History Main / FauxSymbolism

16th Sep '17 5:50:16 PM nombretomado
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* Sent up fairly often in surreal anime parody ''PerfectHairForever''. One episode has crucified clowns in the forest for no real reason. It's also lampshaded: ''I wish these hot dogs and cats were not symbolic of anything, and this was all just a dumb anime mind'''''[[SoundEffectBleep *EFF*]]'''

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* Sent up fairly often in surreal anime parody ''PerfectHairForever''.''WesternAnimation/PerfectHairForever''. One episode has crucified clowns in the forest for no real reason. It's also lampshaded: ''I wish these hot dogs and cats were not symbolic of anything, and this was all just a dumb anime mind'''''[[SoundEffectBleep *EFF*]]'''
5th Sep '17 5:29:54 PM Peteman
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* ''Film/SouthlandTales'' is absolutely notorious [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible for]] [[CrucifiedHeroShot pulling]] [[ArcWords just]] [[ReferenceOverdosed about]] [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory every]] [[AsTheGoodBookSays tactic]] [[RuleOfSymbolism imaginable]] to try to convince the viewer that it's ''so'' "deep and profound." Listing every single instance would probably more than double this page in length, but when a movie is trying to make [[{{Narm}} "Pimps Don't Commit Suicide"]] sound like a profound statement with ''utter sincerity,'' you know it's being hit with this trope '''hard.'''

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* ''Film/SouthlandTales'' is absolutely notorious [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible for]] [[CrucifiedHeroShot pulling]] [[ArcWords just]] [[ReferenceOverdosed about]] [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory every]] [[AsTheGoodBookSays tactic]] [[RuleOfSymbolism imaginable]] to try to convince the viewer that it's ''so'' "deep and profound." Listing every single instance would probably more than double this page in length, but when a movie is trying to make [[{{Narm}} "Pimps Don't Commit Suicide"]] sound like a profound statement with ''utter sincerity,'' you know it's being hit with this trope '''hard.'''trope.
4th Sep '17 5:03:07 AM v-n-n-n-n
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* Lampshaded by Creator/StewartLee in his ''Comedy Vehicle'' series. when asked by Creator/ChrisMorris what he meant by a line in his standup routine, that the £200 million London skyscraper which melted a £50,000 Jaguar was a 'superb' piece of 'heavy-handed satire'. Lee admitted that he didn't know what he meant by it and he only said it because it sounded clever, then going on to say that those who laughed at the line done so 'in an attempt to pass themselves off as "clever"'.
28th Aug '17 6:19:02 AM intastiel
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* In ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'', the Winchesters realize that an alleged "Hell House" was staged when they see that the occult symbolism scrawled on its walls includes a Music/BlueOysterCult logo. Unfortunately for the pranksters who did it, one sigil was authentic enough to start generating a {{Tulpa}} anyway...
24th Aug '17 2:10:04 AM Silverblade2
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* At the beginning of ''[[Franchise/{{Batman}} Detective Comics]]'' Issue #64 "[[http://cacb.wordpress.com/2008/11/22/the-joker-walks-the-last-mile/ The Joker Walks the Last Mile]]", SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker discusses his master plan of putting his JokerImmunity to the test with his {{mooks}} to have them make sure they follow his instructions, exclaiming that "The Joker shall die so that he may live again!" Afterwards, being kind of CrazyPrepared, he plays a villainous version of the SacrificialLion by turning himself in to the police and confessing to a long list of crimes (including robbery and murder), resulting in him being given a death sentence and in his execution by the electric chair at the midnight hour. Right after he is declared dead, his mooks quickly retrieve his body from the prison morgue and carry him to a nearby ambulance where they bring him BackFromTheDead with some life serum; once he is revived, he becomes a free man and can no longer die for his same crimes. This is kind of similar to the same plot concerning Jesus' passion and resurrection, except that he had God the Father and his angels at his side in his moments of death.

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* At the beginning of ''[[Franchise/{{Batman}} Detective Comics]]'' Issue #64 "[[http://cacb.wordpress.com/2008/11/22/the-joker-walks-the-last-mile/ The Joker Walks the Last Mile]]", SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker ComicBook/TheJoker discusses his master plan of putting his JokerImmunity to the test with his {{mooks}} to have them make sure they follow his instructions, exclaiming that "The Joker shall die so that he may live again!" Afterwards, being kind of CrazyPrepared, he plays a villainous version of the SacrificialLion by turning himself in to the police and confessing to a long list of crimes (including robbery and murder), resulting in him being given a death sentence and in his execution by the electric chair at the midnight hour. Right after he is declared dead, his mooks quickly retrieve his body from the prison morgue and carry him to a nearby ambulance where they bring him BackFromTheDead with some life serum; once he is revived, he becomes a free man and can no longer die for his same crimes. This is kind of similar to the same plot concerning Jesus' passion and resurrection, except that he had God the Father and his angels at his side in his moments of death.
16th Aug '17 8:34:49 PM justanid
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* Parodied in the ''VideoGame/DungeonFighter'' webcomic ''Arad's Merry Band of Friends'', the party's [[CharacterClassSystem priest]] has a cross-shaped weapon that has no symbolic meaning and is used for [[http://arad.nexon.co.jp/library/comic_view.aspx?no=430 ridiculous functional reasons.]]
12th Aug '17 7:27:05 AM ClintEastwood
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** The 1967 story "The Abominable Snowman" uses most of its Buddhist symbolism reasonably considering it's set in a Buddhist monastery - like paralleling the Doctor's use of time travel to the monks' understanding of astral projection, or how the Doctor teaches Victoria to chant 'om mani padme hum' to resist [[{{Brainwashed}} Brainwashing]]. Not all of it joins up, though - significantly, the main antagonist ([[spoiler: actually just a puppet of the Intelligence]]) is named Padmasambhava, the writer of ''[[TomeOfEldrichLore The Tibetan Book of the Dead]]'', a book known about at the time due to its recent appropriation by Timothy Leary for his [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs writings about LSD]] - making it random drugs symbolism as well as random Buddhist symbolism. It's very unlikely that they would have had a character called [[TheUnpronounceable Padmasambhava]] in the story if it wasn't necessary to the story they were trying to tell, yet neither the drugs nor the religious allusion seems to have any significance.
** "Planet of the Spiders" was written by a practicing Buddhist as an allegory about reincarnation, which makes it bizarre when the villains use "om mani padme hum" as OminousLatinChanting to summon evil space spiders.
** "The Ark in Space" has continual references to the Bible: an Ark led by a man referred to as "Noah", the Doctor talking about how the HumanPopsicle passengers are 'the entire human race awaiting the trumpet blast' and obliquely referencing Doomsday prophet Nostradamus, lots of white outfits and coffins, the Doctor subtly namechecking the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in his PatrickStewartSpeech, and a dash of MessianicArchetype symbolism in that the Doctor is bringing chosen people back to life. It may mean something, or may also just be a story about parasitic space wasps.
** Several Dalek stories from the mid-70s onwards use terms from Christianity in the title: "Genesis of the Daleks", "Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation of the Daleks" and "Remembrance of the Daleks". Whether any of these mean anything symbolic is debatable and at least one doesn't even have a literal example of the word in its title in it ("Revelation").
** "Genesis of the Daleks" is full of this. The title is a reference to a book in the Bible. The Time Lords were originally scripted to appear to the Doctor in a beautiful garden and then cast him out into Skaro (but this was abandoned for budget and DarkerAndEdgier reasons). There are strong themes of temptation, sacrifice and trial. Davros says destroying the universe would 'set him up above the gods' while the Doctor won't save it because he feels he does not have the right to wield that power. Davros is trying to create a race of creatures but prevent them from having knowledge of good and evil; Nyder's MeaningfulName is a play on 'neidr', Welsh for 'snake'. An obvious scene is the sequence where the Doctor tortures Davros, which is done with the Doctor kneeling at Davros's feet and holding his hand (as Davros's hand is the only part of his body he can move) while gazing up at him in a painting-of-a-disciple-like fashion. None of this appears to really mean anything.

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** The 1967 story "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E2TheAbominableSnowmen The Abominable Snowman" Snowmen]]" uses most of its Buddhist symbolism reasonably considering it's set in a Buddhist monastery - like paralleling the Doctor's use of time travel to the monks' understanding of astral projection, or how the Doctor teaches Victoria to chant 'om mani padme hum' to resist [[{{Brainwashed}} Brainwashing]]. Not all of it joins up, though - significantly, the main antagonist ([[spoiler: actually just a puppet of the Intelligence]]) is named Padmasambhava, the writer of ''[[TomeOfEldrichLore The Tibetan Book of the Dead]]'', a book known about at the time due to its recent appropriation by Timothy Leary for his [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs writings about LSD]] - making it random drugs symbolism as well as random Buddhist symbolism. It's very unlikely that they would have had a character called [[TheUnpronounceable Padmasambhava]] in the story if it wasn't necessary to the story they were trying to tell, yet neither the drugs nor the religious allusion seems to have any significance.
** "Planet "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS11E5PlanetOfTheSpiders Planet of the Spiders" Spiders]]" was written by a practicing Buddhist as an allegory about reincarnation, which makes it bizarre when the villains use "om mani padme hum" as OminousLatinChanting to summon evil space spiders.
** "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace The Ark in Space" Space]]" has continual references to the Bible: an Ark led by a man referred to as "Noah", the Doctor talking about how the HumanPopsicle passengers are 'the entire human race awaiting the trumpet blast' and obliquely referencing Doomsday prophet Nostradamus, lots of white outfits and coffins, the Doctor subtly namechecking the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in his PatrickStewartSpeech, and a dash of MessianicArchetype symbolism in that the Doctor is bringing chosen people back to life. It may mean something, or may also just be a story about parasitic space wasps.
** Several Dalek stories from the mid-70s onwards use terms from Christianity in the title: "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks", "Resurrection Daleks]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E4ResurrectionOfTheDaleks Resurrection of the Daleks", "Revelation Daleks]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E6RevelationOfTheDaleks Revelation of the Daleks" Daleks]]" and "Remembrance "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks Remembrance of the Daleks".Daleks]]". Whether any of these mean anything symbolic is debatable and at least one doesn't even have a literal example of the word in its title in it ("Revelation").
** "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks" Daleks]]" is full of this. The title is a reference to a book in the Bible. The Time Lords were originally scripted to appear to the Doctor in a beautiful garden and then cast him out into Skaro (but this was abandoned for budget and DarkerAndEdgier reasons). There are strong themes of temptation, sacrifice and trial. Davros says destroying the universe would 'set him up above the gods' while the Doctor won't save it because he feels he does not have the right to wield that power. Davros is trying to create a race of creatures but prevent them from having knowledge of good and evil; Nyder's MeaningfulName is a play on 'neidr', Welsh for 'snake'. An obvious scene is the sequence where the Doctor tortures Davros, which is done with the Doctor kneeling at Davros's feet and holding his hand (as Davros's hand is the only part of his body he can move) while gazing up at him in a painting-of-a-disciple-like fashion. None of this appears to really mean anything.



** The main villain in "City of Death" was originally called Sephiroth, with other characters named after the individual Sephiroth also appearing and representing aspects of him. None of this has anything to do with the plot, which was probably why those characters were excised and the character was renamed Scaroth in the final version.
** "Meglos" features a Dodecahedron, a reference to the Platonic solid that formed the basis for quintessence or ether (the perfect element from which Aristotle suggested the stars were made from). Nothing else in the plot has anything to do with this, though.
** "Logopolis". Programmers who use code to hold the universe together are portrayed as chanting monks in a monastery, the Doctor is followed by an apparition who seems like both a revenant and a guardian angel. There is a distinctly Tarotic vibe with a Tower, a Hanged Man, a Judgement and arguably a King of Wands. The constellation Cassiopeia, named for a monarch turned upside down for vanity, is significant in the climax in which the Doctor dies and is resurrected in an inverted and diminished form. There are whole books dedicated to puzzling out what the symbolism in this one means, such as Philip Sandifer's ''Recursive Occlusion'' (an explicitly occultist reading).
** There's also a ton of meaningless Buddhism allusions in "Kinda" and "Snakedance". The monster is called the Mara and encountered on a planet called Deva where it takes over Tegan through the sound of wind chimes (used in Buddhist meditation). The names of its victims (Dukkha, Panna, Karuna, Anatta, Anicca and Tanha) all derive from Buddhist concepts and the Doctor uses meditation in order to work out how to defeat the thing.
** In the TV Movie, the regeneration-transfer-machine the Master straps the Doctor into looks an awful lot like a crucifix and crown of thorns. His companion is called 'Grace' and the Master takes the form of a snake. The Doctor comes back from the dead barefoot, wrapped in a white robe with long hair flowing over his shoulders. His TARDIS looks like a cathedral. None of it is subtle. WordOfGod says the crown was not designed to be a symbol, nor was the Doctor's regeneration intended to be symbolic.

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** The main villain in "City "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E2CityOfDeath City of Death" Death]]" was originally called Sephiroth, with other characters named after the individual Sephiroth also appearing and representing aspects of him. None of this has anything to do with the plot, which was probably why those characters were excised and the character was renamed Scaroth in the final version.
** "Meglos" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E2Meglos Meglos]]" features a Dodecahedron, a reference to the Platonic solid that formed the basis for quintessence or ether (the perfect element from which Aristotle suggested the stars were made from). Nothing else in the plot has anything to do with this, though.
** "Logopolis"."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E7Logopolis Logopolis]]". Programmers who use code to hold the universe together are portrayed as chanting monks in a monastery, the Doctor is followed by an apparition who seems like both a revenant and a guardian angel. There is a distinctly Tarotic vibe with a Tower, a Hanged Man, a Judgement and arguably a King of Wands. The constellation Cassiopeia, named for a monarch turned upside down for vanity, is significant in the climax in which the Doctor dies and is resurrected in an inverted and diminished form. There are whole books dedicated to puzzling out what the symbolism in this one means, such as Philip Sandifer's ''Recursive Occlusion'' (an explicitly occultist reading).
** There's also a ton of meaningless Buddhism allusions in "Kinda" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS19E3Kinda Kinda]]" and "Snakedance"."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E2Snakedance Snakedance]]". The monster is called the Mara and encountered on a planet called Deva where it takes over Tegan through the sound of wind chimes (used in Buddhist meditation). The names of its victims (Dukkha, Panna, Karuna, Anatta, Anicca and Tanha) all derive from Buddhist concepts and the Doctor uses meditation in order to work out how to defeat the thing.
** In the [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie The TV Movie, Movie]], the regeneration-transfer-machine the Master straps the Doctor into looks an awful lot like a crucifix and crown of thorns. His companion is called 'Grace' "Grace" and the Master takes the form of a snake. The Doctor comes back from the dead barefoot, wrapped in a white robe with long hair flowing over his shoulders. His TARDIS looks like a cathedral. None of it is subtle. WordOfGod says the crown was not designed to be a symbol, nor was the Doctor's regeneration intended to be symbolic.



** Also of note is the scene in the Christmas special "Voyage of the Damned" with the Doctor being carried upwards by the "hosts" which are designed to look like biblical angels. This scene has been openly criticized by some religious authorities, but there are also people encouraging teachers to use it as an example of resurrection imagery in Religious Studies classes.
** Rather nice moment in "Smith and Jones". Barefoot Doctor just been resurrected, carrying Martha Jones in his arms through a hospital as it starts raining. That must mean something, but ''sodomy non sapiens''.
** In-universe example in "Let's Kill Hitler":

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** Also of note is the scene in the Christmas special "Voyage "[[Recap/DoctorWho2007CSVoyageOfTheDamned Voyage of the Damned" Damned]]" with the Doctor being carried upwards by the "hosts" which are designed to look like biblical angels. This scene has been openly criticized by some religious authorities, but there are also people encouraging teachers to use it as an example of resurrection imagery in Religious Studies classes.
** Rather nice moment in "Smith "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones Smith and Jones".Jones]]". Barefoot Doctor just been resurrected, carrying Martha Jones in his arms through a hospital as it starts raining. That must mean something, but ''sodomy non sapiens''.
** In-universe example in "Let's "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E8LetsKillHitler Let's Kill Hitler":Hitler]]":



* The guy with the cheese slices in the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Restless." When asked about what he represented, Creator/JossWhedon said he was inserted specifically to be a meaningless element of a densely symbolic episode.

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* The guy with the cheese slices in the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Restless." "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS4E22Restless}} Restless]]". When asked about what he represented, Creator/JossWhedon said he was inserted specifically to be a meaningless element of a densely symbolic episode.
3rd Aug '17 9:58:32 AM GrammarNavi
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** There is also [[spoiler: [[AceCombat6 Talisman's]]]] cutie mark - a pair of angelic wings.

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** There is also [[spoiler: [[AceCombat6 [[VideoGame/AceCombat6FiresOfLiberation Talisman's]]]] cutie mark - a pair of angelic wings.
30th Jul '17 2:15:06 AM Piterpicher
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* ''Literature/TheConfidenceMan'' is considered by some to be the first Postmoderist book, written by HermanMelville in the 1800's. Mostly it was a social satire, but his own views on [[MoralityTropes morality]], [[ReligionTropes religion]], and the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism were in there through ridiculous amounts of religious symbolism. The GainaxEnding makes it so open to interpretation that scholars have been mulling over the meaning since it was first published. Just from one introduction, about the book's symbolism, most authorities trace the origin of All Fools' Day to a Hindu vernal celebration, a masquerade called Huli... The avatars of the Confidence man are avatara, that is, successive incarnations of the Hindu god of salvation, Vishnu. The first major avatar of Vishnu is as a fish who recovers the lost sacred books; the first avatar of the Confidence man is an "Odd fish!" who brings to the world injuctions from The Bible. The second avatar is a tortoise who upholds the world; the second avatar of the Confidence man is a "grotesque" man who slowly stumps around, lives "all 'long shore" and holds his symbolic "coal-sifter of a tambourine" high above his head. After this comes eight other major avatars and innumerable minor ones; the Guinea avatar lists eight other men and innumerable minor ones... The teachings of Buddha aimed for nirvana, which means the extinguishing of a flame or lamp. According to Hindus, Buddha was Vishnu incarnate as a deceiver, leading his enemies into spiritual darkness. The last avatar of the Confidence man, the Cosmpolitan, finally extinguishes the solar lamp and leads man into ensuing darkness.

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* ''Literature/TheConfidenceMan'' is considered by some to be the first Postmoderist book, written by HermanMelville Creator/HermanMelville in the 1800's. Mostly it was a social satire, but his own views on [[MoralityTropes morality]], [[ReligionTropes religion]], and the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism were in there through ridiculous amounts of religious symbolism. The GainaxEnding makes it so open to interpretation that scholars have been mulling over the meaning since it was first published. Just from one introduction, about the book's symbolism, most authorities trace the origin of All Fools' Day to a Hindu vernal celebration, a masquerade called Huli... The avatars of the Confidence man are avatara, that is, successive incarnations of the Hindu god of salvation, Vishnu. The first major avatar of Vishnu is as a fish who recovers the lost sacred books; the first avatar of the Confidence man is an "Odd fish!" who brings to the world injuctions from The Bible. The second avatar is a tortoise who upholds the world; the second avatar of the Confidence man is a "grotesque" man who slowly stumps around, lives "all 'long shore" and holds his symbolic "coal-sifter of a tambourine" high above his head. After this comes eight other major avatars and innumerable minor ones; the Guinea avatar lists eight other men and innumerable minor ones... The teachings of Buddha aimed for nirvana, which means the extinguishing of a flame or lamp. According to Hindus, Buddha was Vishnu incarnate as a deceiver, leading his enemies into spiritual darkness. The last avatar of the Confidence man, the Cosmpolitan, finally extinguishes the solar lamp and leads man into ensuing darkness.
29th Jul '17 11:01:47 AM TrevMUN
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** ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a rare example of a game that uses Aryan--no, not ''[[ThoseWacklyNazis that]]'' Aryan--symbolism, with Hindu filling the gaps. From your ultimate goal being Nirvana, after you pass through Muladhara, Svadisthana, Manipura, Anahata, a few side dungeons, Ajna, and Sahasrara, to fighting Ravana, the Junkyard is practically made of (seemingly) random Hindu symbolism. And this being a ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' game, you kill God, who happens to be Brahman in this reincarnation.

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** ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a rare example of a game that uses Aryan--no, not ''[[ThoseWacklyNazis ''[[ThoseWackyNazis that]]'' Aryan--symbolism, with Hindu filling the gaps. From your ultimate goal being Nirvana, after you pass through Muladhara, Svadisthana, Manipura, Anahata, a few side dungeons, Ajna, and Sahasrara, to fighting Ravana, the Junkyard is practically made of (seemingly) random Hindu symbolism. And this being a ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' game, you kill God, who happens to be Brahman in this reincarnation.
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