History Main / ConvictedByPublicOpinion

14th Jun '16 6:47:42 AM meanmetalmario
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Whenever someone is placed in the dock accused of "Crimes Against Humanity", you can be pretty sure this trope is in full effect.

to:

Whenever someone is placed in the dock accused of "Crimes Against Humanity", you can be pretty sure this trope is in full effect.
effect. The same goes for rape, because RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil.
9th May '16 2:53:51 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'', General Garnett considers himself this due to Stonewall Jackson accusing him of cowardice and then dying before Garnett could defend his actions. Because of this, he feels that he has to win a major victory or die trying in order to redeem his honor, which is why he insists on going on Pickett's Charge despite being too ill to walk. In the film adaptation, ''{{Gettysburg}}'', his final scene shows him riding straight towards a loaded cannon.

to:

* In ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'', General Garnett considers himself this due to Stonewall Jackson accusing him of cowardice and then dying before Garnett could defend his actions. Because of this, he feels that he has to win a major victory or die trying in order to redeem his honor, which is why he insists on going on Pickett's Charge despite being too ill to walk. In the film adaptation, ''{{Gettysburg}}'', ''Film/{{Gettysburg}}'', his final scene shows him riding straight towards a loaded cannon.
4th May '16 12:28:33 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''TheKillerAngels'', General Garnett considers himself this due to Stonewall Jackson accusing him of cowardice and then dying before Garnett could defend his actions. Because of this, he feels that he has to win a major victory or die trying in order to redeem his honor, which is why he insists on going on Pickett's Charge despite being too ill to walk. In the film adaptation, ''{{Gettysburg}}'', his final scene shows him riding straight towards a loaded cannon.

to:

* In ''TheKillerAngels'', ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'', General Garnett considers himself this due to Stonewall Jackson accusing him of cowardice and then dying before Garnett could defend his actions. Because of this, he feels that he has to win a major victory or die trying in order to redeem his honor, which is why he insists on going on Pickett's Charge despite being too ill to walk. In the film adaptation, ''{{Gettysburg}}'', his final scene shows him riding straight towards a loaded cannon.
4th May '16 12:19:36 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Homer was accused of sexual harassment. The entire ''country'' decided he was guilty, based on nothing more than hearsay and an extremely biased - and clearly fake - news segment. The episode was meant as a satire of the current state of the media - which, sadly, hasn't improved since the episode first aired (in 1994!).
** Homer himself immediately buys into the report made by the same show that slandered him about how Groundskeeper Willy (who saved Homer by coming forward with a video that happened to prove his innocence) is a perverted stalker and a looming threat to everyone in Springfield.
*** Funnily enough, Homer is RightForTheWrongReasons- he claims that he believes that Willy is a perverted stalker for the incredibly bad reason that the television is claiming it, rather than the far better one- Willy had ''flat-out confessed'' to it earlier when he was telling Homer that he had a tape that could prove his innocence, since he explained the tape by saying that his hobby is spying on couples having intimate moments and recording them- in other words, he ''is'' a perverted stalker.
---> "''But every single Scotsman does it!''"

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Homer was accused of sexual harassment. The entire ''country'' decided he was guilty, based on nothing more than hearsay and an extremely biased - and clearly fake - news segment. The episode was meant as a satire of the current state of the media - which, sadly, hasn't improved since the episode first aired (in 1994!).
**
1994!). Homer himself immediately buys into the report made by the same show that slandered him about how Groundskeeper Willy (who saved Homer by coming forward with a video that happened to prove his innocence) is a perverted stalker and a looming threat to everyone in Springfield.
*** Funnily enough, Homer is RightForTheWrongReasons- he claims that he believes that Willy is a perverted stalker for the incredibly bad reason that the television is claiming it, rather than the far better one- Willy had ''flat-out confessed'' to it earlier when he was telling Homer that he had a tape that could prove his innocence, since he explained the tape by saying that his hobby is spying on couples having intimate moments and recording them- in other words, he ''is'' a perverted stalker.
---> "''But every single Scotsman does it!''"
Springfield.
4th May '16 12:19:15 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Homer was accused of sexual harassment. The entire ''country'' decided he was guilty, based on nothing more than hearsay and an extremely biased - and clearly fake - news segment. The episode was meant as a satire of the current state of the media - which, sadly, hasn't improved since the episode first aired (in 1994!). The quote of the top of this page is from that episode.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Homer was accused of sexual harassment. The entire ''country'' decided he was guilty, based on nothing more than hearsay and an extremely biased - and clearly fake - news segment. The episode was meant as a satire of the current state of the media - which, sadly, hasn't improved since the episode first aired (in 1994!). The quote of the top of this page is from that episode.
4th May '16 12:13:06 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Tyrion Lannister of ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' always had a reputation of being a monster, despite the fact that he is one of the most honorable characters in the series, simply because of his outward appearance (An ugly dwarf, who eventually loses his nose). Every time he's at trial, everyone is ready to execute him unless defending him will somehow help their own agenda. Fortunately, Tyrion is very much aware of this, and has long since figured out how to use it to his advantage. [[spoiler:Eventually, however, it does make him snap.]]

to:

* Tyrion Lannister of ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' always had a reputation of being a monster, despite the fact that he is one of the most honorable characters in the series, simply because of his outward appearance (An ugly dwarf, who eventually loses his nose). Every time he's at trial, everyone is ready to execute him unless defending him will somehow help their own agenda. Fortunately, Tyrion is very much aware of this, and has long since figured out how to use it to his advantage. [[spoiler:Eventually, however, it does make him snap.]]



* In the ''KnightAndRogueSeries'' because he's marked as a criminal Michael is an instant suspect when buildings start being burned down. He has an alibi all three times, but still gets chased by a mob twice before the real criminal is caught.
* In Creator/StephenKing's original book version of ''{{Carrie}}'', the after-the-fact articles and book snippets make it clear that, after the "Black Prom", [[SpoiledSweet Sue Snell]] and [[LovableJock Tommy Ross]] were blamed by the public and by investigators for driving Carrie [[BewareTheNiceOnes over the edge]], recast as an AlphaBitch and her JerkJock boyfriend so as to have an easy scapegoat.

to:

* In the ''KnightAndRogueSeries'' ''Literature/KnightAndRogueSeries'' because he's marked as a criminal Michael is an instant suspect when buildings start being burned down. He has an alibi all three times, but still gets chased by a mob twice before the real criminal is caught.
* In Creator/StephenKing's original book version of ''{{Carrie}}'', ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'', the after-the-fact articles and book snippets make it clear that, after the "Black Prom", [[SpoiledSweet Sue Snell]] and [[LovableJock Tommy Ross]] were blamed by the public and by investigators for driving Carrie [[BewareTheNiceOnes over the edge]], recast as an AlphaBitch and her JerkJock boyfriend so as to have an easy scapegoat.



* A woman in one episode of {{Castle}} invoked this trope. She wanted to divorce her borderline-abusive famous athlete husband, but knew if she did the public would consider him the victim of "another trophy wife just looking for her share." If, however, she disappeared after they'd spent the night getting drunk on his boat, everyone would believe he'd killed her and his reputation would be ruined.

to:

* A woman in one episode of {{Castle}} ''Series/{{Castle}}'' invoked this trope. She wanted to divorce her borderline-abusive famous athlete husband, but knew if she did the public would consider him the victim of "another trophy wife just looking for her share." If, however, she disappeared after they'd spent the night getting drunk on his boat, everyone would believe he'd killed her and his reputation would be ruined.
23rd Apr '16 8:26:33 PM Zelot
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[AvertedTrope Averted]] in ''VideoGame/DiscoveryFreelancer''. This is known as a "trial by forum", and will get the post deleted, or if the behavior continues, the person behind it is not long for the community.
16th Feb '16 6:23:51 AM Shadowgazer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Usually when a person's guilt can't be proven (or has not yet been proven or disproven) in a court of law, it is assumed that they are innocent. But in the court of public opinion it tends to be the exact opposite. The public (or even the authorities) are convinced you're guilty; they just don't have enough hard evidence to prove your guilt. Now this doesn't necessarily means the person in question ''is'' guilty, mind you, It just means they have already been tried and convicted by public opinion. The public can either be right or dead wrong.

to:

Usually when a person's guilt can't be proven (or has not yet been proven or disproven) disproven, [[OffOnATechnicality without counting ridiculous technicalities]]) in a court of law, it is assumed that they are innocent. But in the court of public opinion it tends to be the exact opposite. The public (or even the authorities) are convinced you're guilty; they just don't have enough hard evidence to prove your guilt. Now this doesn't necessarily means the person in question ''is'' guilty, mind you, It just means they have already been tried and convicted by public opinion. The public can either be right or dead wrong.



* Discussed in ''Film/SinCity'' where the powerful Roarke family [[VillainWithGoodPublicity can get enough public approval to not only get away with crimes]], but the citizens of Basin will gladly put an innocent man behind bars.

to:

* Discussed in ''Film/SinCity'' where the powerful Roarke family [[VillainWithGoodPublicity can get enough public approval to not only get away with crimes]], but the citizens of Basin will gladly put an innocent man behind bars.bars before you can say ''CrapsackWorld award.''



* Literature/HarryPotter oh so many times. The wizarding public changes their mind about whether Harry is the savior of their world or a spoiled celebrity more times than they change their robes.
** Also Frank Bryce from the opening chapter of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'', who was nearly convicted for the murder of Voldemort's muggle family. The villagers continue to treat him with suspicion even after his name is cleared, as they have no idea what happened to the Riddles.
** Sirius Black is a partial example. While he was convicted (without a trial), his infamous reputation went well beyond the crime for which he was originally convicted. For example, Stan and Ernie of the Knight Bus believed him to be Voldemort's [[TheDragon right hand]] and an AxCrazy PsychoSupporter.
** In the case of Barty Crouch, Jr., it's implied that he was convicted on flimsy evidence because the public was crying for blood. [[spoiler:Subverted when it turns out [[TheUntwist he was guilty after all]].]] The movie decided not to bother making it ambiguous and [[spoiler:had him frothing at the mouth crazier than Bellatrix Lestrange herself]].
** Also mentioned by Ron when they find out Hagrid is half-giant: while any who know Hagrid know he'd be incapable of the mindless violence giants are known for, most people don't know Hagrid.
** Ludo Bagman inverted this in his trial - even though there was still some good evidence against him and he [[RedHerring could well have been guilty]], he was also a popular Quidditch player and charismatic enough to quickly get the jury on his side. Before long, the trial stopped being about the charge of selling secrets to a Death Eater and started being about how fantastic Bagman had been against Turkey shortly prior.

to:

* Literature/HarryPotter oh so many times. The wizarding public changes their mind about whether Harry is the savior of their world or a spoiled celebrity (a status that was forced on him mind you, not that his feelings mattered at all) more times than they change their robes.
** Also Frank Bryce from the opening chapter of ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'', who was nearly convicted for the murder of Voldemort's muggle family. The villagers continue to treat him with suspicion and a KnowNothingKnowItAll attitude even after his name is cleared, as they have no idea what happened to the Riddles.
** Sirius Black is a partial example. While he was convicted (without a trial), his infamous reputation went well beyond the crime for which he was originally convicted. For example, Stan and Ernie of the Knight Bus believed him to be Voldemort's [[TheDragon right hand]] and an AxCrazy PsychoSupporter.
PsychoSupporter.
** In the case of Barty Crouch, Jr., it's implied that he was convicted on flimsy evidence because the public was crying for blood. [[spoiler:Subverted when it turns out [[TheUntwist he was guilty after all]].]] ]] After [[spoiler: his supposed death]] though the tide changed and people started to feel sorry for him just because he was condemned by his own father without any of the evidence actually changing. [[spoiler: If only they knew...]] .The movie decided not to bother making it ambiguous ambiguous, most likely because of time restraints, and [[spoiler:had him frothing at the mouth crazier than Bellatrix Lestrange herself]].
** Also mentioned by Ron when they find out Hagrid is half-giant: while any who know Hagrid know he'd be incapable of the mindless violence giants are known for, most people don't know Hagrid.
Hagrid and its this coupled with FantasticRacism and MaliciousSlander in a cocktail of vileness concocted by Skeeter and Malfoy and his cronies.
** Ludo Bagman inverted this in his trial - even though there was still some good evidence against him and he [[RedHerring could well have been guilty]], guilty though he wasn't]], he was also a popular Quidditch player and charismatic (in a sociable if not smart way) enough to quickly get the jury on his side. Before long, the trial stopped being about the charge of selling secrets to a Death Eater and started being about how fantastic Bagman had been against Turkey shortly prior.
8th Jan '16 3:30:01 PM Bissek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''TheKillerAngels'', General Garnett considers himself this due to Stonewall Jackson accusing him of cowardice and then dying before Garnett could defend his actions. Because of this, he feels that he has to win a major victory or die trying in order to redeem his honor, which is why he insists on going on Pickett's charge despite being too ill to walk. In the film adaptation, ''{{Gettysburg}}'', his final scene shows him riding straight towards a loaded cannon.

to:

* In ''TheKillerAngels'', General Garnett considers himself this due to Stonewall Jackson accusing him of cowardice and then dying before Garnett could defend his actions. Because of this, he feels that he has to win a major victory or die trying in order to redeem his honor, which is why he insists on going on Pickett's charge Charge despite being too ill to walk. In the film adaptation, ''{{Gettysburg}}'', his final scene shows him riding straight towards a loaded cannon.


Added DiffLines:

* In one episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', a man who was arrested and then got OffOnATechnicality contacted Gibbs and ''requested'' that he be formally charged and court-martialed, because he felt that he'd suffer this trope forever unless he was formally acquitted. Gibbs did manage to clear him, though the man ended up getting into some trouble for having lied in his initial statements to the police regarding his relationship with the deceased.
27th Dec '15 7:09:35 AM JamesAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->-- '''Kent Brockman''', ''TheSimpsons -- "Homer Badman"''

to:

-->-- '''Kent Brockman''', ''TheSimpsons -- "Homer Badman"''
''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E9HomerBadman Homer Badman]]"
This list shows the last 10 events of 195. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ConvictedByPublicOpinion