History Literature / Gor

14th Aug '16 6:25:24 PM Willbyr
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* SplitHair: Blades are frequently described as being "so sharp it would cut a piece of silk dropped on it."
11th Jul '16 4:00:39 PM nombretomado
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* SkyFace: ''Beasts of Gor'': When the Kur SupervillainLair explodes Tarl sees an image of Zarendargar in the sky. Done via technology in imitation of the Northern Lights.
11th Jul '16 3:52:20 PM nombretomado
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* DeadlyEnvironmentPrison: In ''Tribesmen of Gor'', the salt mines of Klima are staffed entirely by male slaves. There are no guards, and you're free to leave at any time. But it's surrounded by hundreds of square miles of desert, and canteens are limited to small sizes; you'd die of thirst & exposure if you try to leave.
3rd Jul '16 6:00:53 PM nombretomado
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* SpareAMessenger: In ''Blood Brothers of Gor'' after a war between fantasy counterpart American Indians and cowboys, three "cowboy" privates chosen by drawing lots are allowed to go back home to bring word of the defeat while the others are reduced to slavery.
23rd Jun '16 10:56:49 AM Willbyr
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Two films based on the ''Gor'' series were adapted into sword & sorcery films in the late Eighties, ''Gor'' (1987) and ''Outlaw of Gor'' (1989). Loosely adapted from the first two books, the films depict professor Tarl Cabot's adventures after being magically transported to Gor. For better or worse, the films {{Bowdlerize}}d the sex-slavery aspect. This is by no means the only instance of a movie bearing no resemblance (save a few names) to the book that supposedly inspired it, but it is a particularly egregious example from the word "sorcery" onwards.

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Two films based on the ''Gor'' series were adapted into sword & sorcery films in the late Eighties, ''Gor'' (1987) and ''Outlaw of Gor'' (1989). Loosely adapted from the first two books, the films depict professor Tarl Cabot's adventures after being magically transported to Gor. For better or worse, the films {{Bowdlerize}}d [[AdaptationalModesty toned down the sex-slavery aspect.aspect]]. This is by no means the only instance of a movie bearing no resemblance (save a few names) to the book that supposedly inspired it, but it is a particularly egregious example from the word "sorcery" onwards.
4th May '16 4:06:19 PM nombretomado
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* PublicExecution: In ''Assassin of {{Gor}}'', Tarl is put into a gladiatorial combat situation where everyone is supposed to be blindfolded, but in reality everyone else in the "tournament" can see through their blindfolds. Note that at that time in the series it was still heavily influenced by the Literature/{{Barsoom}} series.

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* PublicExecution: In ''Assassin of {{Gor}}'', Gor'', Tarl is put into a gladiatorial combat situation where everyone is supposed to be blindfolded, but in reality everyone else in the "tournament" can see through their blindfolds. Note that at that time in the series it was still heavily influenced by the Literature/{{Barsoom}} series.
4th May '16 4:06:01 PM nombretomado
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* NudityEqualsHonesty: One of the many excuses used to strip slave girls naked in the Literature/{{Gor}} novels. There's an occasional narrative explanation to the effect that nudity both makes it more difficult for a slave to conceal physical objects and also makes it more difficult for a slave to lie. In a variant, it's also frequently pointed out that slave girls are customarily sold naked in order to enforce the honesty of the ''dealer''.

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* NudityEqualsHonesty: One of the many excuses used to strip slave girls naked in the Literature/{{Gor}} Gor novels. There's an occasional narrative explanation to the effect that nudity both makes it more difficult for a slave to conceal physical objects and also makes it more difficult for a slave to lie. In a variant, it's also frequently pointed out that slave girls are customarily sold naked in order to enforce the honesty of the ''dealer''.
2nd Nov '15 12:34:46 AM SeptimusHeap
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Two films based on the ''Gor'' series were adapted into sword & sorcery films in the late Eighties, ''Gor'' (1987) and ''Outlaw of Gor'' (1989). Loosely adapted from the first two books, the films depict professor Tarl Cabotsí adventures after being magically transported to Gor. For better or worse, the films {{Bowdlerize}}d the sex-slavery aspect. This is by no means the only instance of a movie bearing no resemblance (save a few names) to the book that supposedly inspired it, but it is a particularly egregious example from the word "sorcery" onwards.

to:

Two films based on the ''Gor'' series were adapted into sword & sorcery films in the late Eighties, ''Gor'' (1987) and ''Outlaw of Gor'' (1989). Loosely adapted from the first two books, the films depict professor Tarl Cabotsí Cabot's adventures after being magically transported to Gor. For better or worse, the films {{Bowdlerize}}d the sex-slavery aspect. This is by no means the only instance of a movie bearing no resemblance (save a few names) to the book that supposedly inspired it, but it is a particularly egregious example from the word "sorcery" onwards.



* AdaptationSpeciesChange: In ''Tarnsman of Gor'' Cabot rides a tarn, which is a [[GiantFlyer giant bird]]; in other books of the series people also ride [[HorseOfADifferentColor tharlarion and kailla]], which are land animals. In the films ''Gor'' and ''Outlaw of Gor'', people ride horses.



* DrawAggro: In Priest-Kings of Gor Parp, Vika (his daughter) and Tarl are trying to escape the Collapsing Lair of the Priest-Kings, only to be met by two larls (basically, tigers the size of a small elephant). Parp flames one with his pipe-lighter, using up all its energy in one go, then asks Tarl to confirm that he can kill a larl with his sword if he is given a free shot at it. Tarl agrees that it's possible - and Parp gives him that free shot by flinging himself into the monster's jaws.

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* DrawAggro: In Priest-Kings ''Priest-Kings of Gor Gor'' Parp, Vika (his daughter) and Tarl are trying to escape the Collapsing Lair CollapsingLair of the Priest-Kings, only to be met by two larls (basically, tigers the size of a small elephant). Parp flames one with his pipe-lighter, using up all its energy in one go, then asks Tarl to confirm that he can kill a larl with his sword if he is given a free shot at it. Tarl agrees that it's possible - and Parp gives him that free shot by [[PapaBear flinging himself into the monster's jaws. jaws.]]



* LongRunningBookSeries: The first Gor book, ''Tarnsman of Gor'', was published in 1966, the most recent one (''Conspirators of Gor'') in 2012. As of September 2012, there are 31 novels, 3 omnibus editions, and 3 short works (a short story, a novella, and a novelette).

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* LongRunningBookSeries: The first Gor book, ''Tarnsman of Gor'', was published in 1966, the most recent one (''Conspirators (''Rebels of Gor'') in 2012. 2013. As of September 2012, October 2015, there are 31 33 novels, 3 omnibus editions, and 3 short works (a short story, a novella, and a novelette).



* PapaBear: Towards the end of ''Priest-Kings of Gor'', Tarl is escaping from the ruined Nest with his girl of the moment, Vika of Treve, and her silly little father, Parp the fake Priest-King. Their way is barred by two fierce larls - lion-like creatures about half the size of an elephant. Parp flames one with his pipe-lighter, using up all its energy in one go, then asks Tarl to confirm that he can kill a larl with his sword if he is given a free shot at it. Tarl agrees that it's possible - and Parp gives him that free shot by ''flinging himself into the monster's jaws''.

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* PapaBear: Towards the end of ''Priest-Kings of Gor'', Tarl is escaping from the ruined Nest with his girl of the moment, Vika of Treve, and her silly little father, Parp the fake Priest-King. Their way is barred by two fierce larls - lion-like creatures about half the size of an elephant. Parp flames one with his pipe-lighter, using up all its energy in one go, then asks Tarl to confirm that he can kill a larl with his sword if he is given a free shot at it. Tarl agrees that it's possible - and Parp gives him that free shot by ''flinging ''[[DrawAggro flinging himself into the monster's jaws''.jaws]]''.



* PlanetSpaceship:
** The planet Gor itself can be considered an example, since the Priest-Kings (the PhysicalGods of the planet) moved it to its current location 5 million years ago.
** The Kurii live in "Steel Worlds" in the asteroid belt; from there they plot their plans to destroy the Priest-Kings and take over Gor & Earth for themselves. The Steel Worlds have artificial weather & daytime/nighttime and rotate to simulate gravity, with beings living on the inside circumference of the ships. They used to have a planet of their own but they destroyed it making war with each other.



* PuppetState: In Tribesmen of Gor most of the desert tribes are vassals of either the Aretai or Kavar tribe. So when outsiders stir up trouble between those two tribes the entire desert is preparing for war with each other.

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* PuppetState: In Tribesmen ''Tribesmen of Gor Gor'' most of the desert tribes are vassals of either the Aretai or Kavar tribe. So when outsiders stir up trouble between those two tribes the entire desert is preparing for war with each other.



* SelfDestructMechanism: A minor instance: Tarl's mysterious message in Book One is destroyed after he has read it (and after he has foolishly ignored the instruction to throw it away, which costs him his camping gear). And two much more major instances: in ''Priest-Kings of Gor'', Sarm destroys the power plant in the Nest which very nearly blows Gor to shreds as a result; in ''Beasts of Gor'', Zarendargar "Half-Ear" blows up the Kur outpost in the high arctic (but, in deference to his responsibility to his underlings, allows them time to escape first, for which Tarl calls him "a good officer").
* ShoutOut:

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* SelfDestructMechanism: A minor instance: SelfDestructMechanism:
**
Tarl's mysterious message in Book One is destroyed after he has read it (and after he has foolishly ignored the instruction to throw it away, which costs him his camping gear). And two much more major instances: in gear).
** In
''Priest-Kings of Gor'', Gor'' Sarm destroys the power plant in the Nest which very nearly blows Gor to shreds as a result; in result.
** In
''Beasts of Gor'', Gor'' Zarendargar "Half-Ear" blows up the Kur outpost in the high arctic (but, in deference to his responsibility to his underlings, allows them time to escape first, for which Tarl calls him "a good officer").
* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:



* TheStateless: In ''Outlaw of Gor'', Tarl Cabot is returned to Gor and discovers that his [[LandOfOneCity city-state]] Ko-ro-ba has been destroyed by the Physical Gods of the world and no person from Ko-ro-ba may associate with any other; hence he is literally an outlaw, someone outside the law of any city-state. This situation remains until the end of the third book, at which point Korobans are allowed to rebuild their city.



* UnstoppableRage: Several instances. One arises in ''Raiders of Gor'' after Tarl was captured and enslaved by the Rence Growers in the Vosk marshes. It seemed as though he had just about tired of slavery and was about to bite the bullet when slavers from Port Kar attacked the Rencers and [[BerserkButton killed a small boy]] who had been kind to him. Tarl spends the next few days trailing the slow-moving slave barge and mercilessly picking off the slavers one by one with his bow. In ''Hunters of Gor'' Tarl, after delivering a speech about how he lost his honour in the marshes, and cannot regain it, nevertheless sometimes recollects it, takes on fifty armed men single-handed. Then in ''Marauders of Gor'' Tarl begins the story crippled by a paralysing poison for which there is no known cure, until the news reaches him that his ''amour du jour'' Telima has been carried off by the Kurii. The ensuing rage sustains him through several months of adventure - at the climax of which, all the fighting men of Torvaldsland unleash an UnstoppableRage of their own.

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* UnstoppableRage: Several instances. One arises in UnstoppableRage:
** In
''Raiders of Gor'' after Tarl was captured and enslaved by the Rence Growers in the Vosk marshes. It seemed as though he had just about tired of slavery and was about to bite the bullet when slavers from Port Kar attacked the Rencers and [[BerserkButton killed a small boy]] boy who had been kind to him. Tarl spends the next few days trailing the slow-moving slave barge and mercilessly picking off the slavers one by one with his bow. bow.
**
In ''Hunters of Gor'' Tarl, after delivering a speech about how he lost his honour in the marshes, and cannot regain it, nevertheless sometimes recollects it, takes on fifty armed men single-handed. Then in single-handed.
** In
''Marauders of Gor'' Tarl begins the story crippled by a paralysing poison for which there is no known cure, until the news reaches him that his ''amour amour du jour'' jour Telima has been carried off by the Kurii. The ensuing rage sustains him through several months of adventure - at the climax of which, all the fighting men of Torvaldsland unleash an UnstoppableRage Unstoppable Rage of their own.



* AdaptationSpeciesChange: In ''Tarnsman of Gor'' Cabot rides a tarn, which is a [[GiantFlyer giant bird]]; in other books of the series people also ride [[HorseOfADifferentColor tharlarion and kailla]], which are land animals. In the films ''Gor'' and ''Outlaw of Gor'', people ride horses.



* CaliforniaDoubling: As Crow points out, "Gor" is quite obviously Iowa in some scenes.

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* CaliforniaDoubling: As Crow points out, "Gor" ''Gor'' is quite obviously Iowa in some scenes.



-->'''Mike and The Bots''': It's an arealogical, autoerotical, toobular boobular joy!



* HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday: Watney. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by Servo in the [=MST3K=] version.
* HeyItsThatGuy:
** Jack Palance in ''Outlaw of Gor''. This was between ''Franchise/RipleysBelieveItOrNot'' and ''Film/CitySlickers''.
** Besides Jack Palance, there's the screenplay writer...
-->'''Servo:''' (singing) [[Franchise/FuManchu Har-ry Al-len]] ''[[Franchise/FuManchu Towers!!!]]''



* PlanetSpaceship:
** The planet Gor itself can be considered an example, since the Priest-Kings (the PhysicalGods of the planet) moved it to its current location 5 million years ago.
** The Kurii live in "Steel Worlds" in the asteroid belt; from there they plot their plans to destroy the Priest-Kings and take over Gor & Earth for themselves. The Steel Worlds have artificial weather & daytime/nighttime and rotate to simulate gravity, with beings living on the inside circumference of the ships. They used to have a planet of their own but they destroyed it making war with each other.



-->'''Servo:''' Oh geez, now she's trying to sleep her way to the ''bottom.''
* TheStateless: In ''Outlaw of Gor'', Tarl Cabot is returned to Gor and discovers that his [[LandOfOneCity city-state]] Ko-ro-ba has been destroyed by the Physical Gods of the world and no person from Ko-ro-ba may associate with any other; hence he is literally an outlaw, someone outside the law of any city-state. This situation remains until the end of the third book, at which point Korobans are allowed to rebuild their city.
* ThrowingYourSwordAlwaysWorks: "Oh, thank you! I'll just stab myself here."
1st Nov '15 1:15:24 AM SeptimusHeap
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* DrawAggro: In Priest-Kings of Gor Parp, Vika (his daughter) and Tarl are trying to escape the Collapsing Lair of the Priest-Kings, only to be met by two larls (basically, tigers the size of a small elephant). Parp flames one with his pipe-lighter, using up all its energy in one go, then asks Tarl to confirm that he can kill a larl with his sword if he is given a free shot at it. Tarl agrees that it's possible - and Parp gives him that free shot by flinging himself into the monster's jaws.
29th Sep '15 3:16:22 AM SeptimusHeap
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* NudityEqualsHonesty: One of the many excuses used to strip slave girls naked in the Literature/{{Gor}} novels. There's an occasional narrative explanation to the effect that nudity both makes it more difficult for a slave to conceal physical objects and also makes it more difficult for a slave to lie. In a variant, it's also frequently pointed out that slave girls are customarily sold naked in order to enforce the honesty of the ''dealer''.
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