History Main / FauxSymbolism

12th Aug '17 7:27:05 AM ClintEastwood
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** The 1967 story "The Abominable Snowman" uses most of its Buddhist symbolism reasonably considering it's set in a Buddhist monastery - like paralleling the Doctor's use of time travel to the monks' understanding of astral projection, or how the Doctor teaches Victoria to chant 'om mani padme hum' to resist [[{{Brainwashed}} Brainwashing]]. Not all of it joins up, though - significantly, the main antagonist ([[spoiler: actually just a puppet of the Intelligence]]) is named Padmasambhava, the writer of ''[[TomeOfEldrichLore The Tibetan Book of the Dead]]'', a book known about at the time due to its recent appropriation by Timothy Leary for his [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs writings about LSD]] - making it random drugs symbolism as well as random Buddhist symbolism. It's very unlikely that they would have had a character called [[TheUnpronounceable Padmasambhava]] in the story if it wasn't necessary to the story they were trying to tell, yet neither the drugs nor the religious allusion seems to have any significance.
** "Planet of the Spiders" was written by a practicing Buddhist as an allegory about reincarnation, which makes it bizarre when the villains use "om mani padme hum" as OminousLatinChanting to summon evil space spiders.
** "The Ark in Space" has continual references to the Bible: an Ark led by a man referred to as "Noah", the Doctor talking about how the HumanPopsicle passengers are 'the entire human race awaiting the trumpet blast' and obliquely referencing Doomsday prophet Nostradamus, lots of white outfits and coffins, the Doctor subtly namechecking the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in his PatrickStewartSpeech, and a dash of MessianicArchetype symbolism in that the Doctor is bringing chosen people back to life. It may mean something, or may also just be a story about parasitic space wasps.
** Several Dalek stories from the mid-70s onwards use terms from Christianity in the title: "Genesis of the Daleks", "Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation of the Daleks" and "Remembrance of the Daleks". Whether any of these mean anything symbolic is debatable and at least one doesn't even have a literal example of the word in its title in it ("Revelation").
** "Genesis of the Daleks" is full of this. The title is a reference to a book in the Bible. The Time Lords were originally scripted to appear to the Doctor in a beautiful garden and then cast him out into Skaro (but this was abandoned for budget and DarkerAndEdgier reasons). There are strong themes of temptation, sacrifice and trial. Davros says destroying the universe would 'set him up above the gods' while the Doctor won't save it because he feels he does not have the right to wield that power. Davros is trying to create a race of creatures but prevent them from having knowledge of good and evil; Nyder's MeaningfulName is a play on 'neidr', Welsh for 'snake'. An obvious scene is the sequence where the Doctor tortures Davros, which is done with the Doctor kneeling at Davros's feet and holding his hand (as Davros's hand is the only part of his body he can move) while gazing up at him in a painting-of-a-disciple-like fashion. None of this appears to really mean anything.

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** The 1967 story "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E2TheAbominableSnowmen The Abominable Snowman" Snowmen]]" uses most of its Buddhist symbolism reasonably considering it's set in a Buddhist monastery - like paralleling the Doctor's use of time travel to the monks' understanding of astral projection, or how the Doctor teaches Victoria to chant 'om mani padme hum' to resist [[{{Brainwashed}} Brainwashing]]. Not all of it joins up, though - significantly, the main antagonist ([[spoiler: actually just a puppet of the Intelligence]]) is named Padmasambhava, the writer of ''[[TomeOfEldrichLore The Tibetan Book of the Dead]]'', a book known about at the time due to its recent appropriation by Timothy Leary for his [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs writings about LSD]] - making it random drugs symbolism as well as random Buddhist symbolism. It's very unlikely that they would have had a character called [[TheUnpronounceable Padmasambhava]] in the story if it wasn't necessary to the story they were trying to tell, yet neither the drugs nor the religious allusion seems to have any significance.
** "Planet "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS11E5PlanetOfTheSpiders Planet of the Spiders" Spiders]]" was written by a practicing Buddhist as an allegory about reincarnation, which makes it bizarre when the villains use "om mani padme hum" as OminousLatinChanting to summon evil space spiders.
** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace The Ark in Space" Space]]" has continual references to the Bible: an Ark led by a man referred to as "Noah", the Doctor talking about how the HumanPopsicle passengers are 'the entire human race awaiting the trumpet blast' and obliquely referencing Doomsday prophet Nostradamus, lots of white outfits and coffins, the Doctor subtly namechecking the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in his PatrickStewartSpeech, and a dash of MessianicArchetype symbolism in that the Doctor is bringing chosen people back to life. It may mean something, or may also just be a story about parasitic space wasps.
** Several Dalek stories from the mid-70s onwards use terms from Christianity in the title: "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks", "Resurrection Daleks]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E4ResurrectionOfTheDaleks Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation Daleks]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E6RevelationOfTheDaleks Revelation of the Daleks" Daleks]]" and "Remembrance "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks Remembrance of the Daleks".Daleks]]". Whether any of these mean anything symbolic is debatable and at least one doesn't even have a literal example of the word in its title in it ("Revelation").
** "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks" Daleks]]" is full of this. The title is a reference to a book in the Bible. The Time Lords were originally scripted to appear to the Doctor in a beautiful garden and then cast him out into Skaro (but this was abandoned for budget and DarkerAndEdgier reasons). There are strong themes of temptation, sacrifice and trial. Davros says destroying the universe would 'set him up above the gods' while the Doctor won't save it because he feels he does not have the right to wield that power. Davros is trying to create a race of creatures but prevent them from having knowledge of good and evil; Nyder's MeaningfulName is a play on 'neidr', Welsh for 'snake'. An obvious scene is the sequence where the Doctor tortures Davros, which is done with the Doctor kneeling at Davros's feet and holding his hand (as Davros's hand is the only part of his body he can move) while gazing up at him in a painting-of-a-disciple-like fashion. None of this appears to really mean anything.



** The main villain in "City of Death" was originally called Sephiroth, with other characters named after the individual Sephiroth also appearing and representing aspects of him. None of this has anything to do with the plot, which was probably why those characters were excised and the character was renamed Scaroth in the final version.
** "Meglos" features a Dodecahedron, a reference to the Platonic solid that formed the basis for quintessence or ether (the perfect element from which Aristotle suggested the stars were made from). Nothing else in the plot has anything to do with this, though.
** "Logopolis". Programmers who use code to hold the universe together are portrayed as chanting monks in a monastery, the Doctor is followed by an apparition who seems like both a revenant and a guardian angel. There is a distinctly Tarotic vibe with a Tower, a Hanged Man, a Judgement and arguably a King of Wands. The constellation Cassiopeia, named for a monarch turned upside down for vanity, is significant in the climax in which the Doctor dies and is resurrected in an inverted and diminished form. There are whole books dedicated to puzzling out what the symbolism in this one means, such as Philip Sandifer's ''Recursive Occlusion'' (an explicitly occultist reading).
** There's also a ton of meaningless Buddhism allusions in "Kinda" and "Snakedance". The monster is called the Mara and encountered on a planet called Deva where it takes over Tegan through the sound of wind chimes (used in Buddhist meditation). The names of its victims (Dukkha, Panna, Karuna, Anatta, Anicca and Tanha) all derive from Buddhist concepts and the Doctor uses meditation in order to work out how to defeat the thing.
** In the TV Movie, the regeneration-transfer-machine the Master straps the Doctor into looks an awful lot like a crucifix and crown of thorns. His companion is called 'Grace' and the Master takes the form of a snake. The Doctor comes back from the dead barefoot, wrapped in a white robe with long hair flowing over his shoulders. His TARDIS looks like a cathedral. None of it is subtle. WordOfGod says the crown was not designed to be a symbol, nor was the Doctor's regeneration intended to be symbolic.

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** The main villain in "City "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E2CityOfDeath City of Death" Death]]" was originally called Sephiroth, with other characters named after the individual Sephiroth also appearing and representing aspects of him. None of this has anything to do with the plot, which was probably why those characters were excised and the character was renamed Scaroth in the final version.
** "Meglos" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E2Meglos Meglos]]" features a Dodecahedron, a reference to the Platonic solid that formed the basis for quintessence or ether (the perfect element from which Aristotle suggested the stars were made from). Nothing else in the plot has anything to do with this, though.
** "Logopolis"."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E7Logopolis Logopolis]]". Programmers who use code to hold the universe together are portrayed as chanting monks in a monastery, the Doctor is followed by an apparition who seems like both a revenant and a guardian angel. There is a distinctly Tarotic vibe with a Tower, a Hanged Man, a Judgement and arguably a King of Wands. The constellation Cassiopeia, named for a monarch turned upside down for vanity, is significant in the climax in which the Doctor dies and is resurrected in an inverted and diminished form. There are whole books dedicated to puzzling out what the symbolism in this one means, such as Philip Sandifer's ''Recursive Occlusion'' (an explicitly occultist reading).
** There's also a ton of meaningless Buddhism allusions in "Kinda" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS19E3Kinda Kinda]]" and "Snakedance"."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E2Snakedance Snakedance]]". The monster is called the Mara and encountered on a planet called Deva where it takes over Tegan through the sound of wind chimes (used in Buddhist meditation). The names of its victims (Dukkha, Panna, Karuna, Anatta, Anicca and Tanha) all derive from Buddhist concepts and the Doctor uses meditation in order to work out how to defeat the thing.
** In the [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie The TV Movie, Movie]], the regeneration-transfer-machine the Master straps the Doctor into looks an awful lot like a crucifix and crown of thorns. His companion is called 'Grace' "Grace" and the Master takes the form of a snake. The Doctor comes back from the dead barefoot, wrapped in a white robe with long hair flowing over his shoulders. His TARDIS looks like a cathedral. None of it is subtle. WordOfGod says the crown was not designed to be a symbol, nor was the Doctor's regeneration intended to be symbolic.



** Also of note is the scene in the Christmas special "Voyage of the Damned" with the Doctor being carried upwards by the "hosts" which are designed to look like biblical angels. This scene has been openly criticized by some religious authorities, but there are also people encouraging teachers to use it as an example of resurrection imagery in Religious Studies classes.
** Rather nice moment in "Smith and Jones". Barefoot Doctor just been resurrected, carrying Martha Jones in his arms through a hospital as it starts raining. That must mean something, but ''sodomy non sapiens''.
** In-universe example in "Let's Kill Hitler":

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** Also of note is the scene in the Christmas special "Voyage "[[Recap/DoctorWho2007CSVoyageOfTheDamned Voyage of the Damned" Damned]]" with the Doctor being carried upwards by the "hosts" which are designed to look like biblical angels. This scene has been openly criticized by some religious authorities, but there are also people encouraging teachers to use it as an example of resurrection imagery in Religious Studies classes.
** Rather nice moment in "Smith "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones Smith and Jones".Jones]]". Barefoot Doctor just been resurrected, carrying Martha Jones in his arms through a hospital as it starts raining. That must mean something, but ''sodomy non sapiens''.
** In-universe example in "Let's "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler":Hitler]]":



* The guy with the cheese slices in the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Restless." When asked about what he represented, Creator/JossWhedon said he was inserted specifically to be a meaningless element of a densely symbolic episode.

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* The guy with the cheese slices in the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Restless." "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS4E22Restless}} Restless]]". When asked about what he represented, Creator/JossWhedon said he was inserted specifically to be a meaningless element of a densely symbolic episode.
3rd Aug '17 9:58:32 AM GrammarNavi
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** There is also [[spoiler: [[AceCombat6 Talisman's]]]] cutie mark - a pair of angelic wings.

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** There is also [[spoiler: [[AceCombat6 [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation Talisman's]]]] cutie mark - a pair of angelic wings.
30th Jul '17 2:15:06 AM Piterpicher
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* ''Literature/TheConfidenceMan'' is considered by some to be the first Postmoderist book, written by HermanMelville in the 1800's. Mostly it was a social satire, but his own views on [[MoralityTropes morality]], [[ReligionTropes religion]], and the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism were in there through ridiculous amounts of religious symbolism. The GainaxEnding makes it so open to interpretation that scholars have been mulling over the meaning since it was first published. Just from one introduction, about the book's symbolism, most authorities trace the origin of All Fools' Day to a Hindu vernal celebration, a masquerade called Huli... The avatars of the Confidence man are avatara, that is, successive incarnations of the Hindu god of salvation, Vishnu. The first major avatar of Vishnu is as a fish who recovers the lost sacred books; the first avatar of the Confidence man is an "Odd fish!" who brings to the world injuctions from The Bible. The second avatar is a tortoise who upholds the world; the second avatar of the Confidence man is a "grotesque" man who slowly stumps around, lives "all 'long shore" and holds his symbolic "coal-sifter of a tambourine" high above his head. After this comes eight other major avatars and innumerable minor ones; the Guinea avatar lists eight other men and innumerable minor ones... The teachings of Buddha aimed for nirvana, which means the extinguishing of a flame or lamp. According to Hindus, Buddha was Vishnu incarnate as a deceiver, leading his enemies into spiritual darkness. The last avatar of the Confidence man, the Cosmpolitan, finally extinguishes the solar lamp and leads man into ensuing darkness.

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* ''Literature/TheConfidenceMan'' is considered by some to be the first Postmoderist book, written by HermanMelville Creator/HermanMelville in the 1800's. Mostly it was a social satire, but his own views on [[MoralityTropes morality]], [[ReligionTropes religion]], and the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism were in there through ridiculous amounts of religious symbolism. The GainaxEnding makes it so open to interpretation that scholars have been mulling over the meaning since it was first published. Just from one introduction, about the book's symbolism, most authorities trace the origin of All Fools' Day to a Hindu vernal celebration, a masquerade called Huli... The avatars of the Confidence man are avatara, that is, successive incarnations of the Hindu god of salvation, Vishnu. The first major avatar of Vishnu is as a fish who recovers the lost sacred books; the first avatar of the Confidence man is an "Odd fish!" who brings to the world injuctions from The Bible. The second avatar is a tortoise who upholds the world; the second avatar of the Confidence man is a "grotesque" man who slowly stumps around, lives "all 'long shore" and holds his symbolic "coal-sifter of a tambourine" high above his head. After this comes eight other major avatars and innumerable minor ones; the Guinea avatar lists eight other men and innumerable minor ones... The teachings of Buddha aimed for nirvana, which means the extinguishing of a flame or lamp. According to Hindus, Buddha was Vishnu incarnate as a deceiver, leading his enemies into spiritual darkness. The last avatar of the Confidence man, the Cosmpolitan, finally extinguishes the solar lamp and leads man into ensuing darkness.
29th Jul '17 11:01:47 AM TrevMUN
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** ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a rare example of a game that uses Aryan--no, not ''[[ThoseWacklyNazis that]]'' Aryan--symbolism, with Hindu filling the gaps. From your ultimate goal being Nirvana, after you pass through Muladhara, Svadisthana, Manipura, Anahata, a few side dungeons, Ajna, and Sahasrara, to fighting Ravana, the Junkyard is practically made of (seemingly) random Hindu symbolism. And this being a ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' game, you kill God, who happens to be Brahman in this reincarnation.

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** ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a rare example of a game that uses Aryan--no, not ''[[ThoseWacklyNazis ''[[ThoseWackyNazis that]]'' Aryan--symbolism, with Hindu filling the gaps. From your ultimate goal being Nirvana, after you pass through Muladhara, Svadisthana, Manipura, Anahata, a few side dungeons, Ajna, and Sahasrara, to fighting Ravana, the Junkyard is practically made of (seemingly) random Hindu symbolism. And this being a ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' game, you kill God, who happens to be Brahman in this reincarnation.
29th Jul '17 10:37:45 AM TrevMUN
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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' Part 3 introduced Stands, spiritual entities named after tarot cards. Few of them have anything in common with their namesakes, the author's {{handwave}}s nonwithstanding. For example, Tower of Gray is a superfast fly, so named because it brings calamity; Death 13 is a dream-controlling Stand named only because it ''looks'' like TheGrimReaper (while the actual card, ironically, does ''not''), The Emperor is a handgun, and The Empress is a sentient wart which [[BodyHorror grows on its victim]]. About the only Stand that was really accurate was The Sun, a miniature sun. But, there weren't enough Tarot cards to have all the requisite [[MonsterOfTheWeek enemy Stand users]], so the author started naming them after similarly unrelated Egyptian gods. See Horus, an ice Stand named after the sun god. When the author ran out of ''those'' he decided to just name them after bands, and has continued to do so throughout parts 4, 5, 6, and 7, though even those can be sort of wonky at times, such as Super Fly, the tower Stand.

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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' Part 3 introduced Stands, spiritual entities named after tarot cards. Few of them have anything in common with their namesakes, the author's {{handwave}}s nonwithstanding.notwithstanding. For example, Tower of Gray is a superfast fly, so named because it brings calamity; Death 13 is a dream-controlling Stand named only because it ''looks'' like TheGrimReaper (while the actual card, ironically, does ''not''), The Emperor is a handgun, and The Empress is a sentient wart which [[BodyHorror grows on its victim]]. About the only Stand that was really accurate was The Sun, a miniature sun. But, there weren't enough Tarot cards to have all the requisite [[MonsterOfTheWeek enemy Stand users]], so the author started naming them after similarly unrelated Egyptian gods. See Horus, an ice Stand named after the sun god. When the author ran out of ''those'' he decided to just name them after bands, and has continued to do so throughout parts 4, 5, 6, and 7, though even those can be sort of wonky at times, such as Super Fly, the tower Stand.



* In ''Manga/HaruhiChan'', Haruhi (with Kyon's aid) ties Mikuru to a cross and decorates her with balloons. This is an obvious reference to Haruhi's nature as [[EldritchAbomination God]], and thus the Crucifiction of Mikuru shows Her love for the world in that she would sacrifice her favourite [[TheWoobie chew]]-[[BlackComedyRape toy]] for... no, I am just making it up here. It certainly means ''something,'' though. As far as Kyon and Haruhi knew Mikuru was dead before she was tied to the cross ([[RuleOfFunny despite the fact that she was begging them to take her down the entire time]]), so it doesn't involve her being a sacrifice of any sort.

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* In ''Manga/HaruhiChan'', Haruhi (with Kyon's aid) ties Mikuru to a cross and decorates her with balloons. This is an obvious reference to Haruhi's nature as [[EldritchAbomination God]], and thus the Crucifiction Crucifixion of Mikuru shows Her love for the world in that she would sacrifice her favourite [[TheWoobie chew]]-[[BlackComedyRape toy]] for... no, I am just making it up here. It certainly means ''something,'' though. As far as Kyon and Haruhi knew Mikuru was dead before she was tied to the cross ([[RuleOfFunny despite the fact that she was begging them to take her down the entire time]]), so it doesn't involve her being a sacrifice of any sort.



* In the DVD extras for ''Anime/EurekaSeven'', voice actor Crispin Freeman discusses how the names of the main HumongousMecha and its associated AppliedPhlebotinum are derived from Buddhist mythology, as well as the series' references to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Bough The Golden Bough]].

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* In the DVD extras for ''Anime/EurekaSeven'', voice actor Crispin Freeman discusses how the names of the main HumongousMecha and its associated AppliedPhlebotinum are derived from Buddhist mythology, Buddhism, as well as the series' references to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Bough The Golden Bough]].



* ''Anime/TheBigO'' has giant kaiju-like artificial constructs named for the Biblical Leviathan and Behemoth - in addition, it's theorized that Big O corresponds to Behemoth, Big Fau to Leviathan, and Big Duo to the Ziz, rounding out the trio of legendary beasts from Jewish mythology. Sure enough, pamphlet copies of William Blake's painting of Behemoth and Leviathan are mysteriously dropped onto the city at one point.
* ''Anime/FafnerInTheAzureDeadAggressor'' outdoes its rivals with twice the pointless mythology: meaningless German myth for the heroes (see: Fafner), and vague Egyptian-ness for the villains.

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* ''Anime/TheBigO'' has giant kaiju-like artificial constructs named for the Biblical Leviathan and Behemoth - in Behemoth--in addition, it's theorized that Big O corresponds to Behemoth, Big Fau to Leviathan, and Big Duo to the Ziz, rounding out the trio of legendary beasts from Jewish mythology.trio. Sure enough, pamphlet copies of William Blake's painting of Behemoth and Leviathan are mysteriously dropped onto the city at one point.
* ''Anime/FafnerInTheAzureDeadAggressor'' outdoes its rivals with twice the doubles down on pointless mythology: meaningless German myth for the references, with heroes sporting a Germanic/Nore flavor (see: Fafner), and vague Egyptian-ness for the villains.



* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' as a whole is chockfull of symbolism. The symbolism of the [[Manga/SailorMoon manga]] carries over to the [[Anime/SailorMoon anime]]. "The Messiah" is used as an allegory meant to illustrate the dichotomy of destruction and creation as embodied by Sailor Moon and Sailor Saturn; the "Messiahs" as it were. Hotaru even reads from William Butler Yeats' The Second Coming to foreshadow Saturn's return during the fourth arc of the manga. Add to that Naoko's more [[http://writelvin.tumblr.com/post/44035651394/fukufashion-william-blake-super-sailor-moon more subtle use of symbolism]] and the fact that Sailor Moon R, S, and Super S were directed by [[Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena Ikuhara]] and there's plenty of room to make a case for meaning.

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* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' as a whole is chockfull chock-full of symbolism. The symbolism of the [[Manga/SailorMoon manga]] carries over to the [[Anime/SailorMoon anime]]. "The Messiah" is used as an allegory meant to illustrate the dichotomy of destruction and creation as embodied by Sailor Moon and Sailor Saturn; the "Messiahs" as it were. Hotaru even reads from William Butler Yeats' The Second Coming to foreshadow Saturn's return during the fourth arc of the manga. Add to that Naoko's more [[http://writelvin.tumblr.com/post/44035651394/fukufashion-william-blake-super-sailor-moon more subtle use of symbolism]] and the fact that Sailor Moon R, S, and Super S were directed by [[Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena Ikuhara]] and there's plenty of room to make a case for meaning.



** The Mangekyou Sharingan techniques which Itachi is normally seen employing (Amaterasu, Tsukuyomi, and Susanno'o) are named for three of the principle Shinto gods. Itachi is often linked with divinity throughout the course of the manga; he frequently performs jutsu which involve crows in some capacity. The Yatagarasu (the-three legged crow which is messenger of the Gods, the creature which stopped a demon from swallowing the sun, and which led Emperor Jimmu to Japan) could be linked. Just as the Gods used the Yatagarasu to carry out their will, so too does Itachi. And then there's the battle between Itachi and Orochimaru which seems to echo the Shinto myth about the eight-headed snake, Yamata no Orochi, which was destroyed by the God Susanno'o. All of this is probably unsurprising, as Kishimoto apparently once said that he'd created Itachi with the premise that he was exploring what a God would be like as a human.

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** The Mangekyou Sharingan techniques which Itachi is normally seen employing (Amaterasu, Tsukuyomi, and Susanno'o) are named for three of the principle Shinto gods. Itachi is often linked with divinity throughout the course of the manga; he frequently performs jutsu which involve crows in some capacity. The Yatagarasu (the-three legged crow which is messenger of the Gods, the creature which stopped a demon from swallowing the sun, and which led Emperor Jimmu to Japan) could be linked. Just as the Gods used the Yatagarasu to carry out their will, so too does Itachi. And then there's the battle between Itachi and Orochimaru which seems to echo the Shinto myth tale about the eight-headed snake, Yamata no Orochi, which was destroyed by the God Susanno'o. All of this is probably unsurprising, as Kishimoto apparently once said that he'd created Itachi with the premise that he was exploring what a God would be like as a human.



* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' is known for weird names in the UC era, but ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 Gundam 00]]'' takes symbolism to the far end. The Innovators is an example... Ribons Devine Almark Hilling Care Regene Revive Tieria Erde, Bring Anew Stability which when you look at it in one way: Reborn Divine Angel's Healing Care Regenerates and Revives the Green Earth, Bringing Anew Stability. Some of the names of the mecha themselves: [[OurAngelsAreDifferent Seraphim, Throne, Cherubim, Virtue]], etc.

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* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' is known for weird names in the UC era, but ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 Gundam 00]]'' takes symbolism to the far end. The Innovators is an example... Ribons example--Ribons Devine Almark Hilling Care Regene Revive Tieria Erde, Bring Anew Stability which when you look at it in one way: Reborn Divine Angel's Healing Care Regenerates and Revives the Green Earth, Bringing Anew Stability. Some of the names of the mecha themselves: [[OurAngelsAreDifferent Seraphim, Throne, Cherubim, Virtue]], etc.



* ''Manga/ChronoCrusade'' teeters back and forth on the "significant/insignificant" line. The series ''is'' about [[NaughtyNuns a nun]] that [[ChurchMilitant hunts demons]], so a lot of the religious symbolism is justified. But some moments push it, ''particularly'' in the anime. For example, after Chrono is badly injured in a battle and caught up in an explosion, Father Remington finds him buried in rubble marked by two steel beams welded together in the shape of a cross.

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* ''Manga/ChronoCrusade'' teeters back and forth on the "significant/insignificant" line. The series ''is'' about [[NaughtyNuns a nun]] that [[ChurchMilitant hunts demons]], so a lot of the religious symbolism is justified. But Yet some moments push it, ''particularly'' in the anime. For example, after Chrono is badly injured in a battle and caught up in an explosion, Father Remington finds him buried in rubble marked by two steel beams welded together in the shape of a cross.



** Also it is absolutely subverted by marking the homunculi with the Ouroboros symbol. (that thing itself is 1st: symbol for the alchemic process and the circle of life and death, process and product, etc. etc... - and thus a symbol for the Philosopher's stone. 'specially mean towards [[spoiler: Envy]]. Who in the first movie ended up [[spoiler: being a friggin big snake/dragon forced to lie in a circle, nose at his tail]]. Mean.

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** Also it is absolutely subverted by marking the homunculi with the Ouroboros symbol. (that thing itself is 1st: symbol for the alchemic alchemical process and the circle of life and death, process and product, etc. etc... - and thus Thus, a symbol for the Philosopher's stone. 'specially 'Specially mean towards [[spoiler: Envy]]. Who in the first movie ended up [[spoiler: being a friggin big snake/dragon forced to lie in a circle, nose at his tail]]. Mean.



** Other examples would be the Acolytes, Exodus and Joseph[[note]]who was, to be fair, named in-universe by a Catholic nun[[/note]]. But this type of thing had been going on since the 1960s when you had Professor Charles Xavier (the name of a Catholic saint, made even more blatant when they added the middle name Francis), the original X-Man Angel (the name "Beast" presumably is only coincidentally reminiscent of the Book of Revelation), and villains Juggernaut (who gets a Hindu-Judaeo-Christian trifecta as his civilian name is Cain and he is Professor X's step-brother) and Lucifer. In the 1970s and 1980s there would also be two characters called Ariel, the Hellfire Club, Jubilee, two Thunderbirds (Amerindian mythology), Karma, Nimrod, Rachel, and Legion. And names from Graeco-Roman mythology like Cyclops, Proteus and Callisto.

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** Other examples would be the Acolytes, Exodus and Joseph[[note]]who was, to be fair, named in-universe by a Catholic nun[[/note]]. But this type of thing had been going on since the 1960s when you had Professor Charles Xavier (the name of a Catholic saint, made even more blatant when they added the middle name Francis), the original X-Man Angel (the name "Beast" presumably is only coincidentally reminiscent of the Book of Revelation), and villains Juggernaut (who gets a Hindu-Judaeo-Christian trifecta as his civilian name is Cain and he is Professor X's step-brother) and Lucifer. In the 1970s and 1980s there would also be two characters called Ariel, the Hellfire Club, Jubilee, two Thunderbirds (Amerindian mythology), (of Amerindian fame), Karma, Nimrod, Rachel, and Legion. And names from Graeco-Roman mythology like Cyclops, Proteus and Callisto.



* Mark Z. Danielewski's ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'' is chock-full of religious and mythological symbolism, some of it seemingly irrelevant. The most obvious allusions are to the Greek myth of the Labyrinth and the Minotaur because of the nature of the [[color:blue:house]], but other mythologies and religions have their place. For instance, Will Navidson's injuries mirror similar injuries sustained by figures in Norse mythology: Odin lost an eye, Tyr lost a hand, and Heimdall lost his hearing, which are similar to [[spoiler:the one blind eye, the frostbitten (and rendered useless) hand, and the lost ear]] he ends up with. The [[color:blue:house]] is located on Ash Tree Lane, and the [[TheWorldTree world-tree Yggdrasil]] is said to have been a giant ash tree. Danielewski doesn't stop at Greek and Norse mythology, but to list them all here would take up too much space.

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* Mark Z. Danielewski's ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves'' is chock-full of religious and mythological symbolism, some of it seemingly irrelevant. The most obvious allusions are to the Greek myth of the Labyrinth and the Minotaur because of the nature of the [[color:blue:house]], but other mythologies and religions have their place. For instance, Will Navidson's injuries mirror similar injuries sustained by figures in Norse mythology: Odin lost an eye, Tyr lost a hand, and Heimdall lost his hearing, which are similar to [[spoiler:the one blind eye, the frostbitten (and rendered useless) hand, and the lost ear]] he ends up with. The [[color:blue:house]] is located on Ash Tree Lane, and the [[TheWorldTree world-tree Yggdrasil]] is said to have been a giant ash tree. Danielewski doesn't stop at Greek and Norse mythology, but to list them all here would take up too much space.



* Done deliberately in ''Literature/EndersGame'' with the mind game imagery. While much of it is drawn from various mythologies, and much of it makes sense in itself, taken as a whole it's incoherent. WordOfGod [[http://www.hatrack.com/research/questions/q0022.shtml explains:]]

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* Done deliberately in ''Literature/EndersGame'' with the mind game imagery. While much of it is drawn from various mythologies, sources, and much of it makes sense in itself, taken as a whole it's incoherent. WordOfGod [[http://www.hatrack.com/research/questions/q0022.shtml explains:]]



** "The Ark in Space" has continual references to Judeo-Christian mythology - an Ark led by a man referred to as "Noah", the Doctor talking about how the HumanPopsicle passengers are 'the entire human race awaiting the trumpet blast' and obliquely referencing Doomsday prophet Nostradamus, lots of white outfits and coffins, the Doctor subtly namechecking the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in his PatrickStewartSpeech, and a dash of MessianicArchetype symbolism in that the Doctor is bringing chosen people back to life. It may mean something, or may also just be a story about parasitic space wasps.
** Several Dalek stories from the mid-70s onwards use terms from Christianity in the title - "Genesis of the Daleks", "Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation of the Daleks" and "Remembrance of the Daleks". Whether any of these mean anything symbolic is debatable and at least one doesn't even have a literal example of the word in its title in it ("Revelation").

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** "The Ark in Space" has continual references to Judeo-Christian mythology - the Bible: an Ark led by a man referred to as "Noah", the Doctor talking about how the HumanPopsicle passengers are 'the entire human race awaiting the trumpet blast' and obliquely referencing Doomsday prophet Nostradamus, lots of white outfits and coffins, the Doctor subtly namechecking the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in his PatrickStewartSpeech, and a dash of MessianicArchetype symbolism in that the Doctor is bringing chosen people back to life. It may mean something, or may also just be a story about parasitic space wasps.
** Several Dalek stories from the mid-70s onwards use terms from Christianity in the title - title: "Genesis of the Daleks", "Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation of the Daleks" and "Remembrance of the Daleks". Whether any of these mean anything symbolic is debatable and at least one doesn't even have a literal example of the word in its title in it ("Revelation").



** Most of the Elshadoll are named after concepts in Jewish mythology.

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** Most of the Elshadoll are named after concepts in Jewish mythology.Judaism--heck, even the name "Elshadoll" is a play on ''El Shaddai'', one of the names of God of Israel.



* The ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series in general loves to avert this trope. Players recruit demons, gods and spirits from a wide variety of world religions present and past; in the mainline series, you end up siding with God, Lucifer or neither. In between, there's about as much rampant religious imagery as you might imagine. Psychological symbolism and allusions are also tossed about willy-nilly in the ''Persona'' series (starting with the name). Despite the basis of the franchise being drawing from every mythology imaginable, the symbolism is usually well thought out and relevant to the plot.
** ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a rare example of a game that uses Hindu symbolism and mythology. From your ultimate goal being Nirvana, after you pass through Muladhara, Svadisthana, Manipura, Anahata, a few side dungeons, Ajna, and Sahasrara, to fighting Ravana, the Junkyard is practically made of random Hindu symbolism. And this being a ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' game, you kill God, who happens to be Brahman in this reincarnation.
*** It's a bit more complicated than that. It's actually supposed to be random '''Aryan''' (no, not [[ThoseWackyNazis that way]]) symbolism, but because we don't actually know a lot about Aryan mythology, they use Hinduism to fill in the gaps -- it's the closest surviving religion.
*** Well, it's not particularly random. The reason all of it's there is sort of explained as the Asura forms of people being based on who they are and blah blah blah. There's a reason for everything... ish. (there isn't any real reason for Seth and Satan to be in 2 other than for the heck of it)

to:

* The ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series in general loves to avert this trope. Players recruit demons, gods and spirits from a wide variety of world religions present and past; in the mainline series, you end up siding with God, Lucifer or neither. In between, there's about as much rampant religious imagery as you might imagine. Psychological symbolism and allusions are also tossed about willy-nilly in the ''Persona'' series (starting with the name). Despite the basis of the franchise being drawing from every religion, legend, and mythology imaginable, the symbolism is usually well thought out and relevant to the plot.
** ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a rare example of a game that uses Aryan--no, not ''[[ThoseWacklyNazis that]]'' Aryan--symbolism, with Hindu symbolism and mythology. filling the gaps. From your ultimate goal being Nirvana, after you pass through Muladhara, Svadisthana, Manipura, Anahata, a few side dungeons, Ajna, and Sahasrara, to fighting Ravana, the Junkyard is practically made of (seemingly) random Hindu symbolism. And this being a ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' game, you kill God, who happens to be Brahman in this reincarnation.
*** It's a bit more complicated than that. It's actually supposed to be random '''Aryan''' (no, not [[ThoseWackyNazis that way]]) symbolism, but because we don't actually know a lot about Aryan mythology, they use Hinduism to fill in the gaps -- it's the closest surviving religion.
*** Well, it's not particularly random. The reason all of it's there is sort of explained as the Asura forms of people being based on who they are and blah blah blah. There's a reason for everything... ish. (there isn't any real reason for Seth and Satan to be in 2 other than for the heck of it)
reincarnation.



* Like some earlier examples, ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' has a lot of mythological names for things, particularly places given names from Norse mythology, most of which have little or no connection to the things they're named for. There are a couple of exceptions, though.

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* Like some earlier examples, ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'' has uses a lot of mythological names for things, symbolism, particularly places given names from in reference to Norse mythology, most lore, for place-names and other things. Most of which these references have little or no connection to the things they're named for.do with their source. There are a couple of exceptions, though.



* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' has many references to various mythologies and legends.

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* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' has many references to various mythologies religions, literary works, legends, and legends.mythologies. ''Literature/DantesInferno'' is a favorite: Dante was named after Dante Alighieri, after all, and Vergil was named after Publius Vergilius Maro.



** The whole third game is a reimagining of Dante's Inferno. For example, the third level has Dante fight Cerberus... and who guards the third circle of hell?
** It makes sense, as Dante was named after Dante Alighieri, and Vergil was named after Publius Vergilius Maro.

to:

** The whole third game is a reimagining of Dante's Inferno. For example, the third level has Dante fight Cerberus... and Cerberus--and who guards the third circle of hell?
** It makes sense, as Dante was named after Dante Alighieri, and Vergil was named after Publius Vergilius Maro.
hell?



* Parodied in ''VisualNovel/HatofulBoyfriend'' where the character [[AwesomeMcCoolname Anghel Higure]] (his last name being spelled in the Japanese version with two kanji both meaning 'red') who screams all the time about being a FallenAngel, the reincarnation of the Crimson Angel of Judecca and a Servant of God born whose destiny is to battle Demon Spores. He is actually the notorious school eccentric Akagi Yoshio, and he's a member of the Manga Club - and when the player enters his fantasy world, it's just a turn-based (and outrageously cheesy) JRPG, implying he's just a DaydreamBeliever who is into media containing Faux Symbolism rather than an actual believer in angels... although delving into the Latin he uses [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane casts some doubt on this]].

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* Parodied in ''VisualNovel/HatofulBoyfriend'' where the character [[AwesomeMcCoolname Anghel Higure]] (his last name being spelled in the Japanese version with two kanji both meaning 'red') who screams all the time about being a FallenAngel, the reincarnation of the Crimson Angel of Judecca and a Servant of God born whose destiny is to battle Demon Spores. He is actually the notorious school eccentric Akagi Yoshio, and he's a member of the Manga Club - and Club--and when the player enters his fantasy world, it's just a turn-based (and outrageously cheesy) JRPG, implying he's just a DaydreamBeliever who is into media containing Faux Symbolism rather than an actual believer in angels... although delving into the Latin he uses [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane casts some doubt on this]].
25th Jul '17 6:35:35 PM nombretomado
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* In ''Series/TheSopranos'', the [[ShowWithinAShow Film Within a Show]] ''Film/{{Cleaver}}'' invokes this trope; for no real reason the movie closes on a close-up shot of a crucifix and a cornicello (a Southern Italian talisman in the shape of a little horn), to (in the words of [[{{Malaproper}} Little Carmine]]) "juxtapose the sacred and the propane [sic]". Why ''Cleaver'', a [[XMeetsY Mob movie meets paranormal flick meets revenge film]], might need this is anybody's guess.

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* In ''Series/TheSopranos'', the [[ShowWithinAShow Film Within a Show]] ''Film/{{Cleaver}}'' invokes this trope; for no real reason the movie closes on a close-up shot of a crucifix and a cornicello (a Southern Italian talisman in the shape of a little horn), to (in the words of [[{{Malaproper}} Little Carmine]]) "juxtapose the sacred and the propane [sic]". Why ''Cleaver'', a [[XMeetsY [[JustForFun/XMeetsY Mob movie meets paranormal flick meets revenge film]], might need this is anybody's guess.
21st May '17 12:40:42 PM nombretomado
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* Samuel Beckett intentionally wrote ''WaitingForGodot'' with false symbolism and no discernable plot just to piss off literary critics who had [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory overanalyzed his previous works]]. [[InvokedTrope His characters even talk about]] [[LampshadeHanging having no clue what is going on]].

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* Samuel Beckett intentionally wrote ''WaitingForGodot'' ''Theatre/WaitingForGodot'' with false symbolism and no discernable plot just to piss off literary critics who had [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory overanalyzed his previous works]]. [[InvokedTrope His characters even talk about]] [[LampshadeHanging having no clue what is going on]].
16th May '17 4:31:43 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/IKnowWhoKilledMe'', which with its strange "symbols" (persistent use of the colors blue and red, an animated heart tattoo, an owl on a tree branch) made the already ridiculous premise even more insane and inane. Also, a lot of these motifs had [[TwinPeaks already been done before, and better.]]

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* ''Film/IKnowWhoKilledMe'', which with its strange "symbols" (persistent use of the colors blue and red, an animated heart tattoo, an owl on a tree branch) made the already ridiculous premise even more insane and inane. Also, a lot of these motifs had [[TwinPeaks [[Series/TwinPeaks already been done before, and better.]]
13th May '17 12:15:18 PM nombretomado
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* ''LuminousArc2'' has an interesting case with Mage Queen Elicia, whose witch title in Japanese is called "Holy Mother" and her outfit is very similar to her herself. Averted in English, which changed to Dark Queen instead.

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* ''LuminousArc2'' ''VideoGame/LuminousArc2'' has an interesting case with Mage Queen Elicia, whose witch title in Japanese is called "Holy Mother" and her outfit is very similar to her herself. Averted in English, which changed to Dark Queen instead.
3rd May '17 4:53:05 PM ThatDerp1
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* The boar hunt and the final shots of Tsurumaru in Creator/AkiraKurosawa's ''Film/{{Ran}}''.

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* The boar hunt and the final shots of Tsurumaru in Creator/AkiraKurosawa's ''Creator/AkiraKurosawa's ''Film/{{Ran}}''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FauxSymbolism