History Literature / MarcusDidiusFalco

8th Aug '17 10:32:02 PM MadCormorant
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* DatedHistory: While Davis's unsavory depiction of Domitian is internally consistent, its historical foundations have been superseded by more recent research. The main problem is that basically all the sources about Domitian's reign were written after the fact by people who had bones to pick with him--aristocrats of the senatorial class like Suetonius or Pliny the Elder, with whom Domitian had notoriously poor relations--while the positive contemporaneous accounts by poets like Statius and Martial were considered no more than acts of brown-nosing (which, to be fair, they were). The negative accounts were essentially believed without question for centuries. More recent archaeological and historical studies indicate that Domitian's reign marked a period of financial stability thanks to the man's tight grip on economic policy (it is noted that coinage of the era are of particularly good quality in comparison to what came before and after), which laid the groundwork for the later prosperity of the Nerva-Antonine dynasty, and that Domitian was pragmatic enough to not pursue aggressive war policies which might have unnecessarily burdened the state (though this made him rather unpopular with the traditionalists of the upper classes). The common people and the troops generally seemed to have liked him, thanks to his reintroduction/promotion of various public festivities, his visits to the front, and his gifts/donatives to the public and the military--in fact, a group officers of the Praetorian Guard eventually forced Nerva to put his killers to death. The modern, revisionist view paints Domitian as an autocratic but benevolent despot, whose flaws included ControlFreak tendencies, paranoia, an inability to appease the senatorial classes, and an unfortunate penchance to celebrate military victories too early.

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* DatedHistory: While Davis's unsavory depiction of Domitian is internally consistent, its historical foundations have been superseded by more recent research. The main problem is that basically all the sources about Domitian's reign were written after the fact by people who had bones to pick with him--aristocrats of the senatorial class like Suetonius or Pliny the Elder, with whom Domitian had notoriously poor relations--while the positive contemporaneous accounts by poets like Statius and Martial were considered no more than acts of brown-nosing (which, to be fair, they were). The negative accounts were essentially believed without question for centuries. More recent archaeological and historical studies indicate that Domitian's reign marked a period of financial stability thanks to the man's tight grip on economic policy (it is noted that coinage of the era are of particularly good quality in comparison to what came before and after), which laid the groundwork for the later prosperity of the Nerva-Antonine dynasty, and that Domitian was pragmatic enough to not pursue aggressive war policies which might have unnecessarily burdened the state (though this made him rather unpopular with the traditionalists of the upper classes). The common people and the troops generally seemed to have liked him, thanks to his reintroduction/promotion of various public festivities, his visits to the front, and his gifts/donatives to the public and the military--in fact, a group of officers of the Praetorian Guard eventually forced Nerva to put his killers to death. The modern, revisionist view paints Domitian as an autocratic but benevolent despot, whose flaws included ControlFreak tendencies, paranoia, an inability to appease the senatorial classes, and an unfortunate penchance to celebrate military victories too early.
8th Aug '17 10:30:10 PM MadCormorant
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* DatedHistory: While Davis's unsavory depiction of Domitian is internally consistent, its historical foundations have been superseded by more recent research. The main problem is that basically all the sources about Domitian's reign were written after the fact by people who had bones to pick with him--aristocrats of the senatorial class like Suetonius or Pliny the Elder, with whom Domitian had notoriously poor relations--while the positive contemporaneous accounts by poets like Statius and Martial were considered no more than acts of brown-nosing (which, to be fair, they were). The negative accounts were essentially believed without question for centuries. More recent archaeological and historical studies indicate that Domitian's reign marked a period of financial stability thanks to the man's tight grip on economic policy (it is noted that coinage of the era are of particularly good quality in comparison to what came before and after), which laid the groundwork for the later prosperity of the Nerva-Antonine dynasty, and that Domitian was pragmatic enough to not pursue aggressive war policies which might have unnecessarily burdened the state (though this made him rather unpopular with the traditionalists of the upper classes). The common people and the troops generally seemed to have liked him, thanks to his reintroduction/promotion of various public festivities, his visits to the front, and his gifts/donatives to the public and the military--in fact, a group officers of the Praetorian Guard eventually forced Nerva to put his killers to death. The modern, revisionist view paints Domitian as an autocratic but benevolent despot, whose flaws included ControlFreak tendencies, paranoia, an inability to appease the senatorial classes, and an unfortunate penchance to celebrate military victories too early.
14th Jul '17 7:56:29 AM JackG
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''The Silver Pigs'' was loosely adapted into a movie '' Age of Treason'' (1993), with Austalian actor Bryan Brown playing Falco. Lindsey Davis has publicly disowned the film on her website, stating that "It departed from everything that I think makes the books special."

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''The Silver Pigs'' was loosely adapted into a movie '' Age of Treason'' (1993), with Austalian actor Bryan Brown playing Falco. Lindsey Davis has publicly disowned the film on her website, stating that "It departed from everything that I think makes the books special."
Falco.
14th Jul '17 7:55:40 AM JackG
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''The Silver Pigs'' was loosely adapted into a movie '' Age of Treason'' (1993), with Austalian actor Bryan Brown playing Falco. Lindsey Davis has publicly disowned the film on her website, stating that "It departed from everything that I think makes the books special."
14th Jul '17 1:57:30 AM Naresh
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** Davis has admitted to quite a lot of what she calls "tribute plagiarism" of authors she respects, most notably Sir Terry Pratchett. Examples of Discworld homage in the books are too numerous to inventory, but include Heron's steam-engine (''Small Gods''), the character of Zoilus, who flaps around the cemetery in a sheet pretending to be dead (Felmet in ''Wyrd Sisters''), the policeman who turns up at the Saturnalia party dressed as a six-foot carrot; the three witches, one of whom is indisposed because of having to babysit the grandchildren; Alexandria University, where [[spoiler: academics try to gain promotion by killing off the men senior to them, sometimes with the assistance of sacred crocodiles]] (''Pyramids''); and do feel free to add more examples. There are [[http://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Reverse_Annotations#Lindsey_Davis.27_.22Falco.22 plenty]].

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** Davis has admitted to quite a lot of what she calls "tribute plagiarism" of authors she respects, most notably Sir Terry Pratchett. Examples of Discworld homage in the books are too numerous to inventory, but include Heron's steam-engine (''Small Gods''), the character of Zoilus, who flaps around the cemetery in a sheet pretending to be dead (Felmet in ''Wyrd Sisters''), the policeman who turns up at the Saturnalia party dressed as a six-foot carrot; the three witches, one of whom is indisposed because of having to babysit the grandchildren; Alexandria University, where [[spoiler: academics try to gain promotion by killing off the men senior to them, sometimes with the assistance of sacred crocodiles]] (''Pyramids''); and do feel free to add more examples. There are [[http://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Reverse_Annotations#Lindsey_Davis.27_.22Falco.22 plenty]].
11th Jun '17 12:20:48 PM nombretomado
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* SerialKiller: ''Three Hands in the Fountain'' involves the search for a [[WomenInRefrigerators killer of women]] who strikes during festivals, dumping their dismembered bodies in Rome's [[AbsurdlySpaciousSewer formidable aqueduct system]].

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* SerialKiller: ''Three Hands in the Fountain'' involves the search for a [[WomenInRefrigerators killer of women]] women who strikes during festivals, dumping their dismembered bodies in Rome's [[AbsurdlySpaciousSewer formidable aqueduct system]].
20th Jan '17 4:10:54 AM Zadia
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It has a pseudo-prequel, ''The Course Of Honour'' (1998), in which a young man called Vespasian climbs to the very top of the ladder and founds the Flavian dynasty of emperors. It also has what could be described as a grim footnote to the series, ''Master and God'' (2012) in which the reign of Emperor Titus ends prematurely and the second Flavian prince, Domitian, takes over as Emperor, goes insane, and the Flavian dynasty ends in his assassination. Then again, Davis wrote Domitian as the flaky, murderous one as far back in the series as ''Shadows In Bronze'' (1990), so it's not too surprising...

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It has a pseudo-prequel, ''The Course Of Honour'' (1998), in which a young man called Vespasian climbs to the very top of the ladder and founds the Flavian dynasty of emperors. It also has what could be described as a grim footnote to the series, ''Master and God'' (2012) in which the reign of Emperor Titus ends prematurely and the second Flavian prince, Domitian, takes over as Emperor, goes insane, and the Flavian dynasty ends in his assassination. Then again, Davis wrote Domitian as the flaky, murderous one as far back in the series as ''Shadows In Bronze'' (1990), ''The Silver Pigs'' (1989), so it's not too surprising...
6th Nov '16 7:51:00 PM dlchen145
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* TestosteronePoisoning: Falco's description of an uber-[[Main/{{Badass}} badass]] athlete, Milo of Croton, from ''Shadows in Bronze'':

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* TestosteronePoisoning: Falco's description of an uber-[[Main/{{Badass}} badass]] uber-badass athlete, Milo of Croton, from ''Shadows in Bronze'':
6th May '16 11:44:52 PM ArcaneAzmadi
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* EverybodyDidIt: A varient in ''Venus in Copper'' when the landlord Novus is murdered with poison. It turns out that [[spoiler:all the suspects independently ''tried'' to murder him -his own family with a poisoned cake, his business rival with poisoned spices to be added to the wine- but the actual murderer was his fiance, who poisoned the plate the cakes were served on, knowing that gluttonous Novus would lick the plate clean once the meal was done. As a bonus, she sabotaged the efforts of the other would-be assassins by removing the poisoned cake from the platter beforehand, because she hated Novus so much she couldn't stand to have anyone other than her kill him.]]
19th Apr '16 11:49:14 AM erforce
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* ShoutOut: In one novel, Falco strikes up a conversation with a group of Judean refugees who offer him a commission to retrieve one of their holy relics. At first, Falco is afraid that they want him to "raid" the treasures brought back after the Roman conquest. However, they then tell Falco that they want him to look for a "Lost Ark." Falco demurs, and tells that [[IndianaJones someone more of a daredevil then he]] would have to perform that particular quest...

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* ShoutOut: In one novel, Falco strikes up a conversation with a group of Judean refugees who offer him a commission to retrieve one of their holy relics. At first, Falco is afraid that they want him to "raid" the treasures brought back after the Roman conquest. However, they then tell Falco that they want him to look for a "Lost Ark." Falco demurs, and tells that [[IndianaJones [[Franchise/IndianaJones someone more of a daredevil then he]] would have to perform that particular quest...
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