History Main / AcceptableReligiousTargets

6th Dec '17 10:49:56 AM germanlureag
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This activism also comes in part from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on American television who is an openly avowed atheist. Very few TV atheists are portrayed as having come to this conclusion by dispassionate consideration of their experience but, much more likely, they have some tragedy in their past, such as a CynicismCatalyst or gave up after a crisis of faith (which does occur in real-life but isn't universally true). Not appearing to practice or even mention religion at all is fine for most people, but it's generally only characters with a fair degree of cynicism and bitterness who can state outright that they don't believe there is a God, or even that they severely doubt if God exists (however the latter is agnostic, not atheist). In more positive depictions, such characters often reverse or at least re-examine these views after something good happens to them (often in a VerySpecialEpisode or a DoTheyKnowItsChristmasTime), even if nothing in the episode suggested a supernatural influence (and especially if there is supernatural influence). See, for example, House on ''Series/{{House}}'', Mal on ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', or the film ''Film/{{Signs}}''. Less prevalent in Europe, where non-religious people make up for a sizable portion of the population. See also HollywoodAtheist.

to:

This activism also comes in part from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on American television who is an openly avowed atheist. Very few TV atheists are portrayed as having come to this conclusion by dispassionate consideration of their experience but, much more likely, they have some tragedy in their past, such as a CynicismCatalyst or gave up after a crisis of faith (which does occur in real-life but isn't universally true). Not appearing to practice or even mention religion at all is fine for most people, but it's generally only characters with a fair degree of cynicism and bitterness who can state outright that they don't believe there is a God, or even that they severely doubt if God exists (however the latter is agnostic, not atheist). In more positive depictions, such characters often reverse or at least re-examine these views after something good happens to them (often in a VerySpecialEpisode or a DoTheyKnowItsChristmasTime), even if nothing in the episode suggested a supernatural influence (and especially if there is supernatural influence). See, for example, House on ''Series/{{House}}'', Mal on ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', or the film ''Film/{{Signs}}''. Less prevalent in Europe, where non-religious people make up for a sizable portion of the population. See also HollywoodAtheist.



* ''Series/{{Bones}}'''s Dr. Temperance Brennan is probably one of the most well-treated atheists on television. She frequently states her rationale for why she doesn't believe in a God in a calm manner-unsurprising, considering she's an anthropologist above all else-and nothing has ever been made of her being "wrong". She and her Catholic FBI partner get into frequent arguments over her atheism, but over the seasons, he's come to mostly tease her affectionately over it.

to:

* ''Series/{{Bones}}'''s Dr. Temperance Brennan is probably one of the most well-treated atheists on television. She frequently states her rationale for why she doesn't believe in a God in a calm manner-unsurprising, God, considering she's an anthropologist above all else-and nothing has ever been made of her being "wrong".else. She and her Catholic FBI partner get into frequent arguments over her atheism, but over the seasons, he's come to mostly tease her affectionately over it.



* Atheism is commonly repressed or ignored, but many internet sites have a very prominent atheist userbase both despite and ''because'' of this.

to:

* Atheism is commonly repressed or ignored, but many some internet sites have a very prominent atheist userbase both despite and ''because'' of this.
19th Nov '17 2:05:41 PM Fireblood
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Some of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda from both sides, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement some of which contained at least a grain of truth]]. A lot of communist regimes have endorsed state atheism, often in conjunction with violent - even murderous - campaigns against religion/the religious (even communist regimes, such as modern China, that relented from violent anti-religious campaigns have still tried to repress religion through other means). During the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the anti-religious Soviet Union thus atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American [[note]] There was also the case of the late Madalyn Murray O'Hair, at atheist who founded the American Atheist Society and was a Soviet sympathizer who once tried to defect to the Soviet Union.
Ironically enough, one of the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]] In the separate US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement, particularly the New Atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Problems arose with the founders vitriolic stance as well as some [[HitlerAteSugar logically]] [[FallacyFallacy fallacious]] and [[MoralMyopia myopic]] statements (such as founder Richard Dawkins [[MoralMyopia identifying atheists as a persecuted group who's plight should be alleviated while at the same time calling for mockery and ridicule of the religious]], and the anti-religious book by fellow founder Christopher Hitchens consists mostly of [[HitlerAteSugar terrible things religious people have done or endorsed throughout history]]). Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, such as the field of apologetics which really stepped into the public light after the New Atheist movement's emergence.

to:

Some of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda from both sides, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement some of which contained at least a grain of truth]]. A lot of communist regimes have endorsed state atheism, often in conjunction with violent - even murderous - campaigns against religion/the religious (even communist regimes, such as modern China, that relented from violent anti-religious campaigns have still tried to repress religion through other means). During the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the anti-religious Soviet Union Union, thus atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American [[note]] There Un-American.[[note]]There was also the case of the late Madalyn Murray O'Hair, at atheist who founded the American Atheist Society and was a Soviet sympathizer who once tried to defect to the Soviet Union.
Union. Ironically enough, one of the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]] In the separate US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement, particularly the New Atheist movement movement, emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Problems arose with the founders vitriolic stance as well as some [[HitlerAteSugar logically]] [[FallacyFallacy fallacious]] and [[MoralMyopia myopic]] statements (such as founder Richard Dawkins [[MoralMyopia identifying atheists as a persecuted group who's plight should be alleviated while at the same time calling for mockery and ridicule of the religious]], and the anti-religious book by fellow founder Christopher Hitchens consists mostly of [[HitlerAteSugar terrible things religious people have done or endorsed throughout history]]). Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, such as in the field of apologetics apologetics, which really stepped into the public light after the New Atheist movement's emergence.
18th Nov '17 10:25:38 PM SkidTroper
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Some of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda from both sides, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement some of which contained at least a grain of truth]]. A lot of communist regimes have endorsed state atheism, often in conjunction with violent - even murderous - campaigns against religion/the religious (even communist regimes, such as modern China, that relented from violent anti-religious campaigns have still tried to repress religion through other means). During the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the anti-religious Soviet Union thus atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American [[note]] There was also the late Madalyn Murray O'Hair, at atheist who founded the American Atheist Society and was a Soviet sympathizer who tried to defect to the Soviet Union.
Ironically enough, one of the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]] In the separate US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement, particularly the New Atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Problems arose with the founders vitriolic stance as well as some [[HitlerAteSugar logically]] [[FallacyFallacy fallacious]] and [[MoralMyopia myopic]] statements (such as founder Richard Dawkins [[MoralMyopia identifying atheists as a persecuted group who's plight should be alleviated while at the same time calling for mockery and ridicule of the religious]], and the late Christopher Hitchens' anti-religious book consists mostly of [[HitlerAteSugar terrible things religious people have done or endorsed throughout history]]). Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, such as the field of apologetics which really stepped into the public light after the New Atheist movement's emergence.

to:

Some of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda from both sides, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement some of which contained at least a grain of truth]]. A lot of communist regimes have endorsed state atheism, often in conjunction with violent - even murderous - campaigns against religion/the religious (even communist regimes, such as modern China, that relented from violent anti-religious campaigns have still tried to repress religion through other means). During the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the anti-religious Soviet Union thus atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American [[note]] There was also the case of the late Madalyn Murray O'Hair, at atheist who founded the American Atheist Society and was a Soviet sympathizer who once tried to defect to the Soviet Union.
Ironically enough, one of the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]] In the separate US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement, particularly the New Atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Problems arose with the founders vitriolic stance as well as some [[HitlerAteSugar logically]] [[FallacyFallacy fallacious]] and [[MoralMyopia myopic]] statements (such as founder Richard Dawkins [[MoralMyopia identifying atheists as a persecuted group who's plight should be alleviated while at the same time calling for mockery and ridicule of the religious]], and the late Christopher Hitchens' anti-religious book by fellow founder Christopher Hitchens consists mostly of [[HitlerAteSugar terrible things religious people have done or endorsed throughout history]]). Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, such as the field of apologetics which really stepped into the public light after the New Atheist movement's emergence.
18th Nov '17 10:20:24 PM SkidTroper
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The basic joke in America is that an atheist can't be elected dog-catcher and that they are [[https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/in-atheists-we-distrust/ the most disliked and least trusted group]]. Historically, dating back to the classical and medieval era, the word atheist was a strong and nasty word often hurled by groups at each other as an insult, largely because they believed "in other gods" or another kind of Christianity, or if they seemed to have some mild doubts about the doctrine and as such not truly believing in their art (what Orwell would label a "thoughtcrime"). The modern version of atheism came out during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment, the scientific revolution and the French Revolution, and the association of atheism with radical modernity (even if not everyone who was progressive and modernist in those groups were atheists) continues into the 20th and 21st Century.

Within America, atheism was somewhat mainstream in the 19th Century, with the likes of Ambrose Bierce being a respected intellectual and wit, and it was at the very least not seen as a mark of disfavour. Much of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda from both sides. A lot of communist regimes proclaim state atheism and to this day China is an officially atheist state that regularly proscribes and limits religious freedom. On the other hand Castro's Cuba has generally dealt with religion with the carrot, and anti-Communist icon Pope John Paul II visited Cuba and called for the end of the American embargo. Even in the USSR, Stalin despite persecuting many Christians (and Jews and Buddhists, and Muslims, fellow atheists and even fellow communists among others) supported a partial revival of the Orthodox Church during and after World War II.

During the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the Soviet Union and atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American. Ironically enough, the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.[[note]]She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]]

Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, which may have more cachet in the still highly religious US. Very few TV atheists are portrayed as having come to this conclusion by dispassionate consideration of their experience but, much more likely, they have some tragedy in their past, such as a CynicismCatalyst or gave up after a crisis of faith (which does occur in real-life but isn't universally true).

In the US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. This activism also comes from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on American television who is an openly avowed atheist. Not appearing to practice or even mention religion at all is fine for most people, but it's generally only characters with a fair degree of cynicism and bitterness who can state outright that they don't believe there is a God, or even that they severely doubt if God exists (however the latter is agnostic, not atheist). Perhaps this is due to the fact that one of the most prominent real-life atheists, Madalyn Murray O'Hair, was also known for her abrasive personality.

In more positive depictions, such characters often reverse or at least re-examine these views after something good happens to them (often in a VerySpecialEpisode or a DoTheyKnowItsChristmasTime), even if nothing in the episode suggested a supernatural influence (and especially if there is supernatural influence). See, for example, House on ''Series/{{House}}'', Mal on ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', or the film ''Film/{{Signs}}''. Less prevalent in Europe, where non-religious people make up for a sizable portion of the population. See also HollywoodAtheist.

to:

The basic joke in America is that an atheist can't be elected dog-catcher and that they are [[https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/in-atheists-we-distrust/ the most disliked and least trusted group]]. Historically, dating back to the classical and medieval era, the word atheist was a strong and nasty word often hurled by groups at each other as an insult, largely because they believed "in other gods" or another kind of Christianity, or if they seemed to have some mild doubts about the doctrine and as such not truly believing in their art (what Orwell would label a "thoughtcrime"). The modern version of atheism came out during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment, the scientific revolution and the French Revolution, and the association of atheism with radical modernity (even if not everyone who was progressive and modernist in those groups were atheists) continues into the 20th and 21st Century. Within America, atheism was somewhat mainstream in the 19th Century, with the likes of Ambrose Bierce being a respected intellectual and wit, and it was at the very least not seen as a mark of disfavour.

Within America, atheism was somewhat mainstream in the 19th Century, with the likes of Ambrose Bierce being a respected intellectual and wit, and it was at the very least not seen as a mark of disfavour. Much Some of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda from both sides. sides, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement some of which contained at least a grain of truth]]. A lot of communist regimes proclaim have endorsed state atheism and to this day China is an officially atheist state that regularly proscribes and limits atheism, often in conjunction with violent - even murderous - campaigns against religion/the religious freedom. On the other hand Castro's Cuba has generally dealt with (even communist regimes, such as modern China, that relented from violent anti-religious campaigns have still tried to repress religion with the carrot, and anti-Communist icon Pope John Paul II visited Cuba and called for the end of the American embargo. Even in the USSR, Stalin despite persecuting many Christians (and Jews and Buddhists, and Muslims, fellow atheists and even fellow communists among others) supported a partial revival of the Orthodox Church during and after World War II.

through other means). During the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the anti-religious Soviet Union and thus atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American. Un-American [[note]] There was also the late Madalyn Murray O'Hair, at atheist who founded the American Atheist Society and was a Soviet sympathizer who tried to defect to the Soviet Union.
Ironically enough, one of the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.[[note]]She She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]]

[[/note]] In the separate US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement, particularly the New Atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. Problems arose with the founders vitriolic stance as well as some [[HitlerAteSugar logically]] [[FallacyFallacy fallacious]] and [[MoralMyopia myopic]] statements (such as founder Richard Dawkins [[MoralMyopia identifying atheists as a persecuted group who's plight should be alleviated while at the same time calling for mockery and ridicule of the religious]], and the late Christopher Hitchens' anti-religious book consists mostly of [[HitlerAteSugar terrible things religious people have done or endorsed throughout history]]). Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, such as the field of apologetics which may have more cachet in really stepped into the still highly religious US.public light after the New Atheist movement's emergence.

This activism also comes in part from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on American television who is an openly avowed atheist.
Very few TV atheists are portrayed as having come to this conclusion by dispassionate consideration of their experience but, much more likely, they have some tragedy in their past, such as a CynicismCatalyst or gave up after a crisis of faith (which does occur in real-life but isn't universally true). \n\nIn the US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. This activism also comes from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on American television who is an openly avowed atheist. Not appearing to practice or even mention religion at all is fine for most people, but it's generally only characters with a fair degree of cynicism and bitterness who can state outright that they don't believe there is a God, or even that they severely doubt if God exists (however the latter is agnostic, not atheist). Perhaps this is due to the fact that one of the most prominent real-life atheists, Madalyn Murray O'Hair, was also known for her abrasive personality.\n\n In more positive depictions, such characters often reverse or at least re-examine these views after something good happens to them (often in a VerySpecialEpisode or a DoTheyKnowItsChristmasTime), even if nothing in the episode suggested a supernatural influence (and especially if there is supernatural influence). See, for example, House on ''Series/{{House}}'', Mal on ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', or the film ''Film/{{Signs}}''. Less prevalent in Europe, where non-religious people make up for a sizable portion of the population. See also HollywoodAtheist.
18th Nov '17 9:35:23 PM SkidTroper
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One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve a historical interstellar war and aliens and it's founder was a science fiction author who joked more than once that he [[OnlyInItForTheMoney founded Scientology to turn a profit]]. However it's rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; some of it's higher-ranking members tend to be quick to [[AmoralAttorney call in lawyers]], sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, [[YouWannaGetSued and start suing people whenever someone says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology, or directly names Scientology without endorsing it, either in front of them or on a public forum]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a Useful Notes Scientology page).

to:

One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], PathOfInspiration and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve a historical interstellar war and aliens and it's founder was a science fiction author who author, L Ron Hubbard. In addition, Hubbard joked more than once that he [[OnlyInItForTheMoney founded Scientology to turn a profit]]. profit]], and the fact remains that [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything how high one rises and how much of Scientology's beliefs one learns depends half on how much money one gives them]] (the other half is how long they have been Scientologists). However it's Scientology is rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is that the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; aggressively litigious element is somewhat TruthInTelevision ([[HarassingPhoneCall emphasis]] [[AmoralAttorney on]] [[StalkerWithoutACrush aggressive]]); some of it's higher-ranking members tend to be quick to [[AmoralAttorney call in lawyers]], [[ArmyOfLawyers sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, many]], [[YouWannaGetSued and start suing people whenever someone says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology, or directly names Scientology without endorsing it, either in front of them or on a public forum]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a Useful Notes Scientology page).
16th Nov '17 6:31:24 AM JulianLapostat
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There ''are'' Scientologists who hold the religion's beliefs, but are opposed to the church and its founder's actions. These people are called Freezoners. Scientology has also indirectly influenced some franchises through celebrities who are adherents; actor Nancy Cartwright of WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons fame is a Scientologist and it has been said she would leave if the show ever criticized Scientology. There is also the far more tragic case of the late Issac Hayes of WesternAnimaton/SouthPark fame (which resulted from the episode mentioned below). Despite cases such as these, some works still manage to stick in a blatant [[http://www.solitarytrees.net/pickets/elrond/21coset.htm Xenu]] reference without being sued into oblivion.

to:

There ''are'' Scientologists who hold the religion's beliefs, but are opposed to the church and its founder's actions. These people are called Freezoners. Scientology has also indirectly influenced some franchises through celebrities who are adherents; actor Nancy Cartwright of WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons fame is a Scientologist and it has been said she would leave if the show ever criticized Scientology. There is also the far more tragic case of the late Issac Hayes of WesternAnimaton/SouthPark fame (which resulted from the episode mentioned below). Despite cases such as these, some works still manage to stick in a blatant [[http://www.solitarytrees.net/pickets/elrond/21coset.htm Xenu]] reference without being sued into oblivion.
16th Nov '17 12:43:07 AM SkidTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve the worship of an alien and it's founder was a science fiction author who joked more than once about [[OnlyInItForTheMoney founding Scientology to turn a profit]]. However it's rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; some of it's higher-ranking members tend to be quick to [[AmoralAttorney call in lawyers]], sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, [[YouWannaGetSued and start suing people whenever someone in the media says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a Useful Notes Scientology page).

to:

One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve the worship of an alien a historical interstellar war and aliens and it's founder was a science fiction author who joked more than once about that he [[OnlyInItForTheMoney founding founded Scientology to turn a profit]]. profit]]. However it's rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; some of it's higher-ranking members tend to be quick to [[AmoralAttorney call in lawyers]], sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, [[YouWannaGetSued and start suing people whenever someone in the media says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology]]. Scientology, or directly names Scientology without endorsing it, either in front of them or on a public forum]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a Useful Notes Scientology page).
16th Nov '17 12:32:40 AM SkidTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve the worship of an alien and it's founder was a science fiction author who joked more than once about [[MoneyDearBoy founding Scientology to turn a profit]]. However it's rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; this stems from the fact that some of it's higher-ranking members [[AmoralAttorney readily-used tendency to call in lawyers]], sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, [[YouWannaGetSued whenever someone in the media says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a Useful Notes Scientology page).


** Though some still manage to stick in a blatant [[http://www.solitarytrees.net/pickets/elrond/21coset.htm Xenu]] reference without being sued into oblivion.
* And these days, by extension, Creator/TomCruise. Most notably in ''Film/SuperheroMovie''.
* There ''are'' Scientologists who hold the religion's beliefs, but are opposed to the church and its founder's actions. These people are called Freezoners.
* In Belgium, Scientology is the religious equivalent of the drug mafia. This is mainly because there was once an investigation on the sect from 1999 until 2007 that brought to light that they defraud, extort, betray, go against the practices of trade, illegally practice medicine, go against the practices of privacy and participate with criminal organisations.
** The case was dismissed in 2016, [[http://tribune.com.pk/story/1064455/belgian-court-rejects-case-against-scientology/ with the judge saying the suit was brought about as a result of religious prejudice and the prosecutors had been too vague in their case.]]
* In Germany, the Church of Scientology is under ''blanket scrutiny'' by law as it is classified as a cult. On the other hand it hardly ever appears in the media and when it does, it is inevitably about the USA branch.

to:

One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve the worship of an alien and it's founder was a science fiction author who joked more than once about [[MoneyDearBoy [[OnlyInItForTheMoney founding Scientology to turn a profit]]. However it's rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; this stems from the fact that some of it's higher-ranking members tend to be quick to [[AmoralAttorney readily-used tendency to call in lawyers]], sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, [[YouWannaGetSued and start suing people whenever someone in the media says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a Useful Notes Scientology page).


** Though
page).

There ''are'' Scientologists who hold the religion's beliefs, but are opposed to the church and its founder's actions. These people are called Freezoners. Scientology has also indirectly influenced
some franchises through celebrities who are adherents; actor Nancy Cartwright of WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons fame is a Scientologist and it has been said she would leave if the show ever criticized Scientology. There is also the far more tragic case of the late Issac Hayes of WesternAnimaton/SouthPark fame (which resulted from the episode mentioned below). Despite cases such as these, some works still manage to stick in a blatant [[http://www.solitarytrees.net/pickets/elrond/21coset.htm Xenu]] reference without being sued into oblivion.
* And these days, by extension, Creator/TomCruise. Most notably in ''Film/SuperheroMovie''.
* There ''are'' Scientologists who hold the religion's beliefs, but are opposed to the church and its founder's actions. These people are called Freezoners.
*
oblivion.

In Belgium, Scientology is the religious equivalent of the drug mafia. This is mainly because there was once an investigation on the sect from 1999 until 2007 that brought to light that they defraud, extort, betray, go against the practices of trade, illegally practice medicine, go against the practices of privacy and participate with criminal organisations.
**
organisations. The case was dismissed in 2016, [[http://tribune.com.pk/story/1064455/belgian-court-rejects-case-against-scientology/ with the judge saying the suit was brought about as a result of religious prejudice and the prosecutors had been too vague in their case.]]
*
]] In Germany, the Church of Scientology is under ''blanket scrutiny'' by law as it is classified as a cult. On the cult, and similar scrutiny has also emerged in many other hand it hardly ever appears in the media and when it does, it nations where Scientology is inevitably about the USA branch.
practiced.
15th Nov '17 11:55:12 PM SkidTroper
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* Works often make fun of it without naming it, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists.
** There's a reason for not naming them directing, of course... that reason being [[AmoralAttorney their tendency to call in lawyers]]. [[ArmyOfLawyers Lots and lots of lawyers.]]

to:

* Works One of the more recent religions in Western society, Scientology is no stranger to controversy. It's often make fun portrayed in media as a PathOfInspiration, [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything sometimes with a structure similar to a pyramid scheme]], and a [[FrivolousLawsuit very litigious one at that]]. Part of it without naming it, this can be traced to the fact that it's core beliefs involve the worship of an alien and it's founder was a science fiction author who joked more than once about [[MoneyDearBoy founding Scientology to turn a profit]]. However it's rarely named or called out directly in fiction. The reason for this is the same as the one behind Scientology's reputation for being litigious; this stems from the fact that some of it's higher-ranking members [[AmoralAttorney readily-used tendency to call in lawyers]], sometimes an ArmyOfLawyers, [[YouWannaGetSued whenever someone in the media says anything that could be construed as a negative statement about Scientology]]. It's at the point that Scientology often becomes TheScottishTrope in fiction or some online communities, even on ThisVeryWiki, which is why the ChurchOfHappyology trope exists.
** There's
exists (and why ThisVeryWiki doesn't have a reason for not naming them directing, of course... that reason being [[AmoralAttorney their tendency to call in lawyers]]. [[ArmyOfLawyers Lots and lots of lawyers.]]Useful Notes Scientology page).




* Perhaps the best part is that the founder of the Church of Scientology has publicly stated that he did so as a joke and joked about it being a money-making scam.
14th Nov '17 7:22:06 PM N1KF
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In the Anglosphere's modern history (as well as the internet's), Christianity is arguably the most mocked religion in mainstream media (this is not without precedent; on this very wiki alone [[UpToEleven Christianity has its own folder on this page while no other religion does]] and Literature/{{the Bible}}'s page had to be Administrivia/{{locked|Pages}} against edits due to disproportionate amount of edit wars and flame wars it was subject to; a measure as yet unnecessary for the tropes pages of other religious texts such as the Qu'ran). The basic truth is that Christianity, in all its sects, is the world's major and leading religion, it is the dominant religious tradition in the Western nations and Western nations have a disproportionate hold on the global media, so Christianity's [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement perceived negatives]] at times get over-represented or exaggerated. Likewise, Christianity did not become the world's leading religion by accident. As [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope John Paul II]] [[http://www.nostreradici.it/forgiveness.htm himself noted]] in a 2000 prayer seeking forgiveness for the dark parts of Church history: ''Christians have often denied the Gospel; yielding to a mentality of power, they have violated the rights of ethnic groups and peoples, and shown contempt for their cultures and religious traditions: be patient and merciful towards us, and grant us your forgiveness!'' A lot of these actions were criticized [[InternalReformist even by Christians]] in the past, and there are parts of Church history, most modern Christians, regardless of the sect, [[OldShame are not proud of]]. Christianity being a large diverse religion has also been involved in several questionable policies and events over the centuries (such as UsefulNotes/TheSpanishInquisition). It is often criticized among other religious groups for its missionary activities, wars it has waged among various sects, its role in suppression and hijacking of pagan rituals and persecuting other religions (which it must be stated is not exclusive to Christian or Abrahamic faiths, instances are common among many religions).

In Eastern nations, in former colonies, Christianity may be a minority but on account of missionary activities it has greatly impacted the education and cultural life of the elites, which has nonetheless kept Christian tradition and its roles, positive and negative, in public memory. The political and cultural revolutions on behalf of freedom of speech in France, England, United States, Italy, Germany has rested on the separation of the Church and State, and this has led to Christianity in the position of the DesignatedVillain in many anti-censorship fights in the Western World, which thanks to colonialism and imperialism, has made this PopCulturalOsmosis for the entire world. Christianity was perceived, and resented for being MoralGuardians on account of its historical association with censorship (the Vatican Index, Galileo, Darwin), its lack of permissiveness and anti-LGBT policies. A lot of this is true for all religions (for instance general prudishness, censorship, homophobia exist even among Buddhists and even the Roman pagans were pretty uptight about other issues). Since Christianity has been historically the religion with the greatest political and historical clout, and since those fights were ultimately ''won'' [[AssociationFallacy this tends to get associated with Christianity to the point that such aggressive and controversial actions have been used to smear all Christians by association]], [[NeverLiveItDown at times even long (e.g. ''centuries'') after the Christians involved in said controversies died]] (though this has also happened to people of all religions).

Christianity as at times been criticized by other Christians, such as Creator/GrahamGreene, [[WhatTheHellHero for failing to live up to the teachings of the faith]]. The Anglican Priest, Fr. Charles Kingsley even echoed Creator/KarlMarx when he noted, "We have used the Bible as if it were a mere special constable's hand book, an opium dose for keeping beasts of burden patient while they were being overloaded, a mere book to keep the poor in order".[[note]] A recurring theme is the hypocrisy in worshiping a man who claimed peace, condemned greed, befriended prostitutes and the downtrodden yet opposing any reform or revolution, being critical of sexuality and persecuting prostitutes and homosexuals as MoralGuardians, supporting Kings, Aristocrats and Businessmen, and sparking various wars of conquest.[[/note]] Satire and criticism of Christianity in non-Christian media often ([[JesusTaboo but not always]]) separates [[JesusWasWayCool Jesus]] from the actions of various Christian sects. The defining criticism of Christianity is often {{Hypocrisy}},[[note]]An example is Creator/{{Moliere}}'s ''Tartuffe'', a con-man who poses as a priest, a proverbial byword for two-faced corruption [[/note]] though hypocrisy is obviously not exclusive to Christianity, or to religion in general, but obviously it's a strong charge and criticism to a faith that was missionary in origin asserts it is the "one true faith" and often promised a better life for its flock.

to:

In the Anglosphere's modern history (as well as the internet's), Christianity is arguably the most mocked religion in mainstream media (this media.[[note]]This is not without precedent; on this very wiki alone [[UpToEleven Christianity has its own folder on this page while no other religion does]] and Literature/{{the Bible}}'s page had to be Administrivia/{{locked|Pages}} against edits due to disproportionate amount of edit wars and flame wars it was subject to; a measure as yet unnecessary for the tropes pages of other religious texts such as the Qu'ran). Qu'ran.[[/note]] The basic truth is that Christianity, in all its sects, is the world's major and leading religion, it is the dominant religious tradition in the Western nations and Western nations have a disproportionate hold on the global media, so Christianity's [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement perceived negatives]] at times get over-represented or exaggerated. Likewise, Christianity did not become the world's leading religion by accident. As [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope John Paul II]] [[http://www.nostreradici.it/forgiveness.htm himself noted]] in a 2000 prayer seeking forgiveness for the dark parts of Church history: ''Christians have often denied the Gospel; yielding to a mentality of power, they have violated the rights of ethnic groups and peoples, and shown contempt for their cultures and religious traditions: be patient and merciful towards us, and grant us your forgiveness!'' A lot of these actions were criticized [[InternalReformist even by Christians]] in the past, and there are parts of Church history, most modern Christians, regardless of the sect, [[OldShame are not proud of]]. Christianity being a large diverse religion has also been involved in several questionable policies and events over the centuries (such as UsefulNotes/TheSpanishInquisition). It is often criticized among other religious groups for its missionary activities, wars it has waged among various sects, its role in suppression and hijacking of pagan rituals and persecuting other religions (which it must be stated is not exclusive to Christian or Abrahamic faiths, as instances are common among many religions).

In Eastern nations, in former colonies, Christianity may be a minority but on account of missionary activities it has greatly impacted the education and cultural life of the elites, which has nonetheless kept Christian tradition and its roles, positive and negative, in public memory. The political and cultural revolutions on behalf of freedom of speech in France, England, United States, Italy, Germany has rested on the separation of the Church and State, and this has led to Christianity in the position of the DesignatedVillain in many anti-censorship fights in the Western World, which thanks to colonialism and imperialism, has made this PopCulturalOsmosis for the entire world. Christianity was perceived, and resented for being MoralGuardians on account of its historical association with censorship (the Vatican Index, Galileo, Darwin), its lack of permissiveness and anti-LGBT policies. A lot of this is true for all religions (for instance religions. (For instance, general prudishness, censorship, homophobia exist even among Buddhists and even the Roman pagans were pretty uptight about other issues). issues.) Since Christianity has been historically the religion with the greatest political and historical clout, and since those fights were ultimately ''won'' [[AssociationFallacy this tends to get associated with Christianity Christianity]] to the point that such aggressive and controversial actions have been used to smear all Christians by association]], association, at times even [[NeverLiveItDown at times even long (e.g. ''centuries'') after the Christians involved in said controversies died]] (though this has also happened to people of all religions).

Christianity as at times been criticized by other Christians, such as Creator/GrahamGreene, [[WhatTheHellHero for failing to live up to the teachings of the faith]]. The Anglican Priest, Fr. Charles Kingsley even echoed Creator/KarlMarx when he noted, "We have used the Bible as if it were a mere special constable's hand book, an opium dose for keeping beasts of burden patient while they were being overloaded, a mere book to keep the poor in order".[[note]] A recurring theme is the hypocrisy in worshiping a man who claimed peace, condemned greed, befriended prostitutes and the downtrodden yet opposing any reform or revolution, being critical of sexuality and persecuting prostitutes and homosexuals as MoralGuardians, supporting Kings, Aristocrats and Businessmen, and sparking various wars of conquest.[[/note]] Satire and criticism of Christianity in non-Christian media often ([[JesusTaboo but not always]]) separates [[JesusWasWayCool Jesus]] from the actions of various Christian sects. The defining criticism of Christianity is often {{Hypocrisy}},[[note]]An example is Creator/{{Moliere}}'s ''Tartuffe'', a con-man who poses as a priest, a proverbial byword for two-faced corruption [[/note]] though hypocrisy is obviously not exclusive to Christianity, or to religion in general, but obviously it's a strong charge and criticism to a faith that was missionary in origin asserts it is the "one one true faith" faith and often promised a better life for its flock.



Within America, anti-Catholicism has had an old and at times dubious history, and for a long time, Catholics especially from immigrant countries like Ireland and Italy endured some amount of persecution from the largely [[WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant WASP]] American mainstream. The election of UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy was seen as the point where Catholics were embraced by the white mainstream. This was tarnished however by the revelation that parts of the Church hierarchy were complicit in covering up child abuse by their own priests, and a growing trend has been [[PedophilePriest to depict most or all Catholic priests]] [[PaedoHunt as being child abusers and pedophiles]]. Catholicism is also commonly portrayed as the ultimate in fundamentalism and hypocrisy, as a group of people who judge others despite being evil and cruel. Catholic girls are portrayed [[CatholicSchoolGirlsRule as easy and slutty]] but judgmental. Catholics have been portrayed as [[ScienceIsBad enemies of science]] ever since they put Galileo under house arrest (the church didn't officially apologize for the Galileo affair until ''1990''.[[note]]Although Galileo's works were removed from the Holy Index within a century after his death, and the Church formally accepted his heliocentric theory in 1800-about the same time that direct experimental evidence for the Earth's motion in space was first presented. Galileo's rehabilitation had actually been in the works for centuries and would have occurred much earlier were it not for intervening political events.[[/note]] Catholics aren't supposed to use birth control, and stereotypical Catholics have enormous families, presumably because they're too dumb to simply stop having sex when they already have more children than they can feed (and this brings up supposed sexual hypocrisy, of course).

to:

Within America, anti-Catholicism has had an old and at times dubious history, and for a long time, Catholics especially from immigrant countries like Ireland and Italy endured some amount of persecution from the largely [[WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant WASP]] American mainstream. The election of UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy was seen as the point where Catholics were embraced by the white mainstream. This was tarnished however by the revelation that parts of the Church hierarchy were complicit in covering up child abuse by their own priests, and a growing trend has been to [[PedophilePriest to depict most or all Catholic priests]] [[PaedoHunt priests as being child abusers and pedophiles]]. Catholicism is also commonly portrayed as the ultimate in fundamentalism and hypocrisy, as a group of people who judge others despite being evil and cruel. Catholic girls are portrayed [[CatholicSchoolGirlsRule as easy and slutty]] but judgmental. Catholics have been portrayed as [[ScienceIsBad enemies of science]] ever since they put Galileo under house arrest (the church didn't officially apologize for the Galileo affair until ''1990''.[[note]]Although Galileo's works were removed from the Holy Index within a century after his death, and the Church formally accepted his heliocentric theory in 1800-about the same time that direct experimental evidence for the Earth's motion in space was first presented. Galileo's rehabilitation had actually been in the works for centuries and would have occurred much earlier were it not for intervening political events.[[/note]] Catholics aren't supposed to use birth control, and stereotypical Catholics have enormous families, presumably because they're too dumb to simply stop having sex when they already have more children than they can feed (and this brings up supposed sexual hypocrisy, of course).



One common mistake with Catholicism is a case of ChristianityIsCatholic. The heavy ritualization of the Church often makes it more visually appealing than other religious sects and as such in popular culture and general conversations, the Catholic Church is often accused of actions that are more specifically the actions of other sects, mostly because the latter are perhaps visually dry. For instance, [[BurnTheWitch witch burning]] was a largely Protestant affair, and it took place in predominantly Protestant nations. Catholics further point out that unlike the English Protestants who forbade women from acting in the Elizabethan Stage, it was Catholic countries like Spain and France that allowed and welcomed women into the performing arts, and that it was only when Charles II, exiled in France, returned to England (and who on his deathbed converted to Catholicism), that women were allowed to act on the British stage. Likewise, the Catholic Church has accepted and supported UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin and evolution and has never voiced any significant criticism and political opposition against it. It has also denounced Creationism (though unfortunately some lay Catholics have adopted it). Indeed, Gregor Mendel, the father of genetics and one of the two pillars of the modern evolutionary synthesis, was a Catholic friar himself.

to:

One common mistake with Catholicism is a case of ChristianityIsCatholic. The heavy ritualization of the Church often makes it more visually appealing than other religious sects and as such in popular culture and general conversations, the Catholic Church is often accused of actions that are more specifically the actions of other sects, mostly because the latter are perhaps visually dry. For instance, [[BurnTheWitch witch burning]] was a largely Protestant affair, and it took place in predominantly Protestant nations. Catholics further point out that unlike the English Protestants who forbade women from acting in the Elizabethan Stage, it was Catholic countries like Spain and France that allowed and welcomed women into the performing arts, and that it was only when Charles II, exiled in France, returned to England (and who on his deathbed converted to Catholicism), that women were allowed to act on the British stage. Likewise, the Catholic Church has accepted and supported UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin and evolution and has never voiced any significant criticism and political opposition against it. It has also denounced Creationism (though unfortunately Creationism, even though some lay Catholics have adopted it).it. Indeed, Gregor Mendel, the father of genetics and one of the two pillars of the modern evolutionary synthesis, was a Catholic friar himself.



There are two versions of Christian Orthodoxy (the first was Eastern Orthodoxy, which accepts Seven Councils up to the Council of Chalcedonian prior to 1054 while Oriental Orthodoxy[[note]]At least the majority of them[[/note]] accepts Three Councils up to the Council of Ephesus, with each of them having different theology from the others.)

to:

There are two versions of Christian Orthodoxy (the Orthodoxy. (The first was Eastern Orthodoxy, which accepts Seven Councils up to the Council of Chalcedonian prior to 1054 while most of Oriental Orthodoxy[[note]]At least the majority of them[[/note]] Orthodoxy accepts Three Councils up to the Council of Ephesus, with each of them having different theology from the others.)



* What is known about them is pretty funny to some. They stay politically neutral. They preach door to door. Some find this harassing. They don't celebrate birthdays or Christmas due to its origins. They also don't accept blood transfusions due to them following a Bible text that says to abstain from ''drinking'' blood (which is obviously different from being injected blood via syringe).

to:

* What is known about them is pretty funny to some. They stay politically neutral. They preach door to door. Some find this harassing.as harassment. They don't celebrate birthdays or Christmas due to its origins. They also don't accept blood transfusions due to them following a Bible text that says to abstain from ''drinking'' blood (which is obviously different from being injected blood via syringe).drinking blood.



* '''Q:'''Why are there no UU's in Heaven? '''A:''' They were given a choice between going to Heaven and going to a discussion group about the existence of Heaven.

to:

* '''Q:'''Why '''Q''': Why are there no UU's in Heaven? '''A:''' They were given a choice between going to Heaven and going to a discussion group about the existence of Heaven.



Often seen as ineffectual "anything goes" types who will completely contradict their own dogma whenever its convenient. [[NeverLiveItDown That's if people still aren't cracking jokes about Henry VIII.]] In America, WASP jokes will do.

to:

Often seen as ineffectual "anything goes" types who will completely contradict their own dogma whenever its convenient. [[NeverLiveItDown That's if people [[NeverLiveItDown still aren't cracking jokes about Henry VIII.]] VIII]]. In America, WASP jokes will do.



Presbyterians, Lutherans, Methodists and (non-evangelical) Baptists (if they're not feuding) and their splinter groups are often times depicted as bland and interchangeable, assuming they're not TheFundamentalist. Expect tiny churches, beige decor, lots of small-town gossip, big zany hats, rehashing of generic WASP stereotypes...and less emphasis on actual religion than on squeaky-clean socializing, usually involving a carnival (not necessarily [[CrappyCarnival a crappy one]], but pretty boring in either case), a picnic (with men wearing straw hats and ladies playing croquet if a work is set in the GayNineties) or a potluck supper organized by lodge brothers in those funny "Turkish" hats; watch vintage live-action Disney movies or "family" films from the 1950s or '60s if you want to see these stereotypes in action. African American churches are considered somewhat exempt because of their role in the civil rights movement and for being less "vanilla" than Protestants of other races (although there ''are'' some very staid, and even stern, black Protestant churches out there), but they might still be chewed out on some of the more contentious issues (homophobia, gossip, phony faith healing, etc..) ; expect a loud, joyous, clapping choir, a flamboyant preacher, audience participation so involved people are fainting in the aisles...and even bigger, zanier hats. And while there are plenty of American Indian, Pacific Islander, and Asian (usually Hong Kongese, Korean or Burmese) Protestants out there, don't expect to see them in media unless a work is aiming for a realistic portrayal of Protestantism.

to:

Presbyterians, Lutherans, Methodists and (non-evangelical) non-evangelical Baptists (if they're not feuding) and their splinter groups are often times depicted as bland and interchangeable, assuming they're not TheFundamentalist. Expect tiny churches, beige decor, lots of small-town gossip, big zany hats, rehashing of generic WASP stereotypes...and less emphasis on actual religion than on squeaky-clean socializing, usually involving a carnival (not necessarily [[CrappyCarnival a crappy one]], but pretty boring in either case), a picnic (with men wearing straw hats and ladies playing croquet if a work is set in the GayNineties) or a potluck supper organized by lodge brothers in those funny "Turkish" hats; watch vintage live-action Disney movies or "family" films from the 1950s or '60s if you want to see these stereotypes in action. African American churches are considered somewhat exempt because of their role in the civil rights movement and for being less "vanilla" than Protestants of other races (although there ''are'' some very staid, and even stern, black Protestant churches out there), but they might still be chewed out on some of the more contentious issues (homophobia, gossip, phony faith healing, etc..) ; expect a loud, joyous, clapping choir, a flamboyant preacher, audience participation so involved people are fainting in the aisles...and even bigger, zanier hats. And while there are plenty of American Indian, Pacific Islander, and Asian (usually Hong Kongese, Korean or Burmese) Protestants out there, don't expect to see them in media unless a work is aiming for a realistic portrayal of Protestantism.



It's been noted, with only marginal hyperbole, that one could count on one hand for positive depictions of Jewish culture and Jewish people before the 20th Century. Ironically enough, the most famous was Gotthold Lessing's ''Nathan the Wise'', written in German (which was for obvious reasons, revived in a prominent production after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII). After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII revealed the harmful consequences of centuries of religious bigotry, open anti-Semitism is quite rightly, [[OnceAcceptableTargets no longer acceptable]], and in some places is proscribed by law as a hate crime. The de-ghettoization of Jews in the 19th and early 20th Century also led to a renaissance in Jewish culture which has led to aspects of Jewish culture and jokes entering the mainstream. This led to a range of relatively harmless stereotypes, mostly revolving on JewsLoveToArgue and the complexity of Rabbinical discourse. In the Middle East and Eastern Europe, anti-semitism remains common and in some cases is even on the rise. There it has more to do with the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict and resentment over military defeats and percieved DoubleStandard on the part of the West, in feeling guilty over anti-semitism and Jewish persecution rather than colonialism in the region. Among Eastern Europeans anti-semitism endures for a variety of complex reasons revolving around the UsefulNotes/ColdWar and WhyWeAreBummedCommunismFell. Since Israel has an active media as well, there the tension is between Secular Jews and Orthodox and Religious Jews.

to:

It's been noted, with only marginal hyperbole, that one could count on one hand for positive depictions of Jewish culture and Jewish people before the 20th Century. Ironically enough, the most famous was Gotthold Lessing's ''Nathan the Wise'', written in German (which was for obvious reasons, revived in a prominent production after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII). After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII revealed the harmful consequences of centuries of religious bigotry, open anti-Semitism is quite rightly, [[OnceAcceptableTargets no longer acceptable]], and in some places is proscribed by law as a hate crime. The de-ghettoization of Jews in the 19th and early 20th Century also led to a renaissance in Jewish culture which has led to aspects of Jewish culture and jokes entering the mainstream. This led to a range of relatively harmless stereotypes, mostly revolving on JewsLoveToArgue and the complexity of Rabbinical discourse. discourse.

In the Middle East and Eastern Europe, anti-semitism remains common and in some cases is even on the rise. There it has more to do with the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict and resentment over military defeats and percieved DoubleStandard on the part of the West, in feeling guilty over anti-semitism and Jewish persecution rather than colonialism in the region. Among Eastern Europeans anti-semitism endures for a variety of complex reasons revolving around the UsefulNotes/ColdWar and WhyWeAreBummedCommunismFell. Since Israel has an active media as well, there the tension is between Secular Jews and Orthodox and Religious Jews.



It has also become an acceptable target among some leftists and some liberals in recent times, mostly as a fallout of the New Atheism movement where there is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment a contentious debate]] about Western criticism of Islam as a religion, and to the degree it is legitimate to satire and lampoon aspects of Islam especially when that criticism will largely be seen by a non-Muslim audience. As a result of the backlash against ''Literature/TheSatanicVerses'', the Jyllands-Posten controversy and most tragically, the Charlie Hebdo shootings, Muslims are perceived as a religious version of TheMafia: "If you're going to badmouth them, do it privately and very quietly; otherwise, they'll kill you." Nations which are Muslim majority are usually seen as TheTheocracy and bereft of the liberal successes of the separation of the Church and State which needless to say is not born out by quite a few Muslim majority states in history and in the present. It's called a stereotype for a reason. Also, they're all brown-skinned Arabs (or, occasionally, black Africans). So, if you're a white Muslim--a convert, or an Albanian or Bosnian, for example, or perhaps an Arab or Turk of partial Caucasian or Eastern European descent (there are a lot of those)--[[UnPerson you officially do not exist]]. The same goes for Central Asian, East Asian, and Southeast Asian Muslims, despite the fact that three largest Muslim population nations (Indonesia, Pakistan, India) are not Arabic nations, culturally and ethnically, and in the case of India, not even a Muslim majority nation[[note]]Muslims form a minority of 172 million in India, which by the way is more than the population of Russia and Japan, ''in toto'', but since this is India, a nation of 1 billion +, that makes them a minority to the 900 million Hindu majority.[[/note]]. The former Soviet Central Asian Republics were all nominally-Muslim with traditionally-Asian-looking populations, and China has a surprisingly large Muslim community, as well). Despite attempts to mount [[DiscreditedTrope a big backlash against this]], the trope still persists, especially since TheWarOnTerror and ethnic strife in the Middle East remains a major geopolitical headache in the world.

to:

It has also become an acceptable target among some leftists and some liberals in recent times, mostly as a fallout of the New Atheism movement where there is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment a contentious debate]] about Western criticism of Islam as a religion, and to the degree it is legitimate to satire and lampoon aspects of Islam especially when that criticism will largely be seen by a non-Muslim audience. As a result of the backlash against ''Literature/TheSatanicVerses'', the Jyllands-Posten controversy and most tragically, the Charlie Hebdo shootings, Muslims are perceived as a religious version of TheMafia: "If you're going to badmouth them, do it privately and very quietly; otherwise, they'll kill you." Nations which are Muslim majority are usually seen as TheTheocracy and bereft of the liberal successes of the separation of the Church and State which needless to say is not born out by quite a few Muslim majority states in history and in the present. It's called a stereotype for a reason. Also, reason.

Usually,
they're portrayed as all brown-skinned Arabs (or, occasionally, black Africans). So, if you're a white Muslim--a convert, or an Albanian or Bosnian, for example, or perhaps an Arab or Turk of partial Caucasian or Eastern European descent (there are a lot of those)--[[UnPerson you officially do not exist]]. The same goes for Central Asian, East Asian, and Southeast Asian Muslims, despite the fact that three largest Muslim population nations (Indonesia, Pakistan, India) are not Arabic nations, culturally and ethnically, and in the case of India, not even a Muslim majority nation[[note]]Muslims nation.[[note]]Muslims form a minority of 172 million in India, which by the way is more than the population of Russia and Japan, ''in toto'', but since this is India, a nation of 1 billion +, over one-billion, that makes them a minority to the 900 million Hindu majority.[[/note]]. [[/note]] The former Soviet Central Asian Republics were all nominally-Muslim with traditionally-Asian-looking populations, and China has a surprisingly large Muslim community, as well).well. Despite attempts to mount [[DiscreditedTrope a big backlash against this]], the trope still persists, especially since TheWarOnTerror and ethnic strife in the Middle East remains a major geopolitical headache in the world.



* {{Subverted|Trope}} with Creator/ComedyCentral. ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' thought that the censorship of Muhammed would be an acceptable target. They were wrong. Comedy Central censored them hard. Recently, they've become a much less acceptable target. Yet {{inverted|Trope}} in making a statement on the violent reaction to the Mohammed cartoons. And {{subverted|Trope}} in that South Park's depictions of Mohammed (their first was in the "Super Best Friends" episode, which got through unscathed) are neutral at ''worst'', with the censored one even getting an InUniverse comment of "He was just standing there like a normal guy". And it's worth noting that a big reason Comedy Central censored the "Cartoon Wars" version was [[StopBeingStereotypical the receipt of death-threats from extremist Muslim groups]] before it even aired.

to:

* {{Subverted|Trope}} with Creator/ComedyCentral. ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' thought that the censorship of Muhammed would be an acceptable target. They were wrong. Comedy Central censored them hard. Recently, they've become a much less acceptable target. Yet {{inverted|Trope}} in making a statement on the violent reaction to the Mohammed cartoons. And {{subverted|Trope}} in that South Park's depictions of Mohammed (their first was in the "Super Best Friends" episode, which got through unscathed) are neutral at ''worst'', with the censored one even getting an InUniverse comment of "He was just standing there like a normal guy". And it's worth noting that a big reason Comedy Central censored the "Cartoon Wars" version was [[StopBeingStereotypical the receipt of death-threats from extremist Muslim groups]] groups before it even aired.



Most portrayals in the West from the Victorian to the modern era, emphasize and focus on the seemingly bizarre nature of the faith, the idolatry, the heavy ritualization and perceived remoteness. Aspects of Hinduism are often conflated with Buddhism with many portrayals, even the positive ones, going on about finding Nirvana while chanting some pseudo-Hindu prayers. Nirvana is a largely Buddhist concept, the Hindu one is Moksha. Likewise, their pantheon is populated by countless ''avatars'' (that's physical manifestations of gods, [[WeirdAlEffect not]] [[Film/{{Avatar}} blue-striped monkey aliens]] or [[WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender masters of all the elements]]!) that resemble unusual animals and various grotesque multi-armed beings. There's also the fact that Hinduism is more a collection of various beliefs and rituals with immense regional variations. The close association with the [[TheSixties 1960s]] counterculture (thank you, Music/GeorgeHarrison) is also a liability. Victorian era fiction made much about [[SelfImmolation sati]] and the Thugee cult, and of course the British needed some specially reprehensible practise to scapegoat an entire culture, never mind that neither were widespread or generally representative, or without criticism from within. Some people still argue that this is practised and ongoing in India, despite the fact that the Indian government has put a stop to that sort of thing and it is entirely illegal. Portrayals of Hinduism is often associated with a range of stereotypes about India, despite the fact that Hinduism spread far and greatly syncretized in nations like Indonesia, Cambodia, the Fiji and even the Caribbean Islands (as a result of migrant workers settled there by the English). Another stereotype that is a common BerserkButton is the EverybodyHatesHades treatment of Kali. Kali is a popular goddess in India, especially in Bengal, and she is associated with a range of positive qualities and her symbolism of death is meant to indicate acceptance and transition.

Other stereotypes, especially in India, have to do with caste, with Indian intellectuals like B. R. Ambedkar arguing that it was an inherent part of the faith while others point out that since there was rarely an organization enforcing a common program unlike other faiths, this varied with region and time and place. The bigger issue is vegetarianism, where many Indians, find the stereotype in the West about vegetarians being pacifist and tolerant types hilarious on account of the often nasty and violent tensions that flare up across India, with various governments trying to enforce vegetarianism by force and forbidding Christians and Muslims from eating meat or restricting it. As Empire history buffs know, the fact that some cartridges may have been coated with animal fat was one of the reasons for the bloody 1857 Mutiny among its own Sepoys, so it is SeriousBusiness indeed. On account of PositiveDiscrimination, some negative aspects of Hinduism is entirely forgotten or neglected. For instance, many assume that it's a religion of non-violence like Buddhism, on account of the world's most famous Hindu, and most famous Indian, UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi, forgetting that the latter was not a mainstream Hindu in his time and afterwards, confirmed by the fact that he was assassinated by a Hindu zealot. Within Indian media, thanks to government censorship, Hinduism and satirizing some of its practises are generally regarded with RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, but even then Hindu fundamentalists are generally regarded with scorn as being fanatic saffron-wearing LowerClassLout misogynists who want to dial the clock back as far as possible. For some reason, extremist Hinduism hardly receives some of the same approbation from Western critics of Islam, despite the fact that it shares much of the same defects (sexism, hypocrisy, victim-blaming, and intolerance of criticism) as well as MonumentalDamage (such as the destruction of the Babri Masjid in 1991, which preceded the Taliban destruction of the Buddha statues and the stuff that ISIS got up to in TheNewTens).

to:

Most portrayals in the West from the Victorian to the modern era, emphasize and focus on the seemingly bizarre nature of the faith, the idolatry, the heavy ritualization and perceived remoteness. Aspects of Hinduism are often conflated with Buddhism with many portrayals, even the positive ones, going on about finding Nirvana while chanting some pseudo-Hindu prayers. Nirvana is a largely Buddhist concept, the Hindu one is Moksha. Likewise, their pantheon is populated by countless ''avatars'' ''{{avatar}}s'' (that's physical manifestations of gods, [[WeirdAlEffect not]] [[Film/{{Avatar}} blue-striped monkey aliens]] or [[WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender masters of all the elements]]!) that resemble unusual animals and various grotesque multi-armed beings. There's also the fact that Hinduism is more a collection of various beliefs and rituals with immense regional variations. variations.

The close association with the [[TheSixties 1960s]] counterculture (thank you, Music/GeorgeHarrison) is also a liability. Victorian era fiction made much about [[SelfImmolation sati]] and the Thugee cult, and of course the British needed some specially reprehensible practise to scapegoat an entire culture, never mind that neither were widespread or generally representative, or without criticism from within. Some people still argue that this is practised and ongoing in India, despite the fact that the Indian government has put a stop to that sort of thing and it is entirely illegal.

Portrayals of Hinduism is often associated with a range of stereotypes about India, despite the fact that Hinduism spread far and greatly syncretized in nations like Indonesia, Cambodia, the Fiji and even the Caribbean Islands (as a result of migrant workers settled there by the English). Another stereotype that is a common BerserkButton is the EverybodyHatesHades treatment of Kali. Kali is a popular goddess in India, especially in Bengal, and she is associated with a range of positive qualities and her symbolism of death is meant to indicate acceptance and transition.

Other stereotypes, especially in India, have to do with caste, with Indian intellectuals like B. R. Ambedkar arguing that it was an inherent part of the faith while others point out that since there was rarely an organization enforcing a common program unlike other faiths, this varied with region and time and place. The bigger issue is vegetarianism, where many Indians, find the stereotype in the West about vegetarians being pacifist and tolerant types hilarious on account of the often nasty and violent tensions that flare up across India, with various governments trying to enforce vegetarianism by force and forbidding Christians and Muslims from eating meat or restricting it. As Empire history buffs know, the fact that some cartridges may have been coated with animal fat was one of the reasons for the bloody 1857 Mutiny among its own Sepoys, so it is SeriousBusiness indeed. indeed.

On account of PositiveDiscrimination, some negative aspects of Hinduism is entirely forgotten or neglected. For instance, many assume that it's a religion of non-violence like Buddhism, on account of the world's most famous Hindu, and most famous Indian, UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi, forgetting that the latter was not a mainstream Hindu in his time and afterwards, confirmed by the fact that he was assassinated by a Hindu zealot. Within Indian media, thanks to government censorship, Hinduism and satirizing some of its practises are generally regarded with RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, but even then Hindu fundamentalists are generally regarded with scorn as being fanatic saffron-wearing LowerClassLout misogynists who want to dial the clock back as far as possible. For some reason, extremist Hinduism hardly receives some of the same approbation from Western critics of Islam, despite the fact that it shares much of the same defects (sexism, hypocrisy, victim-blaming, and intolerance of criticism) as well as MonumentalDamage (such as the destruction of the Babri Masjid in 1991, which preceded the Taliban destruction of the Buddha statues and the stuff that ISIS got up to in TheNewTens).



Of the five largest religions in India, Sikhism seems to be the one that most Westerners know nothing about. If fact, a lot of them don't even know what a Sikh is. Due to their beards and turbans, [[MistakenIdentity they often get mistaken for Muslims]], despite the fact that the two faiths have nothing to do with each other, so events like 9/11 have led to increases in attacks against Sikhs. But since Sikhs don't get a lot of media attention in the West, anti-Sikhism is rarely addressed. And then there's the issue of the kirpan, a small dagger that Sikhs must carry at all times, but which in fact only traditionalists do. Most Sikhs, even the ones who wear turbans, assimilate heavily into modern society and habits. In Indian media, the stereotype is them being small town yokels (never mind the many urban entrepreneurs and countless small restaurant owners across India) and BoisterousBruiser types who dance at weddings (which by the way, in no small part, inspired the Bollywood dancing trope that Westerners associate with India).

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Of the five largest religions in India, Sikhism seems to be the one that most Westerners know nothing about. If fact, a lot of them don't even know what a Sikh is. Due to their beards and turbans, [[MistakenIdentity they often get mistaken for Muslims]], despite the fact that the two faiths have nothing to do with each other, so events like 9/11 have led to increases in attacks against Sikhs. But since Sikhs don't get a lot of media attention in the West, anti-Sikhism is rarely addressed. And then there's the issue of the kirpan, a small dagger that Sikhs must carry at all times, but which in fact only traditionalists do. Most Sikhs, even the ones who wear turbans, assimilate heavily into modern society and habits. habits.

In Indian media, the stereotype is them being small town yokels (never mind the many urban entrepreneurs and countless small restaurant owners across India) and BoisterousBruiser types who dance at weddings (which by the way, in no small part, inspired the Bollywood dancing trope that Westerners associate with India).



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' might have had the best laugh possible about Scientology-they simply animated what the Scientologist beliefs are-that is, that the evil intergalactic space overlord Xenu placed a bunch of space rebels into spaceships that looked like [=McDonell=]-Douglas DC-8 jetliners, dumped them in volcanoes on Earth in the prehistoric past, killed them all with ''nuclear weapons'', and that the ghosts of these dead space rebels are the cause of everything bad that ever happens to us. Oh, and humans are really space-gods, but these ghosts infesting us are causing us to be mortal. They even had a huge sign flash on screen during this segment-''[[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer This is what Scientologists actually believe]]''.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' might have had the best laugh possible about Scientology-they Scientology--they simply animated what the Scientologist beliefs are-that are--that is, that the evil intergalactic space overlord Xenu placed a bunch of space rebels into spaceships that looked like [=McDonell=]-Douglas DC-8 jetliners, dumped them in volcanoes on Earth in the prehistoric past, killed them all with ''nuclear weapons'', nuclear weapons, and that the ghosts of these dead space rebels are the cause of everything bad that ever happens to us. Oh, and humans are really space-gods, but these ghosts infesting us are causing us to be mortal. They even had a huge sign flash on screen during this segment-''[[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer segment--''[[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer This is what Scientologists actually believe]]''.



*** It does form the entire basis for the auditing process, which is one of Scientology's most sacred and most common rituals, and explains where "evil thoughts" come from. It may not be the "entire crux" of Scientology, but it is a major part of it, much like, say, Exodus (and the 10 Commandments contained therein) is a major part of Judaism and Christianity. The really screwed up part of it, though, is that, despite it being such a large part of Scientology's belief system, the average Scientologist doesn't find out about it until they've already invested years upon years, and hundreds of thousands of dollars into the religion.

to:

*** It does form the entire basis for the auditing process, which is one of Scientology's most sacred and most common rituals, and explains where "evil thoughts" evil thoughts come from. It may not be the "entire crux" entire crux of Scientology, but it is a major part of it, much like, say, Exodus (and the 10 Commandments contained therein) is a major part of Judaism and Christianity. The really screwed up part of it, though, is that, despite it being such a large part of Scientology's belief system, the average Scientologist doesn't find out about it until they've already invested years upon years, and hundreds of thousands of dollars into the religion.



* The word Satan was Hebrew for 'the enemy', and is not to be confused with Devil Worship; so Satanism is the following of a non-Abrahamic religion in God.
** Correction: ''[=HaShatan=]'' means "The Adversary," and it is not clear whether this refers to an Adversary of God or an Adversary of Mankind who ''works for God.''
** Further correction: [=HaShatan=] is, within the context of Judaism, a delightful fellow who works in G-d's court. His name means "The Accuser" and he basically has two jobs: being a judge who tries to prove the accused's guilt, and tempting men away from G-d to see how strong their convictions are.
** Conglomeration: all of these things are true. Satan in the old testament and Jewish belief went from a word that was used to describe someone (anyone) as an "adversary" of some sort. It also can mean "accuser", so in later texts the word was used as a generic title for angels of YHVH's court who at that time happened to be accusing someone of something and provoking YHVH to test them. Much later, shortly before Jesus and Christianity came about, the Jews required that YHVH have a powerful enemy to explain why he had been unable to save them from foreign dominion yet, it was then that they decided that the angels described as "the satan" were a single character, and that Satan was a proper name, and found that previous scriptures that appear to be referring to something entirely different were actually describing Satan's banishment and fall from heaven, thus setting him up as a great power against YHVH.

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* %%
%% This has turned into complete natter. I'm leaving it here in case anybody wants to fix it.
%%
%%*
The word Satan was Hebrew for 'the enemy', and is not to be confused with Devil Worship; so Satanism is the following of a non-Abrahamic religion in God.
** %%** Correction: ''[=HaShatan=]'' means "The Adversary," and it is not clear whether this refers to an Adversary of God or an Adversary of Mankind who ''works for God.''
** %%** Further correction: [=HaShatan=] is, within the context of Judaism, a delightful fellow who works in G-d's court. His name means "The Accuser" and he basically has two jobs: being a judge who tries to prove the accused's guilt, and tempting men away from G-d to see how strong their convictions are.
** %%** Conglomeration: all of these things are true. Satan in the old testament and Jewish belief went from a word that was used to describe someone (anyone) as an "adversary" of some sort. It also can mean "accuser", so in later texts the word was used as a generic title for angels of YHVH's court who at that time happened to be accusing someone of something and provoking YHVH to test them. Much later, shortly before Jesus and Christianity came about, the Jews required that YHVH have a powerful enemy to explain why he had been unable to save them from foreign dominion yet, it was then that they decided that the angels described as "the satan" were a single character, and that Satan was a proper name, and found that previous scriptures that appear to be referring to something entirely different were actually describing Satan's banishment and fall from heaven, thus setting him up as a great power against YHVH.



* Perhaps because New Age = The Force - TheDarkSide. Alternatively, they'll be ruthless con artists cynically manipulating people into buying AllNaturalSnakeOil through a veneer of self-righteous airy-fairy drivel. That's in part because of [[TruthInTelevision the unfortunate number of prominent ones who actually are]].
* Inversely, Norse and Germanic neopagans (sometimes called Astruar), also known as Heathens, are often assumed to be white supremacists or neo-Nazis, because of their use of Germanic symbolism which has been historically appropriated -- much to their dismay and disgust -- by such groups. It doesn't help that there ''is'' a [[VocalMinority vocal racist minority]] among the Heathen community, which the rest earnestly attempt to distance themselves from.

to:

* Perhaps because New Age = The Force - TheDarkSide. Alternatively, they'll be ruthless con artists cynically manipulating people into buying AllNaturalSnakeOil through a veneer of self-righteous airy-fairy drivel. That's in part because of [[TruthInTelevision the unfortunate the number of prominent ones who actually are]].
* Inversely, Norse and Germanic neopagans (sometimes called Astruar), also known as Heathens, are often assumed to be white supremacists or neo-Nazis, because of their use of Germanic symbolism which has been historically appropriated -- much to their dismay and disgust -- by such groups. It doesn't help that there ''is'' a [[VocalMinority vocal racist minority]] VocalMinority among the Heathen community, which the rest earnestly attempt to distance themselves from.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in "Rednecks and Boomsticks" didn't even seem to know how to parody the Wiccan coven of teenage girls Lisa stumbles across. One minute they're the epitome of stereotypical airhead teenybopper fluffy bunnies, the next they're portrayed as mysterious and ethereal beings of intimidating power (instead of, y'know, just acting like NORMAL teenagers who just happen to be pagan) - until, of course [[spoiler:the angry mob of townsfolk who thought they had the power to make everyone go temporarily blind found out it was just moonshine in the water supply]].

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* The portrayal in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in episode "Rednecks and Boomsticks" didn't even seem to know how to does not consistently parody the Wiccan coven of teenage girls Lisa stumbles across. One minute they're the epitome of stereotypical airhead teenybopper fluffy bunnies, the next they're portrayed as mysterious and ethereal beings of intimidating power (instead of, y'know, just acting like NORMAL teenagers who just happen to be pagan) - until, of course [[spoiler:the power--[[spoiler:until the angry mob of townsfolk who thought they had the power to make everyone go temporarily blind found out it was just moonshine in the water supply]].



They are vegetarians and generally love to feed people, so they cant be all bad... probably why that Zombie in Dawn of the dead didn't eat anyone (see below). Oh and FYI Russell Brand the British Comedian is good friends with a Hare Krishna Guru.

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They However, they are vegetarians and generally love to feed people, so they cant be all bad... making their portrayals slightly more sympathetic. This probably why that Zombie in Dawn of the dead didn't eat anyone (see below). Oh and FYI Russell Brand the British Comedian is good friends with a Hare Krishna Guru.
below).



Basically portrayed as brainwashing organizations, whose followers view their religious leader as a [[DarkMessiah Messiah]], and obey him without question. They're almost cut off from the outside world, believing in only in what their leader says. [[VocalMinority Some of the time]] they result in [[DrinkingTheKoolAid mass suicide.]]

The standard cult leader is the guy who is at the top of the cult hierarchy, whose rule is unquestioned, he will talk about that he is right all the time, and has all the answers to everyone's problem. But behind closed doors he secretly uses his authority to get his way with everyone in his cult, regardless of [[AnythingThatMoves age or gender]]. Or he could be a StrawHypocrite who actually doesn't believe anything his cult does, and is only doing it as a means to scam peoples money.

to:

Basically portrayed as brainwashing organizations, whose followers view their religious leader as a [[DarkMessiah Messiah]], and obey him without question. They're almost cut off from the outside world, believing in only in what their leader says. [[VocalMinority Some of the time]] they result in [[DrinkingTheKoolAid mass suicide.]]

suicide]].

The standard cult leader is the guy who is at the top of the cult hierarchy, whose rule is unquestioned, he will talk about that he is right all the time, and has all the answers to everyone's problem. But behind closed doors he secretly uses his authority to get his way with everyone in his cult, regardless of [[AnythingThatMoves age or gender]]. Or he could be a StrawHypocrite who actually doesn't believe anything his cult does, and is only doing it as a means to scam peoples people's money.



* The academic term is "New Religious Movement" as the term "cult" is inherently pejorative.
** This is a fairly recent development. "Cult" was for a couple of centuries before that a perfectly acceptable word meaning, essentially, "worship" or "a particular form of worship." It's only starting from about the 1920s that it acquired the implication that the particular form of worship in question was particularly weird.

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* The academic term is "New Religious Movement" Movement," as the term "cult" is inherently pejorative.
**
pejorative. This is a fairly recent development. modern development since "Cult" was for a couple of centuries before that a perfectly acceptable word meaning, essentially, "worship" or "a particular form of worship." It's only starting from about the 1920s that it acquired the implication that the particular form of worship in question was particularly weird.



There are rarely quietly devout religious believers on American television. Every person openly acknowledged as religious bears some psychological resemblance to the worst, most fundamentalist, most vicious examples of that religion. ''Every'' Muslim, to some extent, secretly admires UsefulNotes/OsamaBinLaden; ''every'' Christian is a violently homophobic closet Jerry Falwell or [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]]... and let's not even ''talk'' about the moronic stereotyping that Jews and Hindus have been forced to endure. In short, characters who treat their religion as something other than stamp-collecting or sport fandom tend to behave as if they got rabies. Of course, the occasional VerySpecialEpisode will go against the grain of this acceptable target, punishing characters within the show who jump to similar conclusions.

to:

There are rarely quietly devout religious believers on American television. Every person openly acknowledged as religious bears some psychological resemblance to the worst, most fundamentalist, most vicious examples of that religion. ''Every'' Muslim, to some extent, secretly admires UsefulNotes/OsamaBinLaden; ''every'' Christian is a violently homophobic closet Jerry Falwell or [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]]... and let's that's not even ''talk'' about getting into the moronic stereotyping that Jews and Hindus have been forced to endure. In short, characters who treat their religion as something other than stamp-collecting or sport fandom tend to behave as if they got rabies. Of course, the occasional VerySpecialEpisode will go against the grain of this acceptable target, punishing characters within the show who jump to similar conclusions.



* Speaking of Jack Chick, a ComicBook/{{Chick Tract|s}} [[https://scribd.com/document/77345042/Chick-Tract-Why-No-Revival-1970 complains]] about the prevalence of this stereotype in fiction - spawning the phrase [[https://images.genius.com/a29bfd69f2cd7d99be2822d5ac00c6cd.904x519x1.jpg "God Told Me To Skin You Alive"]], which became part of punk rock history [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtqPlB-oC4w through the]] Music/DeadKennedys.

to:

* Speaking of Jack Chick, a A ComicBook/{{Chick Tract|s}} [[https://scribd.com/document/77345042/Chick-Tract-Why-No-Revival-1970 complains]] about the prevalence of this stereotype in fiction - spawning the phrase [[https://images.genius.com/a29bfd69f2cd7d99be2822d5ac00c6cd.904x519x1.jpg "God Told Me To Skin You Alive"]], which became part of punk rock history [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtqPlB-oC4w through the]] Music/DeadKennedys.



* Played straight ''and'' averted in ''Webcomic/SomethingPositive'', of all places. The main character's father (Fred) is a quiet man with deep, earnest religious beliefs, but otherwise acts like a normal [[spoiler:(if senile)]] old man. The straight run of the trope came in during a later segment centered around Fred going to a haunted house, which turned out to be run by a bunch of radical Christians showing the horrors of sin and refusing to let people go who wouldn't accept Christ, among other things, complete with a NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer on the first page - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_house they're called Hell Houses]], and ''also'' fit under this trope. When the police became involved and broke the whole thing up, several people who had sat down to protest the haunted house commented negatively about Christians, causing Fred to protest. When the people expressed surprise that Fred wasn't talking down to them for not being Christian themselves, his response was to go home quietly and pray with a tear rolling down his eye. Meanwhile, his now-dead wife, Faye, was as close to a living saint as the comic will ever get.
** Religion is actually a fairly common topic in S*P. Cousins Branwen and Mike are from a Catholic family, both their mothers being offensive traditional Catholics. Mike's mom frequently says things like "No being gay under my roof!", and "Don't you bring a Protestant girl here!" Literally the first thing Branwen's mom does when meeting her then-boyfriend, main character Davan, for the first time is attempt to bully him into converting to Catholicism. Kim was originally Wiccan, but lost interest after the leader of her coven went control freak, assigning homework, trying to get them to proselytize, even trying to excommunicate someone from all of Wicca. Then, of course, there is the Scarf Girl, a little girl who repeats bigoted things her parents say, such as "Black people are dark because their skin is stained with the sins of their ancestors". Needless to say, Randy Milholland is not even remotely concerned about offending people.

to:

* Played straight ''and'' averted Religion is actually a fairly common topic in ''Webcomic/SomethingPositive'', both played straight ''and'' averted, of all places. places.
**
The main character's father (Fred) is a quiet man with deep, earnest religious beliefs, but otherwise acts like a normal [[spoiler:(if senile)]] old man. The straight run of the trope came in during a later man.
** A
segment centered around Fred going to a haunted house, which turned out to be run by a bunch of radical Christians showing the horrors of sin and refusing to let people go who wouldn't accept Christ, among other things, complete with a NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer on the first page - -- [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_house they're called Hell Houses]], and ''also'' fit under this trope. When the police became involved and broke the whole thing up, several people who had sat down to protest the haunted house commented negatively about Christians, causing Fred to protest. When the people expressed surprise that Fred wasn't talking down to them for not being Christian themselves, his response was to go home quietly and pray with a tear rolling down his eye. Meanwhile, his now-dead wife, Faye, was as close to a living saint as the comic will ever get.
** Religion is actually a fairly common topic in S*P. Cousins Branwen and Mike are from a Catholic family, both their mothers being offensive traditional Catholics. Mike's mom frequently says things like "No being gay under my roof!", and "Don't you bring a Protestant girl here!" Literally the first thing Branwen's mom does when meeting her then-boyfriend, main character Davan, for the first time is attempt to bully him into converting to Catholicism. Kim was originally Wiccan, but lost interest after the leader of her coven went control freak, assigning homework, trying to get them to proselytize, even trying to excommunicate someone from all of Wicca. Then, of course, there Wicca.
** There
is the Scarf Girl, a little girl who repeats bigoted things her parents say, such as "Black people are dark because their skin is stained with the sins of their ancestors". Needless to say, Randy Milholland is not even remotely concerned about offending people.



* The Reverend Darren England, in the Literature/WhateleyUniverse. He's a fire-and-brimstone preacher, and a hard-line Christian. He's actively trying to get a couple of the protagonists (up to hiring an assassin) because he sees them as threats to all humanity. Okay, he could be right on one of those calls. On the other hand, he also has a long history of working with superhero groups.
** But averted elsewhere, as at least two of the main protagonists (Loophole and Phase) are devout Christians, with Phase struggling with his beliefs because of the BreakTheHaughty he has gone through. They even had a talk about their religious beliefs in the middle of one of the stories.

to:

* Played straight and averted in the Literature/WhateleyUniverse:
**
The Reverend Darren England, in the Literature/WhateleyUniverse. He's England is a fire-and-brimstone preacher, and a hard-line Christian. He's actively trying to get a couple of the protagonists (up to hiring an assassin) because he sees them as threats to all humanity. Okay, he could be right on one of those calls. On the other hand, he also has a long history of working with superhero groups.
** But averted elsewhere, as at At least two of the main protagonists (Loophole and Phase) are devout Christians, with Phase struggling with his beliefs because of the BreakTheHaughty he has gone through. They even had a talk about their religious beliefs in the middle of one of the stories.



* The less topic-specific and well-moderated a particular subsection of Internet is, the more likely you are to get a response on the lines of: "Oh '''yeah'''? But at least I do not believe in centuries-years-old fairy tales like a dumbass, dumbass."

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* [[{{GIFT}} The less topic-specific and well-moderated a particular subsection of Internet is, is]], the more likely you are to get a response on the lines of: "Oh '''yeah'''? But at least I do not believe in centuries-years-old fairy tales like a dumbass, dumbass."



Within America, atheism was somewhat mainstream in the 19th Century, with the likes of Ambrose Bierce being a respected intellectual and wit, and it was at the very least not seen as a mark of disfavour. Much of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda (on both sides). A lot of communist regimes proclaim state atheism and to this day China is an officially atheist state that regularly proscribes and limits religious freedom. On the other hand Castro's Cuba has generally dealt with religion with the carrot, and anti-Communist icon Pope John Paul II visited Cuba and called for the end of the American embargo. Even in the USSR, Stalin despite persecuting many Christians (and Jews and Buddhists, and Muslims, fellow atheists and even fellow communists among others) supported a partial revival of the Orthodox Church during and after World War II. But nonetheless, during the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the Soviet Union and atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American. Ironically enough, the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.[[note]]She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]] Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, of course, which may have more cachet in the still highly religious US. In fact, very few TV atheists are portrayed as having come to this conclusion by dispassionate consideration of their experience but, much more likely, they have some tragedy in their past, such as a CynicismCatalyst or gave up after a crisis of faith (which does occur in real-life but isn't universally true).

In the US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. This activism also comes from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on (American) television who is an openly avowed atheist. Not appearing to practice or even mention religion at all is fine for everyone, but it's generally only characters with a fair degree of cynicism and bitterness who can state outright that they don't believe there is a God, or even that they severely doubt if God exists (however the latter is agnostic, not atheist). Perhaps this is due to the fact that one of the most prominent real-life atheists, Madalyn Murray O'Hair, was also known for her abrasive personality.

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Within America, atheism was somewhat mainstream in the 19th Century, with the likes of Ambrose Bierce being a respected intellectual and wit, and it was at the very least not seen as a mark of disfavour. Much of the modern stigma can be traced historically to UsefulNotes/ColdWar propaganda (on from both sides).sides. A lot of communist regimes proclaim state atheism and to this day China is an officially atheist state that regularly proscribes and limits religious freedom. On the other hand Castro's Cuba has generally dealt with religion with the carrot, and anti-Communist icon Pope John Paul II visited Cuba and called for the end of the American embargo. Even in the USSR, Stalin despite persecuting many Christians (and Jews and Buddhists, and Muslims, fellow atheists and even fellow communists among others) supported a partial revival of the Orthodox Church during and after World War II. But nonetheless, during

During
the RedScare of TheFifties, ''In God We Trust'' replaced ''E Pluribus Unum'' on the US Currency as part of the general culture wars against the Soviet Union and atheists in popular media were depicted as communists. To be a communist was to be an atheist, so [[LogicalFallacies to be an atheist was to be a communist]], and to be either was to be a traitor and Un-American. Ironically enough, the most vocal and influential anti-communist author of this era, Creator/AynRand, was herself an atheist.[[note]]She was of course far more vocal and tendentious about her anti-communist, pro-US attitudes than she was about her anti-religious opinions.[[/note]] [[/note]]

Many criticisms of atheism by theists also exist, of course, which may have more cachet in the still highly religious US. In fact, very Very few TV atheists are portrayed as having come to this conclusion by dispassionate consideration of their experience but, much more likely, they have some tragedy in their past, such as a CynicismCatalyst or gave up after a crisis of faith (which does occur in real-life but isn't universally true).

In the US Culture Wars of TheNoughties, the atheist movement emerged as a response to the religious right, creationism and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism. This activism also comes from a feeling that it's hard to find a happy, well-adjusted, or optimistic individual on (American) American television who is an openly avowed atheist. Not appearing to practice or even mention religion at all is fine for everyone, most people, but it's generally only characters with a fair degree of cynicism and bitterness who can state outright that they don't believe there is a God, or even that they severely doubt if God exists (however the latter is agnostic, not atheist). Perhaps this is due to the fact that one of the most prominent real-life atheists, Madalyn Murray O'Hair, was also known for her abrasive personality.



* There's a little bit of TruthInTelevision about it: in a lot of places where polygamy is or was practiced, you pretty much ''have'' to be rich in order to be able to feed, clothe, and house more than one set of wife + kid(s), and considering how long it can take to make enough money, you're likely going to be notably older than your second/third wife.
** It is a bitter fact that polygamy tends to turn women into valuable commodities and collectibles. It's also hard on young men trying to start a family since said commodity is monopolized by older and more powerful men.
*** Aside from {{Straw Feminis|t}}m, polygamy tends to bring about the MarsNeedsWomen problem: no society manages it unless the number of polygamous marriages is very small, the young men are eliminated before they can marry, or women are imported into the society. Creator/RudyardKipling, deeply despising {{demonization}}, put jabs at both issues (among others) in ''One View of the Question''.

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* There's a little bit of TruthInTelevision about it: in a lot of places where polygamy is or was practiced, you pretty much ''have'' to be rich in order to be able to feed, clothe, and house more than one set of wife + kid(s), and considering how long it can take to make enough money, you're likely going to be notably older than your second/third wife.
**
wife. It is a bitter fact that polygamy tends to turn women into valuable commodities and collectibles. It's also hard on young men trying to start a family since said commodity is monopolized by older and more powerful men.
*** ** Aside from {{Straw Feminis|t}}m, polygamy tends to bring about the MarsNeedsWomen problem: no society manages it unless the number of polygamous marriages is very small, the young men are eliminated before they can marry, or women are imported into the society. Creator/RudyardKipling, deeply despising {{demonization}}, put jabs at both issues (among others) in ''One View of the Question''.



* It's common for newly deconverted people to refer to themselves as agnostic, when what they really mean is atheist (remember, atheist literally means anyone who doesn't believe in gods, not just those who actively believe they don't exist). However, there's a certain breed of agnostic who claim that they're better than theists and atheists because they don't hold any unsubstantiated belief. Atheists tend to really hate people with this confusion, as the majority of atheists simply disbelieve through lack of evidence, and even the ones who actually do think no gods exist do not hold this as an absolute belief, but merely the most likely scenario. Any agnostic who continues on in this vein moves from 'person confused by the terminology' to Acceptable Target.

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* It's common for newly deconverted people to refer to themselves as agnostic, when what they really mean is atheist (remember, atheist literally atheist. (Atheist means anyone who doesn't believe in gods, not just those who actively believe they don't exist). exist.) However, there's a certain breed of agnostic who claim that they're better than theists and atheists because they don't hold any unsubstantiated belief. Atheists tend to really hate people with this confusion, as the majority of atheists simply disbelieve through lack of evidence, and even the ones who actually do think no gods exist do not hold this as an absolute belief, but merely the most likely scenario. Any agnostic who continues on in this vein moves from 'person confused by the terminology' to Acceptable Target.



* Deists (those who believe in at least one, usually non-interfering god) often get it pretty bad from all sides. Atheists consider them silly for the same reasons they do any other theist and members of other more organized religions scorn them for refusing to commit to ''any'' god.
** Nowadays, at least. Atheists sometimes "grandfather in" Deists who lived in earlier times on the theory that atheism was not an intellectually viable option.

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* Deists Nowadays, deists (those who believe in at least one, usually non-interfering god) often get it pretty bad from all sides. Atheists Many atheists consider them silly for the same reasons they do any other theist and members of other more organized religions scorn them for refusing to commit to ''any'' god.
** Nowadays, at least. Atheists sometimes
god. However, some atheists "grandfather in" Deists deists who lived in earlier times on the theory that atheism was not an intellectually viable option.



'''[[UsefulNotes/{{Voudoun}} Voudosiants]]'''

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'''[[UsefulNotes/{{Voudoun}} Voudosiants]]'''
'''[[UsefulNotes/{{Voudo|un}}siants]]'''



While not a religion in the traditional sense, transhumanists are often a target of both religious and non-religious communities. The religious believe them to be [[MoralMyopia messing with God's creation]] or [[AGodAmI trying to play God]], and the nonreligious often accuse them of either wishful thinking or [[ArtisticLicenseBiology interfering with]] [[GoalOrientedEvolution natural evolution.]]

----

'''Anything religious in general'''

What is the purpose of life?, like what is the afterlife, etc?, Whatever you think, someone will always find a way/reason to hate/bash/spoof it.

to:

While not a religion in the traditional sense, transhumanists are often a target of both religious and non-religious communities. The religious believe them to be [[MoralMyopia messing with God's creation]] or [[AGodAmI trying to play God]], and the nonreligious often accuse them of either wishful thinking or [[ArtisticLicenseBiology interfering with]] [[GoalOrientedEvolution natural evolution.]]

----

'''Anything religious in general'''

What is the purpose of life?, like what is the afterlife, etc?, Whatever you think, someone will always find a way/reason to hate/bash/spoof it.
evolution]].
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