History Literature / DeadSouls

20th Jun '17 11:32:31 AM Lawman592
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* AffluentAscetic/TheScrooge: Plyushkin, who owns several hundred souls, but lives as cheap as a beggar. Chichikov also doesn't like giving away money.


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* TheScrooge: Plyushkin, who [[AffluentAscetic owns several hundred souls, but lives as cheap as a beggar.]] Chichikov also doesn't like giving away money.
20th Jun '17 11:30:27 AM Lawman592
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* AffluentAscetic/TheScrooge: Plyushkin, who owns several hundred souls, but lives as cheap as a beggar. Chichikov also doesn't like giving away money.



* TheScrooge: Plyushkin, who owns several hundred souls, but lives as cheap as a beggar. Chichikov also doesn't like giving away money.
27th Jan '17 12:24:53 AM Xtifr
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'''''Dead Souls''''' is the most famous novel by Russian author Creator/NikolaiGogol. It tells the story of the ambitious guy Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov, who had an idea for a great scam.

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'''''Dead Souls''''' ''Dead Souls'' is the most famous novel by Russian author Creator/NikolaiGogol. It tells the story of the ambitious guy Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov, who had an idea for a great scam.
25th Dec '16 8:03:44 AM Gosicrystal
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* PlotHole: In this case just because parts of the second half of the novel are literally missing, since Gogol originally wanted to destroy the text. Sadly, the complete story is now LostForever.

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* PlotHole: In this case just because parts of the second half of the novel are literally missing, since Gogol originally wanted to destroy the text. Sadly, the complete story is now LostForever.lost forever.
1st Nov '16 4:17:45 AM Mhazard
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Not to confuse with ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''

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Not to confuse with ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''''VideoGame/DarkSouls''.
1st Nov '16 4:17:37 AM Mhazard
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Added DiffLines:


Not to confuse with ''VideoGame/DarkSouls''
14th Oct '16 1:51:05 PM EllaMegablast
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'''''Dead Souls''''' is the most famous novel by Russian author Creator/NikolaiGogol. It tells the story of the ambitious guy Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov, who had the idea for a great scam.

Background explanation: In feudal Russia, major landowners had to pay a tax according to the number of serfs ("souls") they owned. Said serfs were counted in special revisions, which happened not that often - less than once per decade, even. If during the time between two revisions some of these souls happened to die, bad luck, their owners'd still have to pay the tax as if they were alive. OTOH, they could mortgage the estate, with souls included, to the Russian state. Now Chichikov adds two and two and gets the idea: If he buys up a lot of dead souls - which the squires probably want to get rid of - and mortgages them to the state, he'll acquire a big fortune without hard work or risk. Well, that's the theory. In practice, the buying part alone becomes pretty hard due to the eccentricity of said squires.

to:

'''''Dead Souls''''' is the most famous novel by Russian author Creator/NikolaiGogol. It tells the story of the ambitious guy Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov, who had the an idea for a great scam.

Background explanation: In feudal Russia, major landowners had to pay a tax according to the number of serfs ("souls") (measured as "souls") they owned. Said serfs were counted in special revisions, which happened not that often - rarely, sometimes less than once per decade, even. decade. If during the time between two revisions some of these souls serfs happened to die, bad luck, luck: their owners'd still have to pay the tax as if they were alive. OTOH, On the other hand, they could mortgage the estate, with souls included, to the Russian state. Now Chichikov adds two and two and gets the idea: If he buys up a lot of dead souls - which the squires probably want to get rid of - and mortgages them to the state, he'll acquire make a big fortune without hard work or risk. Well, that's the theory. In practice, the buying part alone becomes pretty hard due to the eccentricity of said squires.



* BlatantLies: When Tyentyetnikov inquires why the harvest was so bad, the serfs claim it was the lack of rain. But even the WideEyedIdealist Tyentyetnikov can't help but notice that apparently the rain happened to fall exclusively on the fields of the serfs, but not on his ones.

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* BlatantLies: When Tyentyetnikov inquires why the harvest was so bad, the serfs claim it was the lack of rain. But even the WideEyedIdealist Tyentyetnikov can't help but notice that apparently the rain happened to fall exclusively on the fields of the serfs, but not on his ones.his.



* ButNotTooForeign: Kostanshoglo is described being not a pure Russian, although he thinks of himself as Russian and doesn't speak foreign languages. Speculation: He may have a Turkish ancestor, since many Turkish names end in -oglu.
* ButtMonkey: Captain Kopeikin
* CloudCuckooLander: Tyentyetnikov, Manilov

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* ButNotTooForeign: Kostanshoglo is described being not a pure Russian, although he thinks of himself as Russian and doesn't speak foreign languages. Speculation: He may have a Turkish ancestor, since many Turkish names end in -oglu.
* ButtMonkey: Captain Kopeikin
Kopeikin.
* CloudCuckooLander: Tyentyetnikov, ManilovManilov.



* DealWithTheDevil: Chichikov definitely invokes this with the whole "buying people's 'souls'" thing and he's a lot like the "devil as small time bureaucrat" / TheDevilIsALoser portrayal in works like ''TheDevilAndDanielWebster'' and ''Literature/TheBrothersKaramazov'' (both post-date this novel, but probably draw from the same idea). In fact, both Chichikov and [[TheDevilAndDanielWebster Scratch]] store their souls in a box - the only difference is that Chichikov's are metaphorical.

to:

* DealWithTheDevil: Chichikov definitely invokes this with the whole "buying people's 'souls'" thing thing, and he's a lot like the "devil as small time bureaucrat" / TheDevilIsALoser portrayal in works like ''TheDevilAndDanielWebster'' and ''Literature/TheBrothersKaramazov'' (both post-date this novel, but probably draw from the same idea). In fact, both Chichikov and [[TheDevilAndDanielWebster Scratch]] store their souls in a box - the only difference is that Chichikov's souls are metaphorical.figurative.



* DoubleEntendre: Sobakevich says that he doesn't eat oysters because he knows what they look like. And by that, he means a certain part of the female anatomy. (He isn't kidding. Oysters were considered aphrodisiaka for this very reason.)

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* DoubleEntendre: Sobakevich says that he doesn't eat oysters because he knows what they look like. And by that, he means a certain part of the female anatomy. (He isn't kidding. Oysters were considered aphrodisiaka aphrodisiacs for this very reason.)



* FoodPorn: The descriptions of the several-courses meals the squires eat.

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* FoodPorn: The descriptions of the several-courses multi-course meals the squires eat.



* {{Foreshadowing}}: In the first chapter the author mentions that Chichikov is able to talk about custom officials "as if he had been one of them". Much later we'll learn that this has indeed been the case - and that he tried a big smuggle operation, which almost would've made him a rich man.

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* {{Foreshadowing}}: In the first chapter the author mentions that Chichikov is able to talk about custom officials "as if he had been one of them". Much later we'll learn that this has indeed been the case - and that he tried a big smuggle smuggling operation, which almost would've made him a rich man.



* IHaveAFamily: Chichikov claims this (and is lying - again), to get a lesser punishment after one of his schemes is discovered. [[spoiler:When he tries this at the end of the book, they don't believe him anymore.]]

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* IHaveAFamily: Chichikov claims this (and is lying - again), lying--again), to get a lesser punishment after one of his schemes is discovered. [[spoiler:When he tries this at the end of the book, they don't believe him anymore.]]



* InsaneTrollLogic: At one point, the narrator muses about it. Like with people who don't believe in {{God}} but are certain that they'll have to die soon when the bridge of their nose is itching.
* KarmaHoudini: [[spoiler:Chichikov fakes the testament of Khlobuyev's rich aunt, is even thrown into prison, but the influential Murayov liberates him with a complicated scheme, and Chichikov can leave the town - although Murayov also told him to change his ways. A somewhat BittersweetEnding.]]

to:

* InsaneTrollLogic: At one point, the narrator muses about on it. Like with people who don't believe in {{God}} but are certain that they'll have to die soon when the bridge of their nose is itching.
* KarmaHoudini: [[spoiler:Chichikov fakes the testament of Khlobuyev's rich aunt, and is even thrown into prison, but the influential Murayov liberates him with a complicated scheme, and Chichikov can leave the town - although town--although Murayov also told him to change his ways. A somewhat BittersweetEnding.]]



* RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething: Kostanshoglo, who works hard to make his village wealthy, while one of his neighbors (Khlobuyev) wastes his money, another one is almost as reality-impaired as Literature/DonQuixote, and the third one only thinks about his next meal.

to:

* RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething: Kostanshoglo, who works hard to make his village wealthy, while one of his neighbors (Khlobuyev) wastes his money, another money. Another one is almost as reality-impaired as Literature/DonQuixote, and the third one only thinks about his next meal.
4th Oct '16 10:48:15 PM Gess
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Background explanation: In feudal Russia, the great landowners had to pay a tax according to the number of serfs ("souls") they owned. Said serfs were counted in special revisions, which happened not that often - less than once per decade, even. If during the time between two revisions some of these souls happened to die, bad luck, their owners'd still have to pay the tax as if they were alive. OTOH, they could mortgage the estate, with souls included, to the Russian state. Now Chichikov adds two and two and gets the idea: If he buys up a lot of dead souls - which the squires probably want to get rid of - and mortgages them to the state, he'll acquire a big fortune without hard work or risk. Well, that's the theory. In practice, the buying part alone becomes pretty hard due to the eccentricity of said squires.

to:

Background explanation: In feudal Russia, the great major landowners had to pay a tax according to the number of serfs ("souls") they owned. Said serfs were counted in special revisions, which happened not that often - less than once per decade, even. If during the time between two revisions some of these souls happened to die, bad luck, their owners'd still have to pay the tax as if they were alive. OTOH, they could mortgage the estate, with souls included, to the Russian state. Now Chichikov adds two and two and gets the idea: If he buys up a lot of dead souls - which the squires probably want to get rid of - and mortgages them to the state, he'll acquire a big fortune without hard work or risk. Well, that's the theory. In practice, the buying part alone becomes pretty hard due to the eccentricity of said squires.
8th Aug '16 7:16:14 AM Silverblade2
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* [[CrazyCatLady Crazy Bird Lady]]: Khlobuyev's rich old aunt, who owns hundreds of canaries. Of course, she is very rich, so this doesn't make her crazy, only eccentric. But quite eccentric.

to:

* [[CrazyCatLady Crazy Bird Lady]]: CrazyCatLady: Khlobuyev's rich old aunt, who owns hundreds of canaries. Of course, she is very rich, so this doesn't make her crazy, only eccentric. But quite eccentric.



* [[spoiler:KarmaHoudini: Chichikov fakes the testament of Khlobuyev's rich aunt, is even thrown into prison, but the influential Murayov liberates him with a complicated scheme, and Chichikov can leave the town - although Murayov also told him to change his ways. A somewhat BittersweetEnding.]]

to:

* [[spoiler:KarmaHoudini: Chichikov KarmaHoudini: [[spoiler:Chichikov fakes the testament of Khlobuyev's rich aunt, is even thrown into prison, but the influential Murayov liberates him with a complicated scheme, and Chichikov can leave the town - although Murayov also told him to change his ways. A somewhat BittersweetEnding.]]



* [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Squires Who Actually Do Something]] / NonIdleRich: Kostanshoglo, who works hard to make his village wealthy, while one of his neighbors (Khlobuyev) wastes his money, another one is almost as reality-impaired as Literature/DonQuixote, and the third one only thinks about his next meal.

to:

* [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Squires Who Actually Do Something]] / NonIdleRich: RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething: Kostanshoglo, who works hard to make his village wealthy, while one of his neighbors (Khlobuyev) wastes his money, another one is almost as reality-impaired as Literature/DonQuixote, and the third one only thinks about his next meal.
4th May '16 10:46:25 PM WillBGood
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Background explanation: In feudal Russia, the great landowners had to pay a tax according to the number of serfs ("souls") they owned. Said serfs were counted in special revisions, which happened not that often - less than once per decade, even. If during the time between two revisions some of these souls happened to die, bad luck, their owners'd still have to pay the tax as if they were alive. OTOH, they could mortgage the estate, with souls included, to the Russian state. Now Chichikov adds two and two and gets the idea: If he buys up a lot of dead souls - which the squires probably want to get rid off - and mortgages them to the state, he'll acquire a big fortune without hard work or risk. Well, that's the theory. In practice, the buying part alone becomes pretty hard due to the eccentricity of said squires.

to:

Background explanation: In feudal Russia, the great landowners had to pay a tax according to the number of serfs ("souls") they owned. Said serfs were counted in special revisions, which happened not that often - less than once per decade, even. If during the time between two revisions some of these souls happened to die, bad luck, their owners'd still have to pay the tax as if they were alive. OTOH, they could mortgage the estate, with souls included, to the Russian state. Now Chichikov adds two and two and gets the idea: If he buys up a lot of dead souls - which the squires probably want to get rid off of - and mortgages them to the state, he'll acquire a big fortune without hard work or risk. Well, that's the theory. In practice, the buying part alone becomes pretty hard due to the eccentricity of said squires.
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