History Main / CerebusRollercoaster

8th Feb '16 2:37:54 PM Twentington
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* Joe Diffie started out with a mix of ballads and upbeat novelties on his first two albums. Starting with his third and fourth albums ''Honky Tonk Attitude'' and ''Third Rock from the Sun'', the novelty factor pushed to the forefront, giving him big hits in lighthearted, silly fare such as both albums' title tracks, "Prop Me Up Beside the Jukebox (If I Die)", and "Pickup Man", with "So Help Me Girl" being the lone ballad sucess from either. Once the novelty wore off, he began releasing more serious material again, culminating in 1999's ''A Night to Remember'', which was praised for its serious tone.
3rd Feb '16 7:34:34 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' starts out as a LighterAndSofter blend of fluff and FixFic that's chock full of snark. Then [[spoiler: the Winter Soldier]] turns up, [[DiabolicalMastermind Lucius]] [[MagnificentBastard Malfoy]] [[TookALevelInBadass takes several levels in badass]] and things get serious. Then they lighten up for a few chapters, before descending into a chapter of pure NightmareFuel, before going into a lighter subplot, before getting darker again, though the LemonyNarrator is pretty much omnipresent and even the villain chapters tend to have a fair dose of BlackComedy. Really, the tone varies on a chapter by chapter basis depending which of the EnsembleCast (while Harry is the chief protagonist, his age means that his role in the action is - usually - limited) is being focused on, occasionally leading to quick switches ''within'' chapters (considering that some of them can top 20,000 words, this isn't surprising).

* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' starts off LighterAndSofter, then gets darker and much more serious with chapter 11. Then there's a few lighter chapters, interspersed with a lingering threat, until chapter 21, which is pure unbridled NightmareFuel. After that, the horror takes a step back, and it gets lighter again... then there's several chapters in which it becomes very apparent that Harry's something of a StepfordSmiler, then he deals with his issues. Then he and some new friends get kidnapped by some utterly horrific creatures. Then Harry manages to IndyPloy his way out of trouble. Then it quietens down, with a little revelation or two about Harry's godmother of the ParentsAsPeople variety, looming threat mingled with Fudge having rings run around him and followed by the bad guys facing their first significant set back. Then we see London nearly overrun by an army of the undead, one of the secondary protagonists nearly eaten alive on screen and [[spoiler: Sif has her heart ripped out and Harry Dresden uses his Death Curse. Both get better courtesy of Doctor Strange]]. Things calm down, we get to meet a couple of new characters and it's all a bit lighter... then we find out in Chapter 50 that [[spoiler: Lucius Malfoy has executed a coup d'etat and gained control of the Winter Soldier]] making HYDRA more dangerous than ever. While it's rarely sudden, this is a fic which specialises in MoodWhiplash.
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' starts off LighterAndSofter, then gets darker and much more serious with chapter 11. Then there's a few lighter chapters, interspersed with a lingering threat, until chapter 21, which is pure unbridled NightmareFuel. After that, the horror takes a step back, and it gets lighter again... then there's several chapters in which it becomes very apparent that Harry's something of a StepfordSmiler, then he deals with his issues. Then he and some new friends get kidnapped by some utterly horrific creatures. Then Harry manages to IndyPloy his way out of trouble. Then it quietens down, with a little revelation or two about Harry's godmother of the ParentsAsPeople variety, looming threat mingled with Fudge having rings run around him and followed by the bad guys facing their first significant set back. Then we see London nearly overrun by an army of the undead, one of the secondary protagonists nearly eaten alive on screen and [[spoiler: Sif has her heart ripped out and Harry Dresden uses his Death Curse. Both get better courtesy of Doctor Strange]]. Things calm down, we get to meet a couple of new characters and it's all a bit lighter... then we find out in Chapter 50 that [[spoiler: Lucius Malfoy has executed a coup d'etat and gained control of the Winter Soldier]] making HYDRA more dangerous than ever. ever, before chapters 53-58 deal with milder Harry related sub-plots, then chapters 59 and 60 [[spoiler: have the kids fighting for their lives and the Winter Soldier struggling for his soul]], chapters 61 to 68 have some pretty heavy fallout, before chapter 69, a quite literal HopeSpot, before delving into the three darkest chapters in the story, then a light Christmas special, then a chapter quite literally entitled 'The DarkestHour'. While it's rarely sudden, this is a fic which specialises ''specialises'' in MoodWhiplash.
31st Jan '16 3:36:24 PM jormis29
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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' has the infamous case of [[SliceOfLife happy beginning]], [[TheDarkestHour heart-wrenching middle]] and a controversial BittersweetEnding. ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagicaTheMovieRebellion'' manages to restore things to apparent SugarBowl again, only to deconstruct and partially reconstruct it again over the course of a single movie.
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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' has the infamous case of [[SliceOfLife happy beginning]], [[TheDarkestHour [[DarkestHour heart-wrenching middle]] and a controversial BittersweetEnding. ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagicaTheMovieRebellion'' manages to restore things to apparent SugarBowl again, only to deconstruct and partially reconstruct it again over the course of a single movie.
22nd Jan '16 5:36:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* Musical duo TroutFishingInAmerica recorded two albums of children's songs in their earliest years. Then they did an album of mostly dead-serious folk-rock. Ever since then, they've gone back and forth between the two, even splitting the difference with sillier folk-rock songs, and albums that contain a little of both. * GreenDay's career is frequent with NewSoundAlbum shifts to either "DarkerAndEdgier" or "back to snarky". After breakout ''Dookie'', came the heavier ''Insomniac'' (partly due to CreatorBreakdown), followed by two lighter albums, then two Punk-RockOpera albums, and then a trilogy that tried to go back to the old sound.
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* Musical duo TroutFishingInAmerica Music/TroutFishingInAmerica recorded two albums of children's songs in their earliest years. Then they did an album of mostly dead-serious folk-rock. Ever since then, they've gone back and forth between the two, even splitting the difference with sillier folk-rock songs, and albums that contain a little of both. * GreenDay's Music/GreenDay's career is frequent with NewSoundAlbum shifts to either "DarkerAndEdgier" or "back to snarky". After breakout ''Dookie'', came the heavier ''Insomniac'' (partly due to CreatorBreakdown), followed by two lighter albums, then two Punk-RockOpera albums, and then a trilogy that tried to go back to the old sound.
9th Jan '16 1:59:08 PM Sapphirea2
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** The classic series had a lot of wild shifts in tone, particularly whenever new people took over behind the scenes. The best example might be the tenure of Creator/TomBaker as the [[TheNthDoctor Fourth Doctor]], since it lasted so long. It began with the comical "Robot", which established 4 as much sillier and more alien than his predecessor. Soon it was doing far darker stories like "Pyramids of Mars" and "Genesis of the Daleks". MoralGuardians complained, so we got a RobotBuddy and much more comedy with serials like "City of Death" (written by comedic author Creator/DouglasAdams). Baker's final season, however, was comparatively grim and death and decay was a recurring theme. ** Due to the production difficulties of the time (several producers, tortured budgets and plots that had to be written around [[AbsenteeActor the lead actor's failing mental health]]), Season 3 (with the First Doctor) definitely qualifies. "Mission to the Unknown", a BottleEpisode without the Doctor in it where a bunch of people get miserably slaughtered by Daleks, is followed by "The Myth Makers", a lighthearted {{Bathos}}-based social comedy set in Troy which suddenly becomes very dark and bloody when the Greeks invade in the final episode. "The Daleks' Master Plan" is a SpaceOpera {{Arc}} combining an extreme bodycount (including the deaths of ''two'' companions) and brutal violence with the [[AffablyEvil intentionally goofy]] villain the Monk and a ridiculous comedy episode halfway through where they get stuck on a 1920s film set and then go off to celebrate Christmas. "The Massacre" is another unusually dark episode with a DownerEnding where the Doctor is forced to ignore a genocide and has a HeroicBSOD, interrupted in the last five minutes by a giggly CloudCuckooLander ManicPixieDreamGirl companion accidentally breaking into the TARDIS. Then we get the [[AngstWhatAngst somewhat less relentlessly negative]] "The Ark", the absolutely ridiculous "The Celestial Toymaker", a comedy MusicalEpisode ("The Gunfighters") which again has a suddenly dark and bloody ending, and it's only by "The Savages" and "The War Machines" that the series settles back down into monster-based adventure serials.

** The classic series had a lot of this too, with the tone changing wildly, particularly whenever new people took over behind the scenes. The best example might be the tenure of Creator/TomBaker as the [[TheNthDoctor Fourth Doctor]], since it lasted so long. It began with the comical ''Robot'', which established 4 as much sillier and more alien than his predecessor. Soon it was doing far darker stories like ''Pyramids of Mars'' and ''Genesis of the Daleks''. MoralGuardians complained, so we got a RobotBuddy and much more comedy with serials like ''City of Death'' (written by comedic author Creator/DouglasAdams). Baker's final season, however, was comparatively grim and death and decay was a recurring theme. ** Series 5 and 6 of the new series. Matt Smith was originally a much more [[CloudCuckoolander madcap and alien]] Doctor, who met a girl and took her away to see the universe. In the middle of the season, [[spoiler: Rory gets erased from time]]. However, two episodes after this, the Doctor is passing off as a human lodger and playing football. The episode after that has the Doctor [[spoiler: trapped in the Pandorica; Rory returning, albeit as an Auton and shoots Amy, while River is inside the TARDIS and it's exploding.]] And that's just Series 5. *** Heck, the revival Series 5 [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang finale]] has this in spades, and just in one episode. Music/ChameleonCircuit summed it up quite nicely in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f0xBe0kq3E this song]]. ** As for Series 6? It begins with [[spoiler: The Doctor being KilledOffForReal]] and [[FromBadToWorse only gets worse from there.]] Other episodes in the season include a madcap {{pirate}} romp, a sinister clone saga, a horrifying WhatDoTheyFearEpisode and a buddy comedy. *** "The Doctor's Wife" is as much of this as possible squeezed into one episode: it includes a sweet, whimsical, romantic main plot about the series' origin story, a gruesomely dark and [[TearJerker Tear Jerking]] subplot about the dead Time Lords, quirky CargoShip-riddled bantering and shenanigans between the Doctor and the TARDIS, and a sadistic voice trapping and psychologically torturing Amy and Rory ForTheEvulz. ** Series 7 had "standalone adventure" style episodes, many of them with an at-face-value goofy, funny or gimmicky plot idea. And though there is a lot of comedy and charming moments throughout the series, it also deals with themes such as war-weariness (the Doctor and Kahler Jex), moral ambiguity (the Doctor's confrontations with certain antagonists and his inner demons rearing their ugly head), loss (the Doctor having to part with River and losing his companions in a traumatic manner), grief and depression (the Doctor retreating into himself and noting that "the universe doesn't care", though he eventually gets better), ''death'' (the deaths of Amy and Rory, the deaths of Clara's echoes, the Doctor's eventual revelation that he's out of regenerations and will probably die on Trenzalore, the death of Clara's mother hanging like a shadow over her future, Kahler Jex's bitter self-sacrifice), issues of trust (between the Doctor and Clara, due to the odd mystery surrounding her), and facing one's past (the Eleventh showing his darker side more often, and eventually revealing the existence of the War Doctor). Though the two different halves of the series prove a pretty big comedy-drama rollercoaster in virtually every episode, the 50th anniversary special that follows on from the finale is one of the most optimistic episodes in years: Even if the Doctor has to acknowledge and face some of the sadder moments of his past and legacy, there is always room for redemption, as long as one doesn't give up on hope, mercy, kindness, and the courage to set right what once went wrong. ** Due to the production difficulties of the time (several producers, tortured budgets and plots that had to be written around [[AbsenteeActor the lead actor's failing mental health]]), Season 3 (with the First Doctor) definitely qualifies. "Mission to the Unknown", a BottleEpisode without the Doctor in it where a bunch of people get miserably slaughtered by Daleks, is followed by "The Myth Makers", a lighthearted {{Bathos}}-based social comedy set in Troy which suddenly becomes very dark and bloody when the Greeks invade in the final episode. "The Daleks' Master Plan" is a SpaceOpera {{Arc}} combining an extreme bodycount (including the deaths of ''two'' companions) and brutal violence with the [[AffablyEvil intentionally goofy]] villain the Monk and a ridiculous comedy episode halfway through where they get stuck on a 1920s film set and then go off to celebrate Christmas. "The Massacre" is another unusually dark episode with a DownerEnding where the Doctor is forced to ignore a genocide and has a HeroicBSOD, interrupted in the last five minutes by a giggly CloudCuckooLander ManicPixieDreamGirl companion accidentally breaking into the TARDIS. Then we get the [[AngstWhatAngst somewhat less relentlessly negative]] "The Ark", the absolutely ridiculous "The Celestial Toymaker", a comedy MusicalEpisode ("The Gunfighters") which again has a suddenly dark and bloody ending, and it's only by "The Savages" and "The War Machines" that the series settles back down into monster-based adventure serials.
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** The classic series had a lot of this too, with the tone changing wildly, particularly whenever new people took over behind the scenes. The best example might be the tenure of Creator/TomBaker as the [[TheNthDoctor Fourth Doctor]], since it lasted so long. It began with the comical ''Robot'', which established 4 as much sillier and more alien than his predecessor. Soon it was doing far darker stories like ''Pyramids of Mars'' and ''Genesis of the Daleks''. MoralGuardians complained, so we got a RobotBuddy and much more comedy with serials like ''City of Death'' (written by comedic author Creator/DouglasAdams). Baker's final season, however, was comparatively grim and death and decay was a recurring theme. ** Series 5 and 6 of the new series. 6: Matt Smith was originally a much more [[CloudCuckoolander madcap and alien]] Doctor, who met a girl and took her away to see the universe. In the middle of the season, [[spoiler: Rory gets erased from time]]. However, two episodes after this, the Doctor is passing off as a human lodger and playing football. The episode after that has the Doctor [[spoiler: trapped in the Pandorica; Rory returning, albeit as an Auton and shoots shooting Amy, while River is inside the TARDIS and it's exploding.]] exploding]]! And that's just Series 5. *** Heck, then the revival Series 5 [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang finale]] has this in spades, and just spades in one episode. Music/ChameleonCircuit summed it up quite nicely in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f0xBe0kq3E this song]]. ** As for Series 6? It begins with [[spoiler: The Doctor being KilledOffForReal]] and [[FromBadToWorse only gets worse from there.]] Other episodes in the season include a madcap {{pirate}} romp, a sinister clone saga, a horrifying WhatDoTheyFearEpisode and a buddy comedy. *** comedy. "The Doctor's Wife" is as much of this as possible squeezed into one episode: it includes a sweet, whimsical, romantic main plot about the series' origin story, a gruesomely dark and [[TearJerker Tear Jerking]] subplot about the dead Time Lords, quirky CargoShip-riddled bantering and shenanigans between the Doctor and the TARDIS, and a sadistic voice trapping and psychologically torturing Amy and Rory ForTheEvulz. ** Series 7 had "standalone adventure" style episodes, many of them with an at-face-value goofy, funny or gimmicky plot idea. And though there is a lot of comedy and charming moments throughout the series, it also deals with themes such as war-weariness (the Doctor and Kahler Jex), moral ambiguity (the Doctor's confrontations with certain antagonists and his inner demons rearing their ugly head), loss (the Doctor having to part with River and losing his companions in a traumatic manner), grief and depression (the Doctor retreating into himself and noting that "the universe doesn't care", though he eventually gets better), ''death'' (the deaths of Amy and Rory, the deaths of Clara's echoes, the Doctor's eventual revelation that he's out of regenerations and will probably die on Trenzalore, the death of Clara's mother hanging like a shadow over her future, Kahler Jex's bitter self-sacrifice), issues of trust (between the Doctor and Clara, due to the odd mystery surrounding her), and facing one's past (the Eleventh showing his darker side more often, and eventually revealing the existence of the War Doctor). Though the two different halves of the series prove a pretty big comedy-drama rollercoaster in virtually every episode, the 50th anniversary special that follows on from the finale is one of the most optimistic episodes in years: Even if the Doctor has to acknowledge and face some of the sadder moments of his past and legacy, there is always room for redemption, as long as one doesn't give up on hope, mercy, kindness, and the courage to set right what once went wrong. ** Due The Twelfth Doctor's tenure so far, Series 8 and 9, is more consistent tonally from episode to episode (in part because Series 9 consists mostly of multi-part stories), but it's not uncommon for the production difficulties of the time (several producers, tortured budgets lighter stories to suddenly swerve into tragic territory. "The Caretaker" has Clara trying to hide her two relationships with Danny and plots that had to be written around [[AbsenteeActor the lead actor's failing mental health]]), Season 3 (with the First Doctor) definitely qualifies. "Mission to the Unknown", a BottleEpisode without the Doctor in from each other when the latter poses as a human at her school, but it where also addresses Danny's concern that Clara will come to a bunch bad end traveling with the alien. "The Girl Who Died" is a romp with the Doctor having to help a village of people get miserably slaughtered by Daleks, Vikings defeat hammy aliens...but when the cost of victory is too high to bear, he makes a rash decision that haunts him for the rest of Series 9. On the other hand, the intense "The Zygon Invasion"/"The Zygon Inversion" has whimsical comic relief and a SurprisinglyHappyEnding. And after the tragic, massively-scaled three-part finale of Series 9 comes to its BittersweetEnding, it's followed by "The Myth Makers", Husbands of River Song", a lighthearted {{Bathos}}-based social comedy set in Troy which suddenly ChristmasEpisode that outstrips just about every other revival episode for wackiness '''''then''''' becomes very dark and bloody when the Greeks invade in the final episode. "The Daleks' Master Plan" is a SpaceOpera {{Arc}} combining an extreme bodycount (including the deaths of ''two'' companions) and brutal violence with the [[AffablyEvil intentionally goofy]] villain the Monk and a ridiculous comedy episode halfway through where they get stuck on a 1920s film set and then go off to celebrate Christmas. "The Massacre" is another unusually dark episode with a DownerEnding where the Doctor is forced to ignore a genocide and has a HeroicBSOD, interrupted in the last five minutes by a giggly CloudCuckooLander ManicPixieDreamGirl companion accidentally breaking into the TARDIS. Then we get the [[AngstWhatAngst somewhat less relentlessly negative]] "The Ark", the absolutely ridiculous "The Celestial Toymaker", a comedy MusicalEpisode ("The Gunfighters") which again has a suddenly dark and bloody ending, and it's only by "The Savages" and "The War Machines" tender romance that the series settles back down into monster-based adventure serials.has its own BittersweetEnding -- albeit one more sweet than bitter.
31st Dec '15 10:35:19 AM Doug86
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* ''KarakuridoujiUltimo''. Starts off with the 16-year-old protagonist running into a cute little boy robot, who wants him to help save the world. A few chapters later, we found out, that said robot boy is a SociopathicHero at its worst. Then more comedy and action scenes, which lead up to the protaganist's best friend [[HoYay being in love with him]], and also being batshit insane. Then all the good guys are killed, and the world blows up. Which leads us right into part 2, with time restarted and everybody fine. They even threw in some more comedy just to reassure us that everybody is A-OK. [[CerebusSyndrome Until the end of part two]]. [[spoiler: Two of the original Good Doji masters are dead, and the others are out of commission.]] Part 3, managed to do this in single chapters alone. The only thing you can be sure of with the tone of this series, is that by the end of each part, something bad is going to happen to somebody, if not everybody.
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* ''KarakuridoujiUltimo''.''Manga/KarakuridoujiUltimo''. Starts off with the 16-year-old protagonist running into a cute little boy robot, who wants him to help save the world. A few chapters later, we found out, that said robot boy is a SociopathicHero at its worst. Then more comedy and action scenes, which lead up to the protaganist's best friend [[HoYay being in love with him]], and also being batshit insane. Then all the good guys are killed, and the world blows up. Which leads us right into part 2, with time restarted and everybody fine. They even threw in some more comedy just to reassure us that everybody is A-OK. [[CerebusSyndrome Until the end of part two]]. [[spoiler: Two of the original Good Doji masters are dead, and the others are out of commission.]] Part 3, managed to do this in single chapters alone. The only thing you can be sure of with the tone of this series, is that by the end of each part, something bad is going to happen to somebody, if not everybody.
20th Dec '15 6:02:11 PM nombretomado
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* The {{superhero}} genre went through this. The GoldenAge was pretty dark - Franchise/{{Batman}} was a gun-wielding VigilanteMan, Franchise/WonderWoman liked to have her enemies BoundAndGagged and a lot of heroes had no problem with killing criminals, especially ThoseWackyNazis. The SilverAge was a result of ReverseCerebusSyndrome when everything became LighterAndSofter, sometimes to ridiculous levels. UsefulNotes/{{The Bronze Age|OfComicBooks}} was step towards a more serious direction, which was taken way too far in UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}}. As a result, in the ModernAge, everybody said "screw it" and does whatever they want, so the same company can now publish the adventures of the ComicBook/IncredibleHercules and ComicBook/ThePunisher, or ComicBook/PowerGirl and ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice.
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* The {{superhero}} genre went through this. The GoldenAge was pretty dark - Franchise/{{Batman}} was a gun-wielding VigilanteMan, Franchise/WonderWoman liked to have her enemies BoundAndGagged and a lot of heroes had no problem with killing criminals, especially ThoseWackyNazis. The SilverAge UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} was a result of ReverseCerebusSyndrome when everything became LighterAndSofter, sometimes to ridiculous levels. UsefulNotes/{{The Bronze Age|OfComicBooks}} was step towards a more serious direction, which was taken way too far in UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}}. As a result, in the ModernAge, everybody said "screw it" and does whatever they want, so the same company can now publish the adventures of the ComicBook/IncredibleHercules and ComicBook/ThePunisher, or ComicBook/PowerGirl and ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice.
10th Nov '15 3:00:42 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* The ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogies do this. The first trilogy start of as lighthearted in ''Film/ANewHope'' and dark tones come up in the latter two. In the prequels the first two start lightly, then ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' takes a nosedive into dark.
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* The ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogies do this. The first trilogy start of starts off as lighthearted in ''Film/ANewHope'' ''Film/ANewHope'', turns dark in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', and mingles light and dark tones come up in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' (just compare the latter two.scenes with TheEmperor to the scenes with the Ewoks). In the prequels the first two start lightly, then ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' takes a nosedive into dark.
3rd Nov '15 7:42:06 AM ZemplinTemplar
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** Series 7 had "standalone adventure" style episodes, many of them with an at-face-value goofy, funny or gimmicky plot idea. And though there is a lot of comedy and charming moments throughout the series, it also deals with themes such as war-weariness (the Doctor and Kahler Jex), moral ambiguity (the Doctor's confrontations with certain antagonists and his inner demons rearing their ugly head), loss (the Doctor having to part with River and losing his companions in a traumatic manner), grief and depression (the Doctor retreating into himself and noting that "the universe doesn't care", though he eventually gets better), ''death'' (the deaths of Amy and Rory, the deaths of Clara's echoes, the Doctor's eventual revelation that he's out of regenerations and will probably die on Trenzalore, the death of Clara's mother hanging like a shadow over her future, Kahler Jex's bitter self-sacrifice), issues of trust (between the Doctor and Clara, due to the odd mystery surrounding her), and facing one's past (the Eleventh showing his darker side more often, and eventually revealing the existence of the War Doctor). Though the two different halves of the series prove a pretty big comedy-drama rollercoaster in virtually every episode, the 50th anniversary special that follows on from the finale is one of the optimistic episodes in years, even if the Doctor has to acknowledge and face some of the sadder moments of his past and legacy.
to:
** Series 7 had "standalone adventure" style episodes, many of them with an at-face-value goofy, funny or gimmicky plot idea. And though there is a lot of comedy and charming moments throughout the series, it also deals with themes such as war-weariness (the Doctor and Kahler Jex), moral ambiguity (the Doctor's confrontations with certain antagonists and his inner demons rearing their ugly head), loss (the Doctor having to part with River and losing his companions in a traumatic manner), grief and depression (the Doctor retreating into himself and noting that "the universe doesn't care", though he eventually gets better), ''death'' (the deaths of Amy and Rory, the deaths of Clara's echoes, the Doctor's eventual revelation that he's out of regenerations and will probably die on Trenzalore, the death of Clara's mother hanging like a shadow over her future, Kahler Jex's bitter self-sacrifice), issues of trust (between the Doctor and Clara, due to the odd mystery surrounding her), and facing one's past (the Eleventh showing his darker side more often, and eventually revealing the existence of the War Doctor). Though the two different halves of the series prove a pretty big comedy-drama rollercoaster in virtually every episode, the 50th anniversary special that follows on from the finale is one of the most optimistic episodes in years, even years: Even if the Doctor has to acknowledge and face some of the sadder moments of his past and legacy.legacy, there is always room for redemption, as long as one doesn't give up on hope, mercy, kindness, and the courage to set right what once went wrong.
3rd Nov '15 7:37:05 AM ZemplinTemplar
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** Series 2 alternates between an invasion which the Doctor can't help stop and he may be dying, to a madcap body-snatcher romp, to a tale about humans losing their humanity to cold steel shells, to a somewhat tongue-in-cheek 50s piece with a hammy villain, to demonic possession on board a lonely Sanctuary Base, to an offbeat episode commenting on ''Doctor Who'' fandom itself to all-out war between [[spoiler:the Daleks and the Cybermen]].
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** Series 2 of the revival era alternates between an invasion which the Doctor can't help stop and he may be dying, to a madcap body-snatcher romp, to a tale about humans losing their humanity to cold steel shells, to a somewhat tongue-in-cheek 50s piece with a hammy villain, to demonic possession on board a lonely Sanctuary Base, to an offbeat episode commenting on ''Doctor Who'' fandom itself to all-out war between [[spoiler:the Daleks and the Cybermen]].

*** Heck, the Series 5 [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang finale]] has this in spades, and just in one episode. Music/ChameleonCircuit summed it up quite nicely in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f0xBe0kq3E this song]].
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*** Heck, the revival Series 5 [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang finale]] has this in spades, and just in one episode. Music/ChameleonCircuit summed it up quite nicely in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f0xBe0kq3E this song]].

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*** Heck, the ** Series 5 [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang finale]] 7 had "standalone adventure" style episodes, many of them with an at-face-value goofy, funny or gimmicky plot idea. And though there is a lot of comedy and charming moments throughout the series, it also deals with themes such as war-weariness (the Doctor and Kahler Jex), moral ambiguity (the Doctor's confrontations with certain antagonists and his inner demons rearing their ugly head), loss (the Doctor having to part with River and losing his companions in a traumatic manner), grief and depression (the Doctor retreating into himself and noting that "the universe doesn't care", though he eventually gets better), ''death'' (the deaths of Amy and Rory, the deaths of Clara's echoes, the Doctor's eventual revelation that he's out of regenerations and will probably die on Trenzalore, the death of Clara's mother hanging like a shadow over her future, Kahler Jex's bitter self-sacrifice), issues of trust (between the Doctor and Clara, due to the odd mystery surrounding her), and facing one's past (the Eleventh showing his darker side more often, and eventually revealing the existence of the War Doctor). Though the two different halves of the series prove a pretty big comedy-drama rollercoaster in virtually every episode, the 50th anniversary special that follows on from the finale is one of the optimistic episodes in years, even if the Doctor has this in spades, to acknowledge and just in one episode. Music/ChameleonCircuit summed it up quite nicely in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f0xBe0kq3E this song]].face some of the sadder moments of his past and legacy.
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