglophone and Francophone tourists. The correct pronunciation is "TAHM-peh-reh".
* Brits often pronounce "salsa" as "SALL-tsa", though the correct pronunciation is "SAHL-ssa" with a soft s sound.
* Mixed with SpellMyNameWithAnS, some people prefer to pronounce the name of Disney's Touchstone Pictures division as "TUCK-stone".
* Creator/BillCosby once made an educational short film about bicycle safety called "Bicycles are Beautiful". Here he pronouces "bicycle" as "bi-cycle" (as opposed to the usual "bi-sickle").
* Colonel is pronounced "kernel". Which means that despite being spelled with an L, it's homophonous to the Spanish\Portuguese word for said ranking, "coronel".
* In July 2011, during the American debt ceiling crisis, Congresswoman Michele Bachmann was quoted as saying that President Obama had "lots of chutzpah", pronouncing "chutzpah" as "CHOOTZ-pah", instead of "HOOTZ-pah".
* Does anybody know why in Germany a router [[BuffySpeak (the computer thingie with the blinkenlights)]] is pronounced "rauter" (diphthong, as in "house") by some people?
** Answer: It's a loanword from English (as ''der Router''); German didn't bother creating a new word for it. All forms of English pronounce the networking device as "rauter".
* The British pronounciation of "lieutenant" is "lef-TENant".
* The sudo tool to access root privileges in UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} is pronounced "soo-doo", although a lot of people pronounce it as "pseudo." The confusion comes from the fact that it allows an ordinary user to have root privleges without having to log in as root, in other words, "pseudo root," but the name is derived from ''su''bstitute user ''do''
[[/folder]]

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6th Jul '16 5:17:12 PM Hjortron18
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* In ''Film/{{Kopps}}'', Benny's neighbor Mike insists that "Fock" sounds better than "Fuck".



* Done in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheProudFamily'', where Penny gains a case of AcquiredSituationalNarcissism and insists on "Penn-AY".
* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' has George Avocados who always corrects the pronunciation to "ah-VAW-ca-dos". It doesn't stick.
* This was done in ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic'', too. Jay goes to a fast food restaurant and addresses the clerk by the name on his nametag, "Pizzaface." The clerk of course responds with, "Hey, that's Pizza-fah-CHAY!"
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TaleSpin'' features a shifty client named Weezelle. Although he is an actual weasel, he insists that his name be properly pronounced ("''wee-ZEL!''", accent on the third "e") at all times. Naturally, everyone just called him "Weasel". Eventually, this annoys him so much that he refuses to do anymore work for his boss "until you call me by my correct name." His boss, mind you, is the most feared and ruthless crime lord in the city, and has probably killed people for less than that. Clearly, Weezelle's name is ''important'' to him.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987'' also has a one-shot villain with that name (although he was not a literal weasel -- only a figurative one).
* WesternAnimation/TimonAndPumbaa once met a suspicious-looking raccoon named Thief who insists that his name is pronounced "thife" (rhymes with "life").
* ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitchTheSeries'' has the villainous Dr. Hämsterviel. Pronounced HOHM-ster-vheel, although many pronounce it like "hamster wheel". The fact that Hämsterviel is in fact a literal IntelligentGerbil doesn't help the situation. Of course, the actual way to pronounce it in German would be "Hame-ster-feel". The umlaut works in the same way the silent "e" does in English, and in German "v" makes an "f" sound and "w" makes what is in English a "v" sound.
* ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'' got one under the [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar radar]] featuring the Ahz-Wee-Pay tribe.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Metalocalypse}}'' has a band therapist called "Jonathan Twinkletits" pronounced "Twink-LET-its" instead.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks''
** It's not "Uncle Ruckus", it's "Uncle Ruckuu". [[BlatantLies Because it's French.]]
** Also an inversion: Robert is pulled over by one Officer Douche. Despite being high, Robert has the presence of mind to call him "Doo-shay." Except the officer's name is pronounced the way it looks.
* There was a {{lampshade|Hanging}} parody in the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Margaritaville," starting out with a clerk in a store called ''Sur La Table,'' which he pronounced tāb-lé, and {{running|Gag}} with it the whole episode whenever various words ending in 'able' were used by that character. Which is wrong, since in French (the store's name meaning "on the table") the correct pronunciation is something like "tabla," but with the final ''a''-sound abruptly bitten off (thus, "tabl' ").
* On ''Literature/CliffordTheBigRedDog'', there was a story in which Jetta read Emily Elizabeth's private journal and was led to believe that Emily Elizabeth was going to Hawaii by reading one of her made-up stories. She kept dropping all sorts of hints about Hawaii to Emily Elizabeth, but kept pronouncing it in a really pompous way, with the accent heavily on the second syllable.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'', Doug was trying to impress Patty by trying to look sophisticated and play classical music, only to be shot down by Judy when she corrected him on the pronunciation of the name, Chopin (pronounced SHO-pan).
* In the ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' episode Operation B.R.I.D.G.E. there's a clothing store that sell extremely embarrassing kids' clothing called Les Sissy (It's pronounced Sis-SAY)
* In the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS1E26TheBestNightEver "The Best Night Ever"]], Pinkie Pie tries to adapt to an upper class party.
-->'''Pinkie Pie:''' Ooooh. They don't want to party. These ponies want to par-TAY!
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' uses the "Fra-Gee-Lay" pronunciation joke.
* An accidental instance of this happened in ''WesternAnimation/{{Superjail}}'', when a LittlestCancerPatient accidentally got into Superjail, the resident pyro reads her diagnosis on her hospital bracelet and mistakes it for her name, calling her 'San-ser'.
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'' had Goofy taking a class at the local community center to learn how to be a mime. His instructor, who spoke with an affected New England-type accent, insisted on pronouncing the word "mimes" as "meems" (which, in his defense, ''is'' the correct pronunciation in French, with the exception of the ''s'' being {{s|tealthPun}}ilent).
* In ''WesternAnimation/FantasticMax'', a character is named "Fatso" but insists on his name being pronounced "Fah-ZO", as the T is silent.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', when the Titans meet Kole and Gnarrk, Cyborg calls him "Narrk" (which is technically the correct way of pronouncing it). Everybody corrects him that it is pronounced "Guh-narrk", much to Cyborg's confusion.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' gives us the Dathomirian Nightbrother Savage Opress, with the first part of his name being pronounced "Sa-VAHJ" and the last part being pronounced just like "oppress". When a bounty hunter reads Savage's wanted poster, he mispronounces his name as "Sa-vidge (just like "savage") Oh-priss".
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''; the two {{Jerkass}} detectives in Season 2 pronounce Mako's name as "May-Ko" (like the shark) instead of "Mah-Ko" (like [[Creator/{{Mako}} the late actor]]) when making fun of him.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AllHailKingJulien'', everyone mispronounces "[[SeldomSeenSpecies fossa]]" as "foosa". It's understandable for King Julien, as his syntax is notably convoluted, but the other lemurs have no excuse.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'':
** In the episode "Squid Plus One" Squidward gets an invitation to a party where he can invite one guest. The invitation says "Squidward Tentacles plus one" which he pronounces as "Ploo-zon-ay" and figures the sender got his name wrong with extra words tacked on.
** Of course there is Spongebob's pronunciation of "karate" as "kay-ra-tae".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- People]]
* Allegedly actress Jean Harlow was at dinner with Margot Asquith (wife of the UK Prime Minister at the time) and kept pronouncing her name with the "t". Eventually Asquith told her "No, Jean, the 'T' is silent, [[StealthPun like in 'Harlow']]".
* In England...
** The surname Berkley is pronounced B'''ar'''kley.
** Similarly, Derby is "Darby" (surname and [[strike: county]] city. The county is Derbyshire (DAR-bee-shur)). And the word 'clerk' is "clark". There's something going on there.
*** A [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift Great Vowel Shift]] during the settlement of the New World, perhaps?
** And "Berkshire" is pronounced "Bark-shire". But the abbreviated form "berk" (rhyming slang: berk = Berkshire Hunt = cunt; usage: insult) is still pronounced "berk", not "bark".
*** Actually, it's pronounced "Burk", like Americans pronounce "Derp" as "Durp".
*** The rhyming slang takes its name from the Berkeley Hunt. Which is, of course, pronounced "BARK-lee".
** No one is quite sure how to pronounce the name "Wriothesley," the surname of the former Earls of Southampton. Interpretations include: "ROTTS-lee," "RYE-es-lee," "Wri-oth-es-ley," and the almost certainly incorrect "Risley."
* Possible case: Creator/NicolasCage pronounces his son [[Franchise/{{Superman}} Kal-El's]] name as ka-LELL, despite the hyphen making the correct pronunciation perfectly obvious. More likely he simply pronounces it the same way as Brando did in ''Superman''.
* Ralph ("Rafe") Fiennes ("Fines") definitely falls into this category while at the same time being a terrible example as the two F sounds blend into one if said without thinking about it.
** Also the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.
** However, it should be noted that /ˈreɪf/ is the traditional English pronunciation, which was replaced with the typical German pronunciation /ˈrælf/ (which is of course what it looks like to modern English-speakers, which is why it falls under this trope).
*** Similar to Henry ("Harry", which is now an official alternate spelling) and Agnes ("ANN-iss")
* Scottish actor Gerard (JAYR-id) Butler played King Leonidas in ''Film/ThreeHundred'', whereas {{Joisey}}-born Gerard (juh-RAWRD) Way is the lead singer of Music/MyChemicalRomance.
* The Welsh girls' name Siân is pronounced "shahn". Outside the UK, many people will pronounce it how it's spelt.
* John Boehner, who retired from his post as Speaker of the (U.S.) House in 2015. His last name is pronounced BAY-ner, not [[UnfortunateNames "boner"]].
** Anyone trying to search [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] for "John Bayner" will get redirected to the correct page.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jared_Lee_Loughner Jared Lee Loughner's]] last name is pronounced LOFF-ner, not "{{loner|sAreFreaks}}".
** Same for actor [[Series/HawaiiFive0 Alex]] [[Series/{{Moonlight}} O'Loughlin]].
* After winning the Heisman Trophy, Tony Dorsett announced that his last name should be pronounced "Dor-SETT" rather than "DOR-set". The next year, Earl Campbell won the award and joked that his last name was "Cam-BELL".
** In his senior season, Joe Theismann (originally pronounced THEES-man) changed the pronunciation of his name so that it'd rhyme with Heisman, thinking he'd get more votes that way. He failed; Jim Plunkett won that year.
* Former Rice halfback Dicky Moegle later one changed the spelling of his last name to Maegle the look the way it's pronounced since many people said it as "MOH-gle".
* The printing method known as Giclee is pronounced "Zhee-clay". Go figure.
** Because it's correctly spelt ''giclée'' and pronounced as such. It was taken from the French verb, "gicler" meaning "to squirt, spurt or spray".
* Remember... Guy Forget? (Ghee FOR-zhay)
** Another case of a French pronunciation.
*** Hardly noticeable since, you know, he's French.
* Mike Krzyzewski, coach of the Duke Blue Devils basketball team. Apparently, "Krzyzewski" is pronounced "Sheshefski".
** It's much easier for Americans to try "Sheshefski" than the actual Polish. This is understandable, seeing as it's [[TheUnpronounceable Polish]].[[note]]For the curious, the Polish pronunciation is (approximately) "kzhy-zev-ski".[[/note]]
* Many non-Polish citizens have trouble pronouncing the surname "Szczepaniak", opting instead to write it as "Stepaniak" and pronounce it as "Steh-paw-nic".
* The last name of NHL player Miroslav Satan? Try sha-TAHN.
** Pronounced as in his native Slovak, in which the name is written Šatan (note the difference in the first letter).
* Dallas Mavericks guard Monta Ellis' first name is pronounced "MON-tay."
* Creator/KirstenDunst is pronounced KEER-stuhn, not KUR-stuhn. This is the German and Scandinavian pronunciation of the name, not completely surprising as her father is German and her mother is of German-Swedish extraction. (However, she apparently does not go so far as to insist on her surname being given the proper German pronunciation, which would be more like "doonst").
* Music/LouisArmstrong disliked being called "Louie", as he saw the nickname demeaning and dismissive of his achievements and talents. Even today, the pronunciation of his first name is SeriousBusiness to jazz aficionados.
* While most people say "Carnegie" with the first syllable emphasized, "CAR-neh-gee", Andrew Carnegie himself pronounced his last name with the stress on the second syllable, i.e. "Car-NAY-gee".
** In Pittsburgh, it and the many things with his name have always been pronounced Carnegie's way, to the extent of re-recording a recent bus announcement.
* Thandie Newton's first name is pronounced "Tandy", like the computer.
* One of Oxford's most famous colleges is 'Magdalen'. However, it is not pronounced as it's spelt, it's pronounced 'maudlin'. Same in Cambridge.
** A case of French pronunciation over Latinate orthography. Latin Magdalena, (Old and Modern) French Madeleine; indeed, the English adjective "maudlin" is derived from the name in its medieval pronunciation -- spelled phonetically.
* Halley's Comet. "Hay-lees" used to be a common mispronunciation; it's now usually pronounced "Hah-lees", but if you're following the man it's named after, it should be pronounced "Haw-lees".[[note]]Maybe. Nobody is quite sure exactly how Edmond himself pronounced his last name; orthography was not yet fully standardized in the 17th century, and contemporary spellings included Hailey, Hayley, Haly, Hawly, and Hawley in addition to the now-standard Halley.[[/note]]
* Also, Walter Raleigh. It's "Raw-Lee", not "Rah-lee".
** The capital of North Carolina, however, is definitely "Rah-lee." Or "Rah-luh"; the city of Rolla, MO was named after Raleigh, NC except the settlers (many of whom were from North Carolina) decided to spell it so that it would be pronounced "correctly" by their neighbors. Which led to some people pronouncing it "Row-lay"; you just can't win.
* Creator/CharlizeTheron has stated in interviews that she finds it amusing that people pronounce her last name in the media as "Tha-Rown" to make it sound fancy, saying that it's simply pronounced "thair-in". The sound of it is actually quite different and almost impossible to transcribe even phonetically in English. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3TTi_gAS5c]]
* Arab is supposed to be pronounced "Air-rib," not "A-RAB" like the way [[Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn Huckleberry Finn]] pronounces it. In British English it's pronounced "A-rəb".
* Stephen J. Cannell (rhymes with "channel")
* Creator/MattGroening (rhymes with "raining")
* There is an actress named Karen Cliche ("kleesh")
* George Dzundza ("zoonza")
* "Deborah Kerr is the star."
** "But [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Steve Kerr]] rhymes with 'sir'".
* The "Seuss" in Creator/DrSeuss is pronounced Soyce (rhymes with voice). Dr. Seuss himself has stated this, but nobody seems to remember or care.
** A collaborator of Seuss's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss#Pen_names_and_pronunciations wrote of him:]]
-->You're wrong as the deuce\\
And you shouldn't rejoice\\
If you're calling him "Seuss."\\
He pronounces it "Soice."
* Similarly, the first name of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, being Italian in origin, should be pronounced "cone-doh-leet-zuh" (rhyming with "pizza"). But most people shorten the first "o" and leave out the "t" sound.
** The name is derived from the musical term "con dolcezza", which is pronounced "con dol-chets-tsuh", with the main stress on the (short) "e".
* Scandinavian tongues have weird pronunciation rules, for example the Norwegian name Kjerstine is pronounced "cher-steen-uh".
** Pretty standard across Germanic languages. English is the ugly duckling rather than the rest.
* Creator/SteveBlum pronounces his last name as "bloom". He isn't known to get annoyed about it too often, though.
* Many people pronounce Creator/VicMignogna as it is written, which is wrong. It's pronounced something like min-nya-na.
** It's pronounced Min-yon-na. You can hear him pronounce it himself in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOrpFLetvrU this]] Website/YouTube video. If you don't want to watch the whole thing, he says his name at 1:50. However, if you want to see the hysterical [[MemeticMutation Mustang-miniskirt]] bit, fast forward to 6:30.
* A German living in England named her daughter Caroline, but spells it (unofficially) as Caro-Lynne to force the German pronunciation.
** German pronunciation would be "caro-lee-nuh".
* Can be subverted. Depending on where one lives, a person can officially change their name, or the spelling of their name.
* There is an Israeli talk show host named Guy Pines. For you non-Israelis: it’s a corruption of the German surname Pins, since Hebrew doesn’t have word-final consonant clusters[[note]]unless it’s a consonant that isn’t t/d and a morphemic -t[[/note]], pronounced PEA-ness, but we all know what that ''really'' sounds like. To avoid awkwardness abroad[[note]]He has often interviewed foreign celebrities, and yes, it’s gotten awkward; when he told Creator/JuliaRoberts his name, she said hers was ‘Woman Vagina’.[[/note]], he often claims it’s pronounced like the plural tree type.
* Maurice Gibb of Music/TheBeeGees pronounced his first name "Morris". As did Maurice Evans.
* English novelist Oliver Onions would have you pronounce it "oh-NYE-onz."
* Creator/{{Cillian|Murphy}} (KIL-ian, [[BerserkButton not SIL-ian]]) Murphy definitely qualifies. (Names starting with C are ''always'' a hard C in Irish.)
* Major League Baseball outfielder Matt Diaz, who has gone on record to state that yes, it's pronounced "DIE-az".
** A jarring example is former Major League Baseball catcher Jorge Fábregas, who pronounces his name "George Fabber-gass".
* Creator/TaylorLautner pronounces his surname as "LOWT-ner" instead of "LAHT-ner".
* Inverted by Creator/RickyGervais -- he insists on the Anglicised pronunciation of his surname ("ger-VASE") despite the fact that it's of French origin and historically pronounced "ger-VAY". And by "historically", we mean "his father, probably, and if not his grandfather": his dad was a Franco-Ontarian (i.e. French-Canadian from Ontario) from [[NamesTheSame London]] (the one halfway between Windsor/Detroit and Toronto) who came to Britain as part of [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks the forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and settled there after the war.
* The second-to-last person to rule China during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) was the Empress Dowager Cixi (pinyin transliteration), who was a contemporary of Queen Victoria and was sometimes compared to her. Most English speakers would probably pronounce her name "Seezee", but in Mandarin it was the much less feminine-sounding [[ValuesDissonance (to English ears, anyway)]] "zuh-SHEE."
* Retired American Football quarterback Brett Favre (pronounced far-v)
* Actor [[Series/SportsNight Peter]] [[Series/SixFeetUnder Krause]] pronounces his surname "KRAU-zuh," rather than the more-common-in-America single-syllable pronunciation.
* The American Civil Rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois supposedly insisted that people pronounce his surname "duh-BOYSE", rather than the standard French "doo-BWAH", because he hated the racism of French society in the early 20th century.
* Music/{{Nickelback}}'s Chad and Mike Kroeger's last name is pronounced Kroo-ger like Freddy, but Americans seem to say it as Kroger like the grocery store
* Music/{{Rammstein}} keyboardist Flake Lorenz (his real first name is Christian, but no one calls him that) pronounces his nickname as 'Flah-kuh' rather than 'Flayke'.
* The writer Creator/JamesBranchCabell pronounced his last name CAB-ble, not ca-BELL. To correct the mispronunciation, he came up with a rhyming couplet: "Tell the rabble his name is Cabell."
* Gyllenhaal, of Jake and Maggie fame, is ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=K6nXIdx1hFw#t=110 apparently]]) pronounced "Yillenhoolihay".
* In an instance that takes this trope UpToEleven, the old Southern surname "Enroughty" is pronounced "Darby." No, seriously. A newspaper clipping from [[OlderThanRadio ''The Nation'' in 1887]] offers a more detailed explanation:
-->It is related that the first Enroughty who settled in Henrico County became so incensed and resentful at the mispronunciation of his surname--some calling it Enr-itjfty, others Enrooty, and others again Enrowty—that he insisted, whenever spoken to, that he should be called "Darby." ... The family has ever been tenacious of the name of Enroughty and equally tenacious of the name of "Darby," and if a stranger should happen to call any of them by any name other than that last given, he would immediately be requested to say "Darby." In all writings, bank accounts, and poll-books—indeed, wherever it is necessary to write the true name—it is spelled Enroughty, but invariably pronounced "Darby." We read, in official reports of the operations of Grant's and Lee's armies below Richmond, of "the battle of Darbytown," but, in truth, the locality was Enroughtytown.
* The Chicago Blackhawks' Jonathan Toews falls into this. It's "Tayves", despite the spelling.
** More NHL Examples, Toews' ex teammate Dustin Byfuglin is pronounced Buff-lin.
* The surname of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueBaseball player Kevin Pillar is pronounced like the feminine Spanish name "Pilar".
* Prince Rainier of Monaco's name was pronounced "rahn-YAY", unlike Mt. Rainier (see under Places below).
* There is a famous singer in Russia named Nikolai Baskov. Normally, his last name is pronounced "bus-KOFF" and means "of small and low voice". When he became famous, he changed the pronunciation to "BAHS-kuff" ("of Basque descent").
* The band Music/{{Sade}}, which takes its name from the lead singer Sade Adu (Sade being short for Folasade), is pronounced "Sha-DAY", not "Sahd" as in the Marquis du Sade. Another common mispronounciation is "SHAR-day", which has even led to several children being named Sharde after the band.
* Kim Jong Un's name is regularly mispronounced in British media, creating a hyperforeignism by pronouncing "Jong" as "Yong," when really it's just plain old "Jong." Strangely less of a problem in American media.
* The winemaking Mondavi family of Napa Valley originally used the Americanized pronunciation of "mon-DAY-vee". Then in 1965 amid family turmoil, eldest son Robert left to start his own winery, and began pronouncing it "mon-DAH-vee".
* The name "Koch" is normally pronounced like "Coke" with a softer K at the end. Former UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Mayor Ed Koch pronounced his last name as "Kotch" and Ravens punter Sam Koch is pronounced as "Cook", which actually is the literal translation of Koch.
* Linguist Noam Chomsky’s last name is a common Russian one, and is supposed to be pronounced with a Russian kh-sound. It seems he doesn’t care, though, and even in the linguistic community they pronounce it with an English ch-sound.
* Some English-speaking people with the last name of Benoit, which is French, give it the traditional French pronunciation of "ben-WAH." Others pronounce it the way it looks to English speakers, "Ben-OYT."
** See: Wrestler Wrestling/ChrisBenoit (ben-WAH) versus bowler Bob Benoit (ben-OYT).
* Patrick Brontë, father of the famous Brontë Sisters was Anglo-Irish and born as Patrick Brunty. At some point, he decided to change the spelling of his name to Brontë, which indicates the pronunciation of the root word Gaelic surname (as well as of course sounding "posher"). It's also been speculated that the change was inspired by UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson being awarded the title Duke of Bronté.
* [[Series/BeverlyHills90210 Ian]] [[Film/{{Sharknado}} Ziering's]] first name is pronounced "Eye-An" rather than the more usual pronunciation, though weirdly enough his surname is pronounced the way you'd expect it to be. He lampshaded this while on ''[[Series/TheApprentice Celebrity Apprentice]]'', when Geraldo Rivera completely mangled his name during an all-important presentation, causing Ian to snark "Maybe you should just call me 'Eee-an,' it'd be easier for everyone."
* Creator/MelBlanc (pronounced "blank") and Creator/JBBlanc (pronounced "blonk"). Mel's surname was spelled with a "K" originally, but he later changed the spelling because one of his teachers said that he was just like his name: blank. "Blonk" approximates the correct pronounciaton of B-L-A-N-C, it is a French surname (a nasalised "blah") and JB was born in France despite being English.
* The two US presidents with the last name Roosevelt both pronounced it slightly differently. Teddy said roʊzəvɛlt (roh-zuh-velt), whereas FDR went by roʊzəvəlt (roh-zuh-vuhlt).
* It's a running gag among mathematicians that if you can pronounce "Constantin Carathéodory" correctly then you are one yourself. (Actually, it isn't that hard, just lay the stress on the -ry. But if it comes out like [[Music/BillyJoel "He works at Mr. Carathéodory's down on Sullivan Street"]]...you failed.)
* Beatrice Rana doesn't look hard, but if you're not Italian, it gets confusing. While Americans say "BEE-uh-tris", Rana and most Italians prefer "Bee-uh-TREE-chay". [[http://www.theaterjones.com/ntx/2013vancliburninternationalpianocompetition/20130517072132/2013-05-17/Meet-the-Pianists-Beatrice-Rana One interviewer]] felt they had to include a pronunciation guide at the beginning.
* Most English-speakers nowadays call the famous Roman JOO-lee-us SEE-zer. This can cause consternation for Latin scholars, who either go along with this pronunciation (which sounds completely ridiculous in Latin), or risk sounding pretentious by talking about YOO-lee-us KAI-sar.
* NBA player Stephen Curry pronounces his first name as "Steffen".
* Former NBA player Mark Aguirre's last name is pronounced as "A-gwyre", instead of the traditional Spanish pronunciation "Ah-gi-rre"
* Comedian Creator/DavidKoechner pronounces his surname "Keck-ner" not "Coke-ner".
* The [=McCaughey=] family of Iowa, which includes the first set of septuplets that all survived infancy (born in 1997), pronounces its name "[=McCoy=]".
* Filipino volleyball player Alyssa Valdez. You pronounce her first name as "A-lye-sa", not like you would the first name of Alyssa Milano.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- Places]]
* Québec, Canada. Is it KWI-beck or KEH-beck?
** Neither. In French it's "keh-BECK". In French "qu" renders a hard /k/, and as there is an acute accent on the first syllable, it is pronounced with a clear "eh". Pronouncing the "Qu" as in English is still common and accepted in English-speaking Canada, although here too second syllable is stressed, so there are two "correct" English pronunciations, "kwi-BECK" and "kuh-BECK" (in the first one the vowel is a short "i", in the second a schwa).
* During WWI, there were proposals to change the name of Berlin, NH due to anti-German sentiment at the time. This was dropped when it was pointed out that Berlin, NH is pronounced as BER-lin instead of the German Ber-LIN. Ironically, Berlin, NH has a high population of French Americans and French Canadians.
* Creator/{{ESPN}} guys love to pronounce Detroit as if it were still a French word ("Day-twa"), just for a joke.
** And you're free to fight amongst yourselves as to whether it's pronounced "Duh-TROIT" or "DEE-troit."
*** Or "De-TROH-wit", if you're [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada Bob Cole]].
*** Having lived within a few hours of it for most of a lifetime, it's Dtroit.
*** As to the Mackinac Bridge - Mackin''aw'', that's the law. Mackin''ac'', that's just wack!
* The working class suburb Mangere in Auckland, New Zealand (pronounced MAH-NGE-RE according to the Maori or MAN-gerry in common use), is sometimes fondly referred to as "Mon-ZHER" by its inhabitants.
* Louisville: If you live in Louisville you pronounce it as lul-vul. If you are from anywhere else you may pronounce it as Lou-is-ville, Lou-ie-ville or Low-ville.
** Kentucky, at least. The other Louisvilles are pretty straightforward in their "Lewie-vill" pronunciation.
*** Except for Ohio (Lew-is-ville). But then, Ohio is sort of wonky with its place names: Lima = LIE-ma; Rio Grande = RYE-o Grand; Bellefontaine = Bell Fountain; etc. The former Georgia state capital uses this pronunciation as well.
*** Don't forget Versailles (ver-SALES), Campbell (CAM-ell), Russia (RUE-she), Milan (MY-lan), Conneaut (KAHN-ee-awt), Mantua (MAN-a-way), and Berlin (BER-lin). Not to mention that Ohio has both Louisville and Lewisville, and they're both pronounced as LEW-iss-vihl.
*** Colorado also falls firmly into the Lou-is-ville camp, as does Nebraska.
* Also in Nebraska:
** Beatrice: the stress goes on the second syllable (bee-A-tris). Rumor has it, we can thank train stations, back before amplification: the flat "AAA" is easier to hear over a crowd than "EEE".
** Norfolk: pronounced nor-''fork''. The town was named after the North Fork River, but the United States Postal Service assumed they meant "Norfolk".
** Papillion: "pa-PILL-yon". Originally a French name, ''papillon'' (butterfly), which would be pronounced ''papyo(n)''. The nearby river is called "Papio".
* Nevada: If you live either there or in surrounding states, chances are you say "neh-VA-duh" with the vowel in the middle syllable pronounced like the vowel in "flat." If you don't, you probably say "neh-VAH-duh" with the "a" pronounced like the "o" in "bother." (which, for English English pronouncers, is like the "ar" in "larder"). In at least parts of the deep South, it can even be "NEH-vuh-duh".
** It's a bit of a BerserkButton for them, actually. Michelle Obama pronounced it wrong at a rally for her [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama husband]], back when he was running for president. She [[SeriousBusiness was lucky to correct herself in time.]]
*** Again, Missouri, Ohio, and Iowa as well, are backward on this. Their little towns of the same name are pronounced "Ne-VAY-da".
* The (somewhat fairy-tale) name of the village of Appletreewick in North Yorkshire, UK is pronounced "Ap-trick" by locals.
** Similarly, the locals pronounce the town of Worcester, Massachusetts, "WOO-stah".
*** That is how the original Worcester in England is pronounced - "WORCE-ster".
*** It gets better: locals pronounce Worcestershire, England as "Wistasha".
*** Same goes for Gloucester (GLOSS-ter), Leicester (Lester), and Leominster (Lemon-ster). All named after places in England (though the English Leominster is pronounced "Lem-ster").
*** The Gloucestershire Airplane Corporation (one of the predecessors of British Aerospace) changed its name into Gloster as it expected foreign contracts. "Gloster" is pretty much the phonetic ortography for "Gloucester".
*** Also on "Gloucester"s: there's a Gloucester County in UsefulNotes/NewJersey, as well as a Gloucester City and Gloucester Township. All three are pronounced "GLOSS-ter"--but confusingly, Gloucester City and Gloucester Township are (1) not particularly near each other (a good seven or eight miles apart) and (2) in neighboring Camden County.
** The village of Athelstaneford in Scotland is pronounced "EL-shen-ferd", at least by locals. What makes it slightly more bizarre is that the village is named after the medieval king Athelstan, whose name is pronounced as it looks.
* Great Britain is full of this sort of thing, both in personal names and place names. For example...
** Mr. Featherstonehaugh (FAN-shaw)
** Mr. Menzies (MING-iss). Can also be used as a first name, as in politician Menzies Campbell (MING-iss CAM-ble)
*** Partly because it wasn't originally a 'z' in the middle there, but the old Middle Scots letter 'yogh'. Early Scots printers didn't have a handy yogh in their fonts, so used the similarly shaped 'z' instead.
** Stiffkey (STOO-kee), Cley (CLY) and Wymondham (WIND-um) in Norfolk
** Leicester (LES-tuh) and its attendand -shire (LES-tuh-shuh).
** Cholmondeley is pronounced like "Chumley" (/ˈtʃʌmli/).
** The town of Hednesford in the West Midlands, pronounced "Hens-fud", in a similar manner to Wednesday - not Head-Nes-Ford.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marylebone Marylebone]] in London. [[http://www.fodors.com/community/europe/two-london-questions-one-of-which-is-really-dumb.cfm Which can be said quite a few ways.]] Mary-le-bone, Marry-le-bone, Marleybun (the right one, says Wiki), Mairbun, Mbn.
** In any place name ending in 'wick' or 'wich', such as Chiswick and Greenwich, the 'W' is silent. So Chiswick is 'chiz-ick' not 'chiz-wick', Greenwich is 'gren-itch' not 'green-witch'. Also Southwark is 'Suthuk'
*** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in an '80s beer commercial voiced by Creator/JohnCleese -- where he deliberately mispronounced Greenwich, Connecticut as "Green Witch, Connect-i-cut"
*** The upstate New York town of Greenwich ''is'' pronounced 'green-wich'. You know, just to be different.
*** In the opening scene of ''Theatre/OnTheTown'', Chip demonstrates that he knows UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity only from a guidebook by pronouncing the name of one neighborhood "Green-witch Village."
** And Norwich is pronounced "Norrich"
** Towcester. As in the thing you use to make toast.
** Also, the town Worsley (War-sley) and the surname Worsley (Wurss-ley) are both pronounced differently.
** Should the 'l' in Holme be silent or not?
** The surname St John is pronounced "Sinjin." St Mary Axe, a street in the [[UsefulNotes/OneLondonThirtyThreeBoroughs City of London]], is likewise pronounced "Simmery Axe," as in the PatterSong from ''Theatre/TheSorcerer''.
* Newfoundland is not, in fact, New-Found-Land, it's Newfin-LAND.
** That's it. Oh, and it's not to be pronounced as "New Finland" either. Many a tourist have made that mistake.
** To add to the confusion, Leif Eriksson discovered "Vinland" (Wineland), which is thought to be the southern tip of Newfoundland.
** Though some people pronounce it more like Newfun-land.
* It's illegal in Arkansas to pronounce the final "s".
*** Speaking of which, the pronounciation of "Arkansas" is an easy way to tell if a speaker's from the state itself or Kansas. Arkansans say "AR-kan-saw", and Kansans use the "Ar" as a prefix, something like "ar-KAN-sas".
*** Then there's the Arkansas River, which begins in Colorado and is often pronounced with a final "s" outside the state of the same name.
* Downtown [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Manhattan]] has Houston (HOW-sten) Street. It is not pronounced the same as the city of Houston (HYOO-stin), Texas. The former was named after William Houstoun, and the latter named after Sam Houston.
** Similarly, Houston County, GA, is also pronounced HOW-sten. HYOO-stin may start a fight.
* Several small towns in the Midwest United States are named for more famous world cities and pronounced differently, such as Cairo, Illinois (pronounced KAY-row) and Cairo, Ohio (pronounced "CARE-oh") and [[Film/{{Hoosiers}} Milan, Indiana]], Milan, Illinois,and Milan, Ohio (all pronounced "MY-lun"). Also in Ohio there is a town called Vienna, pronounced Vye-ANN-ah... which contrasts with Vienna, Illinois (vye-ENN-uh).
** In Iowa, you'll find both Madrid (MAD-rid) and Nevada (ne-VAY-da).
** Same with Missouri, with New Madrid instead of simply Madrid. Missouri also has Versailles ("ver-SAILS") and Vichy (somewhere between "vit-shee" and "vishee", definitely ''not'' "VEE-shee"). There's also Rolla, pronounced "RAH-luh", named after Raleigh NC but spelled phonetically.
* Many non-native Minnesotans have trouble pronouncing "Mahtomedi", "wayzata", "Duluth" and "Shakopee".
** In New Mexico, there's a small artsy town between Albuquerque and Santa Fe pronounced "MAH-drid". (seen in the film ''Wild Hogs'')
* And one more for Ohio: {{UsefulNotes/Toledo|Ohio}}. The Northwest Ohio city is pronounced Toe-LEE-doh, as opposed to the Spanish city (its official sister city), pronounced Toe-LAY-doh.
* Sorta subverted in Louisiana where half the places and surnames actually ''are'' French.
** And on the subject of New Orleans, it's only Nawlins if you can say it Yat otherwise it's NEW-or-lins (pronounced as one word), not New-or-leans
*** It's impossible to phoneticize as one word, but it's an unaccented 'nuh oe linz' with the vowels schwa'd together. But then you have street names with spellings in familiar English that locals will insist on pronouncing "Bur-GUN-dee".
** Played straight with the local pronunciation of Chartres Street, which natives will insist on pronouncing like "charters." In actual French, it's "shart."
*** No. In actual French it's "shartr", but I might as well write Chartres as only the S doesn't count. Chartres is a city (and possibly a title linked to whoever the street was named after), a charte is... a charter.
** It became fairly easy to see who was a native of the region and who arrived after Hurricane Katrina thanks to pronunciations of words like Fortier (FOR-shay, not for-TEE-air) and Calliope (CAL-ee-oh, not the Greek daughter-of-Zeus cuh-LIE-oh-pee)
** Not to mention the region called Plaquemines Parish (parishes are the equivalent in Louisiana of counties), pronounced "PLACK-er-mans"
* Burnet, TX is pronounced so that the mnemonic "It's Burnet; Durn it! Learn it!" rhymes.
* The small town of Welsh, Louisiana, is pronounced "welch."
* Also in Texas, Montague County is pronounced "Mon-TAYG," instead of the European "MON-Tuh-Gyu."
* Trevor, WI is pronounced "TREE-ver," not like the name Trevor. Folks from the southern half of Milwaukee County frequently leave the L out of Milwaukee (ma-WAWK-ee). Many French city names in Wisconsin are deliberately mispronounced. If you, for example, pronounce "Prairie du Chien" (means "Dog's Prairie", after the local Indian chief) in the proper French as "Pra-RIE du Shee-ohn," you'll be corrected to "Prarie du Sheen." Likewise, Fond du Lac (literally, "bottom of the lake" - it's at the southern tip of Lake Winnebago) is "Fondle-ack." Oddly, other places like Lac du Flambeaux ("Lake of Torches") and Eau Claire ("Clear Water") are pronounced as they would be in French. With Indian names in the upper Midwest, good luck. We'll be sure to make fun of you for mispronouncing "Oconomowoc." BTW, "Racine" is either "ray-SEEN" or "ra-SEEN," about 50-50 each way. Don't let the locals snow you.
** Yet another Wisconsin hint: It's "New BER-lin," not "New Ber-LIN." Even though it's named after the city in Germany, the pronunciation has shifted for some odd reason. And the second "A" is silent in "Shawano." (it's NOT "sha-WA-no" - it properly has only two syllables ("SHAW-no"), not three!)
** Speaking of Fond du Lac, there is an elementary school there that is named Pier but is pronounced "pi-er" but people calling some times pronounce it as "pe-er".
** And then there's Waupun, pronounced "wuh-PAHN," because of course it is.
* People of Prescott, Arizona (and probably by extension, Prescott valley) say the town's name is pronounced PRES-skit, not PRES-cott.
* Tooele, Utah. It may take visitors a while to realize it is the town referred to when people said, "tuh-WILL-uh." The spelling actually got changed from the closer-to-the-mark Tuilla in the 19th Century.
* Hurricane, Utah, is pronounced HURR-kin (two syllables). Hurricane, West Virginia, on the other hand, is pronounced HURR-i-kin (three syllables).
* Spanish Fork (Utah [again]) is said just like it looks unless you're from there, in which case it is Spanish Fark.
* Weber County, Utah (and Weber State University located there) is pronounced WEE-ber.
* Pierre the capitol of South Dakota is pronounced PEER Not PEA-AIR.
* The western Colorado town of Ouray is pronounced "YOU-ray" It's named after a Ute Indian Chief.
* A major road in Houston, TX is Kuykendahl. Pronounced KIRK-en-doll.
** The H at the beginning of the name of the Houston suburb Humble is silent.
* Head north from Houston towards Dallas, head west when you're a couple hours away, and you'll come to Mexia. Pronounced "Muh-HEY-uh".
* As you're starting to enter South Texas, not far from Corpus Christi, there's a town called Refugio. It was originally pronounced as in Spanish (roughly "reh-FOO-hee-oh"), but a large group of Irish settlers came in the 1830s and had difficulty with the name. They ended up saying it "re-FURY-oh", which became the local pronunciation to this day. Even local Spanish-speakers pronounce it "re-FURY-oh".
* Then in west Texas, you have Colorado City. That's "Caw-luh-RAY-doh City" (made confusing by the fact it's on the "Caw-luh-RAH-doh" River).
* The city of Beaufort, South Carolina is pronounced "Buew-fert", while Beaufort, North Carolina is pronounced "Bow-fert". NC also has the town of Bahama (Ba-HAY-ma).
* People who aren't British seem to have trouble pronouncing Worcestershire Sauce (WORCE-ster-shire). Even though most Brits know how to say it correctly it mostly tends to get referred to as Lea and Perrins.
* Missourians are [[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/13/us/politics/missouree-missouruh-to-be-politic-in-missouri-say-both.html?_r=0 slightly divided on this issue]]. Most of us pronounce it "Missour-EE", but a small number of people, primarily from the southern part of the state, pronounce it "Missour-AH".
* People who live in or near UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} tend to pronounce the city's name as something rather like "Tronno". Toronto, New South Wales is pronounced the same way.
* UsefulNotes/{{Vancouver}} is pronounced as "Vangcouver" by locals, while outsiders tend to say it like two distinct words[[note]]Which, to be fair, it is in the original Dutch origins of the name[[/note]], in other words "Van" rather than "Vang". While this matches the spelling, it is actually the locals who are following standard English phonetic rules of assimilation (e.g. "ingcome" for "income").
* UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}}, in Canadian English, is pronounced "mun-tree-ALL", while Americans use "mon-tree-ALL" - neither is an exact match for the original French ("mon-HAY-ah-le").
** It's subject to debate among ourselves, with "Mon-rayhal", "Mont-rehal" and "Mon-treal" being the most common way to pronounce it
* The street "Dalhousie" in Ottawa is pronounced "Dal-HOO-zee" (as per a Scottish accent) while the university in Nova Scotia says "Dal-HOW-zie".
* Speaking of streets in Canada, Dundas St. in Toronto rhymes with "class," not "bus."
* The Canberra suburb of Manuka is pronounced 'mahn-NAH-ka', not 'mah-NU-ka' like the plant.
* The town of Florida, Colorado pronounces its name the Spanish way: fla - REE - da.
* UK place names again: Edinburgh, Middlesbrough and Loughborough are in wildly different parts of the country (Scotland, North Yorkshire and Leicestershire respectively) and all pronounce the section of their names after the B as Borough despite the different spelling. Even weirder is the town of Brough which doesn't pronounce it like the similarly spelt Middlesbrough, but pronounces it as Bruff.
** Arguably, the end of all of these is pronounced as "brə" with a schwa, rather than as "bərə" although it depends on where you reside. Loughborough (Luf-brə) uses the Brough pronunciation above in it's first half as well.
* The Couch in Couch St. in Portland, OR is pronounced "Cooch," not "Couch."
* The "correct" pronunciations of Oregon include: OR-uh-gun, OR-uh-gin, OR-ih-gun, or Or-ih-gin (not Orry-gone, Orry-gun, Or-gone, or Or-ray-gone).
** Unless you're talking about the suburb of Toledo, Ohio, where it's OR-ih-gone or orry-GONE. Yes, Ohio has a pathological inability to pronounce place names the same as where they were borrowed from.
* In something of an inversion: North Versailles, Pennsylvania was intended to be named for the French palace. However, the name is pronounced "North Vur-SAYLZ".
* The Rainier in Mt. Rainier is pronounced "Rai-NEER," not "Rai-ni-er." [[{{Pun}} It's only pronounced "Rai-ni-er" if you're camping on the west side of the mountain.]]
* Aloha, Oregon is pronounced with a silent H, unlike the Hawaiian word.
* Boise, Idaho. Newscasters call it Boy-ZEE, but its Boy-SEE, to the irritation of its residents and repeated corrections.
** And the small town of Boise City, Oklahoma is "Boyce City" (more often slurred into "boycity").
* Many people pronounce Tokyo with three syllables (toh-kee-oh); it's more accurately pronounced toh-kyo, with the "kyo" one syllable (its name translates to "Eastern Capital"). To make matters more confusing, it's four "beats" in Japanese, as both O's are "long" vowels.
* Spokane, Washington. It is not spo-KAYN (as in cane), it is spo-KAN (as in can). The musical ''Love Life'' got this wrong.
* Schuylerville, New York is pronounced (SKY-ler-ville) while the Schuylkill River in Pennsylvania is pronounced (SKOO-kull). The accident-prone Philadelphia freeway next to and named after the Schuylkill river, however, is sometimes called the "Surekill Expressway", especially when discussing the "Conshohocken Curve" (note that "Conshohocken" is pronounced as spelled but can be a tongue-twister anyway).
** Also in New York: The town near Rochester called Chili is pronounced CHY-ly, not "chilly" as it is commonly mispronounced by non-locals.
* The East-Central PA city named after the country in the Middle East "Lebanon" (Leb-a-non) is pronounced locally as "LEB-nen" As a twofer, one famous product of the area is a kind of sweet spicy lunchmeat Lebanon Bologna, which the locals pronounce "LEB-nen bal-LOW-ee"
* In Vermont, Charlotte is pronounced "shar-lot" and Calais rhymes with palace, instead of the French pronounciation Cal-lay.
* In Rhode Island "Coventry" is "Cawventry" instead of "Cuhventry"
* Yarmouth, Falmouth, and many other old fishing villages in New England are properly pronounces YAR-mit, FAL-mit, and so on.
* "Duquesne" is pronounced "Du-KANE". But in "North Versailles", it's "ver-SALES", not "ver-SIGH". Because why should Western Pennsylvania be consistent?
* Versailles, Kentucky is also pronounced "ver-SALES". The Lexington, Kentucky community of Athens is historically pronounced AY-thenz.
* People from Illinois will jump down your throat if you make the mistake of pronouncing the "S".
* The Virginia cities Portsmouth, Norfolk, Huguenot, and Suffolk get this too.
** Portsmouth: Ports-smith or Ports-smuhth, not Ports-mouth
** Norfolk: Nohr-fick, Nohr-fuhk, or Naw-fick, but not Nohr-fohlk
** Huguenot: Hue-ge-not, not huh-gway-not or hoo-ge-no (or variations of the two)
** Suffolk: Suhf-fick or Suhf-fuhk, but not Suhf-fohlk
** Norfolk, Nebraska is pronounced "nor-''fork''". (It's named after the North Fork River and was supposed to be ''spelled'' "Norfork.")
* People like to pronounce the city of Kobe (written in Japanese as "Koube"), Japan, and the steak that takes its name from the city, like Kobe Bryant ("koh-bee"), when it's actually "kohh-beh." In Japanese, "Koubi" (交尾) means "animal mating," and when applied to human intercourse means "very rough sex."
* Probably unintentional, but [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada Don Cherry]] tends to pronounce Toronto as "trah-na".
* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking,_Austria makes note]] that the name of ''that'' town in Austria rhymes with "booking". That still doesn't stop them stealing the town sign just so they could say [[{{Pun}} that they got to Fucking]] - what does is that the signs were replaced with theft-proof versions after the old ones were swiped too many times.
* Washington state has a few of these, besides Spokane and Mt. Rainier noted above. Most famous are Cle Elum (pronounced "Clellum"), Puyallup (pronounced "pyoo-WALL-up"), and Sequim (pronounced "Squim").
** Yakima is pronounced "YAK-uh-maw," not "Yuh-KEEM-uh." The tribe name is spelled Yakama because they realized settlers got it wrong.
* The Australian city of Brisbane is pronounced Briz-bin, not Briz-bain.
** Same with other Australian cities, Melbourne is Melbin, not Mel-born, and Canberra is Canbra not Can-bear-ra.
* Butte, Montana is pronounced Beaut not [[UranusIsShowing Butt]]
* Hobart,IN is usually pronounced "Ho-burt" by residents rather than "Ho-bart" like the one in Tasmania (note it wasn't named for that one)
* Newark, Delaware is pronounced "New-ARK", while Newark, New Jersey is pronounced more like "Nork" (1 syllable). Neither is pronounced "NEW-erk".
** But Newark, Ohio, ''is'' NEW-erk.
* Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills is pronounced "roh-DAY-oh." There's also a suburb of San Francisco called Rodeo with the same pronunciation.
* The African nation of Niger is pronounced "nee-ZHAIR", not "NI-jer" or [[NWordPrivileges that other pronunciation]]. This is justified since it had been colonized by the French.
* Martinez, GA (a suburb of Augusta). The middle syllable is pronounced like "tin" with very little stress on it (it could almost be "Mart'nez, GA). Also Louisville, GA, unlike Kentucky, pronounces the -s.
* One of Atlanta's main thoroughfares is Ponce de Leon Avenue, but locals pronounce it "PONTS duh LEE-on."
* The town of Saint Helena in California's Napa Valley is traditionally pronounced "Saint Hel-EEN-uh", but possibly due to French influence as Napa's winemaking prestige has grown, it's shifting to something more like "santa-LAY-na", sounding like it's just one word.
* Beijing is regularly mispronounced by English speakers as "Beizhing" (like the "s" in "measure") rather than the Chinese pronunciation, which is exactly how it looks (with a soft "g" like in "gin").
* During the 2014 Winter Olympics, some even pronounced the Russian city Sochi (again, pronounced exactly how it looks) as "Soshi."
* A street in UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} is spelled Kuykendall. Locals pronounce it "Kirk-end-all", but visitors may pronounce that first syllable to rhyme with "guy", "boy", or even "buoy", and the last two may be changed to "[[Franchise/{{Barbie}} Ken doll]]".
* In the Brazilian city of Belo Horizonte, there is a Raja Gabaglia Avenue. It's commonly referred as "Raja", but the surname is usually pronounced the way it's spelled instead of the proper Italian ("gab-alley-ah").
* Whereas the Thames River that flows through London is pronounced "temms," the Thames River of New London, Connecticut is pronounced "thayms."
* UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}}:
** Grand Blanc is pronounced as if it were the English phrase "Grand Blank," rather than the Frenchy "Gron Blon''.
** Lake Orion, Orion Township, and associated roads, etc., are pronounced "OR-ee-uhn," rather than "oh-RY-an" like the constellation.
** Canton is pronounce "CAN-tuhn" even though it is named after the old name for Guangzhou (pronounced "can-TON"). (That region of Wayne County also had townships named [[LocationlThemeNaming Pekin and Nankin]], which have since split off into a number of other municipalities.)
** Saline is pronounced "Sah-leen," not "Say-leen" like the nasal spray. (The derivation is from French: there are salty springs in the area historically used for salt production.)
** In the UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} area, Dequindre Road is always pronounced "De-KWIN-der" (rather than the French, which is more like "deh-KANDR''), and Livernois Road/Street/Avenue is universally pronounced "Liver-noy" (a sort of half-French, half-English compromise). However, the pronunciation of Lahser Rd., five miles to the west of Livernois, is the subject of frequent disagreement among area residents.
* The well-known French city of Nice is pronounced "Neese" (rhymes with geese), not "Nice" (rhymes with ice).
* While Sydney's pronunciation is fairly straightforward, some of its suburbs can get a bit confusing. It's gotten so bad that in some cases, no two people from different ends of Sydney can really agree on pronunciation:
** La Perouse is universally "La Pe-RUSE" rather than "La Pe-ROWSE"
** Sans Succi is universally "San SOO-chi" instead of the French "Sun Soo-SI"
** Campbelltown is universally called "CAM-bull-town"
** Here's the fun part: For Mosman, is it "MOSS-man" or "MOZ-mun"?
** Minto, much like the Toronto example above, is pronounced with a silent T, sounding like "Minno"
* Welcome to Maine. It's "BANG-gore", not "Banger" (Bangor). It's "CAL-us", not "cal-LAY" (Calais). If you want to go to "MY-KNOT", head for the Dakotas because this is "MY-nut" (and neither is ever "min-NOH").
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- Other]]
* [[CaptainObvious "Cache" and "stash" aren't just synonyms; they rhyme as well.]] If you say "cashay" you mean social prestige (cachet).
* The M1 Garand, the signature rifle of the US armed forces in WWII, was named after it's designer, John Garand. Very often, laymen and even firearms experts pronounce it as "Guh-RAND". But in his life, Garand preferred "GAIR-und".
* "Tarzhay" (Target), normally as a humorous jab at the store.
** Some people think that the company is French, despite Target being headquartered in [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]].
* People who shop at "Tarzhay" also tend to shop at Jacques Penne (J.C. Penney).
** aka "Jean Claude Penn-YAY". There was also a smaller mass merchandiser in the Upper Midwest called "Venture", aka "Ven-TUR-a"
** In a bit of FridgeBrilliance, the "JC" in the store's name stands for "James Cash," of which ''Jacques'' is the French form (of "James," that is).
* Orion America Inc. used to have a factory in Princeton, IN, USA, which manufactured cathode-ray tubes for televisions. The most common way for locals to pronounce the name was "or-ree-on", despite the word actually being pronounced "oh-ryan".
** Same thing with Lake Orion and Orion Township, Michigan.
** And Farm Report host Orion Samuelson.
** Evidently, it is pronounced that way in the 23rd century as well, demonstrated by the "Star Trek" animated episode "The Pirates of Orion," when all the Starfleet personnel pronounce it "or-ree-on," despite the long history of pronouncing it correctly in the live-action series.
** There's a Okinawan brand of beer called Orion Beer. However, it's pronounced similarly (oh-ree-on). You might get weird looks from the locals if you pronounce it oh-rye-on. See the Japanese pronunciation guide below.
** That's because Orion in a ''Greek'' word originally, where it was indeed pronounced "oh-ree-on". "Oh-rye-on" is an artifact of the attempt to read its Roman spelling by the English rules.
* People who don't like Kwanzaa or don't feel it's a real holiday will often pronounce it as "Kwan-zaa," rhyming with "can."
* Stereotypically, people who went to Ivy League schools say "RAHW-thuh" or "RAHW-thur."
** Amusingly, this is pretty much the only word on which George W. Bush does not appear to have a Texas accent. Hooray for Yale?
* Cornell University is universally pronounced "cor-NELL" now, but Ezra Cornell, its founder, pronounced it "Corn'l."
* Dr. Jekyll was originally pronounced "JEE-kull".
* "Karaoke" (kah-rah-O-keh) is perhaps the most mispronounced word of all time.
** It's actually made up of two words: "kara" (Japanese for "empty") and the English word "orchestra". Of course, it's not easy for most English-speakers to pronounce Japanese words they way they're meant to be (i.e. without emphasis on any one syllable).
* "Ouija" is pronounced just as it looks like, yet many still refer to them as "Wee-gee" boards.
** It technically should be pronounced "wee-yah," as in the French and German words for "yes." Admittedly, this pronunciation is quite cumbersome for English speakers, who would be apt to conflate it to simply "weeuh." Some English-speaking kids, seeing ''ouija'' for the first time, pronounce it "oyjuh."
* Americans tend to pronounce sake, the Japanese rice wine, as "sah-kee". However, the actual pronunciation is more like "sah-kay".
** Or even "sah-KEH".
** Extra-quick pronunciation course for the Japanese-challenged Yanks: in Japanese words romanized by the Hepburn system (the one you meet most of the time) consonants are read as in English, but the vowels as in Spanish, NO stress. So "sake" is really pronounced just "sah-keh".
* The word "meme" mentioned above is typically pronounced "meem"--which makes sense given its purpose (to transmit ideas and belief information, as genes transmit biological information). Some pronounce it "may-may".
* Creator/StudioGhibli's name is pronounced with a soft G, which is as it would not be in Italian.
* The Navy: it's not Boatswain, it's Bosun. It's not Forecastle, it's Fo'c'sle.
** Inversion: But if you're a Navy man or woman in Louisville and you call the city's summer alternative music festival "Fo'c'sle", you'll mostly get odd looks, and might get a verbal chewing-out. It's the Forecastle Festival, pronounced as the words "fore" and "castle" joined together.
* This one's probably too far gone for rescue, but pronouncing "forte" as "for-tay" is straight affectation. Until the mid-20th century it was pronounced the same way in English as it is in French (where the "e" is silent).
** Possibly borrowed from musical terminology (i.e. Italian), in which "forte" is, in fact, pronounced "FOR-tay."
** It may also be a side effect of "fort" already being a word in English, forcing "forte" to adopt a different unambiguous pronunciation.
* There are a surprisingly large number of people from England's East Midlands who are blessed with the name ''Shitehead''. According to one member of the clan, the approved pronunciation is SHEETH – ead.
* Jaguar cars and the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar and Jaguar CD...the ads always pronounce it "Jag-you-are" (which is the standard British and Australian pronounciation) despite the American pronounciation being "Jag-wahr".
* Creator/{{Sega}} is pronounced as "SEEGA" in Australia, New Zealand, and in the Italian language. It is pronounced this way by some Brits (initially used in advertising), but the correct pronounciation quickly became known to those who played ''VideoGame/{{Sonic the Hedgehog|1}}'' where it is in the intro (basically, the majority of Mega Drive players). Hint: it stands for '''Se'''rvice '''Ga'''mes.
* Many people humorously pronounce "garbage" as "gar-BAHJ".
* Bologna (both the Italian city, and the food) is really supposed to be pronounced "Bo-LON-ya"[[note]]And that's no "baloney"[[/note]]. Music/WeirdAlYankovic however, pronounces it "bolohna" in order to make it sound like "Sharona" (since his song "My Bologna" is a parody of "My Sharona" by The Knack).
* Celtic is supposed to be pronounced "KEL-tic", but that doesn't stop the [[{{UsefulNotes/Basketball}} Boston Celtics]] (or their fans) from pronouncing it "SEL-tic".
** Or indeed the Scottish football team Celtic, who also pronounce it SEL-tic.
* The Native American tribe and the Illinois University team are the "Ill-eye-nigh",not "Ill-ee-nee"...apparently in the past, a few announcers screwed it up and roused some ire.
* A bit of local trivia at Texas A&M University is that Sbisa Dining Hall, on of several large student cafeterias on the main campus, is properly pronounced "Sbeezah", as it was for the person it was named for, and not "Suh-bee-sah", as most Texas A&M students will invariably say it.
* Santander, the Spanish banking conglomerate which has in recent years expanded to the UK and US, has kept the Spanish pronunciation of its name: "sahn-tahn-DEHR".
* Notably since it's from the UK, the Z in UsefulNotes/ZX81 and UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum should be zed, not zee.
* Infamously, the term Chorizo. The word is officially pronounced by Spaniards as "Chor-ees-oh", but widely accepted as "Chor-eetz-oh". Some foreigners who buy it think that "Chor-eee-tho" is the correct way to say it (mimicking the Spanish lisp), which it isn't. The less educated pronounce it "Cho-RIH-zoh". Everyone will insist that theirs is the correct way.
* Scots, and some English people get very annoyed by 'liquorice' (liquoriss) being pronounced 'liquorish', feeling it is emblematic of lower class people.
* The Finnish city of Tampere is often pronounced "Tam-PAIR" by visiting Anglophone and Francophone tourists. The correct pronunciation is "TAHM-peh-reh".
* Brits often pronounce "salsa" as "SALL-tsa", though the correct pronunciation is "SAHL-ssa" with a soft s sound.
* Mixed with SpellMyNameWithAnS, some people prefer to pronounce the name of Disney's Touchstone Pictures division as "TUCK-stone".
* Creator/BillCosby once made an educational short film about bicycle safety called "Bicycles are Beautiful". Here he pronouces "bicycle" as "bi-cycle" (as opposed to the usual "bi-sickle").
* Colonel is pronounced "kernel". Which means that despite being spelled with an L, it's homophonous to the Spanish\Portuguese word for said ranking, "coronel".
* In July 2011, during the American debt ceiling crisis, Congresswoman Michele Bachmann was quoted as saying that President Obama had "lots of chutzpah", pronouncing "chutzpah" as "CHOOTZ-pah", instead of "HOOTZ-pah".
* Does anybody know why in Germany a router [[BuffySpeak (the computer thingie with the blinkenlights)]] is pronounced "rauter" (diphthong, as in "house") by some people?
** Answer: It's a loanword from English (as ''der Router''); German didn't bother creating a new word for it. All forms of English pronounce the networking device as "rauter".
* The British pronounciation of "lieutenant" is "lef-TENant".
* The sudo tool to access root privileges in UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} is pronounced "soo-doo", although a lot of people pronounce it as "pseudo." The confusion comes from the fact that it allows an ordinary user to have root privleges without having to log in as root, in other words, "pseudo root," but the name is derived from ''su''bstitute user ''do''
[[/folder]]

----

to:

* Done in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheProudFamily'', where Penny gains a case of AcquiredSituationalNarcissism and insists on "Penn-AY".
* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' has George Avocados who always corrects the pronunciation to "ah-VAW-ca-dos". It doesn't stick.
* This was done in ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic'', too. Jay goes to a fast food restaurant and addresses the clerk by the name on his nametag, "Pizzaface." The clerk of course responds with, "Hey, that's Pizza-fah-CHAY!"
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TaleSpin'' features a shifty client named Weezelle. Although he is an actual weasel, he insists that his name be properly pronounced ("''wee-ZEL!''", accent on the third "e") at all times. Naturally, everyone just called him "Weasel". Eventually, this annoys him so much that he refuses to do anymore work for his boss "until you call me by my correct name." His boss, mind you, is the most feared and ruthless crime lord in the city, and has probably killed people for less than that. Clearly, Weezelle's name is ''important'' to him.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987'' also has a one-shot villain with that name (although he was not a literal weasel -- only a figurative one).
* WesternAnimation/TimonAndPumbaa once met a suspicious-looking raccoon named Thief who insists that his name is pronounced "thife" (rhymes with "life").
* ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitchTheSeries'' has the villainous Dr. Hämsterviel. Pronounced HOHM-ster-vheel, although many pronounce it like "hamster wheel". The fact that Hämsterviel is in fact a literal IntelligentGerbil doesn't help the situation. Of course, the actual way to pronounce it in German would be "Hame-ster-feel". The umlaut works in the same way the silent "e" does in English, and in German "v" makes an "f" sound and "w" makes what is in English a "v" sound.
* ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'' got one under the [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar radar]] featuring the Ahz-Wee-Pay tribe.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Metalocalypse}}'' has a band therapist called "Jonathan Twinkletits" pronounced "Twink-LET-its" instead.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks''
** It's not "Uncle Ruckus", it's "Uncle Ruckuu". [[BlatantLies Because it's French.]]
** Also an inversion: Robert is pulled over by one Officer Douche. Despite being high, Robert has the presence of mind to call him "Doo-shay." Except the officer's name is pronounced the way it looks.
* There was a {{lampshade|Hanging}} parody in the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Margaritaville," starting out with a clerk in a store called ''Sur La Table,'' which he pronounced tāb-lé, and {{running|Gag}} with it the whole episode whenever various words ending in 'able' were used by that character. Which is wrong, since in French (the store's name meaning "on the table") the correct pronunciation is something like "tabla," but with the final ''a''-sound abruptly bitten off (thus, "tabl' ").
* On ''Literature/CliffordTheBigRedDog'', there was a story in which Jetta read Emily Elizabeth's private journal and was led to believe that Emily Elizabeth was going to Hawaii by reading one of her made-up stories. She kept dropping all sorts of hints about Hawaii to Emily Elizabeth, but kept pronouncing it in a really pompous way, with the accent heavily on the second syllable.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'', Doug was trying to impress Patty by trying to look sophisticated and play classical music, only to be shot down by Judy when she corrected him on the pronunciation of the name, Chopin (pronounced SHO-pan).
* In the ''WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor'' episode Operation B.R.I.D.G.E. there's a clothing store that sell extremely embarrassing kids' clothing called Les Sissy (It's pronounced Sis-SAY)
* In the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS1E26TheBestNightEver "The Best Night Ever"]], Pinkie Pie tries to adapt to an upper class party.
-->'''Pinkie Pie:''' Ooooh. They don't want to party. These ponies want to par-TAY!
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' uses the "Fra-Gee-Lay" pronunciation joke.
* An accidental instance of this happened in ''WesternAnimation/{{Superjail}}'', when a LittlestCancerPatient accidentally got into Superjail, the resident pyro reads her diagnosis on her hospital bracelet and mistakes it for her name, calling her 'San-ser'.
* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'' had Goofy taking a class at the local community center to learn how to be a mime. His instructor, who spoke with an affected New England-type accent, insisted on pronouncing the word "mimes" as "meems" (which, in his defense, ''is'' the correct pronunciation in French, with the exception of the ''s'' being {{s|tealthPun}}ilent).
* In ''WesternAnimation/FantasticMax'', a character is named "Fatso" but insists on his name being pronounced "Fah-ZO", as the T is silent.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', when the Titans meet Kole and Gnarrk, Cyborg calls him "Narrk" (which is technically the correct way of pronouncing it). Everybody corrects him that it is pronounced "Guh-narrk", much to Cyborg's confusion.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' gives us the Dathomirian Nightbrother Savage Opress, with the first part of his name being pronounced "Sa-VAHJ" and the last part being pronounced just like "oppress". When a bounty hunter reads Savage's wanted poster, he mispronounces his name as "Sa-vidge (just like "savage") Oh-priss".
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''; the two {{Jerkass}} detectives in Season 2 pronounce Mako's name as "May-Ko" (like the shark) instead of "Mah-Ko" (like [[Creator/{{Mako}} the late actor]]) when making fun of him.
* In ''WesternAnimation/AllHailKingJulien'', everyone mispronounces "[[SeldomSeenSpecies fossa]]" as "foosa". It's understandable for King Julien, as his syntax is notably convoluted, but the other lemurs have no excuse.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'':
** In the episode "Squid Plus One" Squidward gets an invitation to a party where he can invite one guest. The invitation says "Squidward Tentacles plus one" which he pronounces as "Ploo-zon-ay" and figures the sender got his name wrong with extra words tacked on.
** Of course there is Spongebob's pronunciation of "karate" as "kay-ra-tae".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- People]]
* Allegedly actress Jean Harlow was at dinner with Margot Asquith (wife of the UK Prime Minister at the time) and kept pronouncing her name with the "t". Eventually Asquith told her "No, Jean, the 'T' is silent, [[StealthPun like in 'Harlow']]".
* In England...
** The surname Berkley is pronounced B'''ar'''kley.
** Similarly, Derby is "Darby" (surname and [[strike: county]] city. The county is Derbyshire (DAR-bee-shur)). And the word 'clerk' is "clark". There's something going on there.
*** A [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift Great Vowel Shift]] during the settlement of the New World, perhaps?
** And "Berkshire" is pronounced "Bark-shire". But the abbreviated form "berk" (rhyming slang: berk = Berkshire Hunt = cunt; usage: insult) is still pronounced "berk", not "bark".
*** Actually, it's pronounced "Burk", like Americans pronounce "Derp" as "Durp".
*** The rhyming slang takes its name from the Berkeley Hunt. Which is, of course, pronounced "BARK-lee".
** No one is quite sure how to pronounce the name "Wriothesley," the surname of the former Earls of Southampton. Interpretations include: "ROTTS-lee," "RYE-es-lee," "Wri-oth-es-ley," and the almost certainly incorrect "Risley."
* Possible case: Creator/NicolasCage pronounces his son [[Franchise/{{Superman}} Kal-El's]] name as ka-LELL, despite the hyphen making the correct pronunciation perfectly obvious. More likely he simply pronounces it the same way as Brando did in ''Superman''.
* Ralph ("Rafe") Fiennes ("Fines") definitely falls into this category while at the same time being a terrible example as the two F sounds blend into one if said without thinking about it.
** Also the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.
** However, it should be noted that /ˈreɪf/ is the traditional English pronunciation, which was replaced with the typical German pronunciation /ˈrælf/ (which is of course what it looks like to modern English-speakers, which is why it falls under this trope).
*** Similar to Henry ("Harry", which is now an official alternate spelling) and Agnes ("ANN-iss")
* Scottish actor Gerard (JAYR-id) Butler played King Leonidas in ''Film/ThreeHundred'', whereas {{Joisey}}-born Gerard (juh-RAWRD) Way is the lead singer of Music/MyChemicalRomance.
* The Welsh girls' name Siân is pronounced "shahn". Outside the UK, many people will pronounce it how it's spelt.
* John Boehner, who retired from his post as Speaker of the (U.S.) House in 2015. His last name is pronounced BAY-ner, not [[UnfortunateNames "boner"]].
** Anyone trying to search [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] for "John Bayner" will get redirected to the correct page.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jared_Lee_Loughner Jared Lee Loughner's]] last name is pronounced LOFF-ner, not "{{loner|sAreFreaks}}".
** Same for actor [[Series/HawaiiFive0 Alex]] [[Series/{{Moonlight}} O'Loughlin]].
* After winning the Heisman Trophy, Tony Dorsett announced that his last name should be pronounced "Dor-SETT" rather than "DOR-set". The next year, Earl Campbell won the award and joked that his last name was "Cam-BELL".
** In his senior season, Joe Theismann (originally pronounced THEES-man) changed the pronunciation of his name so that it'd rhyme with Heisman, thinking he'd get more votes that way. He failed; Jim Plunkett won that year.
* Former Rice halfback Dicky Moegle later one changed the spelling of his last name to Maegle the look the way it's pronounced since many people said it as "MOH-gle".
* The printing method known as Giclee is pronounced "Zhee-clay". Go figure.
** Because it's correctly spelt ''giclée'' and pronounced as such. It was taken from the French verb, "gicler" meaning "to squirt, spurt or spray".
* Remember... Guy Forget? (Ghee FOR-zhay)
** Another case of a French pronunciation.
*** Hardly noticeable since, you know, he's French.
* Mike Krzyzewski, coach of the Duke Blue Devils basketball team. Apparently, "Krzyzewski" is pronounced "Sheshefski".
** It's much easier for Americans to try "Sheshefski" than the actual Polish. This is understandable, seeing as it's [[TheUnpronounceable Polish]].[[note]]For the curious, the Polish pronunciation is (approximately) "kzhy-zev-ski".[[/note]]
* Many non-Polish citizens have trouble pronouncing the surname "Szczepaniak", opting instead to write it as "Stepaniak" and pronounce it as "Steh-paw-nic".
* The last name of NHL player Miroslav Satan? Try sha-TAHN.
** Pronounced as in his native Slovak, in which the name is written Šatan (note the difference in the first letter).
* Dallas Mavericks guard Monta Ellis' first name is pronounced "MON-tay."
* Creator/KirstenDunst is pronounced KEER-stuhn, not KUR-stuhn. This is the German and Scandinavian pronunciation of the name, not completely surprising as her father is German and her mother is of German-Swedish extraction. (However, she apparently does not go so far as to insist on her surname being given the proper German pronunciation, which would be more like "doonst").
* Music/LouisArmstrong disliked being called "Louie", as he saw the nickname demeaning and dismissive of his achievements and talents. Even today, the pronunciation of his first name is SeriousBusiness to jazz aficionados.
* While most people say "Carnegie" with the first syllable emphasized, "CAR-neh-gee", Andrew Carnegie himself pronounced his last name with the stress on the second syllable, i.e. "Car-NAY-gee".
** In Pittsburgh, it and the many things with his name have always been pronounced Carnegie's way, to the extent of re-recording a recent bus announcement.
* Thandie Newton's first name is pronounced "Tandy", like the computer.
* One of Oxford's most famous colleges is 'Magdalen'. However, it is not pronounced as it's spelt, it's pronounced 'maudlin'. Same in Cambridge.
** A case of French pronunciation over Latinate orthography. Latin Magdalena, (Old and Modern) French Madeleine; indeed, the English adjective "maudlin" is derived from the name in its medieval pronunciation -- spelled phonetically.
* Halley's Comet. "Hay-lees" used to be a common mispronunciation; it's now usually pronounced "Hah-lees", but if you're following the man it's named after, it should be pronounced "Haw-lees".[[note]]Maybe. Nobody is quite sure exactly how Edmond himself pronounced his last name; orthography was not yet fully standardized in the 17th century, and contemporary spellings included Hailey, Hayley, Haly, Hawly, and Hawley in addition to the now-standard Halley.[[/note]]
* Also, Walter Raleigh. It's "Raw-Lee", not "Rah-lee".
** The capital of North Carolina, however, is definitely "Rah-lee." Or "Rah-luh"; the city of Rolla, MO was named after Raleigh, NC except the settlers (many of whom were from North Carolina) decided to spell it so that it would be pronounced "correctly" by their neighbors. Which led to some people pronouncing it "Row-lay"; you just can't win.
* Creator/CharlizeTheron has stated in interviews that she finds it amusing that people pronounce her last name in the media as "Tha-Rown" to make it sound fancy, saying that it's simply pronounced "thair-in". The sound of it is actually quite different and almost impossible to transcribe even phonetically in English. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3TTi_gAS5c]]
* Arab is supposed to be pronounced "Air-rib," not "A-RAB" like the way [[Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn Huckleberry Finn]] pronounces it. In British English it's pronounced "A-rəb".
* Stephen J. Cannell (rhymes with "channel")
* Creator/MattGroening (rhymes with "raining")
* There is an actress named Karen Cliche ("kleesh")
* George Dzundza ("zoonza")
* "Deborah Kerr is the star."
** "But [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Steve Kerr]] rhymes with 'sir'".
* The "Seuss" in Creator/DrSeuss is pronounced Soyce (rhymes with voice). Dr. Seuss himself has stated this, but nobody seems to remember or care.
** A collaborator of Seuss's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss#Pen_names_and_pronunciations wrote of him:]]
-->You're wrong as the deuce\\
And you shouldn't rejoice\\
If you're calling him "Seuss."\\
He pronounces it "Soice."
* Similarly, the first name of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, being Italian in origin, should be pronounced "cone-doh-leet-zuh" (rhyming with "pizza"). But most people shorten the first "o" and leave out the "t" sound.
** The name is derived from the musical term "con dolcezza", which is pronounced "con dol-chets-tsuh", with the main stress on the (short) "e".
* Scandinavian tongues have weird pronunciation rules, for example the Norwegian name Kjerstine is pronounced "cher-steen-uh".
** Pretty standard across Germanic languages. English is the ugly duckling rather than the rest.
* Creator/SteveBlum pronounces his last name as "bloom". He isn't known to get annoyed about it too often, though.
* Many people pronounce Creator/VicMignogna as it is written, which is wrong. It's pronounced something like min-nya-na.
** It's pronounced Min-yon-na. You can hear him pronounce it himself in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOrpFLetvrU this]] Website/YouTube video. If you don't want to watch the whole thing, he says his name at 1:50. However, if you want to see the hysterical [[MemeticMutation Mustang-miniskirt]] bit, fast forward to 6:30.
* A German living in England named her daughter Caroline, but spells it (unofficially) as Caro-Lynne to force the German pronunciation.
** German pronunciation would be "caro-lee-nuh".
* Can be subverted. Depending on where one lives, a person can officially change their name, or the spelling of their name.
* There is an Israeli talk show host named Guy Pines. For you non-Israelis: it’s a corruption of the German surname Pins, since Hebrew doesn’t have word-final consonant clusters[[note]]unless it’s a consonant that isn’t t/d and a morphemic -t[[/note]], pronounced PEA-ness, but we all know what that ''really'' sounds like. To avoid awkwardness abroad[[note]]He has often interviewed foreign celebrities, and yes, it’s gotten awkward; when he told Creator/JuliaRoberts his name, she said hers was ‘Woman Vagina’.[[/note]], he often claims it’s pronounced like the plural tree type.
* Maurice Gibb of Music/TheBeeGees pronounced his first name "Morris". As did Maurice Evans.
* English novelist Oliver Onions would have you pronounce it "oh-NYE-onz."
* Creator/{{Cillian|Murphy}} (KIL-ian, [[BerserkButton not SIL-ian]]) Murphy definitely qualifies. (Names starting with C are ''always'' a hard C in Irish.)
* Major League Baseball outfielder Matt Diaz, who has gone on record to state that yes, it's pronounced "DIE-az".
** A jarring example is former Major League Baseball catcher Jorge Fábregas, who pronounces his name "George Fabber-gass".
* Creator/TaylorLautner pronounces his surname as "LOWT-ner" instead of "LAHT-ner".
* Inverted by Creator/RickyGervais -- he insists on the Anglicised pronunciation of his surname ("ger-VASE") despite the fact that it's of French origin and historically pronounced "ger-VAY". And by "historically", we mean "his father, probably, and if not his grandfather": his dad was a Franco-Ontarian (i.e. French-Canadian from Ontario) from [[NamesTheSame London]] (the one halfway between Windsor/Detroit and Toronto) who came to Britain as part of [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks the forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and settled there after the war.
* The second-to-last person to rule China during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) was the Empress Dowager Cixi (pinyin transliteration), who was a contemporary of Queen Victoria and was sometimes compared to her. Most English speakers would probably pronounce her name "Seezee", but in Mandarin it was the much less feminine-sounding [[ValuesDissonance (to English ears, anyway)]] "zuh-SHEE."
* Retired American Football quarterback Brett Favre (pronounced far-v)
* Actor [[Series/SportsNight Peter]] [[Series/SixFeetUnder Krause]] pronounces his surname "KRAU-zuh," rather than the more-common-in-America single-syllable pronunciation.
* The American Civil Rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois supposedly insisted that people pronounce his surname "duh-BOYSE", rather than the standard French "doo-BWAH", because he hated the racism of French society in the early 20th century.
* Music/{{Nickelback}}'s Chad and Mike Kroeger's last name is pronounced Kroo-ger like Freddy, but Americans seem to say it as Kroger like the grocery store
* Music/{{Rammstein}} keyboardist Flake Lorenz (his real first name is Christian, but no one calls him that) pronounces his nickname as 'Flah-kuh' rather than 'Flayke'.
* The writer Creator/JamesBranchCabell pronounced his last name CAB-ble, not ca-BELL. To correct the mispronunciation, he came up with a rhyming couplet: "Tell the rabble his name is Cabell."
* Gyllenhaal, of Jake and Maggie fame, is ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=K6nXIdx1hFw#t=110 apparently]]) pronounced "Yillenhoolihay".
* In an instance that takes this trope UpToEleven, the old Southern surname "Enroughty" is pronounced "Darby." No, seriously. A newspaper clipping from [[OlderThanRadio ''The Nation'' in 1887]] offers a more detailed explanation:
-->It is related that the first Enroughty who settled in Henrico County became so incensed and resentful at the mispronunciation of his surname--some calling it Enr-itjfty, others Enrooty, and others again Enrowty—that he insisted, whenever spoken to, that he should be called "Darby." ... The family has ever been tenacious of the name of Enroughty and equally tenacious of the name of "Darby," and if a stranger should happen to call any of them by any name other than that last given, he would immediately be requested to say "Darby." In all writings, bank accounts, and poll-books—indeed, wherever it is necessary to write the true name—it is spelled Enroughty, but invariably pronounced "Darby." We read, in official reports of the operations of Grant's and Lee's armies below Richmond, of "the battle of Darbytown," but, in truth, the locality was Enroughtytown.
* The Chicago Blackhawks' Jonathan Toews falls into this. It's "Tayves", despite the spelling.
** More NHL Examples, Toews' ex teammate Dustin Byfuglin is pronounced Buff-lin.
* The surname of UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueBaseball player Kevin Pillar is pronounced like the feminine Spanish name "Pilar".
* Prince Rainier of Monaco's name was pronounced "rahn-YAY", unlike Mt. Rainier (see under Places below).
* There is a famous singer in Russia named Nikolai Baskov. Normally, his last name is pronounced "bus-KOFF" and means "of small and low voice". When he became famous, he changed the pronunciation to "BAHS-kuff" ("of Basque descent").
* The band Music/{{Sade}}, which takes its name from the lead singer Sade Adu (Sade being short for Folasade), is pronounced "Sha-DAY", not "Sahd" as in the Marquis du Sade. Another common mispronounciation is "SHAR-day", which has even led to several children being named Sharde after the band.
* Kim Jong Un's name is regularly mispronounced in British media, creating a hyperforeignism by pronouncing "Jong" as "Yong," when really it's just plain old "Jong." Strangely less of a problem in American media.
* The winemaking Mondavi family of Napa Valley originally used the Americanized pronunciation of "mon-DAY-vee". Then in 1965 amid family turmoil, eldest son Robert left to start his own winery, and began pronouncing it "mon-DAH-vee".
* The name "Koch" is normally pronounced like "Coke" with a softer K at the end. Former UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Mayor Ed Koch pronounced his last name as "Kotch" and Ravens punter Sam Koch is pronounced as "Cook", which actually is the literal translation of Koch.
* Linguist Noam Chomsky’s last name is a common Russian one, and is supposed to be pronounced with a Russian kh-sound. It seems he doesn’t care, though, and even in the linguistic community they pronounce it with an English ch-sound.
* Some English-speaking people with the last name of Benoit, which is French, give it the traditional French pronunciation of "ben-WAH." Others pronounce it the way it looks to English speakers, "Ben-OYT."
** See: Wrestler Wrestling/ChrisBenoit (ben-WAH) versus bowler Bob Benoit (ben-OYT).
* Patrick Brontë, father of the famous Brontë Sisters was Anglo-Irish and born as Patrick Brunty. At some point, he decided to change the spelling of his name to Brontë, which indicates the pronunciation of the root word Gaelic surname (as well as of course sounding "posher"). It's also been speculated that the change was inspired by UsefulNotes/HoratioNelson being awarded the title Duke of Bronté.
* [[Series/BeverlyHills90210 Ian]] [[Film/{{Sharknado}} Ziering's]] first name is pronounced "Eye-An" rather than the more usual pronunciation, though weirdly enough his surname is pronounced the way you'd expect it to be. He lampshaded this while on ''[[Series/TheApprentice Celebrity Apprentice]]'', when Geraldo Rivera completely mangled his name during an all-important presentation, causing Ian to snark "Maybe you should just call me 'Eee-an,' it'd be easier for everyone."
* Creator/MelBlanc (pronounced "blank") and Creator/JBBlanc (pronounced "blonk"). Mel's surname was spelled with a "K" originally, but he later changed the spelling because one of his teachers said that he was just like his name: blank. "Blonk" approximates the correct pronounciaton of B-L-A-N-C, it is a French surname (a nasalised "blah") and JB was born in France despite being English.
* The two US presidents with the last name Roosevelt both pronounced it slightly differently. Teddy said roʊzəvɛlt (roh-zuh-velt), whereas FDR went by roʊzəvəlt (roh-zuh-vuhlt).
* It's a running gag among mathematicians that if you can pronounce "Constantin Carathéodory" correctly then you are one yourself. (Actually, it isn't that hard, just lay the stress on the -ry. But if it comes out like [[Music/BillyJoel "He works at Mr. Carathéodory's down on Sullivan Street"]]...you failed.)
* Beatrice Rana doesn't look hard, but if you're not Italian, it gets confusing. While Americans say "BEE-uh-tris", Rana and most Italians prefer "Bee-uh-TREE-chay". [[http://www.theaterjones.com/ntx/2013vancliburninternationalpianocompetition/20130517072132/2013-05-17/Meet-the-Pianists-Beatrice-Rana One interviewer]] felt they had to include a pronunciation guide at the beginning.
* Most English-speakers nowadays call the famous Roman JOO-lee-us SEE-zer. This can cause consternation for Latin scholars, who either go along with this pronunciation (which sounds completely ridiculous in Latin), or risk sounding pretentious by talking about YOO-lee-us KAI-sar.
* NBA player Stephen Curry pronounces his first name as "Steffen".
* Former NBA player Mark Aguirre's last name is pronounced as "A-gwyre", instead of the traditional Spanish pronunciation "Ah-gi-rre"
* Comedian Creator/DavidKoechner pronounces his surname "Keck-ner" not "Coke-ner".
* The [=McCaughey=] family of Iowa, which includes the first set of septuplets that all survived infancy (born in 1997), pronounces its name "[=McCoy=]".
* Filipino volleyball player Alyssa Valdez. You pronounce her first name as "A-lye-sa", not like you would the first name of Alyssa Milano.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- Places]]
* Québec, Canada. Is it KWI-beck or KEH-beck?
** Neither. In French it's "keh-BECK". In French "qu" renders a hard /k/, and as there is an acute accent on the first syllable, it is pronounced with a clear "eh". Pronouncing the "Qu" as in English is still common and accepted in English-speaking Canada, although here too second syllable is stressed, so there are two "correct" English pronunciations, "kwi-BECK" and "kuh-BECK" (in the first one the vowel is a short "i", in the second a schwa).
* During WWI, there were proposals to change the name of Berlin, NH due to anti-German sentiment at the time. This was dropped when it was pointed out that Berlin, NH is pronounced as BER-lin instead of the German Ber-LIN. Ironically, Berlin, NH has a high population of French Americans and French Canadians.
* Creator/{{ESPN}} guys love to pronounce Detroit as if it were still a French word ("Day-twa"), just for a joke.
** And you're free to fight amongst yourselves as to whether it's pronounced "Duh-TROIT" or "DEE-troit."
*** Or "De-TROH-wit", if you're [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada Bob Cole]].
*** Having lived within a few hours of it for most of a lifetime, it's Dtroit.
*** As to the Mackinac Bridge - Mackin''aw'', that's the law. Mackin''ac'', that's just wack!
* The working class suburb Mangere in Auckland, New Zealand (pronounced MAH-NGE-RE according to the Maori or MAN-gerry in common use), is sometimes fondly referred to as "Mon-ZHER" by its inhabitants.
* Louisville: If you live in Louisville you pronounce it as lul-vul. If you are from anywhere else you may pronounce it as Lou-is-ville, Lou-ie-ville or Low-ville.
** Kentucky, at least. The other Louisvilles are pretty straightforward in their "Lewie-vill" pronunciation.
*** Except for Ohio (Lew-is-ville). But then, Ohio is sort of wonky with its place names: Lima = LIE-ma; Rio Grande = RYE-o Grand; Bellefontaine = Bell Fountain; etc. The former Georgia state capital uses this pronunciation as well.
*** Don't forget Versailles (ver-SALES), Campbell (CAM-ell), Russia (RUE-she), Milan (MY-lan), Conneaut (KAHN-ee-awt), Mantua (MAN-a-way), and Berlin (BER-lin). Not to mention that Ohio has both Louisville and Lewisville, and they're both pronounced as LEW-iss-vihl.
*** Colorado also falls firmly into the Lou-is-ville camp, as does Nebraska.
* Also in Nebraska:
** Beatrice: the stress goes on the second syllable (bee-A-tris). Rumor has it, we can thank train stations, back before amplification: the flat "AAA" is easier to hear over a crowd than "EEE".
** Norfolk: pronounced nor-''fork''. The town was named after the North Fork River, but the United States Postal Service assumed they meant "Norfolk".
** Papillion: "pa-PILL-yon". Originally a French name, ''papillon'' (butterfly), which would be pronounced ''papyo(n)''. The nearby river is called "Papio".
* Nevada: If you live either there or in surrounding states, chances are you say "neh-VA-duh" with the vowel in the middle syllable pronounced like the vowel in "flat." If you don't, you probably say "neh-VAH-duh" with the "a" pronounced like the "o" in "bother." (which, for English English pronouncers, is like the "ar" in "larder"). In at least parts of the deep South, it can even be "NEH-vuh-duh".
** It's a bit of a BerserkButton for them, actually. Michelle Obama pronounced it wrong at a rally for her [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama husband]], back when he was running for president. She [[SeriousBusiness was lucky to correct herself in time.]]
*** Again, Missouri, Ohio, and Iowa as well, are backward on this. Their little towns of the same name are pronounced "Ne-VAY-da".
* The (somewhat fairy-tale) name of the village of Appletreewick in North Yorkshire, UK is pronounced "Ap-trick" by locals.
** Similarly, the locals pronounce the town of Worcester, Massachusetts, "WOO-stah".
*** That is how the original Worcester in England is pronounced - "WORCE-ster".
*** It gets better: locals pronounce Worcestershire, England as "Wistasha".
*** Same goes for Gloucester (GLOSS-ter), Leicester (Lester), and Leominster (Lemon-ster). All named after places in England (though the English Leominster is pronounced "Lem-ster").
*** The Gloucestershire Airplane Corporation (one of the predecessors of British Aerospace) changed its name into Gloster as it expected foreign contracts. "Gloster" is pretty much the phonetic ortography for "Gloucester".
*** Also on "Gloucester"s: there's a Gloucester County in UsefulNotes/NewJersey, as well as a Gloucester City and Gloucester Township. All three are pronounced "GLOSS-ter"--but confusingly, Gloucester City and Gloucester Township are (1) not particularly near each other (a good seven or eight miles apart) and (2) in neighboring Camden County.
** The village of Athelstaneford in Scotland is pronounced "EL-shen-ferd", at least by locals. What makes it slightly more bizarre is that the village is named after the medieval king Athelstan, whose name is pronounced as it looks.
* Great Britain is full of this sort of thing, both in personal names and place names. For example...
** Mr. Featherstonehaugh (FAN-shaw)
** Mr. Menzies (MING-iss). Can also be used as a first name, as in politician Menzies Campbell (MING-iss CAM-ble)
*** Partly because it wasn't originally a 'z' in the middle there, but the old Middle Scots letter 'yogh'. Early Scots printers didn't have a handy yogh in their fonts, so used the similarly shaped 'z' instead.
** Stiffkey (STOO-kee), Cley (CLY) and Wymondham (WIND-um) in Norfolk
** Leicester (LES-tuh) and its attendand -shire (LES-tuh-shuh).
** Cholmondeley is pronounced like "Chumley" (/ˈtʃʌmli/).
** The town of Hednesford in the West Midlands, pronounced "Hens-fud", in a similar manner to Wednesday - not Head-Nes-Ford.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marylebone Marylebone]] in London. [[http://www.fodors.com/community/europe/two-london-questions-one-of-which-is-really-dumb.cfm Which can be said quite a few ways.]] Mary-le-bone, Marry-le-bone, Marleybun (the right one, says Wiki), Mairbun, Mbn.
** In any place name ending in 'wick' or 'wich', such as Chiswick and Greenwich, the 'W' is silent. So Chiswick is 'chiz-ick' not 'chiz-wick', Greenwich is 'gren-itch' not 'green-witch'. Also Southwark is 'Suthuk'
*** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in an '80s beer commercial voiced by Creator/JohnCleese -- where he deliberately mispronounced Greenwich, Connecticut as "Green Witch, Connect-i-cut"
*** The upstate New York town of Greenwich ''is'' pronounced 'green-wich'. You know, just to be different.
*** In the opening scene of ''Theatre/OnTheTown'', Chip demonstrates that he knows UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity only from a guidebook by pronouncing the name of one neighborhood "Green-witch Village."
** And Norwich is pronounced "Norrich"
** Towcester. As in the thing you use to make toast.
** Also, the town Worsley (War-sley) and the surname Worsley (Wurss-ley) are both pronounced differently.
** Should the 'l' in Holme be silent or not?
** The surname St John is pronounced "Sinjin." St Mary Axe, a street in the [[UsefulNotes/OneLondonThirtyThreeBoroughs City of London]], is likewise pronounced "Simmery Axe," as in the PatterSong from ''Theatre/TheSorcerer''.
* Newfoundland is not, in fact, New-Found-Land, it's Newfin-LAND.
** That's it. Oh, and it's not to be pronounced as "New Finland" either. Many a tourist have made that mistake.
** To add to the confusion, Leif Eriksson discovered "Vinland" (Wineland), which is thought to be the southern tip of Newfoundland.
** Though some people pronounce it more like Newfun-land.
* It's illegal in Arkansas to pronounce the final "s".
*** Speaking of which, the pronounciation of "Arkansas" is an easy way to tell if a speaker's from the state itself or Kansas. Arkansans say "AR-kan-saw", and Kansans use the "Ar" as a prefix, something like "ar-KAN-sas".
*** Then there's the Arkansas River, which begins in Colorado and is often pronounced with a final "s" outside the state of the same name.
* Downtown [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Manhattan]] has Houston (HOW-sten) Street. It is not pronounced the same as the city of Houston (HYOO-stin), Texas. The former was named after William Houstoun, and the latter named after Sam Houston.
** Similarly, Houston County, GA, is also pronounced HOW-sten. HYOO-stin may start a fight.
* Several small towns in the Midwest United States are named for more famous world cities and pronounced differently, such as Cairo, Illinois (pronounced KAY-row) and Cairo, Ohio (pronounced "CARE-oh") and [[Film/{{Hoosiers}} Milan, Indiana]], Milan, Illinois,and Milan, Ohio (all pronounced "MY-lun"). Also in Ohio there is a town called Vienna, pronounced Vye-ANN-ah... which contrasts with Vienna, Illinois (vye-ENN-uh).
** In Iowa, you'll find both Madrid (MAD-rid) and Nevada (ne-VAY-da).
** Same with Missouri, with New Madrid instead of simply Madrid. Missouri also has Versailles ("ver-SAILS") and Vichy (somewhere between "vit-shee" and "vishee", definitely ''not'' "VEE-shee"). There's also Rolla, pronounced "RAH-luh", named after Raleigh NC but spelled phonetically.
* Many non-native Minnesotans have trouble pronouncing "Mahtomedi", "wayzata", "Duluth" and "Shakopee".
** In New Mexico, there's a small artsy town between Albuquerque and Santa Fe pronounced "MAH-drid". (seen in the film ''Wild Hogs'')
* And one more for Ohio: {{UsefulNotes/Toledo|Ohio}}. The Northwest Ohio city is pronounced Toe-LEE-doh, as opposed to the Spanish city (its official sister city), pronounced Toe-LAY-doh.
* Sorta subverted in Louisiana where half the places and surnames actually ''are'' French.
** And on the subject of New Orleans, it's only Nawlins if you can say it Yat otherwise it's NEW-or-lins (pronounced as one word), not New-or-leans
*** It's impossible to phoneticize as one word, but it's an unaccented 'nuh oe linz' with the vowels schwa'd together. But then you have street names with spellings in familiar English that locals will insist on pronouncing "Bur-GUN-dee".
** Played straight with the local pronunciation of Chartres Street, which natives will insist on pronouncing like "charters." In actual French, it's "shart."
*** No. In actual French it's "shartr", but I might as well write Chartres as only the S doesn't count. Chartres is a city (and possibly a title linked to whoever the street was named after), a charte is... a charter.
** It became fairly easy to see who was a native of the region and who arrived after Hurricane Katrina thanks to pronunciations of words like Fortier (FOR-shay, not for-TEE-air) and Calliope (CAL-ee-oh, not the Greek daughter-of-Zeus cuh-LIE-oh-pee)
** Not to mention the region called Plaquemines Parish (parishes are the equivalent in Louisiana of counties), pronounced "PLACK-er-mans"
* Burnet, TX is pronounced so that the mnemonic "It's Burnet; Durn it! Learn it!" rhymes.
* The small town of Welsh, Louisiana, is pronounced "welch."
* Also in Texas, Montague County is pronounced "Mon-TAYG," instead of the European "MON-Tuh-Gyu."
* Trevor, WI is pronounced "TREE-ver," not like the name Trevor. Folks from the southern half of Milwaukee County frequently leave the L out of Milwaukee (ma-WAWK-ee). Many French city names in Wisconsin are deliberately mispronounced. If you, for example, pronounce "Prairie du Chien" (means "Dog's Prairie", after the local Indian chief) in the proper French as "Pra-RIE du Shee-ohn," you'll be corrected to "Prarie du Sheen." Likewise, Fond du Lac (literally, "bottom of the lake" - it's at the southern tip of Lake Winnebago) is "Fondle-ack." Oddly, other places like Lac du Flambeaux ("Lake of Torches") and Eau Claire ("Clear Water") are pronounced as they would be in French. With Indian names in the upper Midwest, good luck. We'll be sure to make fun of you for mispronouncing "Oconomowoc." BTW, "Racine" is either "ray-SEEN" or "ra-SEEN," about 50-50 each way. Don't let the locals snow you.
** Yet another Wisconsin hint: It's "New BER-lin," not "New Ber-LIN." Even though it's named after the city in Germany, the pronunciation has shifted for some odd reason. And the second "A" is silent in "Shawano." (it's NOT "sha-WA-no" - it properly has only two syllables ("SHAW-no"), not three!)
** Speaking of Fond du Lac, there is an elementary school there that is named Pier but is pronounced "pi-er" but people calling some times pronounce it as "pe-er".
** And then there's Waupun, pronounced "wuh-PAHN," because of course it is.
* People of Prescott, Arizona (and probably by extension, Prescott valley) say the town's name is pronounced PRES-skit, not PRES-cott.
* Tooele, Utah. It may take visitors a while to realize it is the town referred to when people said, "tuh-WILL-uh." The spelling actually got changed from the closer-to-the-mark Tuilla in the 19th Century.
* Hurricane, Utah, is pronounced HURR-kin (two syllables). Hurricane, West Virginia, on the other hand, is pronounced HURR-i-kin (three syllables).
* Spanish Fork (Utah [again]) is said just like it looks unless you're from there, in which case it is Spanish Fark.
* Weber County, Utah (and Weber State University located there) is pronounced WEE-ber.
* Pierre the capitol of South Dakota is pronounced PEER Not PEA-AIR.
* The western Colorado town of Ouray is pronounced "YOU-ray" It's named after a Ute Indian Chief.
* A major road in Houston, TX is Kuykendahl. Pronounced KIRK-en-doll.
** The H at the beginning of the name of the Houston suburb Humble is silent.
* Head north from Houston towards Dallas, head west when you're a couple hours away, and you'll come to Mexia. Pronounced "Muh-HEY-uh".
* As you're starting to enter South Texas, not far from Corpus Christi, there's a town called Refugio. It was originally pronounced as in Spanish (roughly "reh-FOO-hee-oh"), but a large group of Irish settlers came in the 1830s and had difficulty with the name. They ended up saying it "re-FURY-oh", which became the local pronunciation to this day. Even local Spanish-speakers pronounce it "re-FURY-oh".
* Then in west Texas, you have Colorado City. That's "Caw-luh-RAY-doh City" (made confusing by the fact it's on the "Caw-luh-RAH-doh" River).
* The city of Beaufort, South Carolina is pronounced "Buew-fert", while Beaufort, North Carolina is pronounced "Bow-fert". NC also has the town of Bahama (Ba-HAY-ma).
* People who aren't British seem to have trouble pronouncing Worcestershire Sauce (WORCE-ster-shire). Even though most Brits know how to say it correctly it mostly tends to get referred to as Lea and Perrins.
* Missourians are [[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/13/us/politics/missouree-missouruh-to-be-politic-in-missouri-say-both.html?_r=0 slightly divided on this issue]]. Most of us pronounce it "Missour-EE", but a small number of people, primarily from the southern part of the state, pronounce it "Missour-AH".
* People who live in or near UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} tend to pronounce the city's name as something rather like "Tronno". Toronto, New South Wales is pronounced the same way.
* UsefulNotes/{{Vancouver}} is pronounced as "Vangcouver" by locals, while outsiders tend to say it like two distinct words[[note]]Which, to be fair, it is in the original Dutch origins of the name[[/note]], in other words "Van" rather than "Vang". While this matches the spelling, it is actually the locals who are following standard English phonetic rules of assimilation (e.g. "ingcome" for "income").
* UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}}, in Canadian English, is pronounced "mun-tree-ALL", while Americans use "mon-tree-ALL" - neither is an exact match for the original French ("mon-HAY-ah-le").
** It's subject to debate among ourselves, with "Mon-rayhal", "Mont-rehal" and "Mon-treal" being the most common way to pronounce it
* The street "Dalhousie" in Ottawa is pronounced "Dal-HOO-zee" (as per a Scottish accent) while the university in Nova Scotia says "Dal-HOW-zie".
* Speaking of streets in Canada, Dundas St. in Toronto rhymes with "class," not "bus."
* The Canberra suburb of Manuka is pronounced 'mahn-NAH-ka', not 'mah-NU-ka' like the plant.
* The town of Florida, Colorado pronounces its name the Spanish way: fla - REE - da.
* UK place names again: Edinburgh, Middlesbrough and Loughborough are in wildly different parts of the country (Scotland, North Yorkshire and Leicestershire respectively) and all pronounce the section of their names after the B as Borough despite the different spelling. Even weirder is the town of Brough which doesn't pronounce it like the similarly spelt Middlesbrough, but pronounces it as Bruff.
** Arguably, the end of all of these is pronounced as "brə" with a schwa, rather than as "bərə" although it depends on where you reside. Loughborough (Luf-brə) uses the Brough pronunciation above in it's first half as well.
* The Couch in Couch St. in Portland, OR is pronounced "Cooch," not "Couch."
* The "correct" pronunciations of Oregon include: OR-uh-gun, OR-uh-gin, OR-ih-gun, or Or-ih-gin (not Orry-gone, Orry-gun, Or-gone, or Or-ray-gone).
** Unless you're talking about the suburb of Toledo, Ohio, where it's OR-ih-gone or orry-GONE. Yes, Ohio has a pathological inability to pronounce place names the same as where they were borrowed from.
* In something of an inversion: North Versailles, Pennsylvania was intended to be named for the French palace. However, the name is pronounced "North Vur-SAYLZ".
* The Rainier in Mt. Rainier is pronounced "Rai-NEER," not "Rai-ni-er." [[{{Pun}} It's only pronounced "Rai-ni-er" if you're camping on the west side of the mountain.]]
* Aloha, Oregon is pronounced with a silent H, unlike the Hawaiian word.
* Boise, Idaho. Newscasters call it Boy-ZEE, but its Boy-SEE, to the irritation of its residents and repeated corrections.
** And the small town of Boise City, Oklahoma is "Boyce City" (more often slurred into "boycity").
* Many people pronounce Tokyo with three syllables (toh-kee-oh); it's more accurately pronounced toh-kyo, with the "kyo" one syllable (its name translates to "Eastern Capital"). To make matters more confusing, it's four "beats" in Japanese, as both O's are "long" vowels.
* Spokane, Washington. It is not spo-KAYN (as in cane), it is spo-KAN (as in can). The musical ''Love Life'' got this wrong.
* Schuylerville, New York is pronounced (SKY-ler-ville) while the Schuylkill River in Pennsylvania is pronounced (SKOO-kull). The accident-prone Philadelphia freeway next to and named after the Schuylkill river, however, is sometimes called the "Surekill Expressway", especially when discussing the "Conshohocken Curve" (note that "Conshohocken" is pronounced as spelled but can be a tongue-twister anyway).
** Also in New York: The town near Rochester called Chili is pronounced CHY-ly, not "chilly" as it is commonly mispronounced by non-locals.
* The East-Central PA city named after the country in the Middle East "Lebanon" (Leb-a-non) is pronounced locally as "LEB-nen" As a twofer, one famous product of the area is a kind of sweet spicy lunchmeat Lebanon Bologna, which the locals pronounce "LEB-nen bal-LOW-ee"
* In Vermont, Charlotte is pronounced "shar-lot" and Calais rhymes with palace, instead of the French pronounciation Cal-lay.
* In Rhode Island "Coventry" is "Cawventry" instead of "Cuhventry"
* Yarmouth, Falmouth, and many other old fishing villages in New England are properly pronounces YAR-mit, FAL-mit, and so on.
* "Duquesne" is pronounced "Du-KANE". But in "North Versailles", it's "ver-SALES", not "ver-SIGH". Because why should Western Pennsylvania be consistent?
* Versailles, Kentucky is also pronounced "ver-SALES". The Lexington, Kentucky community of Athens is historically pronounced AY-thenz.
* People from Illinois will jump down your throat if you make the mistake of pronouncing the "S".
* The Virginia cities Portsmouth, Norfolk, Huguenot, and Suffolk get this too.
** Portsmouth: Ports-smith or Ports-smuhth, not Ports-mouth
** Norfolk: Nohr-fick, Nohr-fuhk, or Naw-fick, but not Nohr-fohlk
** Huguenot: Hue-ge-not, not huh-gway-not or hoo-ge-no (or variations of the two)
** Suffolk: Suhf-fick or Suhf-fuhk, but not Suhf-fohlk
** Norfolk, Nebraska is pronounced "nor-''fork''". (It's named after the North Fork River and was supposed to be ''spelled'' "Norfork.")
* People like to pronounce the city of Kobe (written in Japanese as "Koube"), Japan, and the steak that takes its name from the city, like Kobe Bryant ("koh-bee"), when it's actually "kohh-beh." In Japanese, "Koubi" (交尾) means "animal mating," and when applied to human intercourse means "very rough sex."
* Probably unintentional, but [[Series/HockeyNightInCanada Don Cherry]] tends to pronounce Toronto as "trah-na".
* [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking,_Austria makes note]] that the name of ''that'' town in Austria rhymes with "booking". That still doesn't stop them stealing the town sign just so they could say [[{{Pun}} that they got to Fucking]] - what does is that the signs were replaced with theft-proof versions after the old ones were swiped too many times.
* Washington state has a few of these, besides Spokane and Mt. Rainier noted above. Most famous are Cle Elum (pronounced "Clellum"), Puyallup (pronounced "pyoo-WALL-up"), and Sequim (pronounced "Squim").
** Yakima is pronounced "YAK-uh-maw," not "Yuh-KEEM-uh." The tribe name is spelled Yakama because they realized settlers got it wrong.
* The Australian city of Brisbane is pronounced Briz-bin, not Briz-bain.
** Same with other Australian cities, Melbourne is Melbin, not Mel-born, and Canberra is Canbra not Can-bear-ra.
* Butte, Montana is pronounced Beaut not [[UranusIsShowing Butt]]
* Hobart,IN is usually pronounced "Ho-burt" by residents rather than "Ho-bart" like the one in Tasmania (note it wasn't named for that one)
* Newark, Delaware is pronounced "New-ARK", while Newark, New Jersey is pronounced more like "Nork" (1 syllable). Neither is pronounced "NEW-erk".
** But Newark, Ohio, ''is'' NEW-erk.
* Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills is pronounced "roh-DAY-oh." There's also a suburb of San Francisco called Rodeo with the same pronunciation.
* The African nation of Niger is pronounced "nee-ZHAIR", not "NI-jer" or [[NWordPrivileges that other pronunciation]]. This is justified since it had been colonized by the French.
* Martinez, GA (a suburb of Augusta). The middle syllable is pronounced like "tin" with very little stress on it (it could almost be "Mart'nez, GA). Also Louisville, GA, unlike Kentucky, pronounces the -s.
* One of Atlanta's main thoroughfares is Ponce de Leon Avenue, but locals pronounce it "PONTS duh LEE-on."
* The town of Saint Helena in California's Napa Valley is traditionally pronounced "Saint Hel-EEN-uh", but possibly due to French influence as Napa's winemaking prestige has grown, it's shifting to something more like "santa-LAY-na", sounding like it's just one word.
* Beijing is regularly mispronounced by English speakers as "Beizhing" (like the "s" in "measure") rather than the Chinese pronunciation, which is exactly how it looks (with a soft "g" like in "gin").
* During the 2014 Winter Olympics, some even pronounced the Russian city Sochi (again, pronounced exactly how it looks) as "Soshi."
* A street in UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} is spelled Kuykendall. Locals pronounce it "Kirk-end-all", but visitors may pronounce that first syllable to rhyme with "guy", "boy", or even "buoy", and the last two may be changed to "[[Franchise/{{Barbie}} Ken doll]]".
* In the Brazilian city of Belo Horizonte, there is a Raja Gabaglia Avenue. It's commonly referred as "Raja", but the surname is usually pronounced the way it's spelled instead of the proper Italian ("gab-alley-ah").
* Whereas the Thames River that flows through London is pronounced "temms," the Thames River of New London, Connecticut is pronounced "thayms."
* UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}}:
** Grand Blanc is pronounced as if it were the English phrase "Grand Blank," rather than the Frenchy "Gron Blon''.
** Lake Orion, Orion Township, and associated roads, etc., are pronounced "OR-ee-uhn," rather than "oh-RY-an" like the constellation.
** Canton is pronounce "CAN-tuhn" even though it is named after the old name for Guangzhou (pronounced "can-TON"). (That region of Wayne County also had townships named [[LocationlThemeNaming Pekin and Nankin]], which have since split off into a number of other municipalities.)
** Saline is pronounced "Sah-leen," not "Say-leen" like the nasal spray. (The derivation is from French: there are salty springs in the area historically used for salt production.)
** In the UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} area, Dequindre Road is always pronounced "De-KWIN-der" (rather than the French, which is more like "deh-KANDR''), and Livernois Road/Street/Avenue is universally pronounced "Liver-noy" (a sort of half-French, half-English compromise). However, the pronunciation of Lahser Rd., five miles to the west of Livernois, is the subject of frequent disagreement among area residents.
* The well-known French city of Nice is pronounced "Neese" (rhymes with geese), not "Nice" (rhymes with ice).
* While Sydney's pronunciation is fairly straightforward, some of its suburbs can get a bit confusing. It's gotten so bad that in some cases, no two people from different ends of Sydney can really agree on pronunciation:
** La Perouse is universally "La Pe-RUSE" rather than "La Pe-ROWSE"
** Sans Succi is universally "San SOO-chi" instead of the French "Sun Soo-SI"
** Campbelltown is universally called "CAM-bull-town"
** Here's the fun part: For Mosman, is it "MOSS-man" or "MOZ-mun"?
** Minto, much like the Toronto example above, is pronounced with a silent T, sounding like "Minno"
* Welcome to Maine. It's "BANG-gore", not "Banger" (Bangor). It's "CAL-us", not "cal-LAY" (Calais). If you want to go to "MY-KNOT", head for the Dakotas because this is "MY-nut" (and neither is ever "min-NOH").
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life -- Other]]
* [[CaptainObvious "Cache" and "stash" aren't just synonyms; they rhyme as well.]] If you say "cashay" you mean social prestige (cachet).
* The M1 Garand, the signature rifle of the US armed forces in WWII, was named after it's designer, John Garand. Very often, laymen and even firearms experts pronounce it as "Guh-RAND". But in his life, Garand preferred "GAIR-und".
* "Tarzhay" (Target), normally as a humorous jab at the store.
** Some people think that the company is French, despite Target being headquartered in [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis]].
* People who shop at "Tarzhay" also tend to shop at Jacques Penne (J.C. Penney).
** aka "Jean Claude Penn-YAY". There was also a smaller mass merchandiser in the Upper Midwest called "Venture", aka "Ven-TUR-a"
** In a bit of FridgeBrilliance, the "JC" in the store's name stands for "James Cash," of which ''Jacques'' is the French form (of "James," that is).
* Orion America Inc. used to have a factory in Princeton, IN, USA, which manufactured cathode-ray tubes for televisions. The most common way for locals to pronounce the name was "or-ree-on", despite the word actually being pronounced "oh-ryan".
** Same thing with Lake Orion and Orion Township, Michigan.
** And Farm Report host Orion Samuelson.
** Evidently, it is pronounced that way in the 23rd century as well, demonstrated by the "Star Trek" animated episode "The Pirates of Orion," when all the Starfleet personnel pronounce it "or-ree-on," despite the long history of pronouncing it correctly in the live-action series.
** There's a Okinawan brand of beer called Orion Beer. However, it's pronounced similarly (oh-ree-on). You might get weird looks from the locals if you pronounce it oh-rye-on. See the Japanese pronunciation guide below.
** That's because Orion in a ''Greek'' word originally, where it was indeed pronounced "oh-ree-on". "Oh-rye-on" is an artifact of the attempt to read its Roman spelling by the English rules.
* People who don't like Kwanzaa or don't feel it's a real holiday will often pronounce it as "Kwan-zaa," rhyming with "can."
* Stereotypically, people who went to Ivy League schools say "RAHW-thuh" or "RAHW-thur."
** Amusingly, this is pretty much the only word on which George W. Bush does not appear to have a Texas accent. Hooray for Yale?
* Cornell University is universally pronounced "cor-NELL" now, but Ezra Cornell, its founder, pronounced it "Corn'l."
* Dr. Jekyll was originally pronounced "JEE-kull".
* "Karaoke" (kah-rah-O-keh) is perhaps the most mispronounced word of all time.
** It's actually made up of two words: "kara" (Japanese for "empty") and the English word "orchestra". Of course, it's not easy for most English-speakers to pronounce Japanese words they way they're meant to be (i.e. without emphasis on any one syllable).
* "Ouija" is pronounced just as it looks like, yet many still refer to them as "Wee-gee" boards.
** It technically should be pronounced "wee-yah," as in the French and German words for "yes." Admittedly, this pronunciation is quite cumbersome for English speakers, who would be apt to conflate it to simply "weeuh." Some English-speaking kids, seeing ''ouija'' for the first time, pronounce it "oyjuh."
* Americans tend to pronounce sake, the Japanese rice wine, as "sah-kee". However, the actual pronunciation is more like "sah-kay".
** Or even "sah-KEH".
** Extra-quick pronunciation course for the Japanese-challenged Yanks: in Japanese words romanized by the Hepburn system (the one you meet most of the time) consonants are read as in English, but the vowels as in Spanish, NO stress. So "sake" is really pronounced just "sah-keh".
* The word "meme" mentioned above is typically pronounced "meem"--which makes sense given its purpose (to transmit ideas and belief information, as genes transmit biological information). Some pronounce it "may-may".
* Creator/StudioGhibli's name is pronounced with a soft G, which is as it would not be in Italian.
* The Navy: it's not Boatswain, it's Bosun. It's not Forecastle, it's Fo'c'sle.
** Inversion: But if you're a Navy man or woman in Louisville and you call the city's summer alternative music festival "Fo'c'sle", you'll mostly get odd looks, and might get a verbal chewing-out. It's the Forecastle Festival, pronounced as the words "fore" and "castle" joined together.
* This one's probably too far gone for rescue, but pronouncing "forte" as "for-tay" is straight affectation. Until the mid-20th century it was pronounced the same way in English as it is in French (where the "e" is silent).
** Possibly borrowed from musical terminology (i.e. Italian), in which "forte" is, in fact, pronounced "FOR-tay."
** It may also be a side effect of "fort" already being a word in English, forcing "forte" to adopt a different unambiguous pronunciation.
* There are a surprisingly large number of people from England's East Midlands who are blessed with the name ''Shitehead''. According to one member of the clan, the approved pronunciation is SHEETH – ead.
* Jaguar cars and the UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar and Jaguar CD...the ads always pronounce it "Jag-you-are" (which is the standard British and Australian pronounciation) despite the American pronounciation being "Jag-wahr".
* Creator/{{Sega}} is pronounced as "SEEGA" in Australia, New Zealand, and in the Italian language. It is pronounced this way by some Brits (initially used in advertising), but the correct pronounciation quickly became known to those who played ''VideoGame/{{Sonic the Hedgehog|1}}'' where it is in the intro (basically, the majority of Mega Drive players). Hint: it stands for '''Se'''rvice '''Ga'''mes.
* Many people humorously pronounce "garbage" as "gar-BAHJ".
* Bologna (both the Italian city, and the food) is really supposed to be pronounced "Bo-LON-ya"[[note]]And that's no "baloney"[[/note]]. Music/WeirdAlYankovic however, pronounces it "bolohna" in order to make it sound like "Sharona" (since his song "My Bologna" is a parody of "My Sharona" by The Knack).
* Celtic is supposed to be pronounced "KEL-tic", but that doesn't stop the [[{{UsefulNotes/Basketball}} Boston Celtics]] (or their fans) from pronouncing it "SEL-tic".
** Or indeed the Scottish football team Celtic, who also pronounce it SEL-tic.
* The Native American tribe and the Illinois University team are the "Ill-eye-nigh",not "Ill-ee-nee"...apparently in the past, a few announcers screwed it up and roused some ire.
* A bit of local trivia at Texas A&M University is that Sbisa Dining Hall, on of several large student cafeterias on the main campus, is properly pronounced "Sbeezah", as it was for the person it was named for, and not "Suh-bee-sah", as most Texas A&M students will invariably say it.
* Santander, the Spanish banking conglomerate which has in recent years expanded to the UK and US, has kept the Spanish pronunciation of its name: "sahn-tahn-DEHR".
* Notably since it's from the UK, the Z in UsefulNotes/ZX81 and UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum should be zed, not zee.
* Infamously, the term Chorizo. The word is officially pronounced by Spaniards as "Chor-ees-oh", but widely accepted as "Chor-eetz-oh". Some foreigners who buy it think that "Chor-eee-tho" is the correct way to say it (mimicking the Spanish lisp), which it isn't. The less educated pronounce it "Cho-RIH-zoh". Everyone will insist that theirs is the correct way.
* Scots, and some English people get very annoyed by 'liquorice' (liquoriss) being pronounced 'liquorish', feeling it is emblematic of lower class people.
* The Finnish city of Tampere is often pronounced "Tam-PAIR" by visiting Anglophone and Francophone tourists. The correct pronunciation is "TAHM-peh-reh".
* Brits often pronounce "salsa" as "SALL-tsa", though the correct pronunciation is "SAHL-ssa" with a soft s sound.
* Mixed with SpellMyNameWithAnS, some people prefer to pronounce the name of Disney's Touchstone Pictures division as "TUCK-stone".
* Creator/BillCosby once made an educational short film about bicycle safety called "Bicycles are Beautiful". Here he pronouces "bicycle" as "bi-cycle" (as opposed to the usual "bi-sickle").
* Colonel is pronounced "kernel". Which means that despite being spelled with an L, it's homophonous to the Spanish\Portuguese word for said ranking, "coronel".
* In July 2011, during the American debt ceiling crisis, Congresswoman Michele Bachmann was quoted as saying that President Obama had "lots of chutzpah", pronouncing "chutzpah" as "CHOOTZ-pah", instead of "HOOTZ-pah".
* Does anybody know why in Germany a router [[BuffySpeak (the computer thingie with the blinkenlights)]] is pronounced "rauter" (diphthong, as in "house") by some people?
** Answer: It's a loanword from English (as ''der Router''); German didn't bother creating a new word for it. All forms of English pronounce the networking device as "rauter".
* The British pronounciation of "lieutenant" is "lef-TENant".
* The sudo tool to access root privileges in UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} is pronounced "soo-doo", although a lot of people pronounce it as "pseudo." The confusion comes from the fact that it allows an ordinary user to have root privleges without having to log in as root, in other words, "pseudo root," but the name is derived from ''su''bstitute user ''do''
[[/folder]]

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case
27th Jun '16 7:39:33 PM OPALGARNET16
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* In ''FanFic/PokemonOpalAndGarnet,'' Kaylie's Touceet Clopin (named after [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame that Clopin]]) gets his name continually mispronounced as "klop-pin," with English pronunciation. Clopin is always quick to correct them with the (correct) French pronunciation, "kloh-PAH~n," which ends in a French nasal vowel. Since so many Pokemon have trouble with said nasal vowel, he'll usually accept "kloh-PAH (without the nasality)," but also tell them exactly how the nasal vowel is ''supposed'' to be pronounced [[note]] What follows is an APPROXIMATION- there is no sound like this in English [[/note]]:

to:

* In ''FanFic/PokemonOpalAndGarnet,'' Kaylie's Touceet Clopin (named after [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame that Clopin]]) gets his name continually mispronounced as "klop-pin," with English pronunciation. Clopin is always quick to correct them with the (correct) French pronunciation, "kloh-PAH~n," which ends in a French nasal vowel. Since so many Pokemon have trouble with said nasal vowel, he'll usually accept "kloh-PAH (without the nasality)," but also tell them exactly how the nasal vowel is ''supposed'' to be pronounced [[note]] What follows is an APPROXIMATION- there is no sound like this in English English. If you know French or are French and are offended in any way by this explanation, we apologize in advance [[/note]]:
27th Jun '16 5:23:03 PM OPALGARNET16
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''FanFic/PokemonOpalAndGarnet,'' Kaylie's Touceet Clopin (named after [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame that Clopin]]) gets his name continually mispronounced as "klop-pin," with English pronunciation. Clopin is always quick to correct them with the correct French pronunciation, "kloh-PAH~n," which ends in a French nasal vowel. Since so many Pokemon have trouble with said nasal vowel, he'll usually accept "kloh-PAH," but also tell them exactly how the nasal vowel is ''supposed'' to be pronounced [[note]] What follows is an APPROXIMATION- there is no sound like this in English [[/note]]:

to:

* In ''FanFic/PokemonOpalAndGarnet,'' Kaylie's Touceet Clopin (named after [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame that Clopin]]) gets his name continually mispronounced as "klop-pin," with English pronunciation. Clopin is always quick to correct them with the correct (correct) French pronunciation, "kloh-PAH~n," which ends in a French nasal vowel. Since so many Pokemon have trouble with said nasal vowel, he'll usually accept "kloh-PAH," "kloh-PAH (without the nasality)," but also tell them exactly how the nasal vowel is ''supposed'' to be pronounced [[note]] What follows is an APPROXIMATION- there is no sound like this in English [[/note]]:
27th Jun '16 5:15:42 PM OPALGARNET16
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*In ''FanFic/PokemonOpalAndGarnet,'' Kaylie's Touceet Clopin (named after [[Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame that Clopin]]) gets his name continually mispronounced as "klop-pin," with English pronunciation. Clopin is always quick to correct them with the correct French pronunciation, "kloh-PAH~n," which ends in a French nasal vowel. Since so many Pokemon have trouble with said nasal vowel, he'll usually accept "kloh-PAH," but also tell them exactly how the nasal vowel is ''supposed'' to be pronounced [[note]] What follows is an APPROXIMATION- there is no sound like this in English [[/note]]:
--> '''Clopin''': You have to essentially take the ending and give it a sort of tight, nasal pinch. "PAHHHHHHHHHHH"- that's where the pinch comes in- and then "~n." You barely say the "n," if at all. It's under your breath, at least.
21st Jun '16 11:42:14 AM gewunomox
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* [[OingoBoingo Johnny Vatos']] surname is pronounced "VAH-toe".

to:

* [[OingoBoingo [[Music/OingoBoingo Johnny Vatos']] surname is pronounced "VAH-toe".
19th Jun '16 2:44:27 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** In the episode "The Heartbroke Kid", Bart mispronounces cottage cheese as "cotta-hey cheese" when he sees Marge has bought a tub of it. In the Quebec French dub, he mispronounces it as "crottage" for extra ToiletHumor points ("crotte" bringing to mind poop).



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'':
** In the episode "The Heartbroke Kid", Bart mispronounces cottage cheese as "cotta-hey cheese" when he sees Marge has bought a tub of it.
17th Jun '16 6:14:30 AM aishwarya
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/DeadOfNight'', Creator/MichaelRedgrave's character's surname is pronounced "Freya" by everyone. If it weren't for a close-up of a written statement in which his name is spelt out, we wouldn't know that it's actually spelt "Frere".
14th Jun '16 8:08:29 AM Odacon_Spy
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/Anchorman2TheLegendContinues'': After antagonist Jack Lime loses abet with Ron and is forced to change his name to "Jack Lame", he tries to get around the "embarrassing punishment" part pronouncing it as Lah-mey, which annoys Ron.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ItIsPronouncedTroPay