History Main / GenreBlindness

16th Mar '17 1:26:27 PM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': How long will it take for Iznogoud to understand that the problem in his quest for power is not Wa'at Alahf, but himself?
14th Mar '17 7:08:29 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Horace Hogan (yes, Hulk's nephew) faced Meng on the April 15, 1999 episode of ''[[Wrestling/{{WCW}} Thunder]]''. At one point, Horace gave Meng a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional_wrestling_holds#Sunset_flip sunset flip]] for a 2-count. He tried it again and Meng gave him the [[FinishingMove Tongan Death Grip]] for his troubles.

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* Horace Hogan (yes, Hulk's nephew) faced Meng Wrestling/{{Meng}} on the April 15, 1999 episode of ''[[Wrestling/{{WCW}} Thunder]]''. At one point, Horace gave Meng a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional_wrestling_holds#Sunset_flip sunset flip]] for a 2-count. He tried it again and Meng gave him the [[FinishingMove Tongan Death Grip]] for his troubles.
7th Mar '17 1:09:23 PM EuroSong
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* In ''Series/HouseOfCards'', Zoe Barnes starts to suspect that [[spoiler:Underwood killed Russo]], so if she even potentially thought it was true, especially because he is so powerful, a genre savvy thing to do would be to [[spoiler:predict you are going to be disposed of and get a statement of sanity at several psychiatrists that you aren't suicidal and also write a letter/record a video with evidence of all communications with Underwood, copy it and leave it at several civil law notaries, with the instruction to mail it to news sources and the president in case of her death. And also to create a program which would mail all of those informations from several computers to major US and foreign news sources, Facebook, 4chan, YouTube, etc.]] That way [[spoiler:Underwood couldn't simply cover it up as babbling of an insane man.]] In real life, this is what people who know a lot do to protect themselves.

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* In the American version of ''Series/HouseOfCards'', Zoe Barnes starts to suspect that [[spoiler:Underwood killed Russo]], so if she even potentially thought it was true, especially because he is so powerful, a genre savvy thing to do would be to [[spoiler:predict you are going to be disposed of and get a statement of sanity at several psychiatrists that you aren't suicidal and also write a letter/record a video with evidence of all communications with Underwood, copy it and leave it at several civil law notaries, with the instruction to mail it to news sources and the president in case of her death. And also to create a program which would mail all of those informations from several computers to major US and foreign news sources, Facebook, 4chan, YouTube, etc.]] That way [[spoiler:Underwood couldn't simply cover it up as babbling of an insane man.]] In real life, this is what people who know a lot do to protect themselves.



* A few chefs on ''Series/HellsKitchen'' had actually served a dish that was not completely fresh for the competition's opening signature dish showcase, using something that is prepackaged or frozen. While one of the first chefs to do this, Rock, was able to bounce back and win his season, the other offenders got an imaginary DunceCap put on their heads along with a tongue-lashing from chef Gordon Ramsay (who threatened to kick a few of these people out), and none of them even made it to the halfway point of the show.

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* A few chefs on ''Series/HellsKitchen'' (USA) had actually served a dish that was not completely fresh for the competition's opening signature dish showcase, using something that is prepackaged or frozen. While one of the first chefs to do this, Rock, was able to bounce back and win his season, the other offenders got an imaginary DunceCap put on their heads along with a tongue-lashing from chef Gordon Ramsay (who threatened to kick a few of these people out), and none of them even made it to the halfway point of the show.
6th Mar '17 9:51:15 AM Vir
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* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'': You'd think after living with him as long as they did the Smiths would probably be GenreSavvy enough by now to know just how much of a [[TheSociopath sociopathic bastard]] Roger is to take precaution not falling for any of his lies and schemes. Especially true with Stan and Francine both who have been regularly shown easily fooled by Roger's plans. The Smiths are the only people in-show who see through Roger's [[PaperThinDisguise disguises]], but they always seem to trust him more than they should in later per episode.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'': You'd think after living with him as long as they did the Smiths would probably be GenreSavvy enough by now to know just how much of a [[TheSociopath sociopathic bastard]] Roger is to take precaution not falling for any of his lies and schemes. Especially true with Stan and Francine Francine, both who of whom have been regularly shown to be easily fooled by Roger's plans. The Smiths are the only people in-show who see through Roger's [[PaperThinDisguise disguises]], but they always seem to trust him more than they should in later per episode.
6th Mar '17 9:46:16 AM Vir
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* The eponymous character of ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' can be this at times. For example, in the episode "Let's Play Magicians", she sees [[CatsAreMean Mr. Cat]], as a magician, stick several swords into [[NighInvulnerable Quack Quack]] and then [[SawAWomanInHalf saw him in half]]. Despite the fact that Mr. Cat spends almost all the episodes torturing Quack Quack, she thinks he is actually doing a magic trick and is shocked when she finds out it isn't a trick.

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* The eponymous character of ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' can be this at times. For example, in the episode "Let's Play Magicians", she sees [[CatsAreMean Mr. Cat]], as a magician, stick several swords into [[NighInvulnerable [[NighInvulnerability Quack Quack]] and then [[SawAWomanInHalf saw him in half]]. Despite the fact that Mr. Cat spends almost all the episodes torturing Quack Quack, she thinks he is actually doing a magic trick and is shocked when she finds out it isn't a trick.
6th Mar '17 9:46:08 AM Vir
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** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E23TheHooffieldsAndMccolts "The Hooffields and McColts"]]: Neither Twilight, Fluttershy or the McColts anticipate the "[[TrojanHorse Trojan Cake]]" filled with hostile ponies... quite unlike a good part of the audience.

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** [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E23TheHooffieldsAndMccolts "The Hooffields and McColts"]]: Neither Twilight, Fluttershy or the McColts [=McColts=] anticipate the "[[TrojanHorse Trojan Cake]]" filled with hostile ponies... quite unlike a good part of the audience.
6th Mar '17 9:45:38 AM Vir
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** One episode of ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo'' has Red Herring wanting to add a sidecar onto his mom's motorcycle for her birthday without her finding out. So what does he do? He steals it, and then dresses up as a monster to scare people away. This is in spite of the fact that he lives in the same neighborhood as a ''detective agency who regularly deals with guys dressed up as monsters.''

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** One episode of ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo'' has Red Herring wanting to add a sidecar onto his mom's motorcycle for her birthday without her finding out. So what does he do? He steals it, and then dresses up as a monster to scare people away. This is in spite of the fact that he lives in the same neighborhood as a ''detective agency who regularly deals deal with guys dressed up as monsters.''
21st Feb '17 3:12:55 PM AutumnLeaves
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* In ''The True Princess and the Wandering Bridge'', a fantasy novel by Aleksandra Yegorushkina, one of the characters learns that he's half-human, half-dragon and can shapeshift into a dragon, and he boasts of it to everyone around. In the middle of a dwarf settlement as well. Too bad he hasn't read much fantasy and doesn't know that dwarves are dragons' bitter enemies.
31st Jan '17 2:43:43 AM Troperinik
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* The eponymous character of ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' can be this at times. For example, in the episode "Let's Play Magicians", she sees [[CatsAreMean Mr. Cat]], as a magician, stick several swords into [[NighInvulnerable Quack Quack]] and then [[SawAWomanInHalf saw him in half]]. Despite the fact that Mr. Cat spends almost all the episodes torturing Quack Quack, she thinks he is actually doing a magic trick and is shocked when she finds out it isn't a trick.
17th Jan '17 1:04:45 AM DoctorNemesis
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Although genre blindness can be a legitimate flaw, [[TropesAreNotBad it should be noted]] that it can be difficult for writers to create characters who are not genre blind without [[LampshadeHanging hanging a lampshade on it]] by saying something like [[{{Anvilicious}} "This is just like in the movies!"]], especially in genres which require suspense that can easily be undone by such comedic relief (such as horrors, thrillers, etc). Furthermore, some stories in some genres really couldn't function at all if the characters displayed an innate and complete understanding of what genre they were in and exactly how they should act at all times within a story in said genre if they want to avoid trouble. A certain amount of Genre Blindness can be required to provide the story with tension and drama, since if the character knows exactly what to do to avoid trouble and conflict in their particular story, they'll do it, and consequently have an easy, trouble-free life, and... why are we watching again? Finally, not all of a genre's classic tropes are in fact TruthInTelevision, but as far as the characters are concerned, ThisIsReality, so their "blindness" may be the same as common sense. For example, in real life, a single cough usually does not [[IncurableCoughOfDeath herald a fatal disease]], so ItsProbablyNothing is probably rational despite being Genre Blind.

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Although genre blindness can be a legitimate flaw, [[TropesAreNotBad it should be noted]] that it can be difficult for writers to create characters who are not genre blind without [[LampshadeHanging hanging a lampshade on it]] by saying something like [[{{Anvilicious}} "This is just like in the movies!"]], especially in genres which require suspense that can easily be undone by such comedic relief (such as horrors, thrillers, etc). Furthermore, some stories in some genres really couldn't function at all if the characters displayed an innate and complete understanding of what genre they were in and exactly how they should act at all times within a story in said genre if they want to avoid trouble. A certain amount of Genre Blindness can be required to provide the story with tension and drama, since if the character knows exactly what to do to avoid trouble and conflict in their particular story, they'll do it, and consequently have an easy, trouble-free life, and... why are we watching again? Finally, not all of a genre's classic tropes are in fact TruthInTelevision, but as far as the characters are concerned, ThisIsReality, so their "blindness" may be the same as common sense. After all, people in real life don't usually live their lives as if everything they do or which happens to them conforms to a series of strict narrative conventions, so why would fictional characters? For example, in real life, a single cough usually does not [[IncurableCoughOfDeath herald a fatal disease]], so ItsProbablyNothing is probably rational despite being Genre Blind.
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