History Literature / RedMarsTrilogy

12th Feb '16 3:35:57 PM pittsburghmuggle
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* LatexSpaceSuits: The "mesh suits" worn by the colonists in ''Red Mars'', though it's an extrapolation of real-world research into the effort rather than {{Fanservice}}. They provide pressurization, but the person has to wear cold-weather gear ''over'' it because it has no other protections.

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* LatexSpaceSuits: LatexSpaceSuit: The "mesh suits" worn by the colonists in ''Red Mars'', though it's an extrapolation of real-world research into the effort rather than {{Fanservice}}. They provide pressurization, but the person has to wear cold-weather gear ''over'' it because it has no other protections.
27th Dec '15 8:36:01 PM Exxolon
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The ''Red Mars'' trilogy is a series of novels by sci-fi author Kim Stanley Robinson. It explores the settlement and subsequent {{terraform}}ing of Mars over the course of nearly two centuries. The series is known for its accurate science, complex characters, realistic portrayals of politics and economics, and for its ultimately optimistic tone, shading towards a utopia rather than a {{dystopia}}.

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The ''Red Mars'' '''''Red Mars''''' trilogy is a series of novels by sci-fi author Kim Stanley Robinson. It explores the settlement and subsequent {{terraform}}ing of Mars over the course of nearly two centuries. The series is known for its accurate science, complex characters, realistic portrayals of politics and economics, and for its ultimately optimistic tone, shading towards a utopia rather than a {{dystopia}}.
14th Dec '15 2:23:22 PM SWNT
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* AllegoricalCharacter: Many:
** Sax in many portions of the story represents science itself. At one point he pretends to be someone he is not and literally gets into bed with the character who represents short-sighted corporate business interests in order to be able to do more scientific work, with disastrous consequences.
** Hiroko represents love, spirituality, wholeness, and harmony with the world. This is reflected both in her in-story role as a kind of religious leader, and in more subtle ways such as her (unmatched and effortless) ability to perfectly balance out her rotation with that of the spaceship to leap straight down the central shaft in the shaft-leaping game, or a moment in which Frank, a spiritually hollow character, tries in vain to recall her face as it "turns away from him" in his mind. Her periods of absence from the other characters become an allegory for an absence of spiritual wholeness, for which some of them are prompted to search frustratedly.

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* AllegoricalCharacter: Many:
Several:
** Sax in many portions of the story represents science itself. At one point he pretends to be someone he is not and literally gets into bed with the character who represents short-sighted corporate business interests in order to be able to do more (corporate-funded) scientific work, with work; this has disastrous consequences.
** Hiroko represents love, spirituality, wholeness, and harmony with the world. This is reflected both in her in-story role as a kind of religious leader, and in more subtle ways such as her (unmatched and effortless) ability to perfectly balance out her rotation with that of the spaceship to leap straight down the central shaft in the shaft-leaping game, or a moment in which Frank, a spiritually hollow character, tries in vain to recall her face as it "turns away from him" in his mind. Her periods of absence from the other characters become an allegory for an absence of spiritual wholeness, for which some of them are prompted to search frustratedly.
14th Dec '15 2:18:35 PM SWNT
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Added DiffLines:

* AllegoricalCharacter: Many:
** Sax in many portions of the story represents science itself. At one point he pretends to be someone he is not and literally gets into bed with the character who represents short-sighted corporate business interests in order to be able to do more scientific work, with disastrous consequences.
** Hiroko represents love, spirituality, wholeness, and harmony with the world. This is reflected both in her in-story role as a kind of religious leader, and in more subtle ways such as her (unmatched and effortless) ability to perfectly balance out her rotation with that of the spaceship to leap straight down the central shaft in the shaft-leaping game, or a moment in which Frank, a spiritually hollow character, tries in vain to recall her face as it "turns away from him" in his mind. Her periods of absence from the other characters become an allegory for an absence of spiritual wholeness, for which some of them are prompted to search frustratedly.
14th Dec '15 12:30:42 PM SWNT
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** Much attention is also paid to the contentious relationship between Sax, a terraforming proponent and biologist, and Ann, a geologist who wants to keep Mars just as it is. They represent opposite sides of a philosophical debate about whether Humanity or Nature should be seen as the ultimate source of beauty and goodness in the universe, and this is reflected by their attitudes toward other people (Anne is quite misanthropic, while Sax starts out overly-optimistic and naive about the destructive drives and political complexity of mankind).

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** Much attention is also paid to the contentious relationship between Sax, a terraforming proponent and biologist, and Ann, a geologist who wants to keep Mars just as it is. They represent opposite sides of a philosophical debate about whether Humanity or Nature should be seen as the ultimate source of beauty and goodness in the universe, and this is reflected by their attitudes toward other people (Anne is quite misanthropic, while Sax starts out overly-optimistic and naive about the destructive drives drives, irrationality, and political complexity of mankind).
14th Dec '15 12:29:38 PM SWNT
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** In the later part of the series, much attention is also paid to the contentious relationship between Sax, a terraforming proponent and biologist, and Ann, a geologist who wants to keep Mars just as it is.

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** In the later part of the series, much Much attention is also paid to the contentious relationship between Sax, a terraforming proponent and biologist, and Ann, a geologist who wants to keep Mars just as it is.is. They represent opposite sides of a philosophical debate about whether Humanity or Nature should be seen as the ultimate source of beauty and goodness in the universe, and this is reflected by their attitudes toward other people (Anne is quite misanthropic, while Sax starts out overly-optimistic and naive about the destructive drives and political complexity of mankind).
14th Dec '15 12:21:25 PM SWNT
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** The example that helps characterize the entire series is the relationship between John Boone and Frank Chalmers. Early on, a segment told from Frank's perspective shows that he and John have completely opposite ways of doing things: John is charismatic and easygoing, and gets what he wants by getting people to go along with him, while Frank is intensely driven, but equally intensely temperamental and fierce. Few of his colleagues really like him, and he tends to achieve his aims through a combination of tireless, ceaseless effort and withering vitriol (the better to subdue political and professional rivals). Even after [[spoiler: they both die, John at the beginning of Red Mars and Frank at the end]], they are continually referred to by other characters, as their social philosophies basically embody the major social conflict in Martian life. Frank believed that most people were stupid, weak, and afraid to make hard choices, obliging people like him to take control (through dishonorable means, if necessary) and use the status quo for the greater good, even if it meant working with the transnationals to help keep their depredations under control. John believed that Mars was a chance for people to take what was best from all Terran cultures and create something new and worthwhile, and that the domination of the transnationals should be opposed because it stifled peoples' attempts to make new lives and societies for themselves.

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** The example that helps characterize the entire series is the relationship between John Boone and Frank Chalmers. Early on, a segment told from Frank's perspective shows that he and John have completely opposite ways of doing things: John is charismatic and easygoing, and gets what he wants by getting people to go along with him, while Frank is intensely driven, but equally intensely temperamental and fierce. Few of his colleagues really like him, and he tends to achieve his aims through a combination of tireless, ceaseless effort effort, a complex web of lies, and withering vitriol (the better to subdue political and professional rivals). Even after [[spoiler: they both die, John at the beginning of Red Mars and Frank at the end]], they are continually referred to by other characters, as their social philosophies basically embody the major social conflict in Martian life. Frank believed that most people were stupid, weak, and afraid to make hard choices, obliging people like him to take control (through dishonorable means, if necessary) and use the status quo for the greater good, even if it meant working with the transnationals to help keep their depredations under control. John believed that Mars was a chance for people to take what was best from all Terran cultures and create something new and worthwhile, and that the domination of the transnationals should be opposed because it stifled peoples' attempts to make new lives and societies for themselves.
14th Dec '15 12:15:16 PM SWNT
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** Nirgal, especially as a child, thinks of the world as "the white and the green".

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** Nirgal, especially as a child, thinks of the world as "the white green and the green".white".
25th Nov '15 8:18:08 PM zrice03
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* SpaceElevator: Mars gets one first; by the end of the trilogy, Earth also has several.

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* SpaceElevator: Mars gets one first; by first, and it's promptly destroyed in the revolution less than a year after starting operations. It later gets a second one which stays intact. By the end of the trilogy, Earth also has several.at least ten.
15th Nov '15 1:49:36 PM SWNT
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** Coyote's real name, Desmond, means "of the world", which aptly describes his personality and social style; he goes everywhere, knows everyone, and comes closest to "living off the land" that anyone can on Mars.

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** Coyote's real name, Desmond, means "of the world", which aptly describes his personality and social style; he goes everywhere, knows everyone, and comes closest to "living off the land" that anyone can on Mars. The nickname Coyote is, probably in-universe, a reference to a Native American trickster spirit.
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