History Main / ButThouMust

27th Feb '17 4:00:40 AM Vir
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Rayman 2}}'', you are given the choice whether or not to accept a haul of treasure. You get a plot-advancing potion if you decline, and a non-standard game over if you accept.
* In ''VideoGame/DrawnToLife'', when Mari is pleading for your assistance as the Creator, you can break your apparent years-long silence to tell her, at her people's hour of need, that you won't help her. After hearing ''that'' from what amounts to her deity, she says she guesses it's over, and it sends you back to the TitleScreen. (Selecting that file lets you skip the drawing-in-a-book stuff to go try that scene again, at least.)

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Rayman 2}}'', ''VideoGame/Rayman2'', you are given the choice whether or not to accept a haul of treasure. You get a plot-advancing potion if you decline, and a non-standard game over NonStandardGameOver if you accept.
* In ''VideoGame/DrawnToLife'', when Mari is pleading for your assistance as the Creator, you can break your apparent years-long silence to tell her, at her people's hour of need, that you won't help her. After hearing ''that'' from what amounts to her deity, she says she guesses it's over, and it sends you back to the TitleScreen.StartScreen. (Selecting that file lets you skip the drawing-in-a-book stuff to go try that scene again, at least.)



* In ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'', attempting to exit the first level via Easy Street summons the Blue Fairy, who takes away everything you picked up and sends you back to the start. After Geppetto falls in the water at the end of the final level, if you try walking left instead going right to save him, you lose a life and have to replay the level.

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* In ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'', attempting to exit the first level via Easy Street summons the Blue Fairy, who takes away everything you picked up and sends you back to the start. After Geppetto falls in the water at the end of the final level, if you try walking left instead of going right to save him, you lose a life and have to replay the level.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'', when you and Wheatly disabled the neurotoxins and the turrets set up by [=GLaDOS=], you have a free shot in disabling [=GLaDOS=] by simply pushing a button and there's nothing stopping you. Try as you might, no matter how much you stand there and refuse to press the button, Wheatly will still goad you into pressing it until you do. Even if you know in advance that [[spoiler: Wheatly goes mad with power once you place him in charge of the facility and his incompetence will blow it up]], you still have to press the button to advance the plot.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'', ''VideoGame/Portal2'', when you and Wheatly disabled Wheatley disable the neurotoxins and the turrets set up by [=GLaDOS=], you have a free shot in disabling [=GLaDOS=] by simply pushing a button and there's nothing stopping you. Try as you might, no matter how much you stand there and refuse to press the button, Wheatly Wheatley will still goad you into pressing it until you do. Even if you know in advance that [[spoiler: Wheatly Wheatley goes mad with power once you place him in charge of the facility and his incompetence will blow it up]], you still have to press the button to advance the plot.



* At the beginning of ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonRescueTeam'', your partner asks you if you want to form a rescue team with him/her. You have the option to refuse, but your partner won't let you into your house until you accept.

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* At the beginning of ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonRescueTeam'', your partner asks you if you want to form a rescue team with him/her.them. You have the option to refuse, but your partner won't let you into your house until you accept.



** It also plays with it near the end of the game. [[spoiler:At one point, the shapeshifting villainess Mimi disguises herself as Merlon and tells you to hit a box, in a way that's an obvious trap. If you try to avoid it by talking to her, instead of just repeating a single response, she has a variety of responses -- including direct LampshadeHanging in the form of mention of hypothetical [[EventFlag flags]] that can prevent you from doing what you want unless you trigger them.]]
** Inverted later on when [[spoiler:Dimentio offers to team up with Mario and Luigi to take down Count Bleck]]. If you answer "no" a few times like you're supposed to the game continues, but if you answer "yes" a few times - as he'll continually sweeten the pot even though you're already accepting his offer, to throw up an even bigger red flag - then he'll [[spoiler:slap a mind-control plant on your head]] and give you a NonstandardGameOver.
* A short instance in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' after rescuing Princess Toadstool from Booster and returning her to the Mushroom Kingdom, she'll say she is going to stay. She shortly contradicts this and sneaks out via parasol, and asks to join the party. If the player says no, one party member will come out, continuing on until they're all yelling at Mario, and Peach joins the group anyway.

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** *** It also plays with it near the end of the game. [[spoiler:At one point, the shapeshifting villainess Mimi disguises herself as Merlon and tells you to hit a box, in a way that's an obvious trap. If you try to avoid it by talking to her, instead of just repeating a single response, she has a variety of responses -- including direct LampshadeHanging in the form of mention of hypothetical [[EventFlag flags]] that can prevent you from doing what you want unless you trigger them.]]
** *** Inverted later on when [[spoiler:Dimentio offers to team up with Mario and Luigi to take down Count Bleck]]. If you answer "no" a few times like you're supposed to the game continues, but if you answer "yes" a few times - as he'll continually sweeten the pot even though you're already accepting his offer, to throw up an even bigger red flag - then he'll [[spoiler:slap a mind-control plant on your head]] and give you a NonstandardGameOver.
* A short instance in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'': after rescuing Princess Toadstool from Booster and returning her to the Mushroom Kingdom, she'll say she is going to stay. She shortly contradicts this and sneaks out via parasol, and asks to join the party. If the player says no, one party member will come out, continuing on until they're all yelling at Mario, and Peach joins the group anyway.



* In the opening of ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPaperJam Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam]]'' the player, as Luigi, is tasked by Toad with checking out a hole causing a draft. You can't actually say no (As Luigi only communicates by SpeakingSimlish in this game. Or in this case, vaguely Italian.), but you can try to walk back out the door. Doing this, however, will prompt Toad to stop and berate Luigi. Trying again and again will yield the same results, with Toad getting more and more agitated until he decides to stop verbally chastising Luigi, and instead drop a cartoonish 1 ton weight on Luigi's head.
* Annoyingly used in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}''. Though you may be itching to spend time with a social link, your allies will occasionally pop up to ask you to do something with them or for them that will use up your "after school" hours. No matter how much you say "No" you'll be forced into the problem anyway.

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* In the opening of ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPaperJam Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam]]'' ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPaperJam'' the player, as Luigi, is tasked by Toad with checking out a hole causing a draft. You can't actually say no (As Luigi only communicates by SpeakingSimlish in this game. Or in this case, vaguely Italian.), but you can try to walk back out the door. Doing this, however, will prompt Toad to stop and berate Luigi. Trying again and again will yield the same results, with Toad getting more and more agitated until he decides to stop verbally chastising Luigi, and instead drop a cartoonish 1 ton weight on Luigi's head.
* Annoyingly used in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}''.''VideoGame/Persona3''. Though you may be itching to spend time with a social link, your allies will occasionally pop up to ask you to do something with them or for them that will use up your "after school" hours. No matter how much you say "No" you'll be forced into the problem anyway.



* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' is a little better about this--you're told about the culture and sports clubs but you are not forced into joining either. The game still has "plot interruption days" though. Some of the social links (like your allies) are forced but building them up gives them new tricks in battle and all social links no longer reverse or break if left alone for prolonged periods of time. You get forced into eating Curry made by [[LethalChef Yukiko and Chie]], resulting in you passing out.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': If you refuse to accept the opening ThisIsAWorkOfFiction disclaimer, the narrator proceeds to say "Well, then you can't play this game" and returns you to the StartScreen.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' ''VideoGame/Persona4'' is a little better about this--you're told about the culture and sports clubs but you are not forced into joining either. The game still has "plot interruption days" though. Some of the social links (like your allies) are forced but building them up gives them new tricks in battle and all social links no longer reverse or break if left alone for prolonged periods of time. You get forced into eating Curry made by [[LethalChef Yukiko and Chie]], resulting in you passing out.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': ''VideoGame/Persona5'': If you refuse to accept the opening ThisIsAWorkOfFiction disclaimer, the narrator proceeds to say "Well, then you can't play this game" and returns you to the StartScreen.



** ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' features another subversion -- at one point, your sister suggests that you give up on the war and run away with her. If you agree, you actually ''do it'', for a while, and a brief optional plot arc in which you abandon your responsibilities follows; this ends with the hero confronted by his followers and forced to choose again. Insisting on abandoning them at this point causes a NonstandardGameOver, and it's implied that you've lost their respect in any case.

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** ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' ''Suikoden II'' features another subversion -- at one point, your sister suggests that you give up on the war and run away with her. If you agree, you actually ''do it'', for a while, and a brief optional plot arc in which you abandon your responsibilities follows; this ends with the hero confronted by his followers and forced to choose again. Insisting on abandoning them at this point causes a NonstandardGameOver, and it's implied that you've lost their respect in any case.



** ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has at least one NonstandardGameOver and one [[MultipleEndings Bad End]] you can get this way. In the case of the [[MultipleEndings Bad End]], you earn it by [[spoiler:refusing to use the Rune of Punishment on the flaming ships about to ram your headquarters, even while your strategist, mentor and ''everyone else'' around you ''begs'' you to just use the damn Rune. It's pretty much a TooDumbToLive moment, even though ''overusing the Rune can kill you''... Damned if you do...]]

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** ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has at least one NonstandardGameOver and one [[MultipleEndings Bad End]] you can get this way. In the case of the [[MultipleEndings Bad End]], End, you earn it by [[spoiler:refusing to use the Rune of Punishment on the flaming ships about to ram your headquarters, even while your strategist, mentor and ''everyone else'' around you ''begs'' you to just use the damn Rune. It's pretty much a TooDumbToLive moment, even though ''overusing the Rune can kill you''... Damned if you do...]]



** Another NonstandardGameOver in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' comes with choosing the option to remain on the deserted island early in the game. Doing so traps you in the island and places you into a GroundhogDayLoop. Hope you saved...

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** Another NonstandardGameOver in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' ''Suikoden IV'' comes with choosing the option to remain on the deserted island early in the game. Doing so traps you in the island and places you into a GroundhogDayLoop. Hope you saved...



** Later in ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', an overwhelming enemy force marches on your castle. You have the option of either abandoning the castle and letting them take it, or drawing the line and taking a stand. If you choose to take a stand, several of your most experienced generals and advisers try to talk you out of it, one after another -- but if you keep insisting, they actually all fall in line, and you face the enemy head-on. A very difficult battle ensues, in which at least one of your companions ''will'' die. [[spoiler:Conversely, abandoning the castle instead will lead to a smashing victory for your side, as falling back turns out to have been part of your strategist's {{plan}}. Of course, it would have been nice if [[YouDidntAsk she'd told you that...]]]]
* A strange version of this can be found towards the end of ''VideoGame/EarthBoundBeginnings''. After defeating Teddy in battle he will offer to join your party to Mt. Itoi. If you refuse him repeatedly Ninten's father will call and order you to let him join. Saying no again will cause the group to be teleported back to the game's starting point at Ninten's house. Apparently he really wanted his twelve year old son hanging out with a known gangster.

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** Later in ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', ''Suikoden V'', an overwhelming enemy force marches on your castle. You have the option of either abandoning the castle and letting them take it, or drawing the line and taking a stand. If you choose to take a stand, several of your most experienced generals and advisers try to talk you out of it, one after another -- but if you keep insisting, they actually all fall in line, and you face the enemy head-on. A very difficult battle ensues, in which at least one of your companions ''will'' die. [[spoiler:Conversely, abandoning the castle instead will lead to a smashing victory for your side, as falling back turns out to have been part of your strategist's {{plan}}. Of course, it would have been nice if [[YouDidntAsk she'd told you that...]]]]
* A strange version of this can be found towards the end of ''VideoGame/EarthBoundBeginnings''. After defeating Teddy in battle he will offer to join your party to Mt. Itoi. If you refuse him repeatedly Ninten's father will call and order you to let him join. Saying no again will cause the group to be teleported back to the game's starting point at Ninten's house. Apparently he really wanted his twelve year 12-year old son hanging out with a known gangster.



** And again in ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', before [[spoiler:time-travelling]] to the BigBad's final lair, Dr. Andonuts gives a big inspirational speech about how Ness is TheChosenOne and all, and by pressing the "go back in time" button with his own hand, he is fulfilling his ultimate destiny, and then asks a yes/no question as to whether you want to do it. Saying no prompts him to simply say "Oh. I see", and then ask his own son to do it instead. Saying no past that just loops back to Ness, then back to Jeff, and so on until you press the button.

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** And again in ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', before [[spoiler:time-travelling]] Before [[spoiler:time travelling]] to the BigBad's final lair, Dr. Andonuts gives a big inspirational speech about how Ness is TheChosenOne and all, and by pressing the "go back in time" button with his own hand, he is fulfilling his ultimate destiny, and then asks a yes/no question as to whether you want to do it. Saying no prompts him to simply say "Oh. I see", and then ask his own son to do it instead. Saying no past that just loops back to Ness, then back to Jeff, and so on until you press the button.



* Most of the ''Zelda'' games use it, such as the Great Deku Tree asking for Link's help at the beginning of ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' but ignoring him if he refuses.

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* Most of the ''Zelda'' games use it, such as the Great Deku Tree asking for Link's help at the beginning of ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' but ignoring him if he refuses.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyCrystalChronicles'' offers only these in its ''[[VideoGame/FinalFantasyCrystalChroniclesEchoesOfTime Echoes of Time]]'' spin off. Your choice of response typically only changes the very next sentence in the conversion, if that. One conversation is especially bad, and gives you the following options: "Let's hear a song", "Let's hear a song", "Let's hear a song", and "Let's hear a song".

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyCrystalChronicles'' offers only these in its ''[[VideoGame/FinalFantasyCrystalChroniclesEchoesOfTime Echoes of Time]]'' spin off.spin-off. Your choice of response typically only changes the very next sentence in the conversion, if that. One conversation is especially bad, and gives you the following options: "Let's hear a song", "Let's hear a song", "Let's hear a song", and "Let's hear a song".



** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the introductory mission of the same game, when Phoenix Wright is suffering from complete amnesia, the judge will ask him if the defense is ready. If the player chooses no, Phoenix asks if it's okay if he says no. The judge responds that of course it's not, prompting Phoenix to wonder why he asked in the first place.

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** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the introductory mission of the same game, when game. When Phoenix Wright is suffering from complete amnesia, the judge will ask him if the defense is ready. If the player chooses no, Phoenix asks if it's okay if he says no. The judge responds that of course it's not, prompting Phoenix to wonder why he asked in the first place.



-->Can you see a cave?
-->''> No''
-->Yes you can.
-->Do you want to go in?
-->''> No''
-->Yes you do.

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-->Can you see a cave?
-->''> No''
-->Yes
cave?\\
''> No''\\
Yes
you can.
-->Do
can.\\
Do
you want to go in?
-->''> No''
-->Yes
in?\\
''> No''\\
Yes
you do.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', the dates you can go on with Papyrus, Undyne and Alphys in the Pacifist route all function like this. With Papyrus, you can ignore or outright insult him, and he'll interpret it as you being shy or so honest with your feelings that it overwhelms his passions. Undyne requires you select some tea to proceed with her, which the game blatantly tell you is the correct choice, and picking anything else has her refuse or make a snide comment. Finally, Alphys will always come to the same conclusions no matter which choices you make, and the final choice made after the date doesn't affect the game at all.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', the dates you can go on with Papyrus, Undyne and Alphys in the Pacifist route all function like this. With Papyrus, you can ignore or outright insult him, and he'll interpret it as you being shy or so honest with your feelings that it overwhelms his passions. Undyne requires you select some tea to proceed with her, which the game blatantly tell tells you is the correct choice, and picking anything else has her refuse or make a snide comment. Finally, Alphys will always come to the same conclusions no matter which choices you make, and the final choice made after the date doesn't affect the game at all.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' forces a choice on the player at the conclusion of the main quest that ends the game either way - see its entry under StupidityIsTheOnlyOption. Bethesda fortunately fixed it in the DLC ''Broken Steel''. They still tell you that whoever enters the chamber will die, but even if you choose to sacrifice yourself they manage to miraculously pull you out before you die.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' forces a choice on the player at the conclusion of the main quest that ends the game either way - see its entry under StupidityIsTheOnlyOption. Bethesda fortunately fixed it in the DLC ''Broken Steel''. They still tell you that whoever enters the chamber will die, but even if you choose to sacrifice yourself they manage to miraculously pull you out before you die.
27th Feb '17 2:05:29 AM Vir
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-->'''Mabel:''' He's looking at it, he's looking at it!
-->'''Guy:''' *reading note* Uh, do you like me? Yes. Definitely. Absolutely?
-->'''Mabel:''' I rigged it.
* In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}}'', Patrick writes a song of... questionable quality, sharing it with [=SpongeBob=] almost immediately afterwards.

to:

-->'''Mabel:''' He's looking at it, he's looking at it!
-->'''Guy:'''
it!\\
'''Guy:'''
*reading note* Uh, do you like me? Yes. Definitely. Absolutely?
-->'''Mabel:'''
Absolutely?\\
'''Mabel:'''
I rigged it.
* In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}}'', ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', Patrick writes a song of... questionable quality, sharing it with [=SpongeBob=] almost immediately afterwards.
27th Feb '17 2:05:07 AM Vir
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Occasionally a game utilizing this trope will toss in a question where an incorrect answer results in a NonStandardGameOver. Such questions are usually pretty obvious (the BigBad [[WeCanRuleTogether asking you to become his disciple]], for example), though, so it's [[SchmuckBait easy to avoid falling into that trap]]. Either way, this represents the game forcing you to FollowThePlottedLine, ''period.''

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Occasionally a game utilizing this trope will toss in a question where an incorrect answer results in a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. Such questions are usually pretty obvious (the BigBad [[WeCanRuleTogether asking you to become his disciple]], for example), though, so it's [[SchmuckBait easy to avoid falling into that trap]]. Either way, this represents the game forcing you to FollowThePlottedLine, ''period.''



!!Examples where giving the "wrong" answer makes it impossible to proceed until you give the "right" answer (including giving [[NonStandardGameOver Non-Standard Game Overs]]):

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!!Examples where giving the "wrong" answer makes it impossible to proceed until you give the "right" answer (including giving [[NonStandardGameOver [[NonstandardGameOver Non-Standard Game Overs]]):



** Near the end of the game, the BigBad gives you the option to rule beside him. Agreeing to this (twice, since he was sure you'd turn him down and is in disbelief after the first answer) leads to a NonStandardGameOver. After beating the FinalBoss, if you have found Princess Iris, then she will want to follow you on your next quest. Declining this request prompts a [[ShoutOut "But Thou Must!"]] until you finally concede.

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** Near the end of the game, the BigBad gives you the option to rule beside him. Agreeing to this (twice, since he was sure you'd turn him down and is in disbelief after the first answer) leads to a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. After beating the FinalBoss, if you have found Princess Iris, then she will want to follow you on your next quest. Declining this request prompts a [[ShoutOut "But Thou Must!"]] until you finally concede.



* The BigBad of ''[[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Boktai 2: Solar Boy Django]]'' gives you the option to join him before the battle, and choosing yes earns you a superimposed image of Django's [[SuperPoweredEvilSide vampire self]] across the screen along with a NonStandardGameOver. There's also an EasterEgg late in the game where Lita offers to let you suck her blood, where choosing yes gets a similar ending.

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* The BigBad of ''[[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Boktai 2: Solar Boy Django]]'' gives you the option to join him before the battle, and choosing yes earns you a superimposed image of Django's [[SuperPoweredEvilSide vampire self]] across the screen along with a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. There's also an EasterEgg late in the game where Lita offers to let you suck her blood, where choosing yes gets a similar ending.



* In ''VideoGame/TheMatrixPathOfNeo'', the player is presented with the choice Morpheus gave to Neo in the first film: the choice between the red and blue pill. If the player takes the blue pill, [[NonStandardGameOver the game is over]].

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* In ''VideoGame/TheMatrixPathOfNeo'', the player is presented with the choice Morpheus gave to Neo in the first film: the choice between the red and blue pill. If the player takes the blue pill, [[NonStandardGameOver [[NonstandardGameOver the game is over]].



* The Creator/{{Sierra}} game ''VideoGame/TheAdventuresOfWillyBeamish'' frequently used the NonStandardGameOver variant. An incorrect answer could get you sent to military school, hospitalised, or [[{{Unwinnable}} denied an essential item]].

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* The Creator/{{Sierra}} game ''VideoGame/TheAdventuresOfWillyBeamish'' frequently used the NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver variant. An incorrect answer could get you sent to military school, hospitalised, or [[{{Unwinnable}} denied an essential item]].



* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryII'' throws one at the player: A pushy used Saurus salesman (played by [[Creator/MarxBrothers Groucho Marx]]) tries to get you to buy a riding saurus. The player can say no to drive the price down. If you ''keep'' saying no, you eventually get a NonStandardGameOver, because you ''really'' need to buy that Saurus to complete the game (even though it's only actually relevant in two cutscenes and not at all in gameplay).

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* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryII'' throws one at the player: A pushy used Saurus salesman (played by [[Creator/MarxBrothers Groucho Marx]]) tries to get you to buy a riding saurus. The player can say no to drive the price down. If you ''keep'' saying no, you eventually get a NonStandardGameOver, NonstandardGameOver, because you ''really'' need to buy that Saurus to complete the game (even though it's only actually relevant in two cutscenes and not at all in gameplay).



** In ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity'', refusing to [[spoiler: return to the Pokémon world twice will slap you with a NonStandardGameOver]].

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** In ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity'', refusing to [[spoiler: return to the Pokémon world twice will slap you with a NonStandardGameOver]].NonstandardGameOver]].



** The {{Trope Namer|s}} usage in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' -- the princess asks you to let her accompany you on your travels, which inevitably leads to her marrying you, and if you answer no, she simply says "But thou must." and gives you the choices again. You can keep hitting "No" until the cows come home, but she just won't take it for an answer. (Telling the Dragon Lord "Yes" when he asks you to join him, however, is a NonStandardGameOver. [[note]]This is only true in the NES version. Agreeing his offer in the Super Famicom and GBC remakes return you to Rimuldar's inn.[[/note]])

to:

** The {{Trope Namer|s}} usage in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' -- the princess asks you to let her accompany you on your travels, which inevitably leads to her marrying you, and if you answer no, she simply says "But thou must." and gives you the choices again. You can keep hitting "No" until the cows come home, but she just won't take it for an answer. (Telling the Dragon Lord "Yes" when he asks you to join him, however, is a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. [[note]]This is only true in the NES version. Agreeing his offer in the Super Famicom and GBC remakes return you to Rimuldar's inn.[[/note]])



* The obscure UsefulNotes/GameBoy RPG ''VideoGame/GreatGreed'' has a scene in which a bad guy [[WeCanRuleTogether asks you to join their side]]. If you say "yes" you get a [[FissionMailed fake]] NonStandardGameOver - your NPC ally [[CutscenePowerToTheMax blasts you with a lightning bolt]], you see a GameOver screen for a moment, and then she says that it was a demonstration of what would have happened if you were serious. You are then returned to the game as it was just before you talked to the boss.

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* The obscure UsefulNotes/GameBoy RPG ''VideoGame/GreatGreed'' has a scene in which a bad guy [[WeCanRuleTogether asks you to join their side]]. If you say "yes" you get a [[FissionMailed fake]] NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver - your NPC ally [[CutscenePowerToTheMax blasts you with a lightning bolt]], you see a GameOver screen for a moment, and then she says that it was a demonstration of what would have happened if you were serious. You are then returned to the game as it was just before you talked to the boss.



** In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' you can get a NonStandardGameOver by [[spoiler:accepting the Shadow Queen's invitation to join her at the end of the game]]. This actually still allows for a conclusive ending if you're feeling really lazy.
*** You can get another NonStandardGameOver by [[spoiler:reading the diary of the ghost when you are travelling in the train]]. And that even though you were told [[TooDumbToLive not to do it]] several times.
** ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'' subverts this. If you say "no" to Merlon enough times at the beginning, when he offers you the first Pure Heart, you'll eventually get a NonStandardGameOver. Note that this occurs before the actual gameplay begins. The same happens if you repeatedly refuse an offer for a mission from Queen Jaydes. And also if you [[TooDumbToLive refuse to put on a helmet in outer space]].

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** In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' you can get a NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver by [[spoiler:accepting the Shadow Queen's invitation to join her at the end of the game]]. This actually still allows for a conclusive ending if you're feeling really lazy.
*** You can get another NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver by [[spoiler:reading the diary of the ghost when you are travelling in the train]]. And that even though you were told [[TooDumbToLive not to do it]] several times.
** ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'' subverts this. If you say "no" to Merlon enough times at the beginning, when he offers you the first Pure Heart, you'll eventually get a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. Note that this occurs before the actual gameplay begins. The same happens if you repeatedly refuse an offer for a mission from Queen Jaydes. And also if you [[TooDumbToLive refuse to put on a helmet in outer space]].



** Inverted later on when [[spoiler:Dimentio offers to team up with Mario and Luigi to take down Count Bleck]]. If you answer "no" a few times like you're supposed to the game continues, but if you answer "yes" a few times - as he'll continually sweeten the pot even though you're already accepting his offer, to throw up an even bigger red flag - then he'll [[spoiler:slap a mind-control plant on your head]] and give you a NonStandardGameOver.

to:

** Inverted later on when [[spoiler:Dimentio offers to team up with Mario and Luigi to take down Count Bleck]]. If you answer "no" a few times like you're supposed to the game continues, but if you answer "yes" a few times - as he'll continually sweeten the pot even though you're already accepting his offer, to throw up an even bigger red flag - then he'll [[spoiler:slap a mind-control plant on your head]] and give you a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver.



** ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' features another subversion -- at one point, your sister suggests that you give up on the war and run away with her. If you agree, you actually ''do it'', for a while, and a brief optional plot arc in which you abandon your responsibilities follows; this ends with the hero confronted by his followers and forced to choose again. Insisting on abandoning them at this point causes a NonStandardGameOver, and it's implied that you've lost their respect in any case.

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** ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' features another subversion -- at one point, your sister suggests that you give up on the war and run away with her. If you agree, you actually ''do it'', for a while, and a brief optional plot arc in which you abandon your responsibilities follows; this ends with the hero confronted by his followers and forced to choose again. Insisting on abandoning them at this point causes a NonStandardGameOver, NonstandardGameOver, and it's implied that you've lost their respect in any case.



** ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has at least one NonStandardGameOver and one [[MultipleEndings Bad End]] you can get this way. In the case of the [[MultipleEndings Bad End]], you earn it by [[spoiler:refusing to use the Rune of Punishment on the flaming ships about to ram your headquarters, even while your strategist, mentor and ''everyone else'' around you ''begs'' you to just use the damn Rune. It's pretty much a TooDumbToLive moment, even though ''overusing the Rune can kill you''... Damned if you do...]]

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** ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has at least one NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver and one [[MultipleEndings Bad End]] you can get this way. In the case of the [[MultipleEndings Bad End]], you earn it by [[spoiler:refusing to use the Rune of Punishment on the flaming ships about to ram your headquarters, even while your strategist, mentor and ''everyone else'' around you ''begs'' you to just use the damn Rune. It's pretty much a TooDumbToLive moment, even though ''overusing the Rune can kill you''... Damned if you do...]]



** Another NonStandardGameOver in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' comes with choosing the option to remain on the deserted island early in the game. Doing so traps you in the island and places you into a GroundhogDayLoop. Hope you saved...

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** Another NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' comes with choosing the option to remain on the deserted island early in the game. Doing so traps you in the island and places you into a GroundhogDayLoop. Hope you saved...



** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', early on you are given the option to fight as the loyal opposition in the name of the Queen or declare yourself King (an unheard of act in Falena). Choosing the latter results in a NonStandardGameOver that tells you that you were assassinated some months later, complete with your little sister lamenting how damn stupid you were for letting yourself be manipulated into that choice.

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** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', early on you are given the option to fight as the loyal opposition in the name of the Queen or declare yourself King (an unheard of act in Falena). Choosing the latter results in a NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver that tells you that you were assassinated some months later, complete with your little sister lamenting how damn stupid you were for letting yourself be manipulated into that choice.



* The Japanese Famicom game ''Doraemon - Giga Zombie no Gyakushuu'' begins with Doraemon asking the player character to help him find the rest of his lost crew and save the world from the game's BigBad in what seems like a standard But Thou Must. If you say no multiple times, however, Doraemon finally takes the hint, and walks off crying in a NonStandardGameOver. We hope you're satisfied. [[YouBastard Jerk.]]

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* The Japanese Famicom game ''Doraemon - Giga Zombie no Gyakushuu'' begins with Doraemon asking the player character to help him find the rest of his lost crew and save the world from the game's BigBad in what seems like a standard But Thou Must. If you say no multiple times, however, Doraemon finally takes the hint, and walks off crying in a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. We hope you're satisfied. [[YouBastard Jerk.]]



** The Septentrione and Triangulum Arc both give a NonStandardGameOver choice, if the player chooses to die when Tico asks whether you want to survive and fight demons or accept your fate of dying at the location the Death Video predetermined for you.

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** The Septentrione and Triangulum Arc both give a NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver choice, if the player chooses to die when Tico asks whether you want to survive and fight demons or accept your fate of dying at the location the Death Video predetermined for you.



* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' has one of these at the beginning of the game (or at least, the beginning of the actual gameplay after going through an hour of interactive cutscenes), where you have to choose to own up to your mistake and go save the world, or... Not. [[spoiler:And if you don't, the screen fades to black and explains that your inaction causes the world to [[NonStandardGameOver wind to its inevitable doom]]. You then have to go back to the same choice and select yes.]] The first Djinni you encounter (in both games) gives you another, absolutely refusing to leave you alone until you let it join your party. Saying no enough times just makes them join you out of spite anyway.

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* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' has one of these at the beginning of the game (or at least, the beginning of the actual gameplay after going through an hour of interactive cutscenes), where you have to choose to own up to your mistake and go save the world, or... Not. [[spoiler:And if you don't, the screen fades to black and explains that your inaction causes the world to [[NonStandardGameOver [[NonstandardGameOver wind to its inevitable doom]]. You then have to go back to the same choice and select yes.]] The first Djinni you encounter (in both games) gives you another, absolutely refusing to leave you alone until you let it join your party. Saying no enough times just makes them join you out of spite anyway.



* ''VideoGame/RadiantHistoria'' is just plain ''mean'', though for what it's worth, you're told at the start that there's only one possible future where the world doesn't end. There's one real choice at the very beginning, explicitly marked as such, a few choices that initially don't mean anything, but result in a special quest if you get them all "right," and a whole bunch of choices that lead you off the path and result in an immediate NonStandardGameOver. These endings range from the predictable (why the hell did you let a nine-year-old girl [[spoiler:use a DangerousForbiddenTechnique]]?) to the absurd (did my healer just [[spoiler:kill the rest of the party out of rage]]?).

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* ''VideoGame/RadiantHistoria'' is just plain ''mean'', though for what it's worth, you're told at the start that there's only one possible future where the world doesn't end. There's one real choice at the very beginning, explicitly marked as such, a few choices that initially don't mean anything, but result in a special quest if you get them all "right," and a whole bunch of choices that lead you off the path and result in an immediate NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. These endings range from the predictable (why the hell did you let a nine-year-old girl [[spoiler:use a DangerousForbiddenTechnique]]?) to the absurd (did my healer just [[spoiler:kill the rest of the party out of rage]]?).



* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the [=GameCube=], right before the final mission, you are given the choice of either joining your friends in the mission or staying behind. Eventually, if you keep saying no enough times, you get a NonStandardGameOver where they let you stay behind and the game goes black and a text box says that all your friends died trying to fight and one of your friends says "See, I told you to join us!"

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* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the [=GameCube=], right before the final mission, you are given the choice of either joining your friends in the mission or staying behind. Eventually, if you keep saying no enough times, you get a NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver where they let you stay behind and the game goes black and a text box says that all your friends died trying to fight and one of your friends says "See, I told you to join us!"



* In one of the ''Franchise/HarvestMoon'' titles, ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonDS DS]]'', the mayor gets attacked by your dog at the beginning of the game. You can choose to help or not to help, and choosing not to help causes the [[NonStandardGameOver credits to roll]], implying that the dog killed the mayor... somehow.

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* In one of the ''Franchise/HarvestMoon'' titles, ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonDS DS]]'', the mayor gets attacked by your dog at the beginning of the game. You can choose to help or not to help, and choosing not to help causes the [[NonStandardGameOver [[NonstandardGameOver credits to roll]], implying that the dog killed the mayor... somehow.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'', you can compromise the location of the DoomedHometown and/or agree to join the BigBad, in which case cutscenes play showing your people being mercilessly butchered and you (bound, gagged, straightjacketed and hung from a meathook) being dropped into a vat of green slime which is a part of the process of turning you into a mindless super mutant soldier. At which point, [[NonStandardGameOver the game ends]] with a sober scolding from the narrator. Earlier on, the Overseer demands that you hand over the initial MacGuffin in order for the plot to progress, to the repeated uttering of "Please, the chip!" until the player either caves in or quits the game, should s/he persist in refusing.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'', you can compromise the location of the DoomedHometown and/or agree to join the BigBad, in which case cutscenes play showing your people being mercilessly butchered and you (bound, gagged, straightjacketed and hung from a meathook) being dropped into a vat of green slime which is a part of the process of turning you into a mindless super mutant soldier. At which point, [[NonStandardGameOver [[NonstandardGameOver the game ends]] with a sober scolding from the narrator. Earlier on, the Overseer demands that you hand over the initial MacGuffin in order for the plot to progress, to the repeated uttering of "Please, the chip!" until the player either caves in or quits the game, should s/he persist in refusing.



** In some cases, the games will ask you whether you want to defend a certain client. If you say no, Phoenix will think about saying no, then change his mind and say yes. Not choosing to defend Maya in one case has Phoenix narrating as if you've chosen a NonStandardGameOver, lamenting how a state-appointed lawyer got Maya sentenced to life in prison, but he snaps out of it and agrees to take the case anyway.

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** In some cases, the games will ask you whether you want to defend a certain client. If you say no, Phoenix will think about saying no, then change his mind and say yes. Not choosing to defend Maya in one case has Phoenix narrating as if you've chosen a NonStandardGameOver, NonstandardGameOver, lamenting how a state-appointed lawyer got Maya sentenced to life in prison, but he snaps out of it and agrees to take the case anyway.



** A certain question in the first DS game's bonus case works like the first example, looping you back with Edgeworth telling you to think carefully about what evidence your present. [[spoiler:This is done to avert Unwinnable, since if a player produces the evidence Gant was looking, they would blunder into his trap and get a NonStandardGameOver.]]

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** A certain question in the first DS game's bonus case works like the first example, looping you back with Edgeworth telling you to think carefully about what evidence your present. [[spoiler:This is done to avert Unwinnable, since if a player produces the evidence Gant was looking, they would blunder into his trap and get a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver.]]



* Naturally used for some of ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'''s [[MultipleEndings bad ends]], but by far the most memorable and dramatic example occurs near the end of the game where [[spoiler:Riki finally awakens at the scene of the bus crash and must choose between running away with Rin like Kyousuke told him or trying to save everyone. If you choose the later, the gas will catch fire and explode, killing them, and Kyousuke will tell you to go back and do it the other way before the game gives you a NonStandardGameOver. The only reason the choice exists is to force the player to choose to leave them behind, which, after [[VideoGameCaringPotential how close you've come to the characters]] and how [[TearJerker heartbreaking]] the last scene was, is ''not'' going to be easy.]]

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* Naturally used for some of ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'''s [[MultipleEndings bad ends]], but by far the most memorable and dramatic example occurs near the end of the game where [[spoiler:Riki finally awakens at the scene of the bus crash and must choose between running away with Rin like Kyousuke told him or trying to save everyone. If you choose the later, the gas will catch fire and explode, killing them, and Kyousuke will tell you to go back and do it the other way before the game gives you a NonStandardGameOver.NonstandardGameOver. The only reason the choice exists is to force the player to choose to leave them behind, which, after [[VideoGameCaringPotential how close you've come to the characters]] and how [[TearJerker heartbreaking]] the last scene was, is ''not'' going to be easy.]]



* In ''VisualNovel/MysticMessenger'', the plot is set into motion by you agreeing to break into someone's apartment on the request of an anonymous texter who comes across as rather shady. If you try to defy this by repeatedly stalling on entering the apartment passcode, you get a NonStandardGameOver and the game restarts.

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* In ''VisualNovel/MysticMessenger'', the plot is set into motion by you agreeing to break into someone's apartment on the request of an anonymous texter who comes across as rather shady. If you try to defy this by repeatedly stalling on entering the apartment passcode, you get a NonStandardGameOver NonstandardGameOver and the game restarts.



* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the [=GameCube=], early on in the game you meet a female who has a watch-collecting hobby, and notes that your watch appears extremely unique and says that she wouldn't mind having it. The watch was a gift from your father from when you were a toddler, with the specific instruction to never take it off. You're given the odd option of saying she can have it, or that she can't, and even if you say she can, she realizes the watch's sentimental value and refuses the offer anyway. But if you persist ''many, many'' times, she'll eventually relent and take it. It turns out that the watch was the MacGuffin of the game, and at the end it's a big deal when you don't have it. Rather than give you a depressing NonStandardGameOver, you're simply told to retrieve it, pausing the plot until you do and then resuming as if you never gave it away.

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* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the [=GameCube=], early on in the game you meet a female who has a watch-collecting hobby, and notes that your watch appears extremely unique and says that she wouldn't mind having it. The watch was a gift from your father from when you were a toddler, with the specific instruction to never take it off. You're given the odd option of saying she can have it, or that she can't, and even if you say she can, she realizes the watch's sentimental value and refuses the offer anyway. But if you persist ''many, many'' times, she'll eventually relent and take it. It turns out that the watch was the MacGuffin of the game, and at the end it's a big deal when you don't have it. Rather than give you a depressing NonStandardGameOver, NonstandardGameOver, you're simply told to retrieve it, pausing the plot until you do and then resuming as if you never gave it away.



** ...Except for one of the first times in the game, where you are asked to embark on the quest or not. You can refuse, but the game then [[NonStandardGameOver immediately ends]]. (The CRPG ''The Magic Candle'' does this too.)

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** ...Except for one of the first times in the game, where you are asked to embark on the quest or not. You can refuse, but the game then [[NonStandardGameOver [[NonstandardGameOver immediately ends]]. (The CRPG ''The Magic Candle'' does this too.)



* The ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos'' series is similar -- your answers do not affect the plot ([[NonStandardGameOver with one exception]]), but picking the correct ones will give you bonuses in battle.

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* The ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos'' series is similar -- your answers do not affect the plot ([[NonStandardGameOver ([[NonstandardGameOver with one exception]]), but picking the correct ones will give you bonuses in battle.
27th Feb '17 2:03:57 AM Vir
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Occasionally a game utilizing this trope will toss in a question where an incorrect answer results in a NonstandardGameOver. Such questions are usually pretty obvious (the BigBad [[WeCanRuleTogether asking you to become his disciple]], for example), though, so it's [[SchmuckBait easy to avoid falling into that trap]]. Either way, this represents the game forcing you to FollowThePlottedLine, ''period.''

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Occasionally a game utilizing this trope will toss in a question where an incorrect answer results in a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. Such questions are usually pretty obvious (the BigBad [[WeCanRuleTogether asking you to become his disciple]], for example), though, so it's [[SchmuckBait easy to avoid falling into that trap]]. Either way, this represents the game forcing you to FollowThePlottedLine, ''period.''



** Near the end of the game, the BigBad gives you the option to rule beside him. Agreeing to this (twice, since he was sure you'd turn him down and is in disbelief after the first answer) leads to a NonstandardGameOver. After beating the FinalBoss, if you have found Princess Iris, then she will want to follow you on your next quest. Declining this request prompts a [[ShoutOut "But Thou Must!"]] until you finally concede.

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** Near the end of the game, the BigBad gives you the option to rule beside him. Agreeing to this (twice, since he was sure you'd turn him down and is in disbelief after the first answer) leads to a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. After beating the FinalBoss, if you have found Princess Iris, then she will want to follow you on your next quest. Declining this request prompts a [[ShoutOut "But Thou Must!"]] until you finally concede.



* The BigBad of ''[[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Boktai 2: Solar Boy Django]]'' gives you the option to join him before the battle, and choosing yes earns you a superimposed image of Django's [[SuperpoweredEvilSide vampire self]] across the screen along with a NonstandardGameOver. There's also an EasterEgg late in the game where Lita offers to let you suck her blood, where choosing yes gets a similar ending.

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* The BigBad of ''[[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Boktai 2: Solar Boy Django]]'' gives you the option to join him before the battle, and choosing yes earns you a superimposed image of Django's [[SuperpoweredEvilSide [[SuperPoweredEvilSide vampire self]] across the screen along with a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. There's also an EasterEgg late in the game where Lita offers to let you suck her blood, where choosing yes gets a similar ending.



* The Creator/{{Sierra}} game ''VideoGame/TheAdventuresOfWillyBeamish'' frequently used the NonstandardGameOver variant. An incorrect answer could get you sent to military school, hospitalised, or [[{{Unwinnable}} denied an essential item]].

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* The Creator/{{Sierra}} game ''VideoGame/TheAdventuresOfWillyBeamish'' frequently used the NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver variant. An incorrect answer could get you sent to military school, hospitalised, or [[{{Unwinnable}} denied an essential item]].



* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryII'' throws one at the player: A pushy used Saurus salesman (played by [[Creator/MarxBrothers Groucho Marx]]) tries to get you to buy a riding saurus. The player can say no to drive the price down. If you ''keep'' saying no, you eventually get a NonstandardGameOver, because you ''really'' need to buy that Saurus to complete the game (even though it's only actually relevant in two cutscenes and not at all in gameplay).

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* ''VideoGame/QuestForGloryII'' throws one at the player: A pushy used Saurus salesman (played by [[Creator/MarxBrothers Groucho Marx]]) tries to get you to buy a riding saurus. The player can say no to drive the price down. If you ''keep'' saying no, you eventually get a NonstandardGameOver, NonStandardGameOver, because you ''really'' need to buy that Saurus to complete the game (even though it's only actually relevant in two cutscenes and not at all in gameplay).



** In ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity'', refusing to [[spoiler: return to the Pokémon world twice will slap you with a NonstandardGameOver]].

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** In ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity'', refusing to [[spoiler: return to the Pokémon world twice will slap you with a NonstandardGameOver]].NonStandardGameOver]].



** The {{Trope Namer|s}} usage in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' -- the princess asks you to let her accompany you on your travels, which inevitably leads to her marrying you, and if you answer no, she simply says "But thou must." and gives you the choices again. You can keep hitting "No" until the cows come home, but she just won't take it for an answer. (Telling the Dragon Lord "Yes" when he asks you to join him, however, is a NonstandardGameOver. [[note]]This is only true in the NES version. Agreeing his offer in the Super Famicom and GBC remakes return you to Rimuldar's inn.[[/note]])

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** The {{Trope Namer|s}} usage in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' -- the princess asks you to let her accompany you on your travels, which inevitably leads to her marrying you, and if you answer no, she simply says "But thou must." and gives you the choices again. You can keep hitting "No" until the cows come home, but she just won't take it for an answer. (Telling the Dragon Lord "Yes" when he asks you to join him, however, is a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. [[note]]This is only true in the NES version. Agreeing his offer in the Super Famicom and GBC remakes return you to Rimuldar's inn.[[/note]])



* The obscure UsefulNotes/GameBoy RPG ''VideoGame/GreatGreed'' has a scene in which a bad guy [[WeCanRuleTogether asks you to join their side]]. If you say "yes" you get a [[FissionMailed fake]] NonstandardGameOver - your NPC ally [[CutscenePowerToTheMax blasts you with a lightning bolt]], you see a GameOver screen for a moment, and then she says that it was a demonstration of what would have happened if you were serious. You are then returned to the game as it was just before you talked to the boss.

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* The obscure UsefulNotes/GameBoy RPG ''VideoGame/GreatGreed'' has a scene in which a bad guy [[WeCanRuleTogether asks you to join their side]]. If you say "yes" you get a [[FissionMailed fake]] NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver - your NPC ally [[CutscenePowerToTheMax blasts you with a lightning bolt]], you see a GameOver screen for a moment, and then she says that it was a demonstration of what would have happened if you were serious. You are then returned to the game as it was just before you talked to the boss.



** In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' you can get a NonstandardGameOver by [[spoiler:accepting the Shadow Queen's invitation to join her at the end of the game]]. This actually still allows for a conclusive ending if you're feeling really lazy.
** Also in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' you can get a NonstandardGameOver by [[spoiler:reading the diary of the ghost when you are travelling in the train]]. And that even though you were told [[TooDumbToLive not to do it]] several times.
** ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'' subverts this. If you say "no" to Merlon enough times at the beginning, when he offers you the first Pure Heart, you'll eventually get a NonstandardGameOver. Note that this occurs before the actual gameplay begins. The same happens if you repeatedly refuse an offer for a mission from Queen Jaydes. And also if you [[TooDumbToLive refuse to put on a helmet in outer space]].

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** In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' you can get a NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver by [[spoiler:accepting the Shadow Queen's invitation to join her at the end of the game]]. This actually still allows for a conclusive ending if you're feeling really lazy.
** Also in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'' you *** You can get a NonstandardGameOver another NonStandardGameOver by [[spoiler:reading the diary of the ghost when you are travelling in the train]]. And that even though you were told [[TooDumbToLive not to do it]] several times.
** ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'' subverts this. If you say "no" to Merlon enough times at the beginning, when he offers you the first Pure Heart, you'll eventually get a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. Note that this occurs before the actual gameplay begins. The same happens if you repeatedly refuse an offer for a mission from Queen Jaydes. And also if you [[TooDumbToLive refuse to put on a helmet in outer space]].



** Inverted later on when [[spoiler:Dimentio offers to team up with Mario and Luigi to take down Count Bleck]]. If you answer "no" a few times like you're supposed to the game continues, but if you answer "yes" a few times - as he'll continually sweeten the pot even though you're already accepting his offer, to throw up an even bigger red flag - then he'll [[spoiler:slap a mind-control plant on your head]] and give you a NonstandardGameOver.

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** Inverted later on when [[spoiler:Dimentio offers to team up with Mario and Luigi to take down Count Bleck]]. If you answer "no" a few times like you're supposed to the game continues, but if you answer "yes" a few times - as he'll continually sweeten the pot even though you're already accepting his offer, to throw up an even bigger red flag - then he'll [[spoiler:slap a mind-control plant on your head]] and give you a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver.



** ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' features another subversion -- at one point, your sister suggests that you give up on the war and run away with her. If you agree, you actually ''do it'', for a while, and a brief optional plot arc in which you abandon your responsibilities follows; this ends with the hero confronted by his followers and forced to choose again. Insisting on abandoning them at this point causes a NonstandardGameOver, and it's implied that you've lost their respect in any case.

to:

** ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' features another subversion -- at one point, your sister suggests that you give up on the war and run away with her. If you agree, you actually ''do it'', for a while, and a brief optional plot arc in which you abandon your responsibilities follows; this ends with the hero confronted by his followers and forced to choose again. Insisting on abandoning them at this point causes a NonstandardGameOver, NonStandardGameOver, and it's implied that you've lost their respect in any case.



** ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has at least one NonstandardGameOver and one [[MultipleEndings Bad End]] you can get this way. In the case of the [[MultipleEndings Bad End]], you earn it by [[spoiler:refusing to use the Rune of Punishment on the flaming ships about to ram your headquarters, even while your strategist, mentor and ''everyone else'' around you ''begs'' you to just use the damn Rune. It's pretty much a TooDumbToLive moment, even though ''overusing the Rune can kill you''... Damned if you do...]]

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** ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' has at least one NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver and one [[MultipleEndings Bad End]] you can get this way. In the case of the [[MultipleEndings Bad End]], you earn it by [[spoiler:refusing to use the Rune of Punishment on the flaming ships about to ram your headquarters, even while your strategist, mentor and ''everyone else'' around you ''begs'' you to just use the damn Rune. It's pretty much a TooDumbToLive moment, even though ''overusing the Rune can kill you''... Damned if you do...]]



** Another NonstandardGameOver in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' comes with choosing the option to remain on the deserted island early in the game. Doing so traps you in the island and places you into a GroundhogDayLoop. Hope you saved...

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** Another NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV'' comes with choosing the option to remain on the deserted island early in the game. Doing so traps you in the island and places you into a GroundhogDayLoop. Hope you saved...



** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', early on you are given the option to fight as the loyal opposition in the name of the Queen or declare yourself King (an unheard of act in Falena). Choosing the latter results in a NonstandardGameOver that tells you that you were assassinated some months later, complete with your little sister lamenting how damn stupid you were for letting yourself be manipulated into that choice.

to:

** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', early on you are given the option to fight as the loyal opposition in the name of the Queen or declare yourself King (an unheard of act in Falena). Choosing the latter results in a NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver that tells you that you were assassinated some months later, complete with your little sister lamenting how damn stupid you were for letting yourself be manipulated into that choice.



* The Japanese Famicom game ''Doraemon - Giga Zombie no Gyakushuu'' begins with Doraemon asking the player character to help him find the rest of his lost crew and save the world from the game's BigBad in what seems like a standard But Thou Must. If you say no multiple times, however, Doraemon finally takes the hint, and walks off crying in a NonstandardGameOver. We hope you're satisfied. [[YouBastard Jerk.]]

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* The Japanese Famicom game ''Doraemon - Giga Zombie no Gyakushuu'' begins with Doraemon asking the player character to help him find the rest of his lost crew and save the world from the game's BigBad in what seems like a standard But Thou Must. If you say no multiple times, however, Doraemon finally takes the hint, and walks off crying in a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. We hope you're satisfied. [[YouBastard Jerk.]]



* ''VideoGame/RadiantHistoria'' is just plain ''mean'', though for what it's worth, you're told at the start that there's only one possible future where the world doesn't end. There's one real choice at the very beginning, explicitly marked as such, a few choices that initially don't mean anything, but result in a special quest if you get them all "right," and a whole bunch of choices that lead you off the path and result in an immediate NonstandardGameOver. These endings range from the predictable (why the hell did you let a nine-year-old girl [[spoiler:use a DangerousForbiddenTechnique]]?) to the absurd (did my healer just [[spoiler:kill the rest of the party out of rage]]?).

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* ''VideoGame/RadiantHistoria'' is just plain ''mean'', though for what it's worth, you're told at the start that there's only one possible future where the world doesn't end. There's one real choice at the very beginning, explicitly marked as such, a few choices that initially don't mean anything, but result in a special quest if you get them all "right," and a whole bunch of choices that lead you off the path and result in an immediate NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver. These endings range from the predictable (why the hell did you let a nine-year-old girl [[spoiler:use a DangerousForbiddenTechnique]]?) to the absurd (did my healer just [[spoiler:kill the rest of the party out of rage]]?).



* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the Gamecube, right before the final mission, you are given the choice of either joining your friends in the mission or staying behind. Eventually, if you keep saying no enough times, you get a NonstandardGameOver where they let you stay behind and the game goes black and a text box says that all your friends died trying to fight and one of your friends says "See, I told you to join us!"

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* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the Gamecube, [=GameCube=], right before the final mission, you are given the choice of either joining your friends in the mission or staying behind. Eventually, if you keep saying no enough times, you get a NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver where they let you stay behind and the game goes black and a text box says that all your friends died trying to fight and one of your friends says "See, I told you to join us!"



** A certain question in the first DS game's bonus case works like the first example, looping you back with Edgeworth telling you to think carefully about what evidence your present. [[spoiler:This is done to avert Unwinnable, since if a player produces the evidence Gant was looking, they would blunder into his trap and get a NonstandardGameOver.]]

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** A certain question in the first DS game's bonus case works like the first example, looping you back with Edgeworth telling you to think carefully about what evidence your present. [[spoiler:This is done to avert Unwinnable, since if a player produces the evidence Gant was looking, they would blunder into his trap and get a NonstandardGameOver.NonStandardGameOver.]]



* Naturally used for some of ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'''s [[MultipleEndings bad ends]], but by far the most memorable and dramatic example occurs near the end of the game where [[spoiler:Riki finally awakens at the scene of the bus crash and must choose between running away with Rin like Kyousuke told him or trying to save everyone. If you choose the later, the gas will catch fire and explode, killing them, and Kyousuke will tell you to go back and do it the other way before the game gives you a NonstandardGameOver. The only reason the choice exists is to force the player to choose to leave them behind, which, after [[VideogameCaringPotential how close you've come to the characters]] and how [[TearJerker heartbreaking]] the last scene was, is ''not'' going to be easy.]]

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* Naturally used for some of ''VisualNovel/LittleBusters'''s [[MultipleEndings bad ends]], but by far the most memorable and dramatic example occurs near the end of the game where [[spoiler:Riki finally awakens at the scene of the bus crash and must choose between running away with Rin like Kyousuke told him or trying to save everyone. If you choose the later, the gas will catch fire and explode, killing them, and Kyousuke will tell you to go back and do it the other way before the game gives you a NonstandardGameOver. NonStandardGameOver. The only reason the choice exists is to force the player to choose to leave them behind, which, after [[VideogameCaringPotential [[VideoGameCaringPotential how close you've come to the characters]] and how [[TearJerker heartbreaking]] the last scene was, is ''not'' going to be easy.]]



* In ''VisualNovel/MysticMessenger'', the plot is set into motion by you agreeing to break into someone's apartment on the request of an anonymous texter who comes across as rather shady. If you try to defy this by repeatedly stalling on entering the apartment passcode, you get a NonstandardGameOver and the game restarts.

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* In ''VisualNovel/MysticMessenger'', the plot is set into motion by you agreeing to break into someone's apartment on the request of an anonymous texter who comes across as rather shady. If you try to defy this by repeatedly stalling on entering the apartment passcode, you get a NonstandardGameOver NonStandardGameOver and the game restarts.



** In the final case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney: Justice For All'', [[spoiler:after presenting the evidence that drives de Killer into terminating his contract with Matt (and subsequently making Matt into his next target), you are once again asked to choose to either plead guilty or not guilty, only this time, the choice doesn't really matter anymore: If you plead guilty, Phoenix gives up his client, who promptly has a VillainousBreakdown. If you plead not guilty, Matt himself will plead guilty (because if he's let go, de Killer will be after his ass once he's out of custody) and will go into his breakdown]]. A [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome satisfying ending]] to the final case!

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** In the final case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney: Justice For All'', [[spoiler:after presenting the evidence that drives de Killer into terminating his contract with Matt (and subsequently making Matt into his next target), you are once again asked to choose to either plead guilty or not guilty, only this time, the choice doesn't really matter anymore: If you plead guilty, Phoenix gives up his client, who promptly has a VillainousBreakdown. If you plead not guilty, Matt himself will plead guilty (because if he's let go, de Killer will be after his ass once he's out of custody) and will go into his breakdown]]. A [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome satisfying ending]] to the final case!



* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the Gamecube, early on in the game you meet a female who has a watch-collecting hobby, and notes that your watch appears extremely unique and says that she wouldn't mind having it. The watch was a gift from your father from when you were a toddler, with the specific instruction to never take it off. You're given the odd option of saying she can have it, or that she can't, and even if you say she can, she realizes the watch's sentimental value and refuses the offer anyway. But if you persist ''many, many'' times, she'll eventually relent and take it. It turns out that the watch was the MacGuffin of the game, and at the end it's a big deal when you don't have it. Rather than give you a depressing NonstandardGameOver, you're simply told to retrieve it, pausing the plot until you do and then resuming as if you never gave it away.

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* In ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' for the Gamecube, [=GameCube=], early on in the game you meet a female who has a watch-collecting hobby, and notes that your watch appears extremely unique and says that she wouldn't mind having it. The watch was a gift from your father from when you were a toddler, with the specific instruction to never take it off. You're given the odd option of saying she can have it, or that she can't, and even if you say she can, she realizes the watch's sentimental value and refuses the offer anyway. But if you persist ''many, many'' times, she'll eventually relent and take it. It turns out that the watch was the MacGuffin of the game, and at the end it's a big deal when you don't have it. Rather than give you a depressing NonstandardGameOver, NonStandardGameOver, you're simply told to retrieve it, pausing the plot until you do and then resuming as if you never gave it away.



* At one point in ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime Mario & Luigi: Partner's in Time]]'', you're instead provided no ''right'' answer. To pass a gate, Luigi has to pick the correct answer out of three provided... except, none of them are the right answer -- the correct answer is a fourth option that doesn't exist. The gate claims Luigi is lying when he points this out.

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* At one point in ''[[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime Mario & Luigi: Partner's in Time]]'', ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime'', you're instead provided no ''right'' answer. To pass a gate, Luigi has to pick the correct answer out of three provided... except, none of them are the right answer -- the correct answer is a fourth option that doesn't exist. The gate claims Luigi is lying when he points this out.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' asks [[http://lparchive.org/Fallout-3-(by-Lizard-Wizard)/Update%2001/68-Fallout3_2012-01-17_14-48-33-94.jpg this]] tough question. This is at the end of a series of questions in a school-exam, most of the others determining the skills your character will be good at. The teacher administering the test reads this last question in [[CrowningMomentOfFunny an extremely sarcastic tone]]. The entire exam has no real bearing on the game, anyway. You can choose to not take it and manually assign your upgrades, or switch the upgrades after seeing which it recommends.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'', in the beginning, you can say no to helping Preston Garvey in Concord, but the game will assign you the quest anyway.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' asks [[http://lparchive.org/Fallout-3-(by-Lizard-Wizard)/Update%2001/68-Fallout3_2012-01-17_14-48-33-94.jpg this]] tough question. This is at the end of a series of questions in a school-exam, most of the others determining the skills your character will be good at. The teacher administering the test reads this last question in [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments an extremely sarcastic tone]]. The entire exam has no real bearing on the game, anyway. You can choose to not take it and manually assign your upgrades, or switch the upgrades after seeing which it recommends.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'', ''VideoGame/Fallout4'', in the beginning, you can say no to helping Preston Garvey in Concord, but the game will assign you the quest anyway.
26th Feb '17 11:34:46 PM EnhanceByTorch
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Added DiffLines:

* In the demo for GLITCHED by En House studios, it is a major plot-point that you can [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall interact with your player character.]] Refusing to speak to Gus at all when introduced, or even introducing yourself [[AGodAmI as "the player"]] will drive him insane, leading to a Game Over.
26th Feb '17 10:22:22 AM nombretomado
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* {{Peachi}}: [[VideoGame/{{Persona4}} Starting today, you'll be moving in with your uncle and cousin in Inaba, where you'll be living for then next year.]] [[BlatantLies But first, would you like to see a totally unrelated 15-year old girl in a bikini?]] (Yes/Yes). [[{{Fanservice}} (OMG! I'm SOOOO totally fat!!)]] Awwwwwwww yeah... Wait, what? Oh. Right. Moving in with your uncle, or whatever.

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* {{Peachi}}: ''[[Webcomic/{{Hiimdaisy}} Peachi]]'': [[VideoGame/{{Persona4}} Starting today, you'll be moving in with your uncle and cousin in Inaba, where you'll be living for then next year.]] [[BlatantLies But first, would you like to see a totally unrelated 15-year old girl in a bikini?]] (Yes/Yes). [[{{Fanservice}} (OMG! I'm SOOOO totally fat!!)]] Awwwwwwww yeah... Wait, what? Oh. Right. Moving in with your uncle, or whatever.
22nd Feb '17 9:44:07 AM Prfnoff
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* ''Franchise/YuGiOh: The Sacred Cards'' does this when you finally collect all three god cards, making it impossible to ever use the third card.

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* ''Franchise/YuGiOh: The Sacred Cards'' ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheSacredCards'' does this when you finally collect all three god cards, making it impossible to ever use the third card.
17th Feb '17 2:02:29 PM Malady
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* ''VideoGame/TheMaidOfFairewellHeights'': You must steal the money from the Alice Shop.
--> Steal that money!
--> Casually put it in your pocket.
--> Five-finger discount that loot!
15th Feb '17 7:51:40 PM Narrator1
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* At the climax of the penultimate chapter of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'', the party is trapped and surrounded by an infinitely respawning horde of demons, and [[PlayerCharacter Noctis's]] TrueCompanions tell him to go on ahead to the elevator leading to the Crystal Chamber. The player can ignore this and continue to fight, but only up to a minute later, when a female electronic voice announces that the hangar in which the players are fighting will be sealed shut. To punctuate this, a timer appears counting down to the door closing, and if Noctis doesn't make it, it's NonstandardGameOver time.
13th Feb '17 5:51:22 PM Narrator1
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* At the climax of the penultimate chapter of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'', the party is trapped and surrounded by an infinitely respawning horde of demons, and [[PlayerCharacter Noctis's]] TrueCompanions tell him to go on ahead to the elevator leading to the Crystal Chamber. The player can ignore this and continue to fight, but only up to a minute later, when a female electronic voice announces that the hangar in which the players are fighting will be sealed shut. To punctuate this, a timer appears counting down to the door closing, and if Noctis doesn't make it, it's NonstandardGameOver time.
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