History Main / GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion

31st Aug '16 10:23:16 AM DrOO7
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* In the third RizzoliAndIsles book, Jane Rizzoli learns that she's pregnant and even though the word is never spoken, she's clearly debating this--in the previous two books, it's established that she doesn't like children, and her relationship with the baby's father is uncertain. By the book's end, after a talk with her mother, she calls the guy and not only informs him that she's pregnant, but that she's decided to keep the baby.
11th Aug '16 7:43:34 PM PaulA
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* {{Inverted|Trope}} in Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's Literature/VorkosiganSaga novel ''Barrayar'', when an assassination attempt nearly kills Cordelia Vorkosigan, and does severe, permanent damage to her unborn child. Pretty much everybody thinks she should abort and start over. She doesn't.

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* {{Inverted|Trope}} in Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's Literature/VorkosiganSaga novel ''Barrayar'', ''Literature/{{Barrayar}}'', when an assassination attempt nearly kills Cordelia Vorkosigan, and does severe, permanent damage to her unborn child. Pretty much everybody thinks she should abort and start over. She doesn't.
5th Aug '16 6:27:17 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', at first it was Amy. To be fair, she considered abortion to the point of going to the abortion clinic, but ultimately realized that she couldn't go through with it and it wasn't the best choice for her. This example was far more prominent later in the series, when bad girl Adrian becomes pregnant and goes through with the pregnancy, [[RecycledScript using exactly the same reason as Amy]], [[TheyJustDidntCare word for word]].

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* In ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', at first it was Amy. To be fair, she considered abortion to the point of going to the abortion clinic, but ultimately realized that she couldn't go through with it and it wasn't the best choice for her. This example was far more prominent later in the series, when bad girl Adrian becomes pregnant and goes through with the pregnancy, [[RecycledScript using exactly the same reason as Amy]], [[TheyJustDidntCare Amy, word for word]].
28th Jul '16 9:08:46 AM sagetcommabob
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* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman''. [[spoiler: Diane, a HappilyMarried woman who is generally portrayed as level-headed and good-natured, becomes pregnant, but mutually decides with her husband, Mr. Peanutbutter, that they do not want to have children. The conflict in this plot line stems from Diane's work as the writer of pop star Sextina Aquafina's Twitter page, where she accidentally tweets about her planned abortion and it appears that Sextina is the one who plans to have an abortion. Sextina comes to embrace her role as the face of the pro-choice movement, if [[SarcasmMode a little overzealous]], but the trope is then played with again when Sextina actually does become pregnant and decides to keep the baby.]] However, both decisions are treated as valid and neither woman has any regrets.
19th Jul '16 3:02:35 PM Minni128
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* ''Concerning a Drifter'' subtly but neutrally brings up the issue, however, there for a rather honest reason, as a very traumatized and mentally ill Ryuuko was found to have become pregnant (four times) [[spoiler: by rape]] and, thus, isn't fit to care for a child, as she cannot take care of herself, however, its also mentioned that, while she is mentally well enough to care for a child, she really isn't mentally sound enough to make the choice of terminating, along with dealing with the outcomes if she actually is pregnant. Naturally, her guardian and sister, Satsuki isn't sure of how to bring up the issue of pregnancy and the options to her.

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* ''Concerning a Drifter'' subtly but neutrally brings up the issue, however, there for a rather honest reason, as a very traumatized and mentally ill Ryuuko was found to have become pregnant (four times) [[spoiler: by rape]] and, thus, isn't fit to care for a child, as she cannot take care of herself, however, its also mentioned that, while she is isn't mentally well enough to care for a child, neither is she really isn't mentally sound enough to make the choice of terminating, along with dealing with the outcomes of either option if she actually is pregnant. Naturally, her guardian and sister, Satsuki isn't sure of how to bring up the issue of pregnancy and the options to her.
18th Jul '16 7:36:53 PM Minni128
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*''Concerning a Drifter'' subtly but neutrally brings up the issue, however, there for a rather honest reason, as a very traumatized and mentally ill Ryuuko was found to have become pregnant (four times) [[spoiler: by rape]] and, thus, isn't fit to care for a child, as she cannot take care of herself, however, its also mentioned that, while she is mentally well enough to care for a child, she really isn't mentally sound enough to make the choice of terminating, along with dealing with the outcomes if she actually is pregnant. Naturally, her guardian and sister, Satsuki isn't sure of how to bring up the issue of pregnancy and the options to her.
12th Jul '16 11:05:33 AM DrOO7
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* ''Film/{{Parenthood}}'': When Karen tells husband Gil that she's pregnant with the couple's fourth child, she asks him point blank if he wants her to do this, given his less-than-thrilled reaction and the chaos their life is currently in--oldest son in therapy, Gil just quit his job, Karen wants to start working again, etc. They argue about it and Gil storms out without them having come to a decision, but several days later, he has accepted the pregnancy and they've decided to make it work.
4th Jul '16 10:51:59 PM merotoker
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* Played straight in ''Anime/NowAndThenHereAndThere''. [[spoiler:Sara becomes pregnant as a result of a rape and tries to induce an abortion, but Sis convinces her to not take out her hatred of the man who hurt her on the baby]]. This one's a particularly JustForFun/{{egregious}} case of this trope considering that [[spoiler: Sara is a psychologically traumatized young girl living in a war-torn dystopian hellhole who has limited access to health care and has no family or parents to help her raise the child or support her financially. Her only parental figure is Sis, who dies shortly after talking Sara out of the abortion. In addition, the doctor who gave the option of abortion, and the only real doctor we actually see in the series, was shot dead a few episodes ago, so it may actually be a non-option without putting Sara's life at risk as well.]]

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* Played straight in ''Anime/NowAndThenHereAndThere''. [[spoiler:Sara becomes pregnant as a result of a rape and tries to induce an abortion, but Sis convinces her to not take out her hatred of the man who hurt her on the baby]]. This one's a particularly JustForFun/{{egregious}} case of this trope considering that [[spoiler: Sara is a psychologically traumatized young girl living in a war-torn dystopian hellhole who has limited access to health care and has no family or parents to help her raise the child or support her financially. Her only parental figure is Sis, who dies shortly after talking Sara out of the abortion. In addition, the doctor who gave the option of abortion, and the only real doctor we actually see in the series, was shot dead a few episodes ago, so it may actually be a non-option without putting Sara's life at risk as well.]]well]].



* In ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', this is used to show the differences in morality between Kyoko and [[spoiler:Ren]], though neither woman gets an abortion and they're portrayed in different lights because of their reasons for considering them. [[spoiler:Ren]] threatens to get one [[spoiler:to emotionally manipulate her husband into raising their future child as a boy, regardless of the baby's actual gender, because she's such a {{Yandere}} that she hates the idea of ''any'' woman, even a daughter, taking Akira's attention away from her.]] Kyoko, meanwhile, considers an abortion because she thinks it's better to not have a baby at all than to have one and possibly condemn it to a childhood as abusive and neglectful as her own was. She decides against it when her husband convinces her that she'll be a much better parent than her own were, and that he'll be there to help her. ([[TearJerker He dies while Tohru's still little]], but Kyoko is a good mother.)
* Double subverted and discussed in ''Manga/TheLegendOfMotherSarah''. The story's setting being a [[{{Dystopia}} dystopian]], AfterTheEnd-like future where Earth is nothing a but a barren wasteland of warfare and power struggles, getting pregnant is inherently dangerous for a woman since you must be able to run away from bombings and gunfights anytime as these can happen anywhere, anytime. Double points when being a woman doesn't grant you [[MenAreTheExpendableGender any special immunity]]. The title character evokes the issue with the Mother Superior of the small religious community [[spoiler: her daughter]] chose to join, saying that abortion and even [[spoiler: child-killing]] aren't always avoidable in such a setting. However, it doesn't stop [[spoiler: Satoko]] from carrying her own unplanned pregnancy to completion, as her newborn will also be [[spoiler: [[SomeoneToRememberHimBy a memento from her dead lover]]]].

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* In ''Manga/FruitsBasket'', this is used to show the differences in morality between Kyoko and [[spoiler:Ren]], though neither woman gets an abortion and they're portrayed in different lights because of their reasons for considering them. [[spoiler:Ren]] threatens to get one [[spoiler:to emotionally manipulate her husband into raising their future child as a boy, regardless of the baby's actual gender, because she's such a {{Yandere}} that she hates the idea of ''any'' woman, even a daughter, taking Akira's attention away from her.]] her]]. Kyoko, meanwhile, considers an abortion because she thinks it's better to not have a baby at all than to have one and possibly condemn it to a childhood as abusive and neglectful as her own was. She decides against it when her husband convinces her that she'll be a much better parent than her own were, and that he'll be there to help her. ([[TearJerker He dies while Tohru's still little]], but Kyoko is a good mother.)
* Double subverted and discussed in ''Manga/TheLegendOfMotherSarah''. The story's setting being a [[{{Dystopia}} dystopian]], {{dystopia}}n, AfterTheEnd-like future where Earth is nothing a but a barren wasteland of warfare and power struggles, getting pregnant is inherently dangerous for a woman since you must be able to run away from bombings and gunfights anytime as these can happen anywhere, anytime. Double points when being a woman doesn't grant you [[MenAreTheExpendableGender any special immunity]]. The title character evokes the issue with the Mother Superior of the small religious community [[spoiler: her daughter]] chose to join, saying that abortion and even [[spoiler: child-killing]] aren't always avoidable in such a setting. However, it doesn't stop [[spoiler: Satoko]] from carrying her own unplanned pregnancy to completion, as her newborn will also be [[spoiler: [[SomeoneToRememberHimBy a memento from her dead lover]]]].



* Stephanie Brown ([[Characters/BatmanAndBatFamily The Spoiler]]) is against abortion from the very beginning (the arc was written by conservative Chuck Dixon). At first it looks like it's also going to be Good Girls Avoid Adoption, but she changes her mind after realizing her life is not a suitable place for a child.

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* Stephanie Brown ([[Characters/BatmanAndBatFamily ([[Characters/{{Batgirl}} The Spoiler]]) is against abortion from the very beginning (the arc was written by conservative Chuck Dixon). At first it looks like it's also going to be Good Girls Avoid Adoption, but she changes her mind after realizing her life is not a suitable place for a child.



* The graphic novel ''Aya'' by Margeurite Abouet is a subversion. One of Aya's best friends, Adjoua, contemplates getting an abortion after she becomes pregnant. Aya manages to talk her out of it solely because the woman who would be performing the abortion, one of the local medicine women in Yopougon, is said to do so ''with a knitting needle''. Aya's sole concern was for Adjoua's welfare and not the baby's. As a further subversion, Adjoua's not much of a good girl [[spoiler: since she tells the local rich kid that he's the father of her baby in order to marry him. When the baby is born, the guy's parents are immediately convinced their son's not the father because he looks absolutely nothing like him. And his mother actually met the guy who ''is'' the father. He looks just like his son.]]
* Initially and pointedly averted, in the ''ComicBook/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' Season 9 comics. Buffy gets pregnant, and, knowing that the child would be a target for all of her enemies, would never have a chance to have a normal childhood, might prove a severe distraction to her ongoing world-saving efforts, and, in any case, is seriously not ready to have a kid, apparently decides that terminating the pregnancy is the best option. [[spoiler:Later issues would reveal that Buffy had had her mind implanted in a robot body and, in fact, was not pregnant at all, struck many as a WriterCopOut.]]

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* The graphic novel ''Aya'' by Margeurite Abouet is a subversion. One of Aya's best friends, Adjoua, contemplates getting an abortion after she becomes pregnant. Aya manages to talk her out of it solely because the woman who would be performing the abortion, one of the local medicine women in Yopougon, is said to do so ''with a knitting needle''. Aya's sole concern was for Adjoua's welfare and not the baby's. As a further subversion, Adjoua's not much of a good girl [[spoiler: since she tells the local rich kid that he's the father of her baby in order to marry him. When the baby is born, the guy's parents are immediately convinced their son's not the father because he looks absolutely nothing like him. And his mother actually met the guy who ''is'' the father. He looks just like his son.]]
son]].
* Initially and pointedly averted, in the ''ComicBook/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' Season 9 comics. Buffy gets pregnant, and, knowing that the child would be a target for all of her enemies, would never have a chance to have a normal childhood, might prove a severe distraction to her ongoing world-saving efforts, and, in any case, is seriously not ready to have a kid, apparently decides that terminating the pregnancy is the best option. [[spoiler:Later [[spoiler: The revelation in later issues would reveal that Buffy had had her mind implanted in a robot body and, in fact, was not pregnant at all, struck many as a WriterCopOut.]]



* Averted in ''ComicBook/Invincible''. During the course of their relationship, Atom Eve becomes pregnant with Invincible's child. Shortly thereafter, Invincible leaves Earth to take part in a cosmic war and is gone for months, with Eve never telling him she's with child. When he returns, Eve tearfully tells him that she had an abortion, feeling that she wasn't ready to have a child by herself since there was a very real possibility that Invincible wouldn't come back. Invincible doesn't criticize her for having the abortion, instead lamenting that he wasn't there for her during her time of need.

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* Averted in ''ComicBook/Invincible''.''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}''. During the course of their relationship, Atom Eve becomes pregnant with Invincible's child. Shortly thereafter, Invincible leaves Earth to take part in a cosmic war and is gone for months, with Eve never telling him she's with child. When he returns, Eve tearfully tells him that she had an abortion, feeling that she wasn't ready to have a child by herself since there was a very real possibility that Invincible wouldn't come back. Invincible doesn't criticize her for having the abortion, instead lamenting that he wasn't there for her during her time of need.



* In ''Fanfic/ChristianGreyVsPepperPotts'', while an actual abortion isn't discussed, [[spoiler:when Black Widow ends up unexpectedly pregnant via birth control failure, she has to decide whether to have Bruce Banner halt her Widow enhancements or not (not doing so would have her body automatically have her miscarry early in the pregnancy). She's initially uncertain as she's haunted by memories of the first baby she had (stillborn), but decides to go through with it after coming to terms with it and realizing how much of a medical miracle it was that she and Hawkeye (who had a very low sperm count) could conceive any child at all.]]

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* In ''Fanfic/ChristianGreyVsPepperPotts'', while an actual abortion isn't discussed, [[spoiler:when Black Widow ends up unexpectedly pregnant via birth control failure, she has to decide whether to have Bruce Banner halt her Widow enhancements or not (not doing so would have her body automatically have her miscarry early in the pregnancy). She's initially uncertain as she's haunted by memories of the first baby she had (stillborn), but decides to go through with it after coming to terms with it and realizing how much of a medical miracle it was that she and Hawkeye (who had a very low sperm count) could conceive any child at all.]]all]].



* {{Discussed}} in ''Film/TheDoors'': During Jim's breakdown toward the end, at least two women claim to be pregnant. In one scene, he talks over the matter with Patricia. She wants to keep the baby and raise it ("It would be a genius."), Jim is against raising it ("It would be a monster."). She says she doesn't like "the other fucking thing, either." Although Jim offers to pay for the abortion and support her through it the idea upsets Patricia, although she's so far been shown as a feminist and a practicing white witch (the very women who might have been persecuted for providing abortifacients in the past). The outcome isn't shown, and Jim flies to Paris shortly after.

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--> '''The Metatron''': I'm to charge you with a holy crusade.
--> '''Bethany Sloane''': For the record, I work in an abortion clinic.
--> '''The Metatron''': Noah was a drunk, look what he accomplished.
* {{Discussed}} {{Discussed|Trope}} in ''Film/TheDoors'': During Jim's breakdown toward the end, at least two women claim to be pregnant. In one scene, he talks over the matter with Patricia. She wants to keep the baby and raise it ("It would be a genius."), Jim is against raising it ("It would be a monster."). She says she doesn't like "the other fucking thing, either." Although Jim offers to pay for the abortion and support her through it the idea upsets Patricia, although she's so far been shown as a feminist and a practicing white witch (the very women who might have been persecuted for providing abortifacients in the past). The outcome isn't shown, and Jim flies to Paris shortly after.



* {{Averted}} in ''Series/MurdochMysteries'': [[spoiler:Dr. Julia Ogden]] reveals that she had an abortion and suffered severe complications, which inspired her friend to become an illegal abortionist-in TheGayNineties in Canada where even contraceptive methods are against the law. She has no regrets, because there was no way she would want to marry her lover, and she wanted to pursue her studies and career. However, it's later revealed that the abortion has left her barren. It's not clear how much she wants kids herself, but she knows the man she loves longs for a family.
* In ''Film/KnockedUp'', the female lead's sister mentions the possibility of abortion, but she decides to bring the baby to term. This was a bone of contention for many critics of the film, who pointed out that a) the father was a schlub she had no previous history with and appeared to be a less-than-suitable father figure b) she had no apparent religious convictions or prestated beliefs as to why she might keep the baby, c) she was an anchor at E! who was rather devoted to climbing the corporate ladder and d) the sister who suggested it and Jonah Hill were portrayed very unsympathetically, and the avoidance of the actual word "abortion"-Hill's character refers to it as a "shmushmortion." One unstated but possible reason she decided not to get one is because of the potential fallout of the public finding out she had an abortion, though the film never goes into this.
* {{Averted}} in ''Film/TheGodfatherPartII''. Kay supposedly aborts her second son because she knows the kid is just gonna grow up to be a mafioso like all the other men in the family. This is what leads to her and Michael's final split when he finds out that she had the abortion. It's never really made clear whether we're supposed to root for her or not, [[BlackAndGrayMorality which is just as it should be]]. [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation There is also a possibility Kay was lying to Michael about the abortion and really did just have a]] [[ConvenientMiscarriage miscarriage]].
* {{Averted}} in ''Film/BabyBoy'', when Yvette aborts what would have been her second child with Jody. She has sympathy on her side, however, since she's heartbroken over the procedure and her boyfriend Jody is an irresponsible {{jerkass}} who has a child with another woman.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Series/MurdochMysteries'': [[spoiler:Dr. Julia Ogden]] reveals that she had an abortion and suffered severe complications, which inspired her friend to become an illegal abortionist-in TheGayNineties in Canada where even contraceptive methods are against the law. She has no regrets, because there was no way she would want to marry her lover, and she wanted to pursue her studies and career. However, it's later revealed that the abortion has left her barren. It's not clear how much she wants kids herself, but she knows the man she loves longs for a family.
* In ''Film/KnockedUp'', the female lead's sister mentions the possibility of abortion, but she decides to bring the baby to term. This was a bone of contention for many critics of the film, who pointed out that a) the father was a schlub she had no previous history with and appeared to be a less-than-suitable father figure b) she had no apparent religious convictions or prestated beliefs as to why she might keep the baby, c) she was an anchor at E! who was rather devoted to climbing the corporate ladder and d) the sister who suggested it and Jonah Hill Creator/JonahHill were portrayed very unsympathetically, and the avoidance of the actual word "abortion"-Hill's character refers to it as a "shmushmortion." One unstated but possible reason she decided not to get one is because of the potential fallout of the public finding out she had an abortion, though the film never goes into this.
* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/TheGodfatherPartII''. Kay supposedly aborts her second son because she knows the kid is just gonna grow up to be a mafioso like all the other men in the family. This is what leads to her and Michael's final split when he finds out that she had the abortion. It's never really made clear whether we're supposed to root for her or not, [[BlackAndGrayMorality which is just as it should be]]. [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation There is also a possibility Kay was lying to Michael about the abortion and really did just have a]] [[ConvenientMiscarriage miscarriage]].
* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/BabyBoy'', when Yvette aborts what would have been her second child with Jody. She has sympathy on her side, however, since she's heartbroken over the procedure and her boyfriend Jody is an irresponsible {{jerkass}} who has a child with another woman.



* {{Averted}} in the horror film ''Pin''. Leon's sister, Ursula, discovers that she's pregnant as a result of constantly having unprotected sex. She immediately chooses to have an abortion, which is successful. Afterward, she cleans up her life and the incident is never mentioned again.
* {{Averted}} in ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh''. Stacy Hamilton is a flawed but fundamentally good person. However, when she gets pregnant by Mike Damone[[note]]who she has sex with out of desperation after mistakenly believing Rat has no interest in her[[/note]], an abortion is quickly decided. The drama revolves not on the controversy or ill effects of the abortion, but on Damone flaking on paying his half, and failing to provide a promised ride. It's then exacerbated by Stacy witnessing a demonstration of babies being born at a nearby hospital, which makes her feel very guilty about what she did.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in the horror film ''Pin''. Leon's sister, Ursula, discovers that she's pregnant as a result of constantly having unprotected sex. She immediately chooses to have an abortion, which is successful. Afterward, she cleans up her life and the incident is never mentioned again.
* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh''. Stacy Hamilton is a flawed but fundamentally good person. However, when she gets pregnant by Mike Damone[[note]]who she has sex with out of desperation after mistakenly believing Rat has no interest in her[[/note]], an abortion is quickly decided. The drama revolves not on the controversy or ill effects of the abortion, but on Damone flaking on paying his half, and failing to provide a promised ride. It's then exacerbated by Stacy witnessing a demonstration of babies being born at a nearby hospital, which makes her feel very guilty about what she did.



* {{Played straight}} in ''Film/{{Saved}}''. It doesn't even occur to the main character to have an abortion when she falls pregnant, though this is in-character as a born-again Christian who lives in a very conservative neighborhood, attends a private religious school and was previously shown at pro-life protests. The subject of abortion is only brought up twice, and never actually named, both times by the rebellious Cassandra; only once to Mary's face, and by then, it's "too late."
* {{Averted}} in ''Film/{{Fame}}'', at least in the 1980 version. The ballet dancer has to have an abortion in order to pursue her career. She's somewhat awkward about it, but realistically not devastated.

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* {{Played straight}} [[PlayingWithATrope Played straight]] in ''Film/{{Saved}}''. It doesn't even occur to the main character to have an abortion when she falls pregnant, though this is in-character as a born-again Christian who lives in a very conservative neighborhood, attends a private religious school and was previously shown at pro-life protests. The subject of abortion is only brought up twice, and never actually named, both times by the rebellious Cassandra; only once to Mary's face, and by then, it's "too late."
* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/{{Fame}}'', at least in the 1980 version. The ballet dancer has to have an abortion in order to pursue her career. She's somewhat awkward about it, but realistically not devastated.



* {{Averted}} in ''Film/AprilFoolsDay'' when it turns out that the supposed ShrinkingViolet Nan was pregnant and had an abortion. This comes after someone left a tape of a baby crying in her room.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/AprilFoolsDay'' when it turns out that the supposed ShrinkingViolet Nan was pregnant and had an abortion. This comes after someone left a tape of a baby crying in her room.



* {{Averted}} in ''Film/TheLastAmericanVirgin''. [[TheCasanova Smooth Operator]] Rick gets titular good-girl Karen pregnant then dumps her. [[OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent Protagonist]] Gary sells his stereo and takes heat from [[BattleaxeNurse Nurse Rached]] to get Karen an abortion, and that's all that's heard regarding pregnancy and procedure. This film is based on the Israeli film [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eskimo_Limon Eskimo Limon]] which features the same pregnancy-abortion plot point.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/TheLastAmericanVirgin''. [[TheCasanova Smooth Operator]] Rick gets titular good-girl Karen pregnant then dumps her. [[OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent Protagonist]] Gary sells his stereo and takes heat from [[BattleaxeNurse Nurse Rached]] to get Karen an abortion, and that's all that's heard regarding pregnancy and procedure. This film is based on the Israeli film [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eskimo_Limon Eskimo Limon]] which features the same pregnancy-abortion plot point.



* {{Subverted}} in ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet5TheDreamChild''. Protagonist Alice knows she's pregnant. Alice has magic dream powers that let her dream while awake and affect reality through dreams, but she too can be affected. Alice soon realizes that her unborn son Jacob is exercising the same powers. Freddy Krueger can ordinarily only kill people in dreams, but he can use Jacob's dreams to start murdering Alice's friends pretty much whenever he pleases. One of Alice's friends suggests that she stop Freddy by having an abortion, which would end Jacob's dreams. Alice refuses to do so because she wants to keep the baby and thinks she can destroy Freddy through other means. Alice's other means aren't entirely successful and ultimately her unborn son Jacob has to destroy Freddy in the dream world by copying Freddy's powers. The film's final scene shows Alice and her father cooing over the baby. As the camera pans back, we see girls in old-fashioned white dresses playing jump-rope and singing a song that always heralds Freddy's reappearance in a Nightmare on Elm Street film.
* {{Played with}} in ''Blue Denim'': After a teenage couple, Janet and Arthur, find themselves expecting a baby, they seek help to pay for an abortion, and find a doctor willing to perform the procedure; however, because it takes place in the 1950's, there is some worry over the safety of the procedure itself and in the end [[spoiler: Arthur, worried that Janet will die, breaks down confessing to his parents, and they go to rescue her ''just'' in the nick of time. They go home, and the parents of both teenagers have a discussion before agreeing, with Janet's consent, to send her to [[StigmaticPregnancyEuphemism live with her aunt.]] ]] The characters constantly skate around the word "abortion", but the euphemisms, and the characters' worry about the procedure, makes it pretty clear to the audience as to what it is they're planning to do. In the play [[spoiler: Janet has the abortion after all, and lives through the procedure.]]
* {{Enforced}} in the LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek ''The Devil's Child,'' where a woman pregnant with TheAntichrist tries to get an abortion, but a mysterious explosion kills everyone in the hospital.

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* {{Subverted}} {{Subverted|Trope}} in ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet5TheDreamChild''. Protagonist Alice knows she's pregnant. Alice has magic dream powers that let her dream while awake and affect reality through dreams, but she too can be affected. Alice soon realizes that her unborn son Jacob is exercising the same powers. Freddy Krueger can ordinarily only kill people in dreams, but he can use Jacob's dreams to start murdering Alice's friends pretty much whenever he pleases. One of Alice's friends suggests that she stop Freddy by having an abortion, which would end Jacob's dreams. Alice refuses to do so because she wants to keep the baby and thinks she can destroy Freddy through other means. Alice's other means aren't entirely successful and ultimately her unborn son Jacob has to destroy Freddy in the dream world by copying Freddy's powers. The film's final scene shows Alice and her father cooing over the baby. As the camera pans back, we see girls in old-fashioned white dresses playing jump-rope and singing a song that always heralds Freddy's reappearance in a Nightmare on Elm Street film.
* {{Played with}} [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in ''Blue Denim'': After a teenage couple, Janet and Arthur, find themselves expecting a baby, they seek help to pay for an abortion, and find a doctor willing to perform the procedure; however, because it takes place in the 1950's, there is some worry over the safety of the procedure itself and in the end [[spoiler: Arthur, worried that Janet will die, breaks down confessing to his parents, and they go to rescue her ''just'' in the nick of time. They go home, and the parents of both teenagers have a discussion before agreeing, with Janet's consent, to send her to [[StigmaticPregnancyEuphemism live with her aunt.]] ]] aunt]]]]. The characters constantly skate around the word "abortion", but the euphemisms, and the characters' worry about the procedure, makes it pretty clear to the audience as to what it is they're planning to do. In the play [[spoiler: Janet has the abortion after all, and lives through the procedure.]]
procedure]].
* {{Enforced}} {{Enforced|Trope}} in the LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek ''The Devil's Child,'' where a woman pregnant with TheAntichrist tries to get an abortion, but a mysterious explosion kills everyone in the hospital.



* {{Played straight}} in ''Film/BlueValentine''; Cindy goes to a clinic to get an abortion but backs out at the last possible second.
* {{Discussed}} in ''Film/{{Se7en}}''. Tracy, the wife of one of the main characters, contacts her husband's partner to discuss her pregnancy. She isn't sure she wants to have a child given the environment of the city where they live. Somerset tell her about a previous relationship in which he pressured his partner into having an abortion and later regretted it. He does not actively try to dissuade her, though. [[spoiler: Becomes a moot point when she is killed before deciding what to do about the pregnancy.]]

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* {{Played straight}} [[PlayingWithATrope Played straight]] in ''Film/BlueValentine''; Cindy goes to a clinic to get an abortion but backs out at the last possible second.
* {{Discussed}} {{Discussed|Trope}} in ''Film/{{Se7en}}''. Tracy, the wife of one of the main characters, contacts her husband's partner to discuss her pregnancy. She isn't sure she wants to have a child given the environment of the city where they live. Somerset tell her about a previous relationship in which he pressured his partner into having an abortion and later regretted it. He does not actively try to dissuade her, though. [[spoiler: Becomes a moot point when she is killed before deciding what to do about the pregnancy.]]



* ''Film/WhosAfraidOfVirginiaWoolf'': {{Subverted}}. It is implied that sweet, fragile Honey secretly aborts all her pregnancies because she doesn't want to have children.

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* ''Film/WhosAfraidOfVirginiaWoolf'': {{Subverted}}.{{Subverted|Trope}}. It is implied that sweet, fragile Honey secretly aborts all her pregnancies because she doesn't want to have children.



* ''{{Film/ZPG}}: {{Inverted}} according to the law of the society in the film, which ''mandates'' abortion since [[PopulationControl reproduction is banned]]. The central plot comes up when the female protagonist Carole fails to have one and secretly gives birth to a child, making her go on the run with her husband Russ.

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* ''{{Film/ZPG}}: {{Inverted}} {{Inverted|Trope}} according to the law of the society in the film, which ''mandates'' abortion since [[PopulationControl reproduction is banned]]. The central plot comes up when the female protagonist Carole fails to have one and secretly gives birth to a child, making her go on the run with her husband Russ.



* Justified in ''Film/APlaceInTheSun'' (1951). TheHaysCode prevented the mention of it and it wasn't even legal then, there is also the fact that the vulnerable and very human Alice is apprehensive about obtaining an abortion and if she did, the film would end or spin into another plot.

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* Justified in ''Film/APlaceInTheSun'' (1951). TheHaysCode UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode prevented the mention of it and it wasn't even legal then, there is also the fact that the vulnerable and very human Alice is apprehensive about obtaining an abortion and if she did, the film would end or spin into another plot.



* Bizarrely {{averted}} in one of Creator/KarenTraviss' ''Wess'har'' books, where the protagonist's GodMode is so strong that she can't have a normal abortion, so she has to cut the fetus out and ''blow it up with a grenade''.
* Completely {{averted}} in Lynn Margulis's ''Luminous Fish'', where René, one of the main characters, [[spoiler:has a back alley abortion in her college years because her boyfriend could not stand to see her future ruined. She ends up as a perfectly fine atmospheric chemist later, even if she can't have children (and is happier for it)]]. Note that Margulis is the biologist who made symbiogenesis a mainstream evolutionary theory, and therefore doesn't [[ArtisticLicenseBiology fail biology forever]].

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* Bizarrely {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} in one of Creator/KarenTraviss' ''Wess'har'' books, where the protagonist's GodMode is so strong that she can't have a normal abortion, so she has to cut the fetus out and ''blow it up with a grenade''.
* Completely {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} in Lynn Margulis's ''Luminous Fish'', where René, one of the main characters, [[spoiler:has a back alley abortion in her college years because her boyfriend could not stand to see her future ruined. She ends up as a perfectly fine atmospheric chemist later, even if she can't have children (and is happier for it)]]. Note that Margulis is the biologist who made symbiogenesis a mainstream evolutionary theory, and therefore doesn't [[ArtisticLicenseBiology fail biology forever]].



* {{Averted}} by [[spoiler:Lyra Volfrieds, the protagonist]] in Ursula Vernon's ''Literature/BlackDogs''. She is impregnated by TheDragon in an attempt to create a powerful and long-lived bloodline, and in a HeroicSacrifice she uses a brand of magic to both abort the pregnancy and sterilize herself to prevent this plan from ever being carried through.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} by [[spoiler:Lyra Volfrieds, the protagonist]] in Ursula Vernon's ''Literature/BlackDogs''. She is impregnated by TheDragon in an attempt to create a powerful and long-lived bloodline, and in a HeroicSacrifice she uses a brand of magic to both abort the pregnancy and sterilize herself to prevent this plan from ever being carried through.



* {{Averted}} in Stephen Chbosky's ''Literature/ThePerksOfBeingAWallflower'', when main character Charlie escorts his sister to the abortion clinic after discovering she is knocked up by her abusive {{jerkass}} boyfriend.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in Stephen Chbosky's ''Literature/ThePerksOfBeingAWallflower'', when main character Charlie escorts his sister to the abortion clinic after discovering she is knocked up by her abusive {{jerkass}} boyfriend.



* {{Averted}} in ''[[Literature/AdrianMole Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years]]'' with Rosie, Adrian's teenage sister. While she's not exactly a "good girl", she's portrayed as being rather naive in some ways and thinks she wants to keep the baby. Adrian, in a rare moment of maturity, persuades her to spend a week taking care of a baby doll of the sort used to demonstrate the realities of baby-care to teenagers in school. After caring (after a fashion; at one point she chucks it out the window) for the doll for a week, Rosie opts to have an abortion. It's portrayed as being a good choice for her.
** It's also {{averted}} by Pandora (although she's about as much of a "good girl" as Rosie is), whose dad points out that she "had a termination in her lunch break once".

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''[[Literature/AdrianMole Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years]]'' with Rosie, Adrian's teenage sister. While she's not exactly a "good girl", she's portrayed as being rather naive in some ways and thinks she wants to keep the baby. Adrian, in a rare moment of maturity, persuades her to spend a week taking care of a baby doll of the sort used to demonstrate the realities of baby-care to teenagers in school. After caring (after a fashion; at one point she chucks it out the window) for the doll for a week, Rosie opts to have an abortion. It's portrayed as being a good choice for her.
** It's also {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} by Pandora (although she's about as much of a "good girl" as Rosie is), whose dad points out that she "had a termination in her lunch break once".



* {{Inverted}} in Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's Literature/VorkosiganSaga novel ''Barrayar'', when an assassination attempt nearly kills Cordelia Vorkosigan, and does severe, permanent damage to her unborn child. Pretty much everybody thinks she should abort and start over. She doesn't.

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* {{Inverted}} {{Inverted|Trope}} in Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's Literature/VorkosiganSaga novel ''Barrayar'', when an assassination attempt nearly kills Cordelia Vorkosigan, and does severe, permanent damage to her unborn child. Pretty much everybody thinks she should abort and start over. She doesn't.



* {{Averted}} in ''Literature/TheRedTent''. [[ShrinkingViolet Ruti]] has been suffering at the hands of her husband Laban, and she does not want to give him any more children, because she does not believe he [[HeirClubForMen deserves the honor of more sons]] and she knows he will molest a daughter, so she asks Rachel to help her terminate the pregnancy, threatening to [[MercyKilling kill]] [[OffingTheOffspring the child]] anyway after it's born. Rachel agrees, and next month (when the women enter the menstruation tent), she gives Ruti an [[IAteWhat unidentified black brew]] that induces a miscarriage. The women are all supportive of Ruti's choice, on the grounds that ''they'' don't much care for Laban or the way he treats her either.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Literature/TheRedTent''. [[ShrinkingViolet Ruti]] has been suffering at the hands of her husband Laban, and she does not want to give him any more children, because she does not believe he [[HeirClubForMen deserves the honor of more sons]] and she knows he will molest a daughter, so she asks Rachel to help her terminate the pregnancy, threatening to [[MercyKilling [[MercyKill kill]] [[OffingTheOffspring the child]] anyway after it's born. Rachel agrees, and next month (when the women enter the menstruation tent), she gives Ruti an [[IAteWhat unidentified black brew]] that induces a miscarriage. The women are all supportive of Ruti's choice, on the grounds that ''they'' don't much care for Laban or the way he treats her either.



* {{Inverted}} in ''Literature/BraveNewWorld''. Linda is a social outcast for having a baby in a world where in-vitro fertilization is universal, motherhood is an archaic obscenity, and Abortion Centres are luxury facilities.

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* {{Inverted}} {{Inverted|Trope}} in ''Literature/BraveNewWorld''. Linda is a social outcast for having a baby in a world where in-vitro fertilization is universal, motherhood is an archaic obscenity, and Abortion Centres are luxury facilities.



* {{Discussed}} in ''Literature/MemoirsOfAGeisha'' when it's revealed that Sayuri's mentor Mameha aborts all of the children she conceived by her client, the Baron. While most of the characters treat it as normal if a bit embarrassing, [[TearJerker Mameha has graves for her aborted children which she visits regularly]].
* In ''The Sleep Police'' by Jay Bonansinga this winds up being [[spoiler:the motive for the killer, since due to his beliefs he decided that he would target women who got abortions and kill them in ways reminiscent of the procedure, including cutting them apart and laying them in a fetal position with their thumbs in their mouths. He also decides to target the main character's ex wife after he finds out she's had two abortions and very nearly succeeds at killing her.]]

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* {{Discussed}} {{Discussed|Trope}} in ''Literature/MemoirsOfAGeisha'' when it's revealed that Sayuri's mentor Mameha aborts all of the children she conceived by her client, the Baron. While most of the characters treat it as normal if a bit embarrassing, [[TearJerker Mameha has graves for her aborted children which she visits regularly]].
* In ''The Sleep Police'' by Jay Bonansinga this winds up being [[spoiler:the motive for the killer, since due to his beliefs he decided that he would target women who got abortions and kill them in ways reminiscent of the procedure, including cutting them apart and laying them in a fetal position with their thumbs in their mouths. He also decides to target the main character's ex wife after he finds out she's had two abortions and very nearly succeeds at killing her.]]her]].



* {{Averted}} in Literature/Hometown. GoodBadGirl Vicki fears that she may be carrying a ChildByRape and is distraught by the possibility, but is much calmed when someone points out that abortion is an option. It turns out to be a moot point anyway, as she isn't pregnant, but rather suffering from an eating disorder that has stopped her from menstruating.
* Both {{averted}} and {{played straight}} in ''The Diviners'' by Margaret Laurence. A minor character (who was abused and mistreated throughout her life) self-aborts with a coathanger. The baby is buried at the dump and a nice boy from town marries her, although she can no longer have children. Morag, the protagonist, later uses the incident in a [[MostWritersAreWriters novel]]. Morag's character is a BrokenBird stripper type.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in Literature/Hometown.''Literature/{{Hometown}}''. GoodBadGirl Vicki fears that she may be carrying a ChildByRape and is distraught by the possibility, but is much calmed when someone points out that abortion is an option. It turns out to be a moot point anyway, as she isn't pregnant, but rather suffering from an eating disorder that has stopped her from menstruating.
* Both {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} and {{played straight}} [[PlayingWithATrope played straight]] in ''The Diviners'' by Margaret Laurence. A minor character (who was abused and mistreated throughout her life) self-aborts with a coathanger. The baby is buried at the dump and a nice boy from town marries her, although she can no longer have children. Morag, the protagonist, later uses the incident in a [[MostWritersAreWriters novel]]. Morag's character is a BrokenBird stripper type.



* {{Played straight}} in ''Literature/FrostflowerAndThorn'', where Thorn is hankering for money to procure an abortion until a Type 3 option presents itself (a spell to speed up the pregnancy and birth), but also {{averted}} because Thorn has in fact had at least one abortion before and her current predicament is refreshingly presented not as some agonizing moral dilemma but rather a practical choice.
* {{Zigzagged}} in Mickey Zucker Reichert and Jennifer Wingert's ''Spirit Fox.'' The heroine Kiarda, who's pretty clearly a good girl (though a moody teenager) is impregnated (apparently through rape when she was blacked out). She begs her healer friend Bevin to give her an abortion. Bevin tells her she can't do it, because it would be destructive magic that would endanger Bevin's healing powers (a WhiteMage who practices destructive magic will no longer be able to perform WhiteMagic), and pleads with her to keep the baby. Kiarda reluctantly agrees. However, Kiarda isn't portrayed as bad for wanting an abortion, and Bevin later reassures Kiarda that she doesn't think ill of her for it. [[spoiler: Kiarda eventually suffers a miscarriage anyway, because her HalfHumanHybrid twins are severely deformed and non-viable. Her pregnancy-by-rape was actually pregnancy through mating with a male fox when she was shapeshifted into a female one. It's a bit complicated to explain.]]
* Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar: {{Averted}} near the end of ''Arrow's Flight'' in which Talia allows a midwife to abort a young woman's pregnancy if she wishes it (which was due to [[ParentalIncest her stepfather]] [[ChildByRape raping her]], and she'd found that it was non-viable anyway since the girl was underage).

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* {{Played straight}} [[PlayingWithATrope Played straight]] in ''Literature/FrostflowerAndThorn'', where Thorn is hankering for money to procure an abortion until a Type 3 option presents itself (a spell to speed up the pregnancy and birth), but also {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} because Thorn has in fact had at least one abortion before and her current predicament is refreshingly presented not as some agonizing moral dilemma but rather a practical choice.
* {{Zigzagged}} ZigZaggingTrope in Mickey Zucker Reichert and Jennifer Wingert's ''Spirit Fox.'' The heroine Kiarda, who's pretty clearly a good girl (though a moody teenager) is impregnated (apparently through rape when she was blacked out). She begs her healer friend Bevin to give her an abortion. Bevin tells her she can't do it, because it would be destructive magic that would endanger Bevin's healing powers (a WhiteMage who practices destructive magic will no longer be able to perform WhiteMagic), and pleads with her to keep the baby. Kiarda reluctantly agrees. However, Kiarda isn't portrayed as bad for wanting an abortion, and Bevin later reassures Kiarda that she doesn't think ill of her for it. [[spoiler: Kiarda eventually suffers a miscarriage anyway, because her HalfHumanHybrid twins are severely deformed and non-viable. Her pregnancy-by-rape was actually pregnancy through mating with a male fox when she was shapeshifted into a female one. It's a bit complicated to explain.]]
* Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar: {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} near the end of ''Arrow's Flight'' in which Talia allows a midwife to abort a young woman's pregnancy if she wishes it (which was due to [[ParentalIncest her stepfather]] [[ChildByRape raping her]], and she'd found that it was non-viable anyway since the girl was underage).



* {{Averted}} in the very first TV abortion, that of the 47-year-old protagonist of ''Series/{{Maude}}''. No complications are referred to, and her family supports her choice. Her daughter's encouragement included explaining why a 47-year-old shouldn't have a baby, and Adrienne Barbeau played the daughter. Ironically, the episode aired ''before'' Roe v. Wade became law, but abortion had recently been made legal in New York, which was one of only four states to have abortion on request, with no reason required. Some people interpreted the episode as a subtle PSA regarding this fact.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in the very first TV abortion, that of the 47-year-old protagonist of ''Series/{{Maude}}''. No complications are referred to, and her family supports her choice. Her daughter's encouragement included explaining why a 47-year-old shouldn't have a baby, and Adrienne Barbeau played the daughter. Ironically, the episode aired ''before'' Roe v. Wade became law, but abortion had recently been made legal in New York, which was one of only four states to have abortion on request, with no reason required. Some people interpreted the episode as a subtle PSA regarding this fact.



* {{Averted}} with Chloe on ''Series/MyMadFatDiary''.

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* {{Averted}} %%* {{Averted|Trope}} with Chloe on ''Series/MyMadFatDiary''.



* {{Averted}} in ''Series/SixFeetUnder''. Claire gets pregnant from her cheating sleazy boyfriend, and ends up having an abortion. There are no ill side effects, but she does end up seeing her baby in the arms of Nate's dead wife in a hallucination/trip to the afterlife/whatever the hell that was.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Series/SixFeetUnder''. Claire gets pregnant from her cheating sleazy boyfriend, and ends up having an abortion. There are no ill side effects, but she does end up seeing her baby in the arms of Nate's dead wife in a hallucination/trip to the afterlife/whatever the hell that was.



** Averted again in the fourth season, we find out that [[spoiler: Prentiss had an abortion when she was fifteen. Though this fact is mentioned in the context of revealing why she's screwed up, the abortion is never treated as the reason; it is instead the negative reaction of her priest which damages not her, but her friend.]] In neither of these cases does the character revealing the abortion ''or'' the character hearing about it imply that abortion is an immoral act.

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** Averted again in the fourth season, we find out that [[spoiler: Prentiss had an abortion when she was fifteen. Though this fact is mentioned in the context of revealing why she's screwed up, the abortion is never treated as the reason; it is instead the negative reaction of her priest which damages not her, but her friend.]] friend]]. In neither of these cases does the character revealing the abortion ''or'' the character hearing about it imply that abortion is an immoral act.



* {{Averted}} in ''Series/ColdCase'', which deals with abortion several times.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Series/ColdCase'', which deals with abortion several times.



* One plot line on ''SouthOfNowhere'' involved Chelsea getting pregnant from Clay and going for an abortion. At the last minute, she opts out and keeps the baby, which she later [[ConvenientMiscarriage loses in a car crash]].

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* One plot line on ''SouthOfNowhere'' ''Series/SouthOfNowhere'' involved Chelsea getting pregnant from Clay and going for an abortion. At the last minute, she opts out and keeps the baby, which she later [[ConvenientMiscarriage loses in a car crash]].



* Played with in ''Series/MadMen'', naturally. Joan gives a blink-and-you-miss it reference in the first season (roughly, "Are you late again? Do you need to see Doctor Emerson?"), and later [[spoiler:Betty Draper, of all people, makes serious inquiries after finding out that she's pregnant while estranged from her husband. And one of her friends knows a doctor. Admittedly she doesn't go through with it, but that has less to do with morality and more with being driven to patch her marriage back together at any cost.]] Bear in mind that we're in the early 60s here. In the fourth season, Joan reveals that she's had two abortions (or "procedures" as she calls them) and that she's concerned that she might not be able to get pregnant with her husband because of them. [[spoiler:She most certainly can and does--but not by her husband, leading to what appears to abortion #3. In the underground clinic she goes to, we see a 17-year-old go in for one as well.]] However, [[spoiler:Joan ultimately keeps the child.]] In this case they pay lip-service to past abortions, but [[spoiler:every woman who gets pregnant on the show keeps the baby. Joan may have had abortions in the past, but she wasn't a good girl-she's keeping this baby, because she's a good girl now]].
** Arguably [[spoiler: Peggy Olson's adoption counts as not "keeping" the baby.]]

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* Played with in ''Series/MadMen'', naturally. Joan gives a blink-and-you-miss it reference in the first season (roughly, "Are you late again? Do you need to see Doctor Emerson?"), and later [[spoiler:Betty Draper, of all people, makes serious inquiries after finding out that she's pregnant while estranged from her husband. And one of her friends knows a doctor. Admittedly she doesn't go through with it, but that has less to do with morality and more with being driven to patch her marriage back together at any cost.]] cost]]. Bear in mind that we're in the early 60s here. In the fourth season, Joan reveals that she's had two abortions (or "procedures" as she calls them) and that she's concerned that she might not be able to get pregnant with her husband because of them. [[spoiler:She most certainly can and does--but not by her husband, leading to what appears to abortion #3. In the underground clinic she goes to, we see a 17-year-old go in for one as well.]] However, [[spoiler:Joan ultimately keeps the child.]] In this case they pay lip-service to past abortions, but [[spoiler:every woman who gets pregnant on the show keeps the baby. Joan may have had abortions in the past, but she wasn't a good girl-she's keeping this baby, because she's a good girl now]].
** Arguably [[spoiler: Peggy Olson's adoption counts as not "keeping" the baby.]]baby]].



* The first episode of ''Series/ThatsMyBush'' has a highly fictionalized UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush trying to unite both sides of the abortion issue in a summit. It fails spectacularly with the pro choice spokeswoman (a stereotypical StrawFeminist) gets mistaken for a stripper and the pro life spokesmen (an survived [[{{Squick}} aborted fetus]], which ''has'' happened in real life) getting [[BlackComedy drag off by a dog]]. Laura Bush comforts him by telling him that those who believe that the unborn have a right to life and those who believe that a women has final say on her body will ''never'' see eye to eye as because at the end of the day [[GoldenMeanFallacy they are both sort of right]].

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* The first episode of ''Series/ThatsMyBush'' has a highly fictionalized UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush trying to unite both sides of the abortion issue in a summit. It fails spectacularly with the pro choice spokeswoman (a stereotypical StrawFeminist) gets mistaken for a stripper and the pro life spokesmen (an (a survived [[{{Squick}} aborted fetus]], which ''has'' happened in real life) getting [[BlackComedy drag off by a dog]]. Laura Bush comforts him by telling him that those who believe that the unborn have a right to life and those who believe that a women has final say on her body will ''never'' see eye to eye as because at the end of the day [[GoldenMeanFallacy they are both sort of right]].



* Both {{played straight}} and {{averted}} in ''Series/{{Deadwood}}''. It's made clear that Doc Cochran is the Gem's abortionist-in-residence, and Trixie mentions that she's had several abortions. But when widowed Alma Garrett becomes pregnant by a married man, she decides to keep the pregnancy. Ellsworth generously offers to marry her, and it's only after this marriage that the pregnancy fails and she has to have an [[ConvenientMiscarriage abortion to save her life]].

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* Both {{played straight}} [[PlayingWithATrope played straight]] and {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} in ''Series/{{Deadwood}}''. It's made clear that Doc Cochran is the Gem's abortionist-in-residence, and Trixie mentions that she's had several abortions. But when widowed Alma Garrett becomes pregnant by a married man, she decides to keep the pregnancy. Ellsworth generously offers to marry her, and it's only after this marriage that the pregnancy fails and she has to have an [[ConvenientMiscarriage abortion to save her life]].



* {{Averted}} in series two of ''Series/{{Bedlam}}'': In one episode, Ellie reveals she's pregnant; in the next, she says she's had an abortion (offscreen) because her life is too fucked up to bring a child into.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in series two of ''Series/{{Bedlam}}'': In one episode, Ellie reveals she's pregnant; in the next, she says she's had an abortion (offscreen) because her life is too fucked up to bring a child into.



* {{Played straight}} in ''Series/InspectorGeorgeGently'', when a progressive student falls pregnant and decides not to go to Scotland for an abortion (it had been decriminalised there but not in England) even though she has the money and contacts and not having an abortion would mean dropping out of university and returning to her working-class parents to be a single mother, effectively ending her dreams of becoming a lawyer to support the progressive cause.

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* {{Played straight}} [[PlayingWithATrope Played straight]] in ''Series/InspectorGeorgeGently'', when a progressive student falls pregnant and decides not to go to Scotland for an abortion (it had been decriminalised there but not in England) even though she has the money and contacts and not having an abortion would mean dropping out of university and returning to her working-class parents to be a single mother, effectively ending her dreams of becoming a lawyer to support the progressive cause.



** When April has a pregnancy scare, she decides that she would keep the baby. {{Justified}} as she's very religious and had been a virgin until a few months before.

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** When April has a pregnancy scare, she decides that she would keep the baby. {{Justified}} {{Justified|Trope}} as she's very religious and had been a virgin until a few months before.



* {{Averted}} in ''Series/JackAndBobby''. Missy gets an abortion after accidentally getting pregnant and it's portrayed as being the right thing for her to do. Ironically her devout Catholic father was more upset about her being pregnant in the first place than he was about her getting an abortion, which is the opposite of how it usually is with religious families on TV shows.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Series/JackAndBobby''. Missy gets an abortion after accidentally getting pregnant and it's portrayed as being the right thing for her to do. Ironically her devout Catholic father was more upset about her being pregnant in the first place than he was about her getting an abortion, which is the opposite of how it usually is with religious families on TV shows.



* {{Played with}} in ''Series/AmericanHorrorStory'', where at first college student Hayden's decision to abort the child she's carrying as the result of her affair with Ben is presented as a mature and rational choice, but she changes her mind right before she goes through with it in order to pull TheBabyTrap on Ben, who's already married with one teenage daughter and another on the way, and plans to uproot her life to move to California and is clearly presented as being in the wrong for forcing this on him. [[spoiler:Becomes a moot point when Larry murders her shortly thereafter]]. Likewise the girls who come to the Montgomerys for back alley abortions in the 1920s are not presented in a villainous light and instead as victims of the insane Dr. Montgomery, especially since they had no legal methods available to them at the time.

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* {{Played with}} [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in ''Series/AmericanHorrorStory'', where at first college student Hayden's decision to abort the child she's carrying as the result of her affair with Ben is presented as a mature and rational choice, but she changes her mind right before she goes through with it in order to pull TheBabyTrap on Ben, who's already married with one teenage daughter and another on the way, and plans to uproot her life to move to California and is clearly presented as being in the wrong for forcing this on him. [[spoiler:Becomes a moot point when Larry murders her shortly thereafter]]. Likewise the girls who come to the Montgomerys for back alley abortions in the 1920s are not presented in a villainous light and instead as victims of the insane Dr. Montgomery, especially since they had no legal methods available to them at the time.



** In season 3, it's implied that [[spoiler: she miscarried anyway]]. She is also shown in the Mother's Day episode to regret the children she aborted (and the one she didn't), giving them names and making a little memorial for them with crosses made out of Popsicle sticks, with each of their names on them. Big Boo talks her out of her funk, by saying that [[MercyKilling by aborting them, she spared them a miserable life and spared the legal system more criminals to deal with, thus doing what was best for them.]]

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** In season 3, it's implied that [[spoiler: she miscarried anyway]]. She is also shown in the Mother's Day episode to regret the children she aborted (and the one she didn't), giving them names and making a little memorial for them with crosses made out of Popsicle sticks, with each of their names on them. Big Boo talks her out of her funk, by saying that [[MercyKilling [[MercyKill by aborting them, she spared them a miserable life and spared the legal system more criminals to deal with, thus doing what was best for them.]]



* {{Averted}} with Tara on ''Series/SonsOfAnarchy'', who became pregnant by her boyfriend prior to the start of the series and had an abortion at six weeks. She does not feel guilty about this, but the conflict stems from the fact that her (ex, by the start of the series) boyfriend seems to believe in this trope on top of being more than a little emotionally unstable.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} with Tara on ''Series/SonsOfAnarchy'', who became pregnant by her boyfriend prior to the start of the series and had an abortion at six weeks. She does not feel guilty about this, but the conflict stems from the fact that her (ex, by the start of the series) boyfriend seems to believe in this trope on top of being more than a little emotionally unstable.



* ''{{Series/Salem}}'': Nastily {{averted}} by Mary, who up to that point seemed ''quite'' the good girl. The slave Tituba not only uses magic to abort her child, but apparently it's sacrificed to {{the Devil}} as the beginning of Mary's [[StartOfDarkness slide into evil]].

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* ''{{Series/Salem}}'': Nastily {{averted}} {{averted|Trope}} by Mary, who up to that point seemed ''quite'' the good girl. The slave Tituba not only uses magic to abort her child, but apparently it's sacrificed to {{the Devil}} as the beginning of Mary's [[StartOfDarkness slide into evil]].



* {{Averted}} in ''{{Series/Misfits}}'': Curtis quickly gets rid of his GenderBender power after getting his female alter ego pregnant [[ItMakesSenseInContext accidentally]], effectively aborting that pregnancy. The word isn't used, though Alicia says "There are options, you know" when Melissa!Curtis is worrying over what to do.
* ''Series/{{Defiance}}'': {{Averted}} with [[spoiler:Amanda]], who is one of the least ambiguously good characters and had an abortion years ago. The abortion itself is treated as an understandable choice given the [[AfterTheEnd overall]] [[DeathWorld situation]], but her handling of it - not even discussing it with the father, [[spoiler:Connor Lang]], beforehand, even knowing he would have a problem with it - led to the destruction of their relationship.

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* {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} in ''{{Series/Misfits}}'': Curtis quickly gets rid of his GenderBender power after getting his female alter ego pregnant [[ItMakesSenseInContext accidentally]], effectively aborting that pregnancy. The word isn't used, though Alicia says "There are options, you know" when Melissa!Curtis is worrying over what to do.
* ''Series/{{Defiance}}'': {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} with [[spoiler:Amanda]], who is one of the least ambiguously good characters and had an abortion years ago. The abortion itself is treated as an understandable choice given the [[AfterTheEnd overall]] [[DeathWorld situation]], but her handling of it - not even discussing it with the father, [[spoiler:Connor Lang]], beforehand, even knowing he would have a problem with it - led to the destruction of their relationship.



* {{Parodied}} in ''Series/{{Hex}}'' in which Cassie vacillates but is finally persuaded to have an abortion after becoming pregnant with TheAntichrist. The humor comes when the fetus's demonic father uses undiluted religious pro-life rhetoric to persuade the gynecologist to secretly save the life of the (unnaturally grown) premature infant.
* ''Series/JessicaJones2015'': {{Averted}} hard. Hope Schlottman is the ''epitome'' of the good girl archetype who adamantly refuses to give birth to a [[ChildByRape child by Kilgrave]], and pays her cellmate to beat her up so she will miscarry. When that does not work, Jessica helps her procure abortion pills, and after she physically recovers from the experience she's shown to stand by her decision not to go through with the pregnancy. Considering that in the comics, all of Kilgrave's children inherited his MindRape powers, this was probably the best course of action....

to:

* {{Parodied}} {{Parodied|Trope}} in ''Series/{{Hex}}'' in which Cassie vacillates but is finally persuaded to have an abortion after becoming pregnant with TheAntichrist. The humor comes when the fetus's demonic father uses undiluted religious pro-life rhetoric to persuade the gynecologist to secretly save the life of the (unnaturally grown) premature infant.
* ''Series/JessicaJones2015'': {{Averted}} {{Averted|Trope}} hard. Hope Schlottman is the ''epitome'' of the good girl archetype who adamantly refuses to give birth to a [[ChildByRape child by Kilgrave]], and pays her cellmate to beat her up so she will miscarry. When that does not work, Jessica helps her procure abortion pills, and after she physically recovers from the experience she's shown to stand by her decision not to go through with the pregnancy. Considering that in the comics, all of Kilgrave's children inherited his MindRape powers, this was probably the best course of action....



* ''Series/TheKnick'': {{Discussed}} and mostly averted. Sister Harriet is an abortionist and reassures one of her patients that God would understand. Cleary doesn't like it, but his scruples don't stop him from extorting part of Sister Harriet's payment when he finds out that she performs them. Later, when Cornelia becomes pregnant after having sex with Edwards he initially reluctantly agrees to perform an abortion so that it will be safe, but then backs out. So she goes to Sister Harriet. He isn't happy with this, but knows that being together is socially impossible, and them running away would mean giving up their lives in New York forever. People who don't know that Edwards is the father suggested Cornelia pass off the baby as her fiancee's, which she knew [[ChocolateBaby wouldn't work]].

to:

* ''Series/TheKnick'': {{Discussed}} {{Discussed|Trope}} and mostly averted. Sister Harriet is an abortionist and reassures one of her patients that God would understand. Cleary doesn't like it, but his scruples don't stop him from extorting part of Sister Harriet's payment when he finds out that she performs them. Later, when Cornelia becomes pregnant after having sex with Edwards he initially reluctantly agrees to perform an abortion so that it will be safe, but then backs out. So she goes to Sister Harriet. He isn't happy with this, but knows that being together is socially impossible, and them running away would mean giving up their lives in New York forever. People who don't know that Edwards is the father suggested Cornelia pass off the baby as her fiancee's, which she knew [[ChocolateBaby wouldn't work]].



* In the musical ''Theatre/SpringAwakening'', Wendla gets an abortion though it's implied she does not want to; her mother takes her to get one by force, [[spoiler:and then Wendla dies]]. This is even sadder in the original play on which the musical is based because [[spoiler:her child is the product of rape. Not to mention that in both the musical and play, Wendla does not even know what abortion is.]]

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* In the musical ''Theatre/SpringAwakening'', Wendla gets an abortion though it's implied she does not want to; her mother takes her to get one by force, [[spoiler:and then Wendla dies]]. This is even sadder in the original play on which the musical is based because [[spoiler:her child is the product of rape. Not to mention that in both the musical and play, Wendla does not even know what abortion is.]]is]].



* Sil'lice implies in ''Webcomic/{{Drowtales}}'' that her sister Snadhya'rune has had abortions, specifically referring to how she "[[http://www.drowtales.com/mainarchive.php?order=chapters&id=15 murders her own children while they are still in the womb]]" which to a drow, who place a high value on motherhood and directly connect social status to how many children one has, would be an absurd concept, and Snadhya's rejection of this part of drow culture is seen as scandalous and shameful. However this trope is later twisted on its head when it's revealed [[spoiler:that Snadhya has had a daughter, but she was [[http://www.drowtales.com/mainarchive.php?sid=6838 carried outside of her womb]] thanks to the Jaal'darya's mana-tech, the implication being that Snadhya is such a ControlFreak that she didn't want to be pregnant, but still wanted children. And even more shockingly, the "father" is none other than [[HomosexualReproduction Mel'arnach Val'Sarghress]].]]
* {{Inverted|Trope}} in Moon Over June, with Hatsuki, she choose to keep her child [[{{Squick}} in order to do pregnancy photoshoots]] and [[DisproportionateRetribution to hide the kid from her parents]].

to:

* Sil'lice implies in ''Webcomic/{{Drowtales}}'' that her sister Snadhya'rune has had abortions, specifically referring to how she "[[http://www.drowtales.com/mainarchive.php?order=chapters&id=15 murders her own children while they are still in the womb]]" which to a drow, who place a high value on motherhood and directly connect social status to how many children one has, would be an absurd concept, and Snadhya's rejection of this part of drow culture is seen as scandalous and shameful. However this trope is later twisted on its head when it's revealed [[spoiler:that Snadhya has had a daughter, but she was [[http://www.drowtales.com/mainarchive.php?sid=6838 carried outside of her womb]] thanks to the Jaal'darya's mana-tech, the implication being that Snadhya is such a ControlFreak that she didn't want to be pregnant, but still wanted children. And even more shockingly, the "father" is none other than [[HomosexualReproduction Mel'arnach Val'Sarghress]].]]
Val'Sarghress]]]].
* {{Inverted|Trope}} in Moon Over June, with Hatsuki, she choose who chooses to keep her child [[{{Squick}} in order to do pregnancy photoshoots]] and [[DisproportionateRetribution to hide the kid from her parents]].



** In the episode "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS8E21PartialTermsOfEndearment Partial Terms of Endearment]]" Lois agrees to be a surrogate mother for another couple, however, the couple dies and she must decide whether or not to get an abortion[[spoiler: she does]]. The episode was finished but it was [[BannedEpisode banned from airing on FOX]], however, it is available on DVD and it is not known if it will air on Adult Swim.

to:

** In the episode "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS8E21PartialTermsOfEndearment Partial Terms of Endearment]]" Lois agrees to be a surrogate mother for another couple, however, the couple dies and she must decide whether or not to get an abortion[[spoiler: she does]]. abortion. [[spoiler: She does.]] The episode was finished but it was [[BannedEpisode banned from airing on FOX]], FOX]]; however, it is available on DVD and it is not known if it will air on Adult Swim.Creator/AdultSwim.



** In the ProWrestlingEpisode "W.T.F." the boys set up a WWF acting ring, and Cartman regularly takes the role of a wrestler's floozy. One of his most frequent claims is that he's addicted to drugs, pregnant with some other wrestler's baby, and then that he's had an abortion. Eventually he makes the claim that [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs he's addicted - to abortions.]]

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** In the ProWrestlingEpisode "W.T.F." the boys set up a WWF WWE acting ring, and Cartman regularly takes the role of a wrestler's floozy. One of his most frequent claims is that he's addicted to drugs, pregnant with some other wrestler's baby, and then that he's had an abortion. Eventually he makes the claim that [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs he's addicted - to abortions.]]
26th Jun '16 2:12:49 AM Minni128
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* In ''Fanfic/KiryuuinChronicles'', the issue isn't brought up but it does seem to be implied, considering Ragyou didn't see any other way out of marrying her abusive husband while pregnant with [[spoiler: Satsuki]] besides being disowned, then again, the possibility that, if she didn't marry her abusive husband, her family might have disowned her anyway (whether she terminated the pregnancy or not) cannot be ruled out either.

to:

* In ''Fanfic/KiryuuinChronicles'', the issue isn't brought up but it does seem to be implied, considering Ragyou didn't see any other way out of marrying her abusive husband while pregnant with [[spoiler: Satsuki]] besides being disowned, then again, the possibility that, if she didn't marry her abusive husband, her family might have disowned her anyway (whether she terminated the pregnancy or not) cannot be ruled out either. Either way, she elects to keep her pregnancy.
22nd Jun '16 4:10:16 PM Minni128
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* In ''Fanfic/KiryuuinChronicles'', the issue isn't brought up but it does seem to be implied, considering Ragyou didn't see any other way out of marrying her abusive husband [[spoiler: while pregnant with Satsuki]] besides being disowned, then again, the possibility that her family might have disowned her anyway cannot be ruled out either.

to:

* In ''Fanfic/KiryuuinChronicles'', the issue isn't brought up but it does seem to be implied, considering Ragyou didn't see any other way out of marrying her abusive husband [[spoiler: while pregnant with [[spoiler: Satsuki]] besides being disowned, then again, the possibility that that, if she didn't marry her abusive husband, her family might have disowned her anyway (whether she terminated the pregnancy or not) cannot be ruled out either.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion