History Main / CannonFodder

12th Sep '17 6:59:00 AM BeerBaron
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series, Scamps, [[TheGoomba the weakest known form]] of [[OurDemonsAreDifferent lesser Daedra]], serve this role in the [[OurGodsAreDifferent Daedric Prince]] [[DestroyerDeity Mehrunes Dagon]]'s LegionsOfHell. Due to their relative weakness and [[FunSize small stature]], their only viable tactic is the ZergRush. Often, Scamps can be found in non-combat roles, such as messengers and [[ServantRace servants to perform mundane tasks]]. Mortals are known to use Scamps in these latter roles as well.
19th Aug '17 8:00:52 PM Psychadelico
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Some British commanders in WWI viewed the cost of armoring and healing soldiers as outweighing the cost of simply getting another soldier, right up until the point they realized just how few able bodies there actually were to throw in the war machine. See the Real Life section on LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics for more details.


Added DiffLines:

* There was a saying in [[UsefulNotes/DynastiesFromShangToQing Song Dynasty China]], invoking this trope: "Don't use good iron to make a nail, and don't use a good man to make a soldier."
20th Jul '17 3:56:46 PM Tacitus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasy'':
** Bretonnian Infantry, as Knights are actual Nobles while their infantry are made up of dirt poor peasants.
** Skaven units are this, given their culture. [[BattleThralls Skaven Slaves]] are this in the actual game, as you can fire into melees where only they and the enemy are, making them literal cannon fodder.
* The Imperial Guard from ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''.
** And for them, first [[{{Conscription}} conscripted]] troopers which have less training and only the most basic equipment. Then the Planetary Defense Forces which ''usually'' are even less skilled and have even less equipment.
** For a bit of perspective, in terms of point value a single SpaceMarine Terminator costs as much as 10 Imperial Guard Conscripts. He can take them all together too, and will probably emerge unscathed unless the RandomNumberGod is grumpy. Nevertheless, every round they spend slaughtering expendable troops is a round they're not killing something valuable.
** The Tyranids have basic troops called Rippers that are sent en masse to enemy lines, causing them to waste ammunition for when the ''real'' attack begins with larger and more intelligent troops. The Rippers don't even have digestive systems - after they've consumed all the biomass they can, they are unfit for combat and return to reclamation pools to be consumed for the biomass they contain.
*** Practically all of the Tyranid's basic troops are used like this this includes the gaunt breeds.
** Tau have a habit of turning their enemies into this repeatedly, provided they can stay at a safe distance to do so. They also have the Kroot to be this to their Fire Warriors, battlesuits and other really shooty stuff to stop them [[CripplingOverspecialisation being assaulted and defeated in melee]].
** Chaos Space Marines have Cultists, dirt cheap troops of similar stats and equipment to Imperial Guard Conscripts, meant to be disposable bodies and "hiding spots" for the elite marines and special characters. The Alpha Legion is uniquely the only Chaos legion which actually bothers to train their cultists and rely on them for something other than catching bullets, [[PragmaticVillainy and one of the most successful ones, go figure]].
** The Orks have their Grotz who are at the very bottom of the Ork hierarchy, their basic roles are cannon fodder, as well as used to clear land mine fields, emergency rations, and even used for football.
*** Ork Boyz are only slightly less expendable. One of the defining traits of the average Ork Warboss is the ability to view everyone but himself as totally expendable if it leads to a good fight, and one of the defining traits of the Ork mentality is that this is a positive trait for a leader to have.
** Come to think of it, all armies employ Cannon Fodder to a degree. Even the [[OurElvesAreBetter Eldar]], but Eldar lives are far too valuable to be spent in most circumstances, nevermind wasted, and so the Eldar prefer to [[ManipulativeBastard trick some other schmucks, like humans or Orks, into being the cannon fodder for them]].
** In the game, the concept of "ablative wounds" is the game mechanic of this; Most infantry squads only have a limited number of units that can be upgraded to special weapons or heavy weapons, while the rest are stuck with their stock equipment (which range from comically ineffective to just a tad inefficient, with very few exceptions). Thus the only use for these models is to absorb incoming shots to preserve the heavy/special weapon gunners from harm so they can make the most out of their gun. The most prevalent of these are Tactical Squads; they must be at full strength to take a Heavy Weapon in the first place, meaning you're stuck buying at least 7 generic members (the other two can be upgraded to be a veteran sergeant and a special weapons) who have no other options. Since the Heavy Weapon guy will be firing at stuff far out of the range of the generic ones, all they can do is take hits.
** The Iron Warriors Space Marines were so noted for taking this approach to their attached Army regiments that pre-corruption Horus signed a specific order that Perturabo's troops could only be given control over [[BoxedCrook expendable penal regiments]] and enslaved forces from recently conquered worlds. Was it in any way surprising that they ended up [[FaceHeelTurn falling to Chaos]]? Falling to Chaos made them ''even worse''.
** The use of cannon fodder as a delaying tactic is known as a "tarpit", especially in melee. Cheap, expendable troops like ripper swarms or conscripts remain locked in combat unless they fail a morale save or you kill the bloody lot of them. Give them Fearless or at least a good leadership score with an attached character and the latter becomes the only option. You can tie up a truly scary unit for almost the entire game with half its point value worth of cannon fodder.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasy'':
''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'':
** Bretonnian Infantry, Bretonnia's army is built around its noble knights, which fight exclusively as Knights are actual Nobles while their cavalry. Any infantry units are made up of dirt poor peasants.
levied peasants, the best-trained and -equipped of which can be described as "adequate" soldiers.
** Skaven [[RatMen Skaven]] units are this, given [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder their culture. culture]]. [[BattleThralls Skaven Slaves]] are this in the actual game, as even have a special rule allowing you can to fire into melees where only they and the enemy are, making them literal cannon fodder.
* The Imperial Guard from ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''.
** And for them,
40000}}'' lets you choose which target your gun crews are shooting at, so it's hard to ''force'' your opponent to focus on your most expendable troops, but there's two ways you can evoke this trope. The first [[{{Conscription}} conscripted]] troopers which have less training and only is the "tarpit" approach, where you lock up your enemy's most basic equipment. Then the Planetary Defense Forces which ''usually'' are even less skilled and have even less equipment.
** For a bit of perspective,
dangerous melee units in terms of point value a long assault against cheap, worthless troops - that single SpaceMarine Terminator costs as much as 10 Imperial Guard Conscripts. He can take them all together too, ten Guardsmen, and will probably emerge unscathed unless the RandomNumberGod is grumpy. Nevertheless, every round they spend slaughtering expendable troops is beat them in combat, but it's going to take a round they're few rounds for him to do so, in which he's not earning his points cost back by killing something valuable.
more valuable. Second is the "ablative wounds" approach, where you add additional soldiers to a squad to discard as casualties after taking fire. The more regular soldiers there are, the more likely the troopers carrying the plasma gun or missile launcher are to survive to use their more potent weapons. As for the individual armies and their designated Cannon Fodder units:
** The Imperial Guard is this for the Imperium in general, but can field {{Conscript|ion}} Platoons that are even ''more'' expendable than the average Guardsman. If you take the right special character, he can "recycle" dead platoons with his [[WeHaveReserves "Send in the Next Wave!"]] rule.
** The Tau tend to use their Kroot allies and other alien auxiliaries as this, but not to soak up enemy gunfire, rather to meet or counter-charge an enemy assault, since the Tau [[CripplingOverspecialization are miserable in close combat.]]
** Da Orkz have Grots, which have actually had rules allowing Orks to use them as living cover, mine sweepers (by detonating them), or pathfinders (the Orks step on them for better footing). Other uses for Grots include ammunition, emergency rations, or sports equipment. Of course, even Ork Boyz are to some degree expendable - one of the defining traits of the average Ork Warboss is the ability to view everyone but himself as totally expendable if it leads to a good fight, and one of the defining traits of the Ork mentality is that this is a positive trait for a leader to have.
** The Tyranids have will employ their basic troops called Rippers that are sent 'gaunt or Ripper breeds like this, hurling them at the enemy en masse just to enemy lines, causing them force the Hive Mind's opponent to waste ammunition for when before the ''real'' attack begins with larger and more intelligent troops. The Rippers don't main assault. Some Tyranids are even have born without digestive systems - after they've consumed all the biomass tracts because they can, they are unfit for combat and return aren't intended to reclamation pools to survive their first battle - living or dead, they'll all be consumed for by the biomass they contain.
*** Practically all of the Tyranid's basic troops are used like this this includes the gaunt breeds.
** Tau have a habit of turning their enemies into this repeatedly, provided they can stay at a safe distance to do so. They also have the Kroot to be this to their Fire Warriors, battlesuits and other really shooty stuff to stop them [[CripplingOverspecialisation being assaulted and defeated in melee]].
Rippers as recycled biomass.
** Chaos Space Marines have Cultists, dirt cheap troops of similar stats and equipment to Imperial Guard Conscripts, meant to be disposable bodies and "hiding spots" for the elite marines and special characters. The Alpha Legion is uniquely the only Chaos legion which actually bothers to train their cultists and rely on them for something other than catching bullets, [[PragmaticVillainy and one of the most successful ones, go figure]].
** The Orks have their Grotz who are at the very bottom of the Ork hierarchy, their basic roles are cannon fodder, as well as used to clear land mine fields, emergency rations, and even used for football.
*** Ork Boyz are only slightly less expendable. One of the defining traits of the average Ork Warboss is the ability to view everyone but himself as totally expendable if it leads to a good fight, and one of the defining traits of the Ork mentality is that this is a positive trait for a leader to have.
** Come to think of it, all armies employ Cannon Fodder to a degree. Even the [[OurElvesAreBetter Eldar]], but Eldar lives are far too valuable to be spent in most circumstances, nevermind wasted, and so the Eldar prefer to [[ManipulativeBastard trick some other schmucks, like humans or Orks, into being the cannon fodder for them]].
** In the game, the concept of "ablative wounds" is the game mechanic of this; Most infantry squads only have a limited number of units that can be upgraded to special weapons or heavy weapons, while the rest are stuck with their stock equipment (which range from comically ineffective to just a tad inefficient, with very few exceptions). Thus the only use for these models is to absorb incoming shots to preserve the heavy/special weapon gunners from harm so they can make the most out of their gun. The most prevalent of these are Tactical Squads; they must be at full strength to take a Heavy Weapon in the first place, meaning you're stuck buying at least 7 generic members (the other two can be upgraded to be a veteran sergeant and a special weapons) who have no other options. Since the Heavy Weapon guy will be firing at stuff far out of the range of the generic ones, all they can do is take hits.
**
figure]]. The Iron Warriors Space Marines meanwhile were so noted for taking this approach to their attached Army regiments that pre-corruption Horus signed a specific order that Perturabo's troops could only be given control over [[BoxedCrook expendable penal regiments]] and enslaved forces from recently conquered worlds. Was it in any way surprising that they ended up [[FaceHeelTurn falling to Chaos]]? Falling to Chaos made them ''even worse''.
worlds.
** The use of cannon fodder as a delaying tactic is known as a "tarpit", especially in melee. Cheap, expendable troops like ripper swarms or conscripts remain locked in combat unless they fail a morale save or you kill only armies who really avert this trope are the bloody lot of them. Give them Fearless or at least a good leadership score with Space Marines, an attached character EliteArmy, and the latter becomes the only option. You can tie up Eldar, a truly scary unit for almost the entire game with half its point value worth of cannon fodder.DyingRace that would much rather [[TheChessmaster manipulate]] others into dying in their stead.
26th Jun '17 7:03:06 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* According to TheOtherWiki, the first documented use of the term "cannon fodder" appears in an [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte anti-Napoleonic]] pamphlet by French writer François-René de Chateaubriand, [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars published in 1814]]. In it, Chateaubriand lambasted Napoleon's battle strategy, particularly his treatment of new recruits: "the contempt for the lives of men and for France herself has come to the point of calling the conscripts [[NewMeat 'the raw material']] and [[TropeNamer 'the cannon fodder']]."

to:

* According to TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the first documented use of the term "cannon fodder" appears in an [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte anti-Napoleonic]] pamphlet by French writer François-René de Chateaubriand, [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars published in 1814]]. In it, Chateaubriand lambasted Napoleon's battle strategy, particularly his treatment of new recruits: "the contempt for the lives of men and for France herself has come to the point of calling the conscripts [[NewMeat 'the raw material']] and [[TropeNamer 'the cannon fodder']]."
22nd Jun '17 12:50:14 PM FGHIK
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The term Cannon Fodder itself originated in the endless assaults of the UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Western Front, where there were no operational breakthroughs past the enemy's trench defenses and ''every'' battle consisted entirely of the hard-fought 'assault' phase (assault, breakthrough, exploitation). In this context of these huge battles in which trenches weren't taken faster than they could be dug[[note]] the real problem was with the artillery cover. Friendly artillery would blow the shit out of the defenses, which the infantry would then swarm and defend against enemy counter-attacks. But all artillery pieces have limited range, leaving the infantry vulnerable to bombardments from enemy artillery. To keep advancing you'd need to move the city block's worth of artillery foward.... together with an actual mountain of ammunition and horse fodder and human-food... through the area you just blew the shit out of... faster than the enemy could use trains to just dump all their stuff where it was needed. In practice this was very, very tricky to pull off even if you had all the horses and supplies you needed and organised them perfectly. The Entente never really managed it, with all operations before 1918 having to stop advancing eventually due to unsustainable horse-deaths (from exhaustion) [[/note]], the infantrymen [[BlackHumor were said]] to be nothing more than fodder (a term usually used to describe horse feed) for the artillery. However, its French equivalent ''chair à canon'' (cannon meat) was used a hundred years earlier by Chateaubriand, this being a reference to artillery's fearsome killing power and pivotal role on the pre-rifle battlefields of the Napoleonic Wars. A similar term from times when artillery pieces were so expensive, rare, and heavy they were used almost exclusively for sieges and ships ("food for powder") dates back to the 16th century at least; it is used by Falstaff in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/HenryIVPart1''.

to:

The term Cannon Fodder itself originated in the endless assaults of the UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Western Front, where there were no operational breakthroughs past the enemy's trench defenses and ''every'' battle consisted entirely of the hard-fought 'assault' phase (assault, breakthrough, exploitation). In this context of these huge battles in which trenches weren't taken faster than they could be dug[[note]] the real problem was with the artillery cover. Friendly artillery would blow the shit out of the defenses, which the infantry would then swarm and defend against enemy counter-attacks. But all artillery pieces have limited range, leaving the infantry vulnerable to bombardments from enemy artillery. To keep advancing you'd need to move the city block's worth of artillery foward....forward... together with an actual mountain of ammunition and horse fodder and human-food... through the area you just blew the shit out of... faster than the enemy could use trains to just dump all their stuff where it was needed. In practice this was very, very tricky to pull off even if you had all the horses and supplies you needed and organised them perfectly. The Entente never really managed it, with all operations before 1918 having to stop advancing eventually due to unsustainable horse-deaths (from exhaustion) [[/note]], the infantrymen [[BlackHumor were said]] to be nothing more than fodder (a term usually used to describe horse feed) for the artillery. However, its French equivalent ''chair à canon'' (cannon meat) was used a hundred years earlier by Chateaubriand, this being a reference to artillery's fearsome killing power and pivotal role on the pre-rifle battlefields of the Napoleonic Wars. A similar term from times when artillery pieces were so expensive, rare, and heavy they were used almost exclusively for sieges and ships ("food for powder") dates back to the 16th century at least; it is used by Falstaff in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/HenryIVPart1''.



** In the game, the concept of "ablative wounds" is the game mechanic of this; Most infantry squads only have a limited number of units that can be upgraded to special weapons or heavy weapons, while the rest are stuck with their stock equipment (which range from comically ineffective to just a tad inefficent, with very few exceptions). Thus the only use for these models is to absorb incoming shots to preserve the heavy/special weapon gunners from harm so they can make the most out of their gun. The most prevalent of these are Tactical Squads; they must be at full strength to take a Heavy Weapon in the first place, meaning you're stuck buying at least 7 generic members (the other two can be upgraded to be a veteran sergeant and a special weapons) who have no other options. Since the Heavy Weapon guy will be firing at stuff far out of the range of the generic ones, all they can do is take hits.

to:

** In the game, the concept of "ablative wounds" is the game mechanic of this; Most infantry squads only have a limited number of units that can be upgraded to special weapons or heavy weapons, while the rest are stuck with their stock equipment (which range from comically ineffective to just a tad inefficent, inefficient, with very few exceptions). Thus the only use for these models is to absorb incoming shots to preserve the heavy/special weapon gunners from harm so they can make the most out of their gun. The most prevalent of these are Tactical Squads; they must be at full strength to take a Heavy Weapon in the first place, meaning you're stuck buying at least 7 generic members (the other two can be upgraded to be a veteran sergeant and a special weapons) who have no other options. Since the Heavy Weapon guy will be firing at stuff far out of the range of the generic ones, all they can do is take hits.



* In the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series, the Covenant military use the Grunts primarily as cannon fodder, giving them such glorious jobs as running across active minefields to clear the way for more elite troops. Their fighting skills are generally laughable at best, as their tactics are usually nothing more complex than taking potshots at the enemy and hoping it dies. They also tend to run away when their squad leader is killed. However, Grunts can also be surprisingly dangerous in large numbers; when the entire Grunt race rebelled against the Covenant, it took an Arbiter ordering a massive orbital bombardment of their homeworld to end their revolt. Additionally, some Grunts carry heavy weapons capable of instantly tearing the player apart, and the sticky grenades that all ranks love to throw make them a potential threat even when the player is in a heavy vehicle. They've also taken some levels in badass as the series progressed; from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' onward, Grunts can drive light vehicles and will sometimes attempt to suicide-bomb their foes instead of running away if things go south for them, and ''VideoGame/Halo5Guardians''[='s=] Firefight mode gives us Grunts with recharging energy shields and Grunts piloting superpowerful MiniMecha.

to:

* In the ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' series, the Covenant military use the Grunts primarily as cannon fodder, giving them such glorious jobs as running across active minefields to clear the way for more elite troops. Their fighting skills are generally laughable at best, as their tactics are usually nothing more complex than taking potshots at the enemy and hoping it dies. They also tend to run away when their squad leader is killed. However, Grunts can also be surprisingly dangerous in large numbers; when the entire Grunt race rebelled against the Covenant, it took an Arbiter ordering a massive orbital bombardment of their homeworld to end their revolt. Additionally, some Grunts carry heavy weapons capable of instantly tearing the player apart, and the sticky grenades that all ranks love to throw make them a potential threat even when the player is in a heavy vehicle. They've also taken some levels in badass as the series progressed; from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' onward, Grunts can drive light vehicles and will sometimes attempt to suicide-bomb their foes instead of running away if things go south for them, and ''VideoGame/Halo5Guardians''[='s=] Firefight mode gives us Grunts with recharging energy shields and Grunts piloting superpowerful super powerful MiniMecha.



* ''Videogame/MechWarrior'' generally turns tanks, infantry, and aerospace fighters (all of which are deadly in the [[Tabletopgame/BattleTech original material]]) into cannon fodder designed to waste your [[HumongousMecha BattleMech's]] ammunition reserves upon before the enemy Battlemech force shows up. The only time they're dangerous in ''Mechwarrior 4: Mercenaries'', for example, is when the AI sics over 40 tanks onto your squadron. The trope is averted to a hilarious degree in ''Living Legends'', where countless ''Mech 4'' veterans were slaughtered by rampaging [[MightyGlacier Demolisher]] [[TankGoodness mech-hunter tanks]] and angry [[PoweredArmor battlearmor]] players [[PersonalSpaceInvader swarming over their mech]].

to:

* ''Videogame/MechWarrior'' generally turns tanks, infantry, and aerospace fighters (all of which are deadly in the [[Tabletopgame/BattleTech original material]]) into cannon fodder designed to waste your [[HumongousMecha BattleMech's]] ammunition reserves upon before the enemy Battlemech force shows up. The only time they're dangerous in ''Mechwarrior 4: Mercenaries'', for example, is when the AI sics over 40 tanks onto your squadron. The trope is averted to a hilarious degree in ''Living Legends'', where countless ''Mech 4'' veterans were slaughtered by rampaging [[MightyGlacier Demolisher]] [[TankGoodness mech-hunter tanks]] and angry [[PoweredArmor battlearmor]] battle armor]] players [[PersonalSpaceInvader swarming over their mech]].



* ''How many hordes there are in a Chinese platoon?'' A sarcastic joke amongst the UN troops during the Korean War. The constant nighttime [[ZergRush infiltration-assault attacks]] of People's Liberation Army infantry Platoons (50-100 men) on UN infantry Squads (10 men), in the context of PLA Batallions (500 men) attacking UN Platoons (50-100 men) produced appalling casualties which broadly favoured the Chinese. The daytime UN artillery bombardments and infantry-supported tank attacks, on the other hand, produced even more apalling casualties which heavily favoured the UN. Despite their bravery and cunning in executing such a strategy the balance of losses still worked out very badly against the PLA, not least because of their lesser medical resources.

to:

* ''How many hordes there are in a Chinese platoon?'' A sarcastic joke amongst the UN troops during the Korean War. The constant nighttime [[ZergRush infiltration-assault attacks]] of People's Liberation Army infantry Platoons (50-100 men) on UN infantry Squads (10 men), in the context of PLA Batallions Battalions (500 men) attacking UN Platoons (50-100 men) produced appalling casualties which broadly favoured the Chinese. The daytime UN artillery bombardments and infantry-supported tank attacks, on the other hand, produced even more apalling appalling casualties which heavily favoured the UN. Despite their bravery and cunning in executing such a strategy the balance of losses still worked out very badly against the PLA, not least because of their lesser medical resources.
8th Apr '17 12:37:27 AM GordyTepig
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Invoked in ''Series/ScreamQueens2015'' during the second season. [[AlphaBitch Chanel]] wants to ensure her survival by recruiting girls into the [[GirlPosse Chanels]], whose jobs will mostly consist of being her minions and getting killed by the BigBad, so the main Chanels can live. This ends up ultimately working, as five of the six Chanels end up being targeted and killed by the Green Meanies, while Chanels 1, 3, 5 and 6 and 8 survive.
7th Apr '17 12:46:49 AM Yukianesa
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Tau have a habit of turning their enemies into this repeatedly, provided they can stay at a safe distance to do so.

to:

** Tau have a habit of turning their enemies into this repeatedly, provided they can stay at a safe distance to do so. They also have the Kroot to be this to their Fire Warriors, battlesuits and other really shooty stuff to stop them [[CripplingOverspecialisation being assaulted and defeated in melee]].
** Chaos Space Marines have Cultists, dirt cheap troops of similar stats and equipment to Imperial Guard Conscripts, meant to be disposable bodies and "hiding spots" for the elite marines and special characters. The Alpha Legion is uniquely the only Chaos legion which actually bothers to train their cultists and rely on them for something other than catching bullets, [[PragmaticVillainy and one of the most successful ones, go figure]].
14th Feb '17 8:14:14 PM Yukianesa
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Iron Warriors Space Marines were so noted for taking this approach to their attached Army regiments that pre-corruption Horus signed a specific order that Perturabo's troops could only be given control over [[BoxedCrook expendable penal regiments]] and enslaved forces from recently conquered worlds. Was it in any way surprising that they ended up [[HeelFaceTurn falling to Chaos]]? Falling to Chaos made them ''even worse''.

to:

** The Iron Warriors Space Marines were so noted for taking this approach to their attached Army regiments that pre-corruption Horus signed a specific order that Perturabo's troops could only be given control over [[BoxedCrook expendable penal regiments]] and enslaved forces from recently conquered worlds. Was it in any way surprising that they ended up [[HeelFaceTurn [[FaceHeelTurn falling to Chaos]]? Falling to Chaos made them ''even worse''.
14th Feb '17 8:13:25 PM Yukianesa
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Iron Warriors Space Marines were so noted for taking this approach to their attached Army regiments that pre-corruption Horus signed a specific order that Perturabo's troops could only be given control over [[BoxedCrook expendable penal regiments]] and enslaved forces from recently conquered worlds.

to:

** The Iron Warriors Space Marines were so noted for taking this approach to their attached Army regiments that pre-corruption Horus signed a specific order that Perturabo's troops could only be given control over [[BoxedCrook expendable penal regiments]] and enslaved forces from recently conquered worlds. Was it in any way surprising that they ended up [[HeelFaceTurn falling to Chaos]]? Falling to Chaos made them ''even worse''.
26th Oct '16 12:39:52 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' gives us... [[BigScrewedUpFamily the Freys]] (and their hapless retainers). [[WeHaveReserves There are a lot of them]], and the House is at least rich enough to equip them all fairly well. There are also a lot of factions willing to wield armies in the field, most of whom they have tried to ally with. The family has, however, gone and made the strategic mistake of getting [[HateSink generally hated]] by ''all'' sides for [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder various]] [[SacredHospitality reasons]] just as they've ditched their habit of turning up more than fashionably late to wars. Guess who now has pride of place near the very top of the list of those chosen for the front lines when any given commander wishes to reserve their best, most loyal troops? Go on... guess.

to:

* ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' gives us... [[BigScrewedUpFamily the Freys]] (and their hapless retainers). [[WeHaveReserves There are a lot of them]], and the House is at least rich enough to equip them all fairly well. There are also a lot of factions willing to wield armies in the field, most of whom they have tried to ally with. The family has, however, gone and made the strategic mistake of getting [[HateSink generally hated]] by ''all'' sides for [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder various]] [[SacredHospitality reasons]] just as they've ditched their habit of turning up more than fashionably late to wars. Guess who now has pride of place near the very top of the list of those chosen for the front lines when any given commander wishes to reserve their best, most loyal troops? Go on... guess.



* One of the most chilling examples is AllQuietOnTheWesternFront, where we are treated to scores of deaths of nameless individuals. The narrator, Paul, only bothers to give a handful of his comrades names, and AnyoneCanDie. Paul shows less and less concern about dying soldiers as time goes on, showing ever growing indifference to the deaths of countless men. The novel may be the TropeCodifier for this trope, at least as far as modern armies go.

to:

* One of the most chilling examples is AllQuietOnTheWesternFront, ''Literature/AllQuietOnTheWesternFront'', where we are treated to scores of deaths of nameless individuals. The narrator, Paul, only bothers to give a handful of his comrades names, and AnyoneCanDie. Paul shows less and less concern about dying soldiers as time goes on, showing ever growing indifference to the deaths of countless men. The novel may be the TropeCodifier for this trope, at least as far as modern armies go.
This list shows the last 10 events of 181. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CannonFodder