History Literature / TheThreeInvestigators

30th Oct '17 4:40:42 AM Ingonyama
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* [[ExcitedShowTitle Excited Chapter Title!]]: Every book in the series has at least one chapter title like this, usually more. Invariably it is "Trapped!", "Captured!", or some variation of this where the boys are in some sort of danger. Arden got a bit carried away in ''Purple Pirate'' though, which has ''seven''.

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* [[ExcitedShowTitle Excited Chapter Title!]]: Every book in the series has at least one chapter title like this, usually more. Invariably it is "Trapped!", "Captured!", or some variation of this where the boys are in some sort of danger. Arden got a bit carried away though in ''Purple Pirate'' though, Pirate'', which has ''seven''.''seven'', and ''Dancing Devil'', which has ''eight''.


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* NaturalSpotlight: At the climax of ''Headless Horse'', after days of rain and flooding, [[CueTheSun the sun finally comes out]] right when Jupiter solves the mystery--by having a sunbeam shine down right on the jewel-encrusted Sword of Cortes.
6th Oct '17 4:45:51 AM Ingonyama
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* ScoobyDooHoax: The frequent explanation behind seemingly supernatural happenings. Textbook examples include ''Green Ghost'', ''Skeleton Island'', ''Flaming Footprints'', ''Haunted Mirror'' ([[RealAfterAll maybe]]), ''Dancing Devil'', ''Sinister Scarecrow'', ''Wreckers' Rock'' (although only as a subplot), and ''Blazing Cliffs''. The latter is an extremely over-the-top and overly complicated example, but justified by the villains in question being rather desperate and including failed actors among their number, and that they are playing to a paranoid and credulous audience.

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* ScoobyDooHoax: The frequent explanation behind seemingly supernatural happenings. Textbook examples include ''Terror Castle'', ''Green Ghost'', ''Skeleton Island'', ''Flaming Footprints'', ''Haunted Mirror'' ([[RealAfterAll maybe]]), ''Dancing Devil'', ''Sinister Scarecrow'', ''Wreckers' Rock'' (although only as a subplot), and ''Blazing Cliffs''. The latter is an extremely over-the-top and overly complicated example, but justified by the villains in question being rather desperate and including failed actors among their number, and that they are playing to a paranoid and credulous audience.
25th Jul '17 5:35:43 PM jccw227
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* LiteralMinded: During the Crimebusters series, Pete once gave Jupiter a hard time because during one chance he had with a girl, he ended up blowing it by boring her with a detailed explanation of the structure of the atom because "she wanted to get to the basics." It didn't cross his mind what she really meant until he tried to defend his actions and everyone began laughing.
9th Jul '17 10:34:00 AM nombretomado
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* MightyWhiteyAndMellowYellow: This seems to have been the nature of the relationship between Matthias Green and his Chinese wife in {{Backstory}}. Rumors suggest Green had trouble with nobles in China, which could have been either because of his theft of the Ghost Pearls or his theft of the Chinese princess he wed. The publication date of the book suggests Arthur would have been well aware of the stereotypes regarding white men and Asian women, either from Vietnam or Korea, or WorldWarTwo before it. On the other hand, however the relationship started, it seems clear there was genuine love involved--Mr. Won, when speaking of the matter, observed that Green had "stolen" a bride but also that "women follow their hearts", and the way Green made a memorial coffin for her in a secret room suggests great devotion. And while he took to wearing Mandarin robes in his mansion, something that could suggest a fetishizing of the exotic Eastern Other, it's just as likely (when combined with them having only Chinese servants) that he was doing it to make her feel at home or because he had even come to genuinely enjoy the culture himself. So if this was how the two became involved, it at least seems to have been a bit more complicated and realistic than the stereotype.

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* MightyWhiteyAndMellowYellow: This seems to have been the nature of the relationship between Matthias Green and his Chinese wife in {{Backstory}}. Rumors suggest Green had trouble with nobles in China, which could have been either because of his theft of the Ghost Pearls or his theft of the Chinese princess he wed. The publication date of the book suggests Arthur would have been well aware of the stereotypes regarding white men and Asian women, either from Vietnam or Korea, or WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII before it. On the other hand, however the relationship started, it seems clear there was genuine love involved--Mr. Won, when speaking of the matter, observed that Green had "stolen" a bride but also that "women follow their hearts", and the way Green made a memorial coffin for her in a secret room suggests great devotion. And while he took to wearing Mandarin robes in his mansion, something that could suggest a fetishizing of the exotic Eastern Other, it's just as likely (when combined with them having only Chinese servants) that he was doing it to make her feel at home or because he had even come to genuinely enjoy the culture himself. So if this was how the two became involved, it at least seems to have been a bit more complicated and realistic than the stereotype.
11th Jun '17 9:39:58 PM alanh
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* ElaborateUndergroundBase: For a teens, anyway. Headquarters has secret entrances, a crime lab, and a private phone line with an answering machine (quite a luxury when the stories were written).

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* ElaborateUndergroundBase: For a teens, anyway. Headquarters has secret entrances, a crime lab, and a private phone line with an answering machine (quite a luxury when the stories were written).
11th Jun '17 9:39:22 PM alanh
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* ElaborateUndergroundBase: For a teens, anyway. Headquarters has secret entrances, a crime lab, and a private phone line with an answering machine (quite a luxury when the stories were written).
3rd Feb '17 7:59:20 AM Ingonyama
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* DyingClue: A few of the riddles or searches for lost treasure involve one of these. The Chumash Hoard's hiding place is revealed by the FamousLastWords of Chief Magnus Verde, while the delirious Joshua Cameron of ''Shrinking House'' babbled a message for [[spoiler:Marechal]] about the hiding place of the lost Fortunard. Don Sebastian Alvaro of ''Headless Horse'', dying in a cave after the American deserters hunted him down, left one on the wall next to him that was particularly cryptic, but inspired: "Ashes Dust Rain Ocean", meaning that like everything else in life, the Cortes Sword had gone back to where it began...

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* DyingClue: A few of the riddles or searches for lost treasure involve one of these. The Chumash Hoard's hiding place in ''Laughing Shadow'' is revealed by the FamousLastWords of Chief Magnus Verde, while the delirious Joshua Cameron of ''Shrinking House'' babbled a message for [[spoiler:Marechal]] about the hiding place of the lost Fortunard. Don Sebastian Alvaro of ''Headless Horse'', dying in a cave after the American deserters hunted him down, left one on the wall next to him that was particularly cryptic, but inspired: "Ashes Dust Rain Ocean", meaning that like everything else in life, the Cortes Sword had gone back to where it began...
3rd Feb '17 12:00:51 AM Ingonyama
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** By {{Irony}}, the very thing the Investigators need to get around Southern California, the Rolls-Royce, is also so conspicuous it allows the villains (and Skinny Norris) to know what they're doing and where they've been, as they discover right away in ''Stuttering Parrot'' and again in ''Fiery Eye''. They also discover that the Ghost-to-Ghost Hookup, while it allows them to learn information quickly, draws attention to itself too and can allow people they don't want to know about it (like Skinny) to be tipped off thanks to a friend of a friend. The issue with the Rolls-Royce is dealt with by using the car as a decoy on several occasions while they go to their real destination in one of the salvage yard trucks (although this solution and the problem it addressed never came up again in later books, except once when Worthington uses his own car to following the fellowship to Torrente Canyon in ''Singing Serpent''). The Ghost-to-Ghost Hookup problem quietly vanishes altogether, although it isn't used in many of the books after Arthur's death.

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** By {{Irony}}, the very thing the Investigators need to get around Southern California, the Rolls-Royce, is also so conspicuous it allows the villains (and Skinny Norris) to know what they're doing and where they've been, as they discover right away in ''Stuttering Parrot'' and again in ''Fiery Eye''. They also discover that the Ghost-to-Ghost Hookup, while it allows them to learn information quickly, draws attention to itself too and can allow people they don't want to know about it (like Skinny) to be tipped off thanks to a friend of a friend. The issue with the Rolls-Royce is dealt with by using the car as a decoy on several occasions while they go to their real destination in one of the salvage yard trucks (although this solution and the problem it addressed never came up again in later books, except once when Worthington uses his own car to following follow the fellowship to Torrente Canyon in ''Singing Serpent''). The Ghost-to-Ghost Hookup problem quietly vanishes altogether, although it isn't used in many of the books after Arthur's death.
28th Jan '17 1:22:05 AM Ingonyama
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* CloudCuckoolander: A number of these appear throughout the series whether as clients, witnesses, or clue bearers. Irma Waggoner from ''Stuttering Parrot'' (who is almost a bird-owning version of the CrazyCatLady), Miss Agawam from ''Vanishing Treasure'', Imogene Taylor from ''Screaming Clock'' (who can't find her spectacles after pushing them up on her forehead), and Mrs. Darnley from ''Haunted Mirror'' are prime examples. Miss Maureen Melody of ''Two-Toed Pigeon'' is...sweet and kind, but very strange. She also seems unable to understand why her neighbors would not enjoy being next door to grounds filled with birds that sing constantly.

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* CloudCuckoolander: A number of these appear throughout the series whether as clients, witnesses, or clue bearers. Irma Waggoner from ''Stuttering Parrot'' (who is almost a bird-owning version of the CrazyCatLady), Miss Agawam from ''Vanishing Treasure'', Imogene Taylor from ''Screaming Clock'' (who can't find her spectacles after pushing them up on her forehead), Aunt Pat from ''Singing Serpent'', and Mrs. Darnley from ''Haunted Mirror'' are prime examples. Miss Maureen Melody of ''Two-Toed Pigeon'' is...sweet and kind, but very strange. She also seems unable to understand why her neighbors would not enjoy being next door to grounds filled with birds that sing constantly.
21st Jan '17 5:10:13 AM Ingonyama
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* WellDoneSonGuy: Jim Clay of ''Dancing Devil'' turns out to be this [[spoiler:and it's why he pretends to destroy the Dancing Devil, so his father can keep the thing he treasures so much]]. William Margon of ''Smashing Glass'' claims to be this (his actions being done "just to make you proud") but his father calls him on it, saying he instead wanted to impress him, make money, and be important.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheThreeInvestigators