History Main / GladYouThoughtOfIt

1st Apr '18 6:14:26 PM Generality
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** Lord Vetinari is a master of this (presumably just to amuse himself, given that he's an absolute dictator whose word is law). You could use this example from ''Discworld/TheLastHero'':

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** Lord Vetinari is a master of this (presumably just to amuse himself, given that he's an absolute dictator whose word is law). You could use this In the following example from ''Discworld/TheLastHero'':''Discworld/TheLastHero'', it serves Vetinari's interest to make Archchancellor Ridcully agree with him, because the two are theoretically of equal rank and friction between the city and the University could be troublesome:
31st Mar '18 4:57:10 AM __Vano
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You know how the GladIThoughtOfIt trope is when a character suggests something, only to have another scoff at the idea, but then claim it to have been their own idea when it succeeds? Well, maybe there's a trope involving a character who has a plan, but wants someone else to think it's their idea and thus drops subtle hints about carrying out the plan under the idea that it was their idea to begin with. But it'd need someone to make such a page, and I can't think who...

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You know how the GladIThoughtOfIt trope is when a character suggests something, only to have another scoff at the idea, but then claim it to have been their own idea when it succeeds? Well, maybe there's a trope involving a character who has a plan, but wants someone else to think it's their idea and thus drops subtle hints about carrying out the plan under the idea that it was their idea to begin with. [[SelfDemonstratingArticle But it'd need someone to make such a page, and I can't think who...
who...]]
25th Feb '18 8:05:33 AM Gravidef
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* The legendary "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" speech from ''[[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare's]] ''Julius Caesar'' is a famous example. Mark Antony, who gives the oration, is given strict instructions ''not'' to praise Caesar by the conspirators. Antony agrees and promises to "bury Caesar, not praise him"...then proceeds to use those "insults" to sway the public's opinion against the murderers, [[ExactWords all while explaining why what he's saying aren't compliments]]. Soon, the Roman populace is whipped into a frenzy of love for Caesar; the conspirators are next kicked out of Rome, which eventually leads to a civil war that ends in their defeat. This is all a subtle scheme on Mark Antony's part to seize power for himself and his own allies; by making it seem like he's simply following the crowd's will, he's able to endear himself to them and gain their unwavering support.

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* The legendary "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" speech from ''[[Creator/WilliamShakespeare [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare's]] ''Julius Caesar'' is a famous example. Mark Antony, who gives the oration, is given strict instructions ''not'' to praise Caesar by the conspirators.group that murdered him. Antony agrees and promises to "bury Caesar, not praise him"...then proceeds to use those "insults" to sway the public's opinion against the murderers, assassins, [[ExactWords all while explaining why what he's saying aren't compliments]]. Soon, the Roman populace is whipped into a frenzy of love for Caesar; the conspirators are next kicked out of Rome, which eventually leads to a civil war that ends in their defeat. This is all a subtle scheme on Mark Antony's part to seize power for himself and his own allies; by making it seem like he's simply following the crowd's will, he's able to endear himself to them and gain their unwavering support.
25th Feb '18 8:03:56 AM Gravidef
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Added DiffLines:

* The legendary "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" speech from ''[[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespeare's]] ''Julius Caesar'' is a famous example. Mark Antony, who gives the oration, is given strict instructions ''not'' to praise Caesar by the conspirators. Antony agrees and promises to "bury Caesar, not praise him"...then proceeds to use those "insults" to sway the public's opinion against the murderers, [[ExactWords all while explaining why what he's saying aren't compliments]]. Soon, the Roman populace is whipped into a frenzy of love for Caesar; the conspirators are next kicked out of Rome, which eventually leads to a civil war that ends in their defeat. This is all a subtle scheme on Mark Antony's part to seize power for himself and his own allies; by making it seem like he's simply following the crowd's will, he's able to endear himself to them and gain their unwavering support.
25th Feb '18 7:56:22 AM Gravidef
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* In ''Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix'', Benjamin Franklin uses this twice in rapid succession with his and John Adams's proposal for American independence stalls in the Continental Congress. Franklin summons [[LargeHam Richard Henry Lee]] of Virginia to ask about how to get the idea moving again, and Lee suggests getting someone else in Congress to propose independence, just as the Pennsylvanian planned. Franklin then makes a show about wondering what Virginian could ''possibly'' have enough influence in the state's House of Burgesses to suggest writing the proposal...and Lee immediately realizes that he's the perfect choice, [[ThatRemindsMeOfASong bursting into song]] about how he'll get the resolution within a day. The whole situation is promptly lampshaded by Adams, who wonders why Franklin didn't simply ask Lee for help; Franklin replies that if he had, they would [[YouOweMe owe Lee a favor]], a situation that could cause issues in the future.

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* In ''Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix'', Benjamin Franklin uses this twice in rapid succession with his and John Adams's proposal for American independence stalls in the Continental Congress. Franklin summons [[LargeHam Richard Henry Lee]] of Virginia to ask about how to get the idea moving again, and Lee suggests getting someone else in Congress to propose independence, just as the Pennsylvanian planned. Franklin then makes a show about wondering what Virginian could ''possibly'' have enough influence power in the state's House of Burgesses government to suggest writing the proposal...and Lee immediately realizes that he's the perfect choice, [[ThatRemindsMeOfASong bursting into song]] about how he'll get the resolution within a day. The whole situation is promptly lampshaded by Adams, who wonders why Franklin didn't simply ask Lee for help; Franklin replies that if he had, they would [[YouOweMe owe Lee a favor]], a situation that could cause issues in the future.future.
-->'''Benjamin Franklin''': Now, if we could think of a Virginian with enough influence to go down there and persuade the House of Burgesses--
-->'''Richard Henry Lee''': [[NoIndoorVoice DAMN ME IF I HAVEN'T THOUGHTA SOMEONE!]]
-->'''Franklin, John Adams''': Who?
-->'''Lee''': Me!
-->'''Franklin''': [[BlatantLies Oh, why didn't I think of that?]]
25th Feb '18 7:52:25 AM Gravidef
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix'', Benjamin Franklin uses this twice in rapid succession with his and John Adams's proposal for American independence stalls in the Continental Congress. Franklin summons [[LargeHam Richard Henry Lee]] of Virginia to ask about how to get the idea moving again, and Lee suggests getting someone else in Congress to propose independence, just as the Pennsylvanian planned. Franklin then makes a show about wondering what Virginian could ''possibly'' have enough influence in the state's House of Burgesses to suggest writing the proposal...and Lee immediately realizes that he's the perfect choice, [[ThatRemindsMeOfASong bursting into song]] about how he'll get the resolution within a day. The whole situation is promptly lampshaded by Adams, who wonders why Franklin didn't simply ask Lee for help; Franklin replies that if he had, they would [[YouOweMe owe Lee a favor]], a situation that could cause issues in the future.
17th Jan '18 7:00:33 AM lalalei2001
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* ''ComicString/{{Dilbert}}'' realized that deliberately invoking this on his boss was about the only way to get funding for an idea Dilbert came up with. Considering [[GladIThoughtOfIt his]] [[PointyHairedBoss boss]], he's right. Dilbert refers to this as "bossifying" his idea, and an example can be seen [[http://dilbert.com/strip/2014-01-12 here]]...

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* ''ComicString/{{Dilbert}}'' ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' realized that deliberately invoking this on his boss was about the only way to get funding for an idea Dilbert came up with. Considering [[GladIThoughtOfIt his]] [[PointyHairedBoss boss]], he's right. Dilbert refers to this as "bossifying" his idea, and an example can be seen [[http://dilbert.com/strip/2014-01-12 here]]...
17th Jan '18 6:04:00 AM lalalei2001
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Theatre/JacobMarleysChristmasCarol'' the Bogle drops increasingly obvious hints about Marley using his spirit powers to affect Scrooge, with varying terms, but he doesn't get it until the alcoholic version of "spirits" is used.
6th Dec '17 10:10:59 AM Odacon_Spy
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* ''Film/DjangoUnchained'': Stephen, Candyland's head house slave, is forced to do this with the estate's owners and staff after [[spoiler:Calvin, who is much more receptive to his criticism and input, is killed]]. He privately confides to Django how [[HintDropping heavily he had to drop hints]] before anyone finally picked up on his suggestion of [[spoiler:selling Django to a mining company known for its atrociously cruel treatment of slaves]].

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* ''Film/DjangoUnchained'': Stephen, Candyland's head house slave, is forced to do resort to this with the estate's his owners and staff after [[spoiler:Calvin, [[spoiler:Calvin Candie, who is normally much more receptive to his direct criticism and input, is killed]]. He privately confides to Django how [[HintDropping frustratingly heavily he had to [[HintDropping drop hints]] before anyone finally picked up on his suggestion of [[spoiler:selling [[spoiler:punishing Django by selling him to a mining company known for its atrociously cruel treatment of slaves]].
6th Dec '17 10:03:34 AM Odacon_Spy
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* ''Film/DjangoUnchained'': Stephen, Candyland's head house slave, is forced to do this with the estate's owners and staff after [[spoiler:Calvin, who is much more receptive to his criticism and input, is killed]].
He privately confides to Django how [[HintDropping heavily he had to drop hints]] before anyone finally picked up on his suggestion of [[spoiler:selling Django to a mining company known for its atrociously cruel treatment of slaves]].

to:

* ''Film/DjangoUnchained'': Stephen, Candyland's head house slave, is forced to do this with the estate's owners and staff after [[spoiler:Calvin, who is much more receptive to his criticism and input, is killed]].
killed]]. He privately confides to Django how [[HintDropping heavily he had to drop hints]] before anyone finally picked up on his suggestion of [[spoiler:selling Django to a mining company known for its atrociously cruel treatment of slaves]].
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