History Literature / ATaleOfTwoCities

8th Mar '16 12:46:20 PM Josef5678
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* DomesticAbuser: Cruncher's introduction reveals that he gets into violent rows with his wife, which is more or less played for comedy. It helps establish him as a dumb, working-class cockney.

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* DomesticAbuser: DomesticAbuse: Cruncher's introduction reveals that he gets into violent rows with his wife, which is more or less played for comedy. It helps establish him as a dumb, working-class cockney.
30th Jan '16 2:52:50 AM Shadowgazer
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* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation One interpretation of]] [[spoiler: Madame Defarge]]

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* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation One interpretation of]] [[spoiler: WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds:[[spoiler: Madame Defarge]]Defarge]] which seems very believable considering all the justifiable hatred that stewed in [[spoiler:her]] for all those years.
11th Nov '15 3:17:23 PM LahmacunKebab
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** Charles Darnay: [[spoiler: is actually a French aristocrat, Charles St. Evrémonde, whose family is infamous for its mistreatment of the poor. He renounces his title and wealth, moves to England and attempts to live a new life.]]
** Sydney Carton: [[spoiler: His mother died when he was young. He "followed his father to the grave," and otherwise never felt at home anywhere. He always did other people's work at university, and never took credit when it was due to him. The result is his alcoholism and self-deprecatory attitude.]]
** Dr. Manette: [[spoiler: is wrongly imprisoned in the Bastille for 18 years by Darnay's father and uncle, causing him to write a manifesto that would later sentence his son-in-law to the Guillotine.]]
** Madame Defarge: [[spoiler: It was her older sister who was raped and ultimately killed by Darnay's uncle. Her brother died defending her honor, and her father died of grief. Thus Defarge swore vengeance against all of the Evrémondes.]]

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** Charles Darnay: [[spoiler: is [[spoiler:Is actually a French aristocrat, Charles St. Evrémonde, whose family is infamous for its mistreatment of the poor. He renounces his title and wealth, moves to England and attempts to live a new life.]]
** Sydney Carton: [[spoiler: His [[spoiler:His mother died when he was young. He "followed his father to the grave," and otherwise never felt at home anywhere. He always did other people's work at university, and never took credit when it was due to him. The result is his alcoholism and self-deprecatory attitude.]]
** Dr. Manette: [[spoiler: is [[spoiler:Is wrongly imprisoned in the Bastille for 18 years by Darnay's father and uncle, causing him to write a manifesto that would later sentence his son-in-law to the Guillotine.]]
** Madame Defarge: [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It was her older sister who was raped and ultimately killed by Darnay's uncle. Her brother died defending her honor, and her father died of grief. Thus Defarge swore vengeance against all of the Evrémondes.]]
11th Nov '15 3:06:02 PM LahmacunKebab
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'''''A Tale of Two Cities''''' is a novel written by Creator/CharlesDickens first published in 1859, dealing with the events of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and their impact on the lives of a number of fictional characters living at the time. The two cities of the title are London and Paris: Paris as a [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized symbol of lawlessness]], while London represents Order, albeit containing problems that could in time, lead to a situation as bad as Paris.

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'''''A Tale of Two Cities''''' is a novel written by Creator/CharlesDickens first published in 1859, dealing with the events of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and their impact on the lives of a number of fictional characters living at the time. The two cities of the title are London and Paris: Paris as a [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized symbol of lawlessness]], while London represents Order, albeit containing problems that could could, in time, lead to a situation as bad as Paris.
12th Oct '15 11:16:49 PM JulianLapostat
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'''''A Tale of Two Cities''''' is a novel written by Creator/CharlesDickens first published in 1859, dealing with the events of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and their impact on the lives of a number of fictional characters living at the time. The two cities of the title are London and Paris: London is seen in the book as a bastion of order, and Paris as a [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized symbol of lawlessness]].

to:

'''''A Tale of Two Cities''''' is a novel written by Creator/CharlesDickens first published in 1859, dealing with the events of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and their impact on the lives of a number of fictional characters living at the time. The two cities of the title are London and Paris: London is seen in the book as a bastion of order, and Paris as a [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized symbol of lawlessness]].
lawlessness]], while London represents Order, albeit containing problems that could in time, lead to a situation as bad as Paris.



Dickens' novel was largely inspired by his reading of Thomas Carlyle's ''The French Revolution: A History'', and took from it the sense of the Revolution as an elemental eruption of the human spirit when pushed too far. Thomas Carlyle's book was itself a highly romantic and melodramatic work rather than historical so the novel does suffer from DatedHistory to some extent despite being broadly accurate to the circumstances and events of the French Revolution. Unlike Carlyle, Dickens sympathized with the ends, though not the conduct, of the Revolution, and offers a glimpse of hope that after the Robespierres and Defarges have died off, France itself would rise a free and happy Republic, [[UsefulNotes/FrenchPoliticalSystem eventually]].

to:

Dickens' novel was largely inspired by his reading of Thomas Carlyle's ''The French Revolution: A History'', and took from it the sense of the Revolution as an elemental eruption of the human spirit when pushed too far. Thomas Carlyle's book was itself a highly romantic and melodramatic work rather than historical so the novel does suffer from DatedHistory to some extent despite being broadly accurate to the circumstances and events of the French Revolution. Unlike Carlyle, Dickens sympathized with the ends, though not the conduct, of the Revolution, and offers a glimpse of hope that after the Robespierres and Defarges have died off, extremists meet their end, France itself would rise a free and happy Republic, [[UsefulNotes/FrenchPoliticalSystem eventually]].
eventually]].
16th Sep '15 10:12:16 PM DrOO7
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Added DiffLines:

* UndersideRide: How Gaspard is able to follow the Marquis to his chateau in order to kill him. This is ominously hinted at when the narrative describes the carriage as being heavier than usual.
26th Aug '15 9:39:49 PM JulianLapostat
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Dickens' novel was largely inspired by his reading of Thomas Carlyle's ''The French Revolution: A History'', and took from it the sense of the Revolution as an elemental eruption of the human spirit when pushed too far. Dickens, however, unlike Carlyle, sympathized with the ends, though not the conduct, of the Revolution, and offers a glimpse of hope that after the Robespierres and Defarges have died off, France itself would rise a free and happy Republic, [[UsefulNotes/FrenchPoliticalSystem eventually]].

to:

Dickens' novel was largely inspired by his reading of Thomas Carlyle's ''The French Revolution: A History'', and took from it the sense of the Revolution as an elemental eruption of the human spirit when pushed too far. Dickens, however, unlike Thomas Carlyle's book was itself a highly romantic and melodramatic work rather than historical so the novel does suffer from DatedHistory to some extent despite being broadly accurate to the circumstances and events of the French Revolution. Unlike Carlyle, Dickens sympathized with the ends, though not the conduct, of the Revolution, and offers a glimpse of hope that after the Robespierres and Defarges have died off, France itself would rise a free and happy Republic, [[UsefulNotes/FrenchPoliticalSystem eventually]].



** Darnay's uncle. Unsurprisingly, no one's upset when the pissed off father murders him.

to:

** Darnay's uncle. Unsurprisingly, no one's upset when the pissed off father when Gaspard murders him.



* AFriendInNeed



* MaliciousSlander



* NobleMaleRoguishMale: Darnay (Noble) and Carton (Roguish).

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* NobleMaleRoguishMale: Darnay (Noble) and is Noble, Carton (Roguish).is slightly more roguish while Stryver is a total cad.



* SurvivorsGuilt: The brief moment when [[spoiler:Darnay is initially freed from the Revolutionary Tribunal has Darnay reflect that he might have gotten off but some of his fellow inmates, some of whom are innocent would not get justice]].



* TextileWorkIsFeminine: Madame Defarge knits [[spoiler: revolutionary code into her work]]. She and her fellow female revolutionaries knit at the base of the guillotine and count the heads.

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* TextileWorkIsFeminine: Madame Defarge knits [[spoiler: revolutionary code into her work]]. She and her fellow female revolutionaries knit at the base of the guillotine and count the heads. They are based on the famous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tricoteuse Tricoteuses]].
26th Aug '15 2:15:15 PM JulianLapostat
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* DroitDeSeigneur: [[spoiler:Cited by Dr. Manette in his Letter as to the crimes of the Evremondes towards Defarge's sister]].

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* DroitDeSeigneur: DroitDuSeigneur: [[spoiler:Cited by Dr. Manette in his Letter as to the crimes of the Evremondes towards Defarge's sister]].
26th Aug '15 2:11:28 PM JulianLapostat
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Dickens' novel was largely inspired by his reading of Thomas Carlyle's ''The French Revolution: A History'', and took from it the sense of the Revolution as an elemental eruption of the human spirit when pushed too far. Dickens, however, unlike Carlyle, sympathized with the ends, though not the conduct, of the Revolution, and offers a glimpse of hope that after the Robespierres and Defarges have died off, France itself would rise a free and happy Republic. (Yeah, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_French_Empire that didn't work out too well]].)

to:

Dickens' novel was largely inspired by his reading of Thomas Carlyle's ''The French Revolution: A History'', and took from it the sense of the Revolution as an elemental eruption of the human spirit when pushed too far. Dickens, however, unlike Carlyle, sympathized with the ends, though not the conduct, of the Revolution, and offers a glimpse of hope that after the Robespierres and Defarges have died off, France itself would rise a free and happy Republic. (Yeah, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_French_Empire that didn't work out too well]].)
Republic, [[UsefulNotes/FrenchPoliticalSystem eventually]].






* AssholeVictim: Darnay's uncle. Unsurprisingly, no one's upset when the pissed off father murders him.

to:

* AssholeVictim: Darnay's AristocratsAreEvil: Make no mistake, they definitely are. Indeed Darnay is so guilty that he decides to ShedTheFamilyName but his family is way more evil than even he suspected and it nearly gets him killed as well.
* AssholeVictim:
**Darnay's
uncle. Unsurprisingly, no one's upset when the pissed off father murders him.him.
**Most of the early victims of the Revolution are regarded as this, being corrupt nobility in the main.



* BestServedCold: Madame Defarge will silently knit and continue knitting as she watches the aristocrats run roughshod over the people, fully waiting for the day of reckoning when she will, remorselessly and pitilessly, unlesh her vengeance upon them.



* BuyThemOff

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* BuyThemOffBuyThemOff: The Marquis tosses a coin to the father whose child his carriage runs over. He is really offended when that gold coin gets tossed back in to the carriage, rightly seeing it as an action of contempt.



* DisproportionateRestitution: A nobleman in a speeding carriage crushes a child and flips a coin onto the street for the grieving father.
* DisproportionateRetribution: The Revolution quickly gives way to the Reign of Terror, where the most tenuous links to the aristocracy, the most minor of infractions or the slightest hint of disloyalty will earn you an appointment with the National Razor. Madame Defarge is the living embodiment of this trope and would gladly murder the entire family of Charles Darnay for what his uncle did to her family. Even the child. The innocent seamstress girl [[spoiler:who dies just before Sydney Carton on the Guillotine]] is the living embodiment of the victims of such rage and hatred

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* DisproportionateRestitution: DisproportionateRestitution:
**
A nobleman in a speeding carriage crushes a child and flips a coin onto the street for the grieving father.
* DisproportionateRetribution: ** The Revolution quickly gives way to the Reign of Terror, where the most tenuous links to the aristocracy, the most minor of infractions or the slightest hint of disloyalty will earn you an appointment with the National Razor. Madame Defarge is the living embodiment of this trope and would gladly murder the entire family of Charles Darnay for what his uncle did to her family. Even the child. The innocent seamstress girl [[spoiler:who dies just before Sydney Carton on the Guillotine]] is the living embodiment of the victims of such rage and hatredhatred.
* DroitDeSeigneur: [[spoiler:Cited by Dr. Manette in his Letter as to the crimes of the Evremondes towards Defarge's sister]].



** Darnay rushes back to France to aid a former servant in need. Without telling anyone. During the French Revolution. Silly Charles.

to:

** Darnay rushes back to France to aid a former servant in need. Without telling anyone. During the French Revolution. Silly Charles. Turns out that the servant he was trying to rescue wasn't in as tight a spot as Darnay believed, which makes it even worse.



* KangarooCourt: Carton saves Darnay from one in London, but there are plenty more in Paris, and they're even less just.

to:

* KangarooCourt: Carton saves Darnay from one in London, but there are plenty more in Paris, and they're even less just. Though the first trial of Darnay actually frees him thanks to excellent character witnesses. The second trial though is a textbook example.



* LaserGuidedKarma: As critical as Dickens is of the excessive violence of the Revolution he argues that the French nobility fully brought this on themselves and that any society built on this injustice will eventually face drastic consequences such as the events of the book.



* PinballProtagonist: Lucie
* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Credit to Mr. Dickens though, he didn't make the French Revolutionaries out to be as AxCrazy and unjustified as most of his contemporaries did.

to:

* PinballProtagonist: Lucie
Darnay.
* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Credit to Mr. Dickens though, he didn't make the French Revolutionaries out to be as AxCrazy and unjustified as most of his contemporaries did. Though like most of his contemporaries, for all kinds of [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies understandable reasons]], don't give the Revolution any credit for its positive achievements either.



* ReignOfTerror: One of literature's most famous depictions.

to:

* ReignOfTerror: One of literature's most famous depictions. Though it largely conflates the Terror with the earlier September Massacres.



* {{The Revolution Will Not Be Civilized}}: France is (in the typical British style) portrayed as being absolutely insane at the time period. Dickens actually [[TakeAThirdOption takes a third option]]--neither side is justified, and there are good and bad people among the rich and the poor. However, he declares that the actions of the nobles led directly to the atrocities committed against them. (Postscripts by modern editors often compare his description of the process to the later rise of a certain [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Austrian "reformer."]])

to:

* {{The Revolution Will Not Be Civilized}}: France is (in the typical British style) portrayed as being absolutely insane at the time period. Dickens actually [[TakeAThirdOption takes a third option]]--neither side is justified, and there are good and bad people among the rich and the poor. However, he declares that the actions of the nobles led directly to the atrocities committed against them. (Postscripts by modern editors often compare his description of the process to the later rise of a certain [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Austrian "reformer."]])


Added DiffLines:

* AStormIsComing: Madame Defarge one point tells her husband that a great earthquake is coming to France ready to open the ground and swallow everything into it. [[TheExtremistWasRight She leads a woman batallion during the Storming of the Bastille]].
7th Aug '15 10:13:33 PM Mdumas43073
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''A Tale of Two Cities'' is a novel written by Creator/CharlesDickens first published in 1859, dealing with the events of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and their impact on the lives of a number of fictional characters living at the time. The two cities of the title are London and Paris: London is seen in the book as a bastion of order, and Paris as a [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized symbol of lawlessness]].

to:

''A '''''A Tale of Two Cities'' Cities''''' is a novel written by Creator/CharlesDickens first published in 1859, dealing with the events of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and their impact on the lives of a number of fictional characters living at the time. The two cities of the title are London and Paris: London is seen in the book as a bastion of order, and Paris as a [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized symbol of lawlessness]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.ATaleOfTwoCities