History Main / BrainFever

15th Jan '18 11:29:04 PM Pamina
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** Cathy (the first one) is very ill with brain fever, caused by a confrontation between herself, Edgar, and Heathcliff, during the first two months of her pregnancy. She never entirely regains her health, and [[DeathByChildbirth dies]] two hours after the baby is born.

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** Cathy (the first one) is becomes very ill with brain fever, caused by a confrontation between herself, Edgar, and Heathcliff, during the first two months of her pregnancy. She never entirely regains her health, and [[DeathByChildbirth dies]] two hours after the baby is born.



* In ''LaDameAuxCamellias'', Armand is already ill from grief after Marguerite's death, and develops a full-blown brain fever after seeing her body exhumed. In his case, the doctor declares it a fortunate occurrence: the physical illness will drive out the strong emotion, and prevent Armand from going mad with grief.

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* In ''LaDameAuxCamellias'', ''La dame aux camellias'', Armand is already ill from grief after Marguerite's death, and develops a full-blown brain fever after seeing her body exhumed. In his case, the doctor declares it a fortunate occurrence: the physical illness will drive out the strong emotion, and prevent Armand from going mad with grief. Most adaptations (e.g. ''Theatre/LaTraviata'' and the classic 1936 film) cut this part of the story.
21st Dec '17 12:37:08 PM fruitstripegum
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* After Oscar's final confrontation with his father in ''Film/ClosetMonster'', Oscar wakes up at his mother's house,having been sweating and unconscious for an unspecified length of time.

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* After Oscar's final confrontation with his father in ''Film/ClosetMonster'', Oscar wakes up at his mother's house,having house, having been sweating and unconscious for an unspecified length of time.
14th Nov '17 12:14:57 PM Pichu-kun
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* In ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'', [[spoiler:Hinamizawa Syndrome is a version of this combined with HatePlague]].



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* In ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'', [[spoiler:Hinamizawa Syndrome]] is a version of this combined with [[spoiler:HatePlague]].
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* Delirium or hallucinations may be considered a sort of brain fever. Dehydration, lack of sleep, and overexertion can cause such effects.
** It could be a case of getting cause and effect the wrong way round--high temperatures caused by an infection not directly related to the brain can cause delirium or mental disturbance, especially in children.

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* Delirium or hallucinations may be considered a sort of brain fever. Dehydration, lack of sleep, and overexertion can cause such effects. \n** It could be a case of getting cause and effect the wrong way round--high temperatures caused by an infection not directly related to the brain can cause delirium or mental disturbance, especially in children.children.
* While not a fever, an overload of stress can cause other psychosomatic side-effects such as body pains or fatigue.
29th Jul '17 7:11:52 PM scootermark
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* Believe it or not, this is ''not'' a ForgottenTrope in Southeast Asia, where many a KoreanDrama or TaiwaneseSeries has the hero/heroine collapsing due to stress, overwork, or convenience, and ends up being cared for by their significant other, often with comfort food and a cold compress across the eyes.

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* Believe it or not, this is ''not'' a ForgottenTrope in Southeast east Asia, where many a KoreanDrama or TaiwaneseSeries has the hero/heroine collapsing due to stress, overwork, or convenience, and ends up being cared for by their significant other, often with comfort food and a cold compress across the eyes.
22nd Jun '17 10:31:07 PM jormis29
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* Although Creator/HPLovecraft was more known to have characters GoMadFromTheRevelation, this trope also cropped up occasionally in his work, such as the young artist's suffering in TheCallOfCthulhu (although this, like many of Lovecraft's usages of Brain Fever, is ambiguous in that it ''might'' be the result of trauma, or possible a physical effect of the Great Old One's mental influence.)

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* Although Creator/HPLovecraft was more known to have characters GoMadFromTheRevelation, this trope also cropped up occasionally in his work, such as the young artist's suffering in TheCallOfCthulhu ''Literature/TheCallOfCthulhu'' (although this, like many of Lovecraft's usages of Brain Fever, is ambiguous in that it ''might'' be the result of trauma, or possible a physical effect of the Great Old One's mental influence.)
27th Apr '17 12:50:06 PM StFan
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* Later Christie novels reflect the fact that ScienceMarchesOn. For instance, in ''TheBigFour'' Hastings suggests that an insensible man is suffering from brain fever, to which a doctor character responds, "Invention of novelists!"

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* Later Christie novels reflect the fact that ScienceMarchesOn. For instance, in ''TheBigFour'' ''Literature/TheBigFour'' Hastings suggests that an insensible man is suffering from brain fever, to which a doctor character responds, "Invention of novelists!"



* The character Phillip Ammon suffers from Brain Fever after Elnora disappears from the swamp in ''AGirlOfTheLimberlost''.

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* The character Phillip Ammon suffers from Brain Fever after Elnora disappears from the swamp in ''AGirlOfTheLimberlost''.''Literature/{{A Girl of the Limberlost}}''.



* ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'' had Jonathan Harker suffer from brain fever when Mina finally found him after he somehow escaped the vampire's clutches.

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* ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'' had ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' has Jonathan Harker suffer from brain fever when Mina finally found him after he somehow escaped the vampire's clutches.



-->"After a long talk with the harbor-master, Captain Leclere left Naples greatly disturbed in mind. In twenty-four hours he was attacked by a fever, and died three days afterwards."

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-->"After -->''After a long talk with the harbor-master, Captain Leclere left Naples greatly disturbed in mind. In twenty-four hours he was attacked by a fever, and died three days afterwards."''






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* In ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender,'' Zuko spirals into an illness immediately after he frees Appa at the pinnacle last few episodes of the 2nd season, the explanation being that his inner turmoil had caused his body to react in a sickly fashion.
** WordOfGod states that the truly amazing longevity of Bumi, Guru Pathik and Avatar Kyoshi can be attributed to "balanced chi". If balanced chi can create health and long life, then perhaps unbalanced chi can create illness.
** It is a fact that depression and anxiety can cause one's immune system to weaken significantly, thus making one ''very'' susceptible to a wide range of health problems. When Iroh said that Zuko's illness was an emotional illness, he very well may have been correct. (If Zuko hadn't been so stressed-out and angry all the time, his infection most likely would not have manifested itself so severely.)

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* In ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender,'' Zuko spirals into an illness immediately after he frees Appa at the pinnacle last few episodes of the 2nd season, the explanation being that his inner turmoil had caused his body to react in a sickly fashion.
**
fashion. WordOfGod states that the truly amazing longevity of Bumi, Guru Pathik and Avatar Kyoshi can be attributed to "balanced chi". If balanced chi can create health and long life, then perhaps unbalanced chi can create illness.
**
illness. It is a fact that depression and anxiety can cause one's immune system to weaken significantly, thus making one ''very'' susceptible to a wide range of health problems. When Iroh said that Zuko's illness was an emotional illness, he very well may have been correct. (If Zuko hadn't been so stressed-out and angry all the time, his infection most likely would not have manifested itself so severely.)



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18th Apr '17 7:27:15 PM Pamina
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Theatre]]

* While the term "brain fever" isn't used, the opera ''Lucia di Lammermoor'' treats the heroine's madness in much the same way, as she dies offstage within hours of losing her mind. Some productions avert this, though, and have her stab herself at the end of the Mad Scene to make her death more explicable.
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15th Apr '17 11:47:42 PM Juicehead_Baby
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A popular plot device in the nineteenth century, but also appearing in earlier works, Brain Fever isn't used much anymore because, well, [[ScienceMarchesOn diseases don't work that way]]. Today, we have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ([[Creator/GeorgeCarlin formerly called]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne Shell Shock]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo Battle Fatigue]] or "[[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar Operational Exhaustion]]"[[note]]sounds like something that'd happen to your car![[/note]]]]) instead. It was commonly believed in more-prudish Victorian times that too much sun exposure could cause overheating and subsequent brain fever, and that the preventative measure for this was (when going out into the hot sun) to wear plenty of thick wool and felt clothes to protect yourself from the sun's baleful rays. Needless to say, these heavy clothes only contributed to heat-related illnesses.

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A popular plot device in the nineteenth century, but also appearing in earlier works, Brain Fever isn't used much anymore because, well, [[ScienceMarchesOn diseases don't work that way]]. Today, we have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ([[Creator/GeorgeCarlin formerly called]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne Shell Shock]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo Battle Fatigue]] or "[[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar Operational Exhaustion]]"[[note]]sounds like something that'd happen to your car![[/note]]]]) car![[/note]]) instead. It was commonly believed in more-prudish Victorian times that too much sun exposure could cause overheating and subsequent brain fever, and that the preventative measure for this was (when going out into the hot sun) to wear plenty of thick wool and felt clothes to protect yourself from the sun's baleful rays. Needless to say, these heavy clothes only contributed to heat-related illnesses.
15th Apr '17 11:47:21 PM Juicehead_Baby
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A popular plot device in the nineteenth century, but also appearing in earlier works, Brain Fever isn't used much anymore because, well, [[ScienceMarchesOn diseases don't work that way]]. Today, we have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ([[Creator/GeorgeCarlin formerly called]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne Shell Shock]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo Battle Fatigue]] or "[[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar Operational Exhaustion]]"[[note/sounds like something that'd happen to your car!]]) instead. It was commonly believed in more-prudish Victorian times that too much sun exposure could cause overheating and subsequent brain fever, and that the preventative measure for this was (when going out into the hot sun) to wear plenty of thick wool and felt clothes to protect yourself from the sun's baleful rays. Needless to say, these heavy clothes only contributed to heat-related illnesses.

to:

A popular plot device in the nineteenth century, but also appearing in earlier works, Brain Fever isn't used much anymore because, well, [[ScienceMarchesOn diseases don't work that way]]. Today, we have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ([[Creator/GeorgeCarlin formerly called]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne Shell Shock]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo Battle Fatigue]] or "[[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar Operational Exhaustion]]"[[note/sounds Exhaustion]]"[[note]]sounds like something that'd happen to your car!]]) car![[/note]]]]) instead. It was commonly believed in more-prudish Victorian times that too much sun exposure could cause overheating and subsequent brain fever, and that the preventative measure for this was (when going out into the hot sun) to wear plenty of thick wool and felt clothes to protect yourself from the sun's baleful rays. Needless to say, these heavy clothes only contributed to heat-related illnesses.
15th Apr '17 11:46:56 PM Juicehead_Baby
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A popular plot device in the nineteenth century, but also appearing in earlier works, Brain Fever isn't used much anymore because, well, [[ScienceMarchesOn diseases don't work that way]]. Today, we have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (formerly called Shell Shock or Battle Fatigue) instead. It was commonly believed in more-prudish Victorian times that too much sun exposure could cause overheating and subsequent brain fever, and that the preventative measure for this was (when going out into the hot sun) to wear plenty of thick wool and felt clothes to protect yourself from the sun's baleful rays. Needless to say, these heavy clothes only contributed to heat-related illnesses.

to:

A popular plot device in the nineteenth century, but also appearing in earlier works, Brain Fever isn't used much anymore because, well, [[ScienceMarchesOn diseases don't work that way]]. Today, we have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (formerly called ([[Creator/GeorgeCarlin formerly called]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne Shell Shock or Shock]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo Battle Fatigue) Fatigue]] or "[[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar Operational Exhaustion]]"[[note/sounds like something that'd happen to your car!]]) instead. It was commonly believed in more-prudish Victorian times that too much sun exposure could cause overheating and subsequent brain fever, and that the preventative measure for this was (when going out into the hot sun) to wear plenty of thick wool and felt clothes to protect yourself from the sun's baleful rays. Needless to say, these heavy clothes only contributed to heat-related illnesses.
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