History Literature / TheThreeInvestigators

22nd Sep '16 2:42:17 PM Ingonyama
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* EnemyMine: Less serious than most examples (since other than when he almost runs Bob and Harry off the road, no real harm is aimed at the boys), but Hugenay and the boys do work together in ''Screaming Clock''--in return for [[ClearTheirName proving Harry's father's innocence]] (and rescuing Bob and Harry), the art thief will get to keep the stolen paintings once found. Of course thanks to Pete calling the police, it doesn't work out that way, but Hugenay [[MagnificentBastard still gets to walk away scot-free]]. In the later book ''Death Trap Mine'' there is a minor example--when the bank robbers kidnap Pete and Allie, Thurgood not only tries to rescue them and face off with the bad guys, but he provides every assistance to the police in tracking them down. Of course it is in his best interests to do this since [[spoiler:he's both an imposter and secretly running a stock swindle via the mine, and has also kidnapped Mrs. Macomber]].
22nd Sep '16 2:31:30 PM Ingonyama
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** NarrativeProfanityFilter: The mynah bird Blackbeard from ''Stuttering Parrot'' was taught a number of racy pirate slang and swear words "not meant for decent company" according to the old lady who bought him. When the boys first get to hear him speak, the text notes he "burst into a string of expressions the boys knew their families would never approve of".

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** NarrativeProfanityFilter: NarrativeProfanityFilter:
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The mynah bird Blackbeard from ''Stuttering Parrot'' was taught a number of racy pirate slang and swear words "not meant for decent company" according to the old lady who bought him. When the boys first get to hear him speak, the text notes he "burst into a string of expressions the boys knew their families would never approve of".
*** In ''Screaming Clock'', when told of Jeeters, Carlos, and Jerry having kidnapped Bob and Harry, Hugenay "let out several expressive words in French." (You can bet ''merde'' was one of them.) A similar thing happens from Carlos only with Spanish when the "cops" burst in to arrest them.
21st Sep '16 7:56:52 PM Ingonyama
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* {{Foreshadowing}}: The series isn't exactly known for this, but it does occur in ''Silver Spider'': when searching their room for the missing jewelry, the boys see a cricket become ensnared in a web, and then only a scant few minutes later all of them except Pete and Elena get captured by Duke Stefan's guards. The subtlety is unfortunately undercut by Pete [[DiscussedTrope actually commenting on it]], [[TemptingFate hoping it wasn't a sign of bad luck for them]]. However, later in their cell when they break free with a TheGuardsMustBeCrazy plot, Rudy observes that the guards tied up in their blanket-nooses are struggling just like the cricket, suggesting if there was an omen it wasn't just a bad one after all.
21st Sep '16 1:49:20 AM Ingonyama
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** Also, Jupiter Jones, Java Jim, and AntiVillain Claude Claudius.

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** Also, Jupiter Jones, Java Jim, and AntiVillain Claude Claudius. And the Verdant Valley Vineyard.



* TheButlerDidIt: At one point in ''Whispering Mummy'', the boys suspect Professor Yarborough's butler Wilkins of being involved in the criminal doings, mostly because: he's in the best position to make the mummy whisper (or lie about not having heard it); was the one most insistent on there being a curse and that the professor should get rid of the mummy; and because he had once been a vaudevillian actor and so could have convincingly feigned shock and a faint as well as, possibly, know ventriloquism. Bob also [[DiscussedTrope mentions the trope by name]]. He of course turns out to be innocent. In a variation, one of the professor's gardeners ''does'' turn out to be behind the various dangers which occur to make it seem as if there is a curse (because he's working for the Libyan family the villain has conned into thinking they are descendants of the mummy), but he still isn't the actual villain, just a patsy.



* DescriptionCut: After being captured by Rawley and the gnomes in ''Vanishing Treasure'', Jupe and Pete are certain Miss Agawam will call the police once she finds them missing, and they'll be saved. Immediately the next chapter cuts to her finding their empty bedroom, deciding they were scared by the gnomes and fled, and calling her nephew in fear to come pick her up, doing nothing to effect a rescue.



* EveryoneHatesHades: When one of the thieves in ''Whispering Mummy'' dresses up as Anubis to frighten the butler, the narrative describes him as "the dreaded jackal god". Since this scene is from the POV of the butler however, who is predisposed to view Anubis as evil and frightening, this may just be an in-story invocation of the trope. And considering the thief in question had been told to dress up that way by [[spoiler:someone knowledgeable about ancient Egypt]], it's extremely likely the villain would be aware of the maligning and misunderstanding of a death-related deity and thus was exploiting the trope as well.



* GoshDangItToHeck: Goes with the genre, although the UnusualEuphemism used by Aunt Mathilda ("Mercy and goodness and sweetness and light!") stands out.

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* GoshDangItToHeck: Goes with the genre, although the UnusualEuphemism used by Aunt Mathilda ("Mercy and goodness and sweetness and light!") stands out. A very notable example however is from ''Green Ghost''--Chief Reynolds to Bob's reporter father, when he asked if he could quote him on having seen the eponymous green ghost: "You know darned well you can't!" On the one hand, this is in front of the boys; on the other hand, it's hard to imagine a police chief, even in a small town, not having saucier language than this.


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* LemonyNarrator: In ''Whispering Mummy'', after Hamid is horrified at Americans eating dogs: "But there was no time now to explain about the mysteries of the American hot dog."


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* MightyWhiteyAndMellowYellow: This seems to have been the nature of the relationship between Matthias Green and his Chinese wife in {{Backstory}}. Rumors suggest Green had trouble with nobles in China, which could have been either because of his theft of the Ghost Pearls or his theft of the Chinese princess he wed. The publication date of the book suggests Arthur would have been well aware of the stereotypes regarding white men and Asian women, either from Vietnam or Korea, or WorldWarTwo before it. On the other hand, however the relationship started, it seems clear there was genuine love involved--Mr. Won, when speaking of the matter, observed that Green had "stolen" a bride but also that "women follow their hearts", and the way Green made a memorial coffin for her in a secret room suggests great devotion. And while he took to wearing Mandarin robes in his mansion, something that could suggest a fetishizing of the exotic Eastern Other, it's just as likely (when combined with them having only Chinese servants) that he was doing it to make her feel at home or because he had even come to genuinely enjoy the culture himself. So if this was how the two became involved, it at least seems to have been a bit more complicated and realistic than the stereotype.


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** In ''Green Ghost'', Jupiter references the "curious incident of the dog in the nighttime" from [[Literature/SherlockHolmes "Silver Blaze"]], and it applies in exactly the same way--what is notable is that the dog did nothing in the nighttime, in this case because [[spoiler:there was no actual ghost for it to sense and react to]].
27th Aug '16 6:00:13 PM Ingonyama
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* ThirteenIsUnlucky: Invoked by Hitchcock in his introduction to ''Crooked Cat'', wherein he notes the extreme difficulties, turns of bad luck, numerous accidents at the carnival, and other dangers that assault the boys which they might have avoided, or at least been better prepared for, if they'd been wary of taking on their thirteenth case. (Also note the case involves looking for a stuffed cat which, though striped, is mostly black.)

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* ThirteenIsUnlucky: Invoked by Hitchcock in his introduction to ''Crooked Cat'', wherein he notes the extreme difficulties, turns of bad luck, numerous accidents at the carnival, and other dangers that assault the boys which they might have avoided, or at least been better prepared for, if they'd been wary of taking on their thirteenth case. (Also note the case involves [[SuperstitionEpisode looking for a stuffed cat which, though striped, is mostly black.black]].)
27th Aug '16 5:49:55 PM Ingonyama
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** The prize Jupiter won was to have a Rolls Royce at his disposal for 30 days. When one month was nearly over, Jupiter argued that 30 days actually amount to 720 ''hours of service''.
** The relevant exact words were "30 days of 24 hours each (720 hours), Jupiter argues that by that wording only full days count, and they've only used 3 of them.

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** The prize Jupiter won was to have a Rolls Royce at his disposal for 30 days. When one month was nearly over, Jupiter argued that 30 days actually amount to 720 ''hours of service''.
**
service''. The relevant exact words were "30 days of 24 hours each (720 hours), Jupiter argues that by that wording only full days count, and they've only used 3 of them.
27th Aug '16 5:04:41 PM Ingonyama
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* [[TrailersAlwaysSpoil Covers Always Spoil]]: At the same time, a few of the covers of the books also spoil major plot points or even endings. ''Vanishing Treasure'' depicts the boys with the belt in Headquarters, revealing they get it back; ''Fiery Eye'' shows them digging the eponymous jewel up, thus completely deflating the tension of the search for the busts; ''Silver Spider'' shows the eponymous spider [[spoiler:in a web]]; one version of ''Laughing Shadow'' shows Indian Head Mountain, thus hinting at [[spoiler:the meaning of "eye of the sky"]] before it is revealed; ''Coughing Dragon'' makes it fairly clear that said dragon is [[spoiler:a robot]]; and a very eagle-eyed observer will notice [[spoiler:the awning patch with the stripes going the wrong way]] on the eponymous ''Shrinking House''.


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* SpoilerCover: A few of the covers of the books also spoil major plot points or even endings. ''Vanishing Treasure'' depicts the boys with the belt in Headquarters, revealing they get it back; ''Fiery Eye'' shows them digging the eponymous jewel up, thus completely deflating the tension of the search for the busts; ''Silver Spider'' shows the eponymous spider [[spoiler:in a web]]; one version of ''Laughing Shadow'' shows Indian Head Mountain, thus hinting at [[spoiler:the meaning of "eye of the sky"]] before it is revealed; ''Coughing Dragon'' makes it fairly clear that said dragon is [[spoiler:a robot]]; and a very eagle-eyed observer will notice [[spoiler:the awning patch with the stripes going the wrong way]] on the eponymous ''Shrinking House''.
23rd Aug '16 11:03:02 PM Ingonyama
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* AuthorAppeal: M.V. Carey, a later author in the series, seems to have had a fixation on the supernatural since it figures prominently in at least four of the titles she wrote: ''Singing Serpent'', ''Invisible Dog'', ''Haunted Mirror'', and ''Magic Circle''. She also wrote stories involving cryptozoology and [[FlyingSaucer UFO]] sightings (''Monster Mountain'' and ''Blazing Cliffs'', respectively). Even ''Flaming Footprints'' and ''Sinister Scarecrow'' had vaguel supernatural elements, although the "ghost" leaving footprints and walking scarecrow were just done with [[ScoobyDooHoax chemicals and a costume]].

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* AuthorAppeal: M.V. Carey, a later author in the series, seems to have had a fixation on the supernatural since it figures prominently in at least four of the titles she wrote: ''Singing Serpent'', ''Invisible Dog'', ''Haunted Mirror'', and ''Magic Circle''. She also wrote stories involving cryptozoology and [[FlyingSaucer UFO]] sightings (''Monster Mountain'' and ''Blazing Cliffs'', respectively). Even ''Flaming Footprints'' and ''Sinister Scarecrow'' had vaguel vaguely supernatural elements, although the "ghost" leaving footprints and walking scarecrow were just done with [[ScoobyDooHoax chemicals and a costume]].
11th Jul '16 8:19:13 AM TheGracefullyWicked
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* AuthorAppeal: M.V. Carey, a later author in the series, seems to have had a fixation on the supernatural since it figures prominently in at least four of the titles she wrote: ''Singing Serpent'', ''Invisible Dog'', ''Haunted Mirror'', and ''Magic Circle''. She also wrote stories involving cryptozoology and [[FlyingSaucer UFO]] sightings (''Monster Mountain'' and ''Blazing Cliffs'', respectively). Even ''Flaming Footprints'' and ''Sinister Scarecrow'' had vaguely supernatural elements, although the "ghost" leaving footprints and walking scarecrow were just done with [[ScoobyDooHoax chemicals and a costume]].

to:

* AuthorAppeal: M.V. Carey, a later author in the series, seems to have had a fixation on the supernatural since it figures prominently in at least four of the titles she wrote: ''Singing Serpent'', ''Invisible Dog'', ''Haunted Mirror'', and ''Magic Circle''. She also wrote stories involving cryptozoology and [[FlyingSaucer UFO]] sightings (''Monster Mountain'' and ''Blazing Cliffs'', respectively). Even ''Flaming Footprints'' and ''Sinister Scarecrow'' had vaguely vaguel supernatural elements, although the "ghost" leaving footprints and walking scarecrow were just done with [[ScoobyDooHoax chemicals and a costume]].



* NeverSayDie: Although the boys never really come too close to death, the danger they suffer is often very real and both they and their families worry about getting injured or killed. Of course the worst violence they usually suffer is getting knocked out and/or BoundAndGagged[=/=]LockedInAFreezer. But in ''Dead Man's Riddle'' they do almost [[InevitableWaterfall go over a waterfall]], and in the early book ''Green Ghost'', when Jensen asks Mr. Won what to do if the boys don't turn over the Ghost Pearls, [[WhamLine he coldly tells him to slit their throats]]. The threats Three-Dots makes with his SwordCane in ''Fiery Eye'' (and his supposed YouHaveFailedMe killing of one of the Black Moustache gang) are taken quite seriously as well. They are also held at gunpoint several times (''Stuttering Parrot'', ''Vanishing Treasure'', ''Screaming Clock'', ''Laughing Shadow'', ''Flaming Footprints'', ''Shrinking House'') and are left to die in the desert in ''Death Trap Mine''. Pete did drown in a pool once, though Bob brought him back.

to:

* NeverSayDie: Although the boys never really come too close to death, the danger they suffer is often very real and both they and their families worry about getting injured or killed. Of course the worst violence they usually suffer is getting knocked out and/or BoundAndGagged[=/=]LockedInAFreezer. But in ''Dead Man's Riddle'' they do almost [[InevitableWaterfall go over a waterfall]], and in the early book ''Green Ghost'', when Jensen asks Mr. Won what to do if the boys don't turn over the Ghost Pearls, [[WhamLine he coldly tells him to slit their throats]]. The threats Three-Dots makes with his SwordCane in ''Fiery Eye'' (and his supposed YouHaveFailedMe killing of one of the Black Moustache gang) are taken quite seriously as well. They are also held at gunpoint several times (''Stuttering Parrot'', ''Vanishing Treasure'', ''Screaming Clock'', ''Laughing Shadow'', ''Flaming Footprints'', ''Shrinking House'') and are left to die in the desert in ''Death Trap Mine''. Pete did drown in a pool once, though Bob Frank brought him back.
11th Jul '16 7:40:58 AM TheGracefullyWicked
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* NeverSayDie: Although the boys never really come too close to death, the danger they suffer is often very real and both they and their families worry about getting injured or killed. Of course the worst violence they usually suffer is getting knocked out and/or BoundAndGagged[=/=]LockedInAFreezer. But in ''Dead Man's Riddle'' they do almost [[InevitableWaterfall go over a waterfall]], and in the early book ''Green Ghost'', when Jensen asks Mr. Won what to do if the boys don't turn over the Ghost Pearls, [[WhamLine he coldly tells him to slit their throats]]. The threats Three-Dots makes with his SwordCane in ''Fiery Eye'' (and his supposed YouHaveFailedMe killing of one of the Black Moustache gang) are taken quite seriously as well. They are also held at gunpoint several times (''Stuttering Parrot'', ''Vanishing Treasure'', ''Screaming Clock'', ''Laughing Shadow'', ''Flaming Footprints'', ''Shrinking House'') and are left to die in the desert in ''Death Trap Mine''.

to:

* NeverSayDie: Although the boys never really come too close to death, the danger they suffer is often very real and both they and their families worry about getting injured or killed. Of course the worst violence they usually suffer is getting knocked out and/or BoundAndGagged[=/=]LockedInAFreezer. But in ''Dead Man's Riddle'' they do almost [[InevitableWaterfall go over a waterfall]], and in the early book ''Green Ghost'', when Jensen asks Mr. Won what to do if the boys don't turn over the Ghost Pearls, [[WhamLine he coldly tells him to slit their throats]]. The threats Three-Dots makes with his SwordCane in ''Fiery Eye'' (and his supposed YouHaveFailedMe killing of one of the Black Moustache gang) are taken quite seriously as well. They are also held at gunpoint several times (''Stuttering Parrot'', ''Vanishing Treasure'', ''Screaming Clock'', ''Laughing Shadow'', ''Flaming Footprints'', ''Shrinking House'') and are left to die in the desert in ''Death Trap Mine''. Pete did drown in a pool once, though Bob brought him back.
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