History Main / ArtificialGravity

22nd Sep '17 12:47:49 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''NexusTheJupiterIncident'' has the spinning kind and the more traditional artificial graivity field, although none of that is mentioned. The only indication that all but Earth ships (which have spinning sections and very limited maneuverability) have AG is their lack of spinning sections and increased maneuverability and acceleration (suggesting InertialDampening).

to:

* ''NexusTheJupiterIncident'' ''VideoGame/NexusTheJupiterIncident'' has the spinning kind and the more traditional artificial graivity field, although none of that is mentioned. The only indication that all but Earth ships (which have spinning sections and very limited maneuverability) have AG is their lack of spinning sections and increased maneuverability and acceleration (suggesting InertialDampening).



* {{Startopia}} has a rotating space station creating CentrifugalGravity.

to:

* {{Startopia}} VideoGame/{{Startopia}} has a rotating space station creating CentrifugalGravity.
5th Jul '17 6:31:19 AM onyhow
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A section of the [[SpaceStation ISS]] was planned which would have been able to generate artificial gravity between 0.01 and 2 times that of Earth gravity via [[WhenThingsSpinScienceHappens spinning]], but was eventually cancelled. The module is currently on display in Japan.

to:

* A section of the [[SpaceStation ISS]] was planned which would have been able to generate artificial gravity between 0.01 and 2 times that of Earth gravity via [[WhenThingsSpinScienceHappens [[CentrifugalGravity spinning]], but was eventually cancelled. The module is currently on display in Japan.
29th May '17 7:35:45 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/RobertAHeinlein subverts this in some of his works, including several of the stories in "Literature/TheGreenHillsOfEarth", (especially "We Also Walk Dogs" which is about this trope), but he plays it completely straight when it's convenient to the plot for him to do so (like in ''Literature/StarshipTroopers''.)

to:

* Creator/RobertAHeinlein subverts this in some of his works, including several of the stories in "Literature/TheGreenHillsOfEarth", ''The Green Hills of Earth'' (especially "We "--We Also Walk Dogs" Dogs", which is about this trope), but he plays it completely straight when it's convenient to the plot for him to do so (like in ''Literature/StarshipTroopers''.)''Literature/StarshipTroopers'').
17th May '17 9:07:47 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

to:

[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Animated]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* The film version of ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' used the centrifugal method of gravity generation onboard both the space station and the ''Discovery''. It's notable that the non-rotating parts of ''Discovery'' and the famous shuttle sequence near the beginning are as being zero gee, through actors walking strangely in "velcro booties," and dangling props from wires, etc.

to:

[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]
* The film version of ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' used the centrifugal method of gravity generation onboard both the space station and the ''Discovery''. It's notable that the non-rotating parts of ''Discovery'' and the famous shuttle sequence near the beginning are as being zero gee, through actors walking strangely in "velcro booties," booties", and dangling props from wires, etc.



* ''Film/{{Moonraker}}'' also uses the centrifugal method (except when traveling between modules, apparently) but when the station rotation halts we're treated to the most ambitious (at that time) zero-gee sequence on film.



* ''Film/{{Apollo 13}}'' depicted zero gravity the hard way: by building spacecraft sets in the NASA zero gravity training aircraft (the Vomit Comet) and filming in it for a month. Far from all of the scenes inside the spacecraft were done this way; a lot of it was done with harnesses and bellyboards and careful framing.
* ''Film/{{Armageddon}}'' has a bizarre relationship with this trope, even by scifi standards. Perhaps the most egregious example: The film specifically addresses the fact that the asteroid would have little or no gravity and gives the characters special suits and equipment with "thrusters" so they don't float away while out on the surface of the asteroid. Yet when the characters are inside their space shuttle, which is ''parked right on the asteroid'', they walk around unsuited as though under normal Earth gravity. [[FlatWhat What.]]
* ''Film/TheBlackHole'' had this function as one of Dr. Reinhart's impressive inventions: a gravity field astonishingly powerful enough to not only have regular gravity in the ship, but also to keep the entire ship itself in a secure stationary position just beyond the event horizon of a black hole!



* ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'' has it. Not much is said of it onscreen, but it's made obvious by the crew of the ship moving about the ship like normal in the first scene.
* In ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', [[BadassAdorable Rocket Raccoon]] orchestrates a prison break by turning off the artificial gravity everywhere but in the guard tower, then flying said guard tower through the rest of the base.
* ''Film/{{Moonraker}}'' also uses the centrifugal method (except when traveling between modules, apparently) but when the station rotation halts we're treated to the most ambitious (at that time) zero-gee sequence on film.



* In ''Film/{{Pandorum}}'', the ''Elysium'' has artificial gravity throughout; it would be tough to justify the film's BeePeople being able to make traps that utilize gravity otherwise. [[spoiler:But then the ''Elysium'' is revealed [[TomatoSurprise to have crash landed into the planet it was headed for]] over a century before the events of the movie, thus subverting this trope very, very hard as by then the planet's gravity had taken over.]]
* ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes1968'' has it in the opening scene; we clearly see Taylor walking over to his cryosleep pod to get inside.



* ''Film/QueenOfOuterSpace''. After crashlanding on an unknown planet, the crew of the spaceship think they might be back on Earth, and check this by turning off the artificial gravity. As the gravity meter isn't on zero, they know they're not in Kansas anymore.



* ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'' is a fine example of a variant of this trope, in which gravity and air appear to be intimately connected. Everything in an air lock is floating around until the lock is pressurized... whereupon its contents crash to the ground.

to:

* ''Film/{{Sunshine}}'' is a fine example of a variant of this trope, in which gravity and air appear to be intimately connected. Everything in an air lock is floating around until The SpaceStation at the lock is pressurized... whereupon its contents crash to start of ''Film/{{Saturn 3}}'' has people walking on the ground.ceiling as well as the floor.



* In the ''Franchise/StarWars'' universe, all ships from the ''[[CoolStarship Millennium Falcon]]'' to the [[KillSat Death Star]] have artificial gravity. It's not clear if it exists or is necessary for one-man fighters, although in ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' they do have [[InertialDampening inertial compensators]] (which are often "dialed down" slightly so pilots can "feel" what their craft is doing). The mega-cheap TIE Fighters explicitly don't have cockpit gravity or atmosphere in ''Legends'', but it's assumed all the others do.

to:

* In the ''Franchise/StarWars'' universe, all ''Franchise/StarWars'': All ships from the ''[[CoolStarship Millennium Falcon]]'' to the [[KillSat Death Star]] have artificial gravity. It's not clear if it exists or is necessary for one-man fighters, although in ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' they do have [[InertialDampening inertial compensators]] (which are often "dialed down" slightly so pilots can "feel" what their craft is doing). The mega-cheap TIE Fighters explicitly don't have cockpit gravity or atmosphere in ''Legends'', but it's assumed all the others do.



** In ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' there's a book, ''Spore'', that largely takes place on an asteroid that's large but not big enough for substantial gravity. A base on it has artificial gravity, but outside of it characters have to use special boots with tractor beams in them to avoid floating away.
* ''Film/{{Apollo 13}}'' depicted zero gravity the hard way: by building spacecraft sets in the NASA zero gravity training aircraft (the Vomit Comet) and filming in it for a month. Far from all of the scenes inside the spacecraft were done this way; a lot of it was done with harnesses and bellyboards and careful framing.
* In ''Film/{{Pandorum}}'', the Elysium has artificial gravity throughout; it would be tough to justify the film's BeePeople being able to make traps that utilize gravity otherwise. [[spoiler:[[TomatoSurprise But then the Elysium is revealed to have crash landed into the planet it was headed for]] over a century before the events of the movie, thus subverting this trope very, very hard as by then the planet's gravity had taken over.]]
* ''Film/TheBlackHole'' had this function as one of Dr. Reinhart's impressive inventions: a gravity field astonishingly powerful enough to not only have regular gravity in the ship, but also to keep the entire ship itself in a secure stationary position just beyond the event horizon of a black hole!
* ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'' has it. Not much is said of it onscreen, but it's made obvious by the crew of the ship moving about the ship like normal in the first scene.
* ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes1968'' has it in the opening scene; we clearly see Taylor walking over to his cryosleep pod to get inside.
* ''Film/{{Armageddon}}'' has a bizarre relationship with this trope, even by scifi standards. Perhaps the most egregious example: The film specifically addresses the fact that the asteroid would have little or no gravity and gives the characters special suits and equipment with "thrusters" so they don't float away while out on the surface of the asteroid. Yet when the characters are inside their space shuttle, which is ''parked right on the asteroid'', they walk around unsuited as though under normal Earth gravity. [[FlatWhat What.]]
* ''Film/QueenOfOuterSpace''. After crashlanding on an unknown planet, the crew of the spaceship think they might be back on Earth, and check this by turning off the artificial gravity. As the gravity meter isn't on zero, they know they're not in Kansas anymore.
* In ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', [[BadassAdorable Rocket Raccoon]] orchestrates a prison break by turning off the artificial gravity everywhere but in the guard tower, then flying said guard tower through the rest of the base.
* The SpaceStation at the start of ''Film/{{Saturn 3}}'' has people walking on the ceiling as well as the floor.

to:

** In ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' there's a book, ''Spore'', that largely takes place on an asteroid that's large but not big enough for substantial gravity. A base on it has artificial gravity, but outside of it characters have to use special boots with tractor beams in them to avoid floating away.
* ''Film/{{Apollo 13}}'' depicted zero gravity the hard way: by building spacecraft sets in the NASA zero gravity training aircraft (the Vomit Comet) and filming in it for a month. Far from all of the scenes inside the spacecraft were done this way; a lot of it was done with harnesses and bellyboards and careful framing.
* In ''Film/{{Pandorum}}'', the Elysium has artificial gravity throughout; it would be tough to justify the film's BeePeople being able to make traps that utilize gravity otherwise. [[spoiler:[[TomatoSurprise But then the Elysium
''Film/{{Sunshine}}'' is revealed to have crash landed into the planet it was headed for]] over a century before the events of the movie, thus subverting this trope very, very hard as by then the planet's gravity had taken over.]]
* ''Film/TheBlackHole'' had this function as one of Dr. Reinhart's impressive inventions: a gravity field astonishingly powerful enough to not only have regular gravity in the ship, but also to keep the entire ship itself in a secure stationary position just beyond the event horizon
fine example of a black hole!
* ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'' has it. Not much is said
variant of it onscreen, but it's made obvious by the crew of the ship moving about the ship like normal in the first scene.
* ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes1968'' has it in the opening scene; we clearly see Taylor walking over to his cryosleep pod to get inside.
* ''Film/{{Armageddon}}'' has a bizarre relationship with
this trope, even by scifi standards. Perhaps the most egregious example: The film specifically addresses the fact that the asteroid would have little or no in which gravity and gives the characters special suits and equipment with "thrusters" so they don't float away while out on the surface of the asteroid. Yet when the characters are inside their space shuttle, which air appear to be intimately connected. Everything in an air lock is ''parked right on the asteroid'', they walk floating around unsuited as though under normal Earth gravity. [[FlatWhat What.]]
* ''Film/QueenOfOuterSpace''. After crashlanding on an unknown planet,
until the crew of lock is pressurized... whereupon its contents crash to the spaceship think they might be back on Earth, and check this by turning off the artificial gravity. As the gravity meter isn't on zero, they know they're not in Kansas anymore.
* In ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'', [[BadassAdorable Rocket Raccoon]] orchestrates a prison break by turning off the artificial gravity everywhere but in the guard tower, then flying said guard tower through the rest of the base.
* The SpaceStation at the start of ''Film/{{Saturn 3}}'' has people walking on the ceiling as well as the floor.
ground.



* Stephen R. Donaldson's ''Literature/TheGapCycle'' goes into detail about how artificial gravity works, how it affects the engines (when going into "tach", the artificial gravity is shut off or the rotation could cause the ship to miss its target), and even how having zero G and 1G psychologically affects the crew.
* Creator/HGWells's ''Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon'' (1901) is probably the earliest example in English literature. Wells's hero travels to the moon with the help of "cavorite", a [[{{Unobtainium}} mysterious substance]] that blocks gravity in the same way a steel wall blocks light.

to:

* Stephen R. Donaldson's ''Literature/TheGapCycle'' goes into detail about how In ''Literature/{{Aeon 14}}'', artificial gravity works, how it affects by pulling gravitons out of the engines (when going into "tach", dark layer[[note]]the imperceptible part of the artificial gravity universe that dark matter exists in, kind of like the underwater part of an iceberg[[/note]] and projecting them. In the 5th millennium only very large installations such as the thirty-kilometer colony ship ''Intrepid'' can fit them, but they're later miniaturized and become much more versatile, ultimately leading to ReactionlessDrive and the discovery of FasterThanLightTravel. By ''Destiny Lost'' graviton emitters are so common that ships don't even need to be airtight anymore. The miniaturization also allows for its use in InertialDampening.
* Every alien spaceship in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' fits this trope. When all of the Jahar's energy
is shut taken away by the living asteroids in Andalite Chronicles, they are left floating inside their ship with no gravity. Also, Andalite dome ships have an interesting mechanic wherein it feels and looks as if you're walking off or the rotation could cause edge of a cliff when moving from one part of the ship to miss its target), and even how having zero G and 1G psychologically affects another, where the crew.
* Creator/HGWells's ''Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon'' (1901)
new floor is probably the earliest example in English literature. Wells's hero travels at a ninety degree angle to the moon with old, and each has its own gravity.
* In Piers Anthony's Literature/ApprenticeAdept series,
the help of "cavorite", a [[{{Unobtainium}} mysterious substance]] that blocks habitable areas on Proton have earthlike gravity in due to devices focussing the same way a steel wall blocks light.natural gravity of the planet into those areas: the surrounding landscape has ''lower'' gravity than normal for the planet, and is [[{{Mordor}} suffering for it]].



* An interesting variant is shown in at least one ship type in Creator/GordonRDickson's ''Literature/ChildeCycle'': the gravity generator is sandwiched between halves of the ship, so one half is upside-down relative to the other half, and you have to dive ''down'' through a hole in the floor of one section to come ''up'' in the other. This actually seems marginally more like something possible than having every deck oriented the same way and ''all with the same gravity'', as on ''Franchise/StarTrek'' ships.
* The Literature/CoDominium setting uses only rotation or thrust to generate pseudogravity-- the amount of thrust needed for 1 G on a warship being roughly equal to detonating several multi-megaton thermonuclear warheads ''per second''. And they sometimes go to ''nine'' gees for several minutes; the limiting factor being not the engines or energy required, but how long the crew can stand the acceleration. No wonder they can [[DeathFromAbove slag planets]].
* ''Literature/{{Coyote}}'', by Creator/AllenSteele, tries and fails to avert this trope, when [[CriticalResearchFailure a ship traveling at a constant velocity of .2 C results in an effectively 1 g environment.]]
* The discovery of a way to reduce gravity drives the plot of Creator/HarryHarrison's ''The Daleth Effect''. The discoverer specifically mentions that the knowledge could be used to do horrible things, such as grabbing chunks of the Moon and [[ColonyDrop dropping them on an enemy country]]. The use of the device, for example, allows a craft (which doesn't even need proper engines) to travel to the Moon within hours and to Mars within days (presumably, when Mars is near). A trip to Alpha Centauri would still take over 5 years, but this is ''much'' better than the centuries we're looking at with our current technology. [[spoiler:It turns out that the trick is actually pretty easy to figure out by scientists, once they know what to look for, and, by the end of the novel, several countries have independently filed patents for the technology]].
* The first ''{{Literature/Doom}}'' novelization made gravity into something akin to a plot point at one early point in the story. The Martian moons have artificial gravity fields built by the Gate builders. This being a ''{{VideoGame/Doom}}'' novelization, the plot point was that Fly killed a monster with its help. This is notable considering that the video game didn't even have proper ''height'' let alone gravity.
* In Creator/NikolayNosov's children's book ''Doono on the Moon'', the first expedition to the Moon brings back some rock samples, one of which turns out to have [[Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon cavorite]]-like properties when in close proximity to a magnet. Dubbing the mineral "moonite" (or "lunite"), Doono (the smart shorty) builds a big rocket to carry a second expedition to discover the nature of craters on the Moon (he things they were formed when the Moon was being formed in the manner of bubbles popping on a pancake) and retrieve more moonite for subsequent expeditions. The rocket is spacious and even has a hold full of seeds of the giant fruit and vegetable plants that grow all over Earth (it's implied that these plants are normal-sized but the shorties are ''very'' small). The titular character is excluded from the mission for being clueless about anything and rude to many shorties. He (and another excluded shorty) sneak about the night before take-off but accidentally activate the launch. Since the rocket engine doesn't provide much thrust (most of the lifting power is due to the properties of moonite), no one else hears it take off. The two shorties end up on the Moon and then accidentally find themselves falling through a crack... and find out that the [[HollowEarth Moon is hollow]]. They keep falling with their parachutes until they land on a mini-Earth inside the Moon.
** When Doono has another rocket built, this one using conventional propulsion, it's much smaller, has a smaller crew, and far less comfort than the "moonite"-powered one.



* Creator/HGWells's ''Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon'' (1901) is probably the earliest example in English literature. Wells's hero travels to the moon with the help of "cavorite", a [[{{Unobtainium}} mysterious substance]] that blocks gravity in the same way a steel wall blocks light.
* In the late days of the Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series, antigrav technology was finally developed. Initially, it was used just to create "gravitic elevators", but by the time of ''Literature/FoundationsEdge'' it had been worked into the basis for a [[spoiler: ReactionlessDrive]].
* Stephen R. Donaldson's ''Literature/TheGapCycle'' goes into detail about how artificial gravity works, how it affects the engines (when going into "tach", the artificial gravity is shut off or the rotation could cause the ship to miss its target), and even how having zero G and 1G psychologically affects the crew.



* In the Literature/KnownSpace stories by Creator/LarryNiven, human spaceships at first either used inertial (spinning) pseudo-gravity, or learned to do without. At least, until the Man-Kzin Wars (the Kzinti having developed artificial gravity, which humans reverse-engineered).

to:

* In the Literature/KnownSpace ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels by Creator/DavidWeber, artificial gravity is the basis of the series' distinctive "impeller drives" and coupled force fields as well as the hyperspace gravity wave-riding "Warshawski sails". Impeller drives can provide theoretically infinite acceleration, limited only by an inertial compensator's ability to prevent the crew from feeling it (usually topping out under 800 gravities). It's also the source of tractor beams which provide the basis for [[spoiler:the spider drive]], it's how bomb-pumped grasers shape the blast towards the lasing rods, and it has provided a revolution in cheap interstellar transport of goods and skyscraper design.
** The artificial gravity is provided by adjustable "grav plating". But it's difficult to match up the gravity fields of docked ships, so the docking tube (equivalent of a gangplank) is null-''g'', and characters "swing" into the ship's gravity field.
* In Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series, the method of [[FasterThanLightTravel FTL propulsion]] used by most spacefaring races is accomplished by creating an extremely powerful artificial gravity field in front of a spaceship, which then pulls the vessel towards it. This pushes the field further forward, and so forth. As the ship approaches the speed of light, the distortion induced by the field shunts it into [[SubspaceOrHyperspace "space-plus"]]. The field is also used to create artificial gravity for the ship's inhabitants.
* In the ''Literature/KnownSpace''
stories by Creator/LarryNiven, human spaceships at first either used inertial (spinning) pseudo-gravity, or learned to do without. At least, until the Man-Kzin Wars (the Kzinti having developed artificial gravity, which humans reverse-engineered).



* The Literature/CoDominium setting uses only rotation or thrust to generate pseudogravity-- the amount of thrust needed for 1 G on a warship being roughly equal to detonating several multi-megaton thermonuclear warheads ''per second''. And they sometimes go to ''nine'' gees for several minutes; the limiting factor being not the engines or energy required, but how long the crew can stand the acceleration. No wonder they can [[DeathFromAbove slag planets]].
* In the Literature/HonorHarrington novels by Creator/DavidWeber, artificial gravity is the basis of the series' distinctive "impeller drives" and coupled force fields as well as the hyperspace gravity wave-riding "Warshawski sails." Impeller drives can provide theoretically infinite acceleration, limited only by an inertial compensator's ability to prevent the crew from feeling it (usually topping out under 800 gravities). It's also the source of tractor beams which provide the basis for [[spoiler:the spider drive]], it's how bomb-pumped grasers shape the blast towards the lasing rods, and it has provided a revolution in cheap interstellar transport of goods and skyscraper design.
** The artificial gravity is provided by adjustable "grav plating". But it's difficult to match up the gravity fields of docked ships, so the docking tube (equivalent of a gangplank) is null-''g'', and characters "swing" into the ship's gravity field.

to:

* The Literature/CoDominium setting uses only rotation or thrust to generate pseudogravity-- Notably {{Subverted}} in the amount of thrust needed for 1 G on a warship being roughly equal to detonating several multi-megaton thermonuclear warheads ''per second''. And they sometimes go to ''nine'' gees for several minutes; the limiting factor being not the engines or energy required, but how long the crew can stand the acceleration. No wonder they can [[DeathFromAbove slag planets]].
* In the Literature/HonorHarrington novels by Creator/DavidWeber,
otherwise straight SpaceOpera ''Literature/LuciferStar'' as artificial gravity is only exists when the basis starship's drives are working and pulling them to the ship's engines (which are deliberately always put at the bottom of the series' distinctive "impeller drives" ship). The rest of the time, they use magnetic boots and coupled locks to keep everything in place.
* Peter F. Hamilton's ''Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy'' has several forms of this: rotational, in the shape of the bitek or asteroid habitats; and more "sci-fi" in the form of the Voidhawks - they manipulate the shape of space-time (and thereby gravity) around them in order to move, then produce a counter-acceleration
force fields as well as the hyperspace gravity wave-riding "Warshawski sails." Impeller drives can provide theoretically infinite acceleration, limited only by an inertial compensator's ability to prevent for the crew from feeling it (usually topping out under 800 gravities). It's also compartments to leave a constant 1G gravitational field for the source humans on board. Adamist starships have to make do with thrust acceleration. [[spoiler: In one of tractor beams the short stories in the associated collection, Marcus Calvert stumbles upon an alien wreck which provide the basis for [[spoiler:the spider drive]], it's how bomb-pumped grasers shape the blast towards the lasing rods, and it has provided a revolution in cheap interstellar transport of goods and skyscraper design.
** The
actual artificial gravity is provided by adjustable "grav plating". But it's difficult - but they are forced to match up destroy the ship, losing the knowledge forever. However, given their eventual evident level of technology, it would be unlikely that the Kiint don't have artgrav of some description.]]
* Both CentrifugalGravity and the constant one-G variation are played straight in Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy. The protagonists fly their GenerationShip to an [[AlternateUniverse Alternate Dimension]] by [[ItMakesSenseInContext accelerating the ship to an infinite velocity]] at a rate of one-G for about a year. When they turn off the engines and stop accelerating, the lack of
gravity fields of docked ships, unexpectedly causes their crops to fail, so they begin spinning the docking tube (equivalent of a gangplank) is null-''g'', and characters "swing" into the ship's gravity field.ship to compensate.



* In Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series, the method of [[FasterThanLightTravel FTL propulsion]] used by most spacefaring races is accomplished by creating an extremely powerful artificial gravity field in front of a spaceship, which then pulls the vessel towards it. This pushes the field further forward, and so forth. As the ship approaches the speed of light, the distortion induced by the field shunts it into [[SubspaceOrHyperspace "space-plus"]]. The field is also used to create artificial gravity for the ship's inhabitants.
* In addition to the traditional use of this on spacecraft in the VideoGame/WingCommander universe, the "hopper" drive [[AllThereInTheManual described]] in ''Confederation Handbook'' (essentially the manual for [[Film/WingCommander the movie]]) creates a temporary gravity anomaly to effectively make the equipped ship [[FasterThanLightTravel superluminal]] (though not with the ease of use of traditional jump drives). The novels building off of the movie {{novelization}}, ''Pilgrim Stars'' and the unreleased ''Pilgrim Truth'' (for which the outline is publicly available) have an improved version of this drive that eliminates some of the limitations and can be used as a weapon, equipped on a ship that gets hijacked by Pilgrims.

to:

* In Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series, the method of [[FasterThanLightTravel FTL propulsion]] used by most spacefaring races is accomplished by creating an extremely powerful artificial gravity field Mentioned as a fairly recent invention in front of a spaceship, which then pulls the vessel towards it. This pushes the field further forward, and so forth. As the ship approaches the speed of light, the distortion induced by the field shunts it into [[SubspaceOrHyperspace "space-plus"]]. The field is also used to create artificial gravity Creator/JackMcDevitt's ''Literature/PriscillaHutchins'' novels (except for the ship's inhabitants.
* In addition to the traditional use of this on spacecraft
in the VideoGame/WingCommander universe, first book, where [[EncyclopediaExposita newspaper and journal extracts at the "hopper" drive [[AllThereInTheManual described]] in ''Confederation Handbook'' (essentially the manual for [[Film/WingCommander the movie]]) creates a temporary gravity anomaly to effectively make the equipped ship [[FasterThanLightTravel superluminal]] (though not with the ease end of use chapters]] sometimes mentions development of traditional jump drives). The novels building off of the movie {{novelization}}, ''Pilgrim Stars'' anti-gravity and the unreleased ''Pilgrim Truth'' (for which the outline is publicly available) have an improved version of that this drive that eliminates some would be a logical development of the limitations and can be used as a weapon, equipped on a ship that gets hijacked by Pilgrims.that).



* The first ''{{Literature/Doom}}'' novelization made gravity into something akin to a plot point at one early point in the story. The Martian moons have artificial gravity fields built by the Gate builders. This being a ''{{VideoGame/Doom}}'' novelization, the plot point was that Fly killed a monster with its help. This is notable considering that the video game didn't even have proper ''height'' let alone gravity.
* ''Literature/{{Coyote}}'', by Creator/AllenSteele, tries and fails to avert this trope, when [[CriticalResearchFailure a ship traveling at a constant velocity of .2 C results in an effectively 1 g environment.]]
* Every alien spaceship in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' fits this trope. When all of the Jahar's energy is taken away by the living asteroids in Andalite Chronicles, they are left floating inside their ship with no gravity. Also, Andalite dome ships have an interesting mechanic wherein it feels and looks as if you're walking off the edge of a cliff when moving from one part of the ship to another, where the new floor is at a ninety degree angle to the old, and each has its own gravity.
* An interesting variant is shown in at least one ship type in Creator/GordonRDickson's ''Literature/ChildeCycle'': the gravity generator is sandwiched between halves of the ship, so one half is upside-down relative to the other half, and you have to dive ''down'' through a hole in the floor of one section to come ''up'' in the other. This actually seems marginally more like something possible than having every deck oriented the same way and ''all with the same gravity'', as on ''Franchise/StarTrek'' ships.
* Peter F. Hamilton's ''Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy'' has several forms of this: rotational, in the shape of the bitek or asteroid habitats; and more "sci-fi" in the form of the Voidhawks - they manipulate the shape of space-time (and thereby gravity) around them in order to move, then produce a counter-acceleration force for the crew compartments to leave a constant 1G gravitational field for the humans on board. Adamist starships have to make do with thrust acceleration. [[spoiler: In one of the short stories in the associated collection, Marcus Calvert stumbles upon an alien wreck which has actual artificial gravity - but they are forced to destroy the ship, losing the knowledge forever. However, given their eventual evident level of technology, it would be unlikely that the Kiint don't have artgrav of some description.]]
* In Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''[[Literature/TheStarsAreColdToys Star Shadow]]'', the Strong races have gravity-manipulation technology (used to lift ships into orbit), implying the use of artificial gravity on their ships. The [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Geo]][[HumanAliens meters]] have artificial gravity on their ships. When a Russian "Buran" shuttle is docked to a Geometer ship, the latter's computer extends the ship's AG field to the shuttle. When the protagonist then gets into a fight with a more seasoned cosmonaut, he has the advantage, as he'd gotten used to AG, while the other man fights as one would in zero-g (e.g. hit and lightly push off to float to the ceiling).
* The invention of artificial gravity helps to drive the plot of Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/FallingFree'', rendering the Quaddies (genetically engineered HumanSubspecies designed with legs replaced by a second set of arms + hands and free-fall adapted metabolisms) obsolete.
* The Tzenkethi in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse manipulate gravity on a local scale so they can use every surface of a room for work or recreation. They consider using only the floor to be a foolish waste of available space. Also, they're psychologically uncomfortable with open spaces and prefer the sense of enclosement that comes from having workstations on every wall, floor and ceiling. The effects are shown in the ''Literature/TerokNor'' and ''Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact'' series.



* In Michael Reaves' ''The Shattered World'' and ''The Burning Realm'', the fragments of a [[EarthShatteringKaboom broken fantasy planet]] are kept in orbit and provided with localized artificial gravity by powerful Runestones, allowing life to continue on each FloatingContinent within an immense magically-preserved air envelope. Smaller Runestones are likewise used to generate normal gravity aboard flying ships that travel from fragment to fragment.
* E.E. "Doc" Smith flipped back and forth between hard and very soft sci-fi at times. In ''The Skylark of Space'', humanity's first stumbling efforts into the void are played very hard in the gravitational sense. Later, the characters meet alien beings from whom they copy, acquire or (justifiably at times) appropriate gravity-manipulation technology. The ''Lensman'' universe has portable gravity dampers for human personnel assigned to ships of races which are either heavy-gee to start with or have a higher tolerance of it in combat manoeuvres.
** In the ''Family d'Alembert'' series, the heavyworlders who form the top ranks of the galaxy's secret service invariably end up paired with each other because they're the only ones who can stand each other's native environments - and even then, one of them finds that the extra half-gee of the place he's visiting (three vs. 2.5) makes a lot of difference when you're fighting for your life. In fact, the human heavyworlders' planets seem to top out at three gees in both the Lensman and Family d'Alembert series, which suggests Smith did some research which indicated that this was the practical maximum that humans could be expected to successfully adapt to without assistive technology. Such technology is not easily man-portable in the ''Family d'Alembert'' universe, although it is fitted to some of the larger spacecraft, and artificial gravity boosting up to twenty-five gees can be selectively turned on in individual rooms of a dwelling or compartments of a ship. This becomes a major plot point in the climax of both the first and final novels of the series.
* ''Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries'': In ''3001: The Final Odyssey'', it is shown that humanity eventually develops this, which also drives their InertialDampening and [[ReactionlessDrive Reactionless Drives]].
* In Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''[[Literature/TheStarsAreColdToys Star Shadow]]'', the Strong races have gravity-manipulation technology (used to lift ships into orbit), implying the use of artificial gravity on their ships. The [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Geo]][[HumanAliens meters]] have artificial gravity on their ships. When a Russian "Buran" shuttle is docked to a Geometer ship, the latter's computer extends the ship's AG field to the shuttle. When the protagonist then gets into a fight with a more seasoned cosmonaut, he has the advantage, as he'd gotten used to AG, while the other man fights as one would in zero-g (e.g. hit and lightly push off to float to the ceiling).
* In ''Literature/StarshipsMage'', [[SpaceFantasy gravity runes]] need to be constantly refreshed by magic. Since mages are always in demand, it's expensive to bring them in on a regular basis, which means many spaceships at dock don't have extensive artificial gravity. Ships in transit often have spinning components that allow centrifugal force to pull inhabitants to the outside of the ship. Despite the fact that mages can create their own artificial gravity fields, some, like the main character, choose to float through zero gravity spaces just like the rest of the population, to avoid drawing attention to themselves.
* The Tzenkethi in the Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse manipulate gravity on a local scale so they can use every surface of a room for work or recreation. They consider using only the floor to be a foolish waste of available space. Also, they're psychologically uncomfortable with open spaces and prefer the sense of enclosement that comes from having workstations on every wall, floor and ceiling. The effects are shown in the ''Literature/TerokNor'' and ''Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact'' series.
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** In ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' there's a book, ''Spore'', that largely takes place on an asteroid that's large but not big enough for substantial gravity. A base on it has artificial gravity, but outside of it characters have to use special boots with tractor beams in them to avoid floating away.



* The discovery of a way to reduce gravity drives the plot of Creator/HarryHarrison's ''The Daleth Effect''. The discoverer specifically mentions that the knowledge could be used to do horrible things, such as grabbing chunks of the Moon and [[ColonyDrop dropping them on an enemy country]]. The use of the device, for example, allows a craft (which doesn't even need proper engines) to travel to the Moon within hours and to Mars within days (presumably, when Mars is near). A trip to Alpha Centauri would still take over 5 years, but this is ''much'' better than the centuries we're looking at with our current technology. [[spoiler:It turns out that the trick is actually pretty easy to figure out by scientists, once they know what to look for, and, by the end of the novel, several countries have independently filed patents for the technology]].
* In Piers Anthony's Literature/ApprenticeAdept series, the habitable areas on Proton have earthlike gravity due to devices focussing the natural gravity of the planet into those areas: the surrounding landscape has ''lower'' gravity than normal for the planet, and is [[{{Mordor}} suffering for it]].



* In the late days of the Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series, antigrav technology was finally developed. Initially, it was used just to create "gravitic elevators", but by the time of ''Literature/FoundationsEdge'' it had been worked into the basis for a [[spoiler: ReactionlessDrive]].
* Mentioned as a fairly recent invention in Creator/JackMcDevitt's ''Literature/PriscillaHutchins'' novels (except for in the first book, where [[EncyclopediaExposita newspaper and journal extracts at the end of chapters]] sometimes mentions development of anti-gravity and that this would be a logical development of that).

to:

* In the late days of the Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series, antigrav technology was finally developed. Initially, it was used just to create "gravitic elevators", but by the time of ''Literature/FoundationsEdge'' it had been worked into the basis for a [[spoiler: ReactionlessDrive]].
* Mentioned as a fairly recent
''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'': The invention in Creator/JackMcDevitt's ''Literature/PriscillaHutchins'' novels (except for in of artificial gravity helps to drive the first book, where [[EncyclopediaExposita newspaper plot of ''Literature/FallingFree'', rendering the Quaddies (genetically engineered HumanSubspecies designed with legs replaced by a second set of arms + hands and journal extracts at the end of chapters]] sometimes mentions development of anti-gravity and that this would be a logical development of that).free-fall adapted metabolisms) obsolete.



* In Creator/NikolayNosov's children's book ''Dunno on the Moon'', the first expedition to the Moon brings back some rock samples, one of which turns out to have [[Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon cavorite]]-like properties when in close proximity to a magnet. Dubbing the mineral "moonite" (or "lunite"), Doono (the smart shorty) builds a big rocket to carry a second expedition to discover the nature of craters on the Moon (he things they were formed when the Moon was being formed in the manner of bubbles popping on a pancake) and retrieve more moonite for subsequent expeditions. The rocket is spacious and even has a hold full of seeds of the giant fruit and vegetable plants that grow all over Earth (it's implied that these plants are normal-sized but the shorties are ''very'' small). The titular character is excluded from the mission for being clueless about anything and rude to many shorties. He (and another excluded shorty) sneak about the night before take-off but accidentally activate the launch. Since the rocket engine doesn't provide much thrust (most of the lifting power is due to the properties of moonite), no one else hears it take off. The two shorties end up on the Moon and then accidentally find themselves falling through a crack... and find out that the [[HollowEarth Moon is hollow]]. They keep falling with their parachutes until they land on a mini-Earth inside the Moon.
** When Doono has another rocket built, this one using conventional propulsion, it's much smaller, has a smaller crew, and far less comfort than the "moonite"-powered one.
* Both CentrifugalGravity and the constant one-G variation are played straight in Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy. The protagonists fly their GenerationShip to an [[AlternateUniverse Alternate Dimension]] by [[ItMakesSenseInContext accelerating the ship to an infinite velocity]] at a rate of one-G for about a year. When they turn off the engines and stop accelerating, the lack of gravity unexpectedly causes their crops to fail, so they begin spinning the ship to compensate.
* E.E. "Doc" Smith flipped back and forth between hard and very soft sci-fi at times. In ''The Skylark of Space'', humanity's first stumbling efforts into the void are played very hard in the gravitational sense. Later, the characters meet alien beings from whom they copy, acquire or (justifiably at times) appropriate gravity-manipulation technology. The ''Lensman'' universe has portable gravity dampers for human personnel assigned to ships of races which are either heavy-gee to start with or have a higher tolerance of it in combat manoeuvres.
** In the ''Family d'Alembert'' series, the heavyworlders who form the top ranks of the galaxy's secret service invariably end up paired with each other because they're the only ones who can stand each other's native environments - and even then, one of them finds that the extra half-gee of the place he's visiting (three vs. 2.5) makes a lot of difference when you're fighting for your life. In fact, the human heavyworlders' planets seem to top out at three gees in both the Lensman and Family d'Alembert series, which suggests Smith did some research which indicated that this was the practical maximum that humans could be expected to successfully adapt to without assistive technology. Such technology is not easily man-portable in the ''Family d'Alembert'' universe, although it is fitted to some of the larger spacecraft, and artificial gravity boosting up to twenty-five gees can be selectively turned on in individual rooms of a dwelling or compartments of a ship. This becomes a major plot point in the climax of both the first and final novels of the series.
* In ''[[Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries 3001: The Final Odyssey]]'', it is shown that humanity eventually develops this, which also drives their InertialDampening and [[ReactionlessDrive Reactionless Drives]].
* In ''Literature/StarshipsMage'', [[SpaceFantasy gravity runes]] need to be constantly refreshed by magic. Since mages are always in demand, it's expensive to bring them in on a regular basis, which means many spaceships at dock don't have extensive artificial gravity. Ships in transit often have spinning components that allow centrifugal force to pull inhabitants to the outside of the ship. Despite the fact that mages can create their own artificial gravity fields, some, like the main character, choose to float through zero gravity spaces just like the rest of the population, to avoid drawing attention to themselves.
* In Michael Reaves' ''The Shattered World'' and ''The Burning Realm'', the fragments of a [[EarthShatteringKaboom broken fantasy planet]] are kept in orbit and provided with localized artificial gravity by powerful Runestones, allowing life to continue on each FloatingContinent within an immense magically-preserved air envelope. Smaller Runestones are likewise used to generate normal gravity aboard flying ships that travel from fragment to fragment.
* In ''Literature/{{Aeon 14}}'', artificial gravity by pulling gravitons out of the dark layer[[note]]the imperceptible part of the universe that dark matter exists in, kind of like the underwater part of an iceberg[[/note]] and projecting them. In the 5th millennium only very large installations such as the thirty-kilometer colony ship ''Intrepid'' can fit them, but they're later miniaturized and become much more versatile, ultimately leading to ReactionlessDrive and the discovery of FasterThanLightTravel. By ''Destiny Lost'' graviton emitters are so common that ships don't even need to be airtight anymore. The miniaturization also allows for its use in InertialDampening.
* Notably {{Subverted}} in the otherwise straight SpaceOpera ''Literature/LuciferStar'' as artificial gravity only exists when the starship's drives are working and pulling them to the ship's engines (which are deliberately always put at the bottom of the ship). The rest of the time, they use magnetic boots and locks to keep everything in place.

to:

* In Creator/NikolayNosov's children's book ''Dunno on the Moon'', the first expedition addition to the Moon brings back some rock samples, one traditional use of which turns out to have [[Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon cavorite]]-like properties when in close proximity to a magnet. Dubbing the mineral "moonite" (or "lunite"), Doono (the smart shorty) builds a big rocket to carry a second expedition to discover the nature of craters this on the Moon (he things they were formed when the Moon was being formed spacecraft in the manner of bubbles popping on a pancake) and retrieve more moonite for subsequent expeditions. The rocket is spacious and even has a hold full of seeds of the giant fruit and vegetable plants that grow all over Earth (it's implied that these plants are normal-sized but the shorties are ''very'' small). The titular character is excluded from the mission for being clueless about anything and rude to many shorties. He (and another excluded shorty) sneak about the night before take-off but accidentally activate the launch. Since the rocket engine doesn't provide much thrust (most of the lifting power is due to the properties of moonite), no one else hears it take off. The two shorties end up on the Moon and then accidentally find themselves falling through a crack... and find out that the [[HollowEarth Moon is hollow]]. They keep falling with their parachutes until they land on a mini-Earth inside the Moon.
** When Doono has another rocket built, this one using conventional propulsion, it's much smaller, has a smaller crew, and far less comfort than the "moonite"-powered one.
* Both CentrifugalGravity and the constant one-G variation are played straight in Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy. The protagonists fly their GenerationShip to an [[AlternateUniverse Alternate Dimension]] by [[ItMakesSenseInContext accelerating the ship to an infinite velocity]] at a rate of one-G for about a year. When they turn off the engines and stop accelerating, the lack of gravity unexpectedly causes their crops to fail, so they begin spinning the ship to compensate.
* E.E. "Doc" Smith flipped back and forth between hard and very soft sci-fi at times. In ''The Skylark of Space'', humanity's first stumbling efforts into the void are played very hard in the gravitational sense. Later, the characters meet alien beings from whom they copy, acquire or (justifiably at times) appropriate gravity-manipulation technology. The ''Lensman'' universe has portable gravity dampers for human personnel assigned to ships of races which are either heavy-gee to start with or have a higher tolerance of it in combat manoeuvres.
** In the ''Family d'Alembert'' series, the heavyworlders who form the top ranks of the galaxy's secret service invariably end up paired with each other because they're the only ones who can stand each other's native environments - and even then, one of them finds that the extra half-gee of the place he's visiting (three vs. 2.5) makes a lot of difference when you're fighting for your life. In fact, the human heavyworlders' planets seem to top out at three gees in both the Lensman and Family d'Alembert series, which suggests Smith did some research which indicated that this was the practical maximum that humans could be expected to successfully adapt to without assistive technology. Such technology is not easily man-portable in the ''Family d'Alembert''
VideoGame/WingCommander universe, although it the "hopper" drive [[AllThereInTheManual described]] in ''Confederation Handbook'' (essentially the manual for [[Film/WingCommander the movie]]) creates a temporary gravity anomaly to effectively make the equipped ship [[FasterThanLightTravel superluminal]] (though not with the ease of use of traditional jump drives). The novels building off of the movie {{novelization}}, ''Pilgrim Stars'' and the unreleased ''Pilgrim Truth'' (for which the outline is fitted to publicly available) have an improved version of this drive that eliminates some of the larger spacecraft, limitations and artificial gravity boosting up to twenty-five gees can be selectively turned used as a weapon, equipped on in individual rooms of a dwelling or compartments of a ship. This becomes a major plot point in the climax of both the first and final novels of the series.
* In ''[[Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries 3001: The Final Odyssey]]'', it is shown
ship that humanity eventually develops this, which also drives their InertialDampening and [[ReactionlessDrive Reactionless Drives]].
* In ''Literature/StarshipsMage'', [[SpaceFantasy gravity runes]] need to be constantly refreshed
gets hijacked by magic. Since mages are always in demand, it's expensive to bring them in on a regular basis, which means many spaceships at dock don't have extensive artificial gravity. Ships in transit often have spinning components that allow centrifugal force to pull inhabitants to the outside of the ship. Despite the fact that mages can create their own artificial gravity fields, some, like the main character, choose to float through zero gravity spaces just like the rest of the population, to avoid drawing attention to themselves.
* In Michael Reaves' ''The Shattered World'' and ''The Burning Realm'', the fragments of a [[EarthShatteringKaboom broken fantasy planet]] are kept in orbit and provided with localized artificial gravity by powerful Runestones, allowing life to continue on each FloatingContinent within an immense magically-preserved air envelope. Smaller Runestones are likewise used to generate normal gravity aboard flying ships that travel from fragment to fragment.
* In ''Literature/{{Aeon 14}}'', artificial gravity by pulling gravitons out of the dark layer[[note]]the imperceptible part of the universe that dark matter exists in, kind of like the underwater part of an iceberg[[/note]] and projecting them. In the 5th millennium only very large installations such as the thirty-kilometer colony ship ''Intrepid'' can fit them, but they're later miniaturized and become much more versatile, ultimately leading to ReactionlessDrive and the discovery of FasterThanLightTravel. By ''Destiny Lost'' graviton emitters are so common that ships don't even need to be airtight anymore. The miniaturization also allows for its use in InertialDampening.
* Notably {{Subverted}} in the otherwise straight SpaceOpera ''Literature/LuciferStar'' as artificial gravity only exists when the starship's drives are working and pulling them to the ship's engines (which are deliberately always put at the bottom of the ship). The rest of the time, they use magnetic boots and locks to keep everything in place.
Pilgrims.



[[folder:Live Action TV ]]
* The first episode of ''Series/LostInSpace'' has the artifical gravity turned off to make repairs.

to:

[[folder:Live Action TV ]]
[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'': The first episode of ''Series/LostInSpace'' has in-universe explanation for why the artifical gravity turned off to make repairs.''Andromeda Ascendant'' can maneuver like a SpaceFighter despite being a [[TheBattlestar kilometer-long capital ship]] is fine control of the ship's AG field by the AI.



* In ''Series/DarkMatter'' the ship is equipped with this, but unlike most examples of this trope, the artificial gravity ''will'' go out if the ship has to divert power for evasive maneuvers



* In ''Series/DarkMatter'' the ship is equipped with this, but unlike most examples of this trope, the artificial gravity ''will'' go out if the ship has to divert power for evasive maneuvers.



* Rabbit Hutch in Series/KamenRiderFourze has a large lever to activate this.
* The first episode of ''Series/LostInSpace'' has the artificial gravity turned off to make repairs.
* Series/NightMan's anti-gravity belt is what allows him to fly. Apparently, according to the pilot, it was planned to be standard-issue for cops of the future, along with an InvisibilityCloak and an {{Eye Beam|s}}.



* ''Franchise/StargateVerse'': All spaceships have some sort of artificial gravity.
** In ''Series/StargateSG1'', Ba'al has a research base dedicated to the manipulation of artificial gravity, complete with a jail cell that shares all the same drawbacks as a ForceFieldDoor.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
*** When Rodney and two bit characters are trying to repair an Ancient KillSat in part one of "The Siege", they're initially weightless because the satellite has been without power for millennia. Then they turn on the artificial gravity too fast and [[AmusingInjuries poor Rodney falls about twenty feet onto his back]].
*** Samantha Carter and Bill Lee were working in a half-finished base that didn't have artificial gravity. Sam glided gracefully from point to point, while Bill... well, spaceships need barf bags, too.



* ''Franchise/StargateVerse'': All spaceships have some sort of artificial gravity.
** In ''Series/StargateSG1'', Ba'al has a research base dedicated to the manipulation of artificial gravity, complete with a jail cell that shares all the same drawbacks as a ForceFieldDoor.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
*** When Rodney and two bit characters are trying to repair an Ancient KillSat in part one of "The Siege", they're initially weightless because the satellite has been without power for millennia. Then they turn on the artificial gravity too fast and [[AmusingInjuries poor Rodney falls about twenty feet onto his back]].
*** Samantha Carter and Bill Lee were working in a half-finished base that didn't have artificial gravity. Sam glided gracefully from point to point, while Bill... well, spaceships need barf bags, too.
* ''Series/{{Andromeda}}'': The in-universe explanation for why the ''Andromeda Ascendent'' can maneuver like a SpaceFighter despite being a [[TheBattlestar kilometer-long capital ship]] is fine control of the ship's AG field by the AI.
* Series/NightMan's anti-gravity belt is what allows him to fly. Apparently, according to the pilot, it was planned to be standard-issue for cops of the future, along with an InvisibilityCloak and an {{Eye Beam|s}}.
* Rabbit Hutch in Series/KamenRiderFourze has a large lever to activate this.



* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' are somewhat implied to have such a device with this principle; what with being heavily armed, 30 foot tall robots. [[UpToEleven Many of which can even fly]].



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' - played straight, as "Gravity Pumps" have been invented. There's even a scene where Bender is flying [[strike:drunk]] sober up-side down on a planet, and everything inside is still "pulled to the floor" just like normal.
** Also, in the episode "Brannigan Begin Again," the crew is delivering pillows to a world with significantly higher g than earth. Even after they land on the planet, they are unaffected until they step off the platform that lowered them to the surface. At this point the cart used to move the pillows is destroyed by the weight, Fry's normally upright hair falls, Bender's legs collapse, and Brannigan's girdle fails spectacularly.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' - played straight, as "Gravity Pumps" have been invented. There's even a scene where Bender is flying [[strike:drunk]] sober up-side upside down on a planet, and everything inside is still "pulled to the floor" just like normal.
** Also, in the episode "Brannigan Begin Again," Again", the crew is delivering pillows to a world with significantly higher g than earth. Even after they land on the planet, they are unaffected until they step off the platform that lowered them to the surface. At this point the cart used to move the pillows is destroyed by the weight, Fry's normally upright hair falls, Bender's legs collapse, and Brannigan's girdle fails spectacularly.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' are somewhat implied to have such a device with this principle; what with being heavily armed, 30 foot tall robots. [[UpToEleven Many of which can even fly]].
13th May '17 5:35:27 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Franchise/StarCraft'' Terran ships and space platforms use "gravity channeling", in the latter case it explains how ground units can walk around on those things without flying off into space.

to:

* In ''Franchise/StarCraft'' ''VideoGame/StarCraft'' Terran ships and space platforms use "gravity channeling", in the latter case it explains how ground units can walk around on those things without flying off into space.
8th May '17 6:40:11 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Manga/{{ARIA}}'', set on Mars (a.k.a. Aqua) matches Earth's gravity perfectly. However, it requires a group of underground gravity technicians called Gnomes to make this happen. Al, one of the Gnomes, is a recurring side character. Due to ''ARIA'''s nature as a feel-good series, though, just how this ArtificialGravity works is left unexplained.

to:

* ''Manga/{{ARIA}}'', set on Mars (a.k.a. Aqua) matches Earth's gravity perfectly. However, it requires a group of underground gravity technicians called Gnomes to make this happen. Al, one of the Gnomes, is a recurring side character. Due to ''ARIA'''s nature as a feel-good series, though, just how this ArtificialGravity artificial gravity works is left unexplained.



** ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamIronBloodedOrphans'' is the first entry to have actual ArtificialGravity on spaceships, no spinning required. How it works hasn't been explained beyond the fact that "Ahab Reactors" make it possible.

to:

** ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamIronBloodedOrphans'' is the first entry to have actual ArtificialGravity artificial gravity on spaceships, no spinning required. How it works hasn't been explained beyond the fact that "Ahab Reactors" make it possible.



* ''WesternAnimation/WallE'' was rather odd about this - the Axiom apparently had ArtificialGravity, but not InertialDampening.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/WallE'' was rather odd about this - the Axiom apparently had ArtificialGravity, artificial gravity, but not InertialDampening.



* In ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'', the ArtificialGravity in the Klingon ship is damaged immediately by torpedoes. Although this is probably more to do with [[RuleOfCool the rule of cool]] of having a zero-G gunfight than any attempt at [[MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness hard SF]], it is notable, because rare in Star Trek was Zero-gravity ever used. No matter how well beaten a ship was the gravity always worked through thick and thin. Life support out? Power completely lost? Gravity's still on.

to:

* In ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'', the ArtificialGravity artificial gravity in the Klingon ship is damaged immediately by torpedoes. Although this is probably more to do with [[RuleOfCool the rule of cool]] of having a zero-G gunfight than any attempt at [[MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness hard SF]], it is notable, because rare in Star Trek was Zero-gravity ever used. No matter how well beaten a ship was the gravity always worked through thick and thin. Life support out? Power completely lost? Gravity's still on.



* The SpaceStation at the start of ''[[Film/{{Saturn3}} Saturn 3]]'' has people walking on the ceiling as well as the floor.

to:

* The SpaceStation at the start of ''[[Film/{{Saturn3}} Saturn 3]]'' ''Film/{{Saturn 3}}'' has people walking on the ceiling as well as the floor.



* In the Literature/HonorHarrington novels by Creator/DavidWeber, ArtificialGravity is the basis of the series' distinctive "impeller drives" and coupled force fields as well as the hyperspace gravity wave-riding "Warshawski sails." Impeller drives can provide theoretically infinite acceleration, limited only by an inertial compensator's ability to prevent the crew from feeling it (usually topping out under 800 gravities). It's also the source of tractor beams which provide the basis for [[spoiler:the spider drive]], it's how bomb-pumped grasers shape the blast towards the lasing rods, and it has provided a revolution in cheap interstellar transport of goods and skyscraper design.

to:

* In the Literature/HonorHarrington novels by Creator/DavidWeber, ArtificialGravity artificial gravity is the basis of the series' distinctive "impeller drives" and coupled force fields as well as the hyperspace gravity wave-riding "Warshawski sails." Impeller drives can provide theoretically infinite acceleration, limited only by an inertial compensator's ability to prevent the crew from feeling it (usually topping out under 800 gravities). It's also the source of tractor beams which provide the basis for [[spoiler:the spider drive]], it's how bomb-pumped grasers shape the blast towards the lasing rods, and it has provided a revolution in cheap interstellar transport of goods and skyscraper design.



* In Michael Reaves' ''The Shattered World'' and ''The Burning Realm'', the fragments of a [[EarthShatteringKaboom broken fantasy planet]] are kept in orbit and provided with localized ArtificialGravity by powerful Runestones, allowing life to continue on each FloatingContinent within an immense magically-preserved air envelope. Smaller Runestones are likewise used to generate normal gravity aboard flying ships that travel from fragment to fragment.

to:

* In Michael Reaves' ''The Shattered World'' and ''The Burning Realm'', the fragments of a [[EarthShatteringKaboom broken fantasy planet]] are kept in orbit and provided with localized ArtificialGravity artificial gravity by powerful Runestones, allowing life to continue on each FloatingContinent within an immense magically-preserved air envelope. Smaller Runestones are likewise used to generate normal gravity aboard flying ships that travel from fragment to fragment.



[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

to:

[[folder: Live [[folder:Live Action TV ]]



* Author Ben Bova's UniverseBible for the shortlived series ''Series/TheStarLost'' explicitly invoked ArtificialGravity for the Ark, but coyly refused to quantify the technology, except to note that gravity generators were likely to be large, massive and completely non-portable devices. The show did not last long enough for the specifics to become important to a story.

to:

* Author Ben Bova's UniverseBible for the shortlived series ''Series/TheStarLost'' explicitly invoked ArtificialGravity artificial gravity for the Ark, but coyly refused to quantify the technology, except to note that gravity generators were likely to be large, massive and completely non-portable devices. The show did not last long enough for the specifics to become important to a story.



* The FirstPersonShooter ''VideoGame/Prey2006'' is pretty creative with this, in that the Sphere's ArtificialGravity goes in different directions in different parts of the ship. You can look out a window in one room and see people running on the ceiling in the next.

to:

* The FirstPersonShooter ''VideoGame/Prey2006'' is pretty creative with this, in that the Sphere's ArtificialGravity artificial gravity goes in different directions in different parts of the ship. You can look out a window in one room and see people running on the ceiling in the next.



** In "The Practical Joker", the title character uses its control over the Enterprise computer to turn off the ship's ArtificialGravity system, causing the characters to float around in zero gravity.

to:

** In "The Practical Joker", the title character uses its control over the Enterprise computer to turn off the ship's ArtificialGravity artificial gravity system, causing the characters to float around in zero gravity.



* A section of the [[SpaceStation ISS]] was planned which would have been able to generate ArtificialGravity between 0.01 and 2 times that of Earth gravity via [[WhenThingsSpinScienceHappens spinning]], but was eventually cancelled. The module is currently on display in Japan.

to:

* A section of the [[SpaceStation ISS]] was planned which would have been able to generate ArtificialGravity artificial gravity between 0.01 and 2 times that of Earth gravity via [[WhenThingsSpinScienceHappens spinning]], but was eventually cancelled. The module is currently on display in Japan.
29th Apr '17 11:03:50 AM CharlesPhipps
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Notably {{Subverted}} in the otherwise straight SpaceOpera ''Literature/LuciferStar'' as artificial gravity only exists when the starship's drives are working and pulling them to the ship's engines (which are deliberately always put at the bottom of the ship). The rest of the time, they use magnetic boots and locks to keep everything in place.
9th Apr '17 8:47:21 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In one multi-part episode of ''RockyAndBullwinkle'', they encounter a substance called Upsidaisium, which has negative weight.

to:

* In one multi-part episode of ''RockyAndBullwinkle'', ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle'', they encounter a substance called Upsidaisium, which has negative weight.
6th Mar '17 2:58:16 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In TabletopGame/Warhammer40K, Space Hulks are the smashed-together remains of lost ships that occasionally resurface from the Warp. Literature/CiaphasCain ('''HERO OF THE IMPERIUM!''') mentions the strange feeling of gravity shifting when they move in range of one ship's gravity generator to another.

to:

* In TabletopGame/Warhammer40K, ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'', Space Hulks are the smashed-together remains of lost ships that occasionally resurface from the Warp. Literature/CiaphasCain ('''HERO OF THE IMPERIUM!''') mentions the strange feeling of gravity shifting when they move in range of one ship's gravity generator to another.
26th Jan '17 6:27:22 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the late days of the Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series, antigrav technology was finally developed. Initially, it was used just to create "gravitic elevators", but by the time of ''Foundation's Edge'' it had been worked into the basis for a [[spoiler: ReactionlessDrive]].

to:

* In the late days of the Galactic Empire in Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series, antigrav technology was finally developed. Initially, it was used just to create "gravitic elevators", but by the time of ''Foundation's Edge'' ''Literature/FoundationsEdge'' it had been worked into the basis for a [[spoiler: ReactionlessDrive]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 152. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArtificialGravity