History Fridge / AceAttorney

18th May '16 5:15:28 AM Cyberlink420
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* The anime adaptation premiered in 2016...the same year that the first game is supposed to take place.



** Similarly, for Apollo Justice, "Appearances Can Be Deceiving", if you take into account [[spoiler:Phoenix being disbarred but still being very much on the ball and active in the legal world, Kristoph and Klavier's bandmate being evil, Lamiroir being blind rather than Machi, and the whole debacle with forged evidence.]]
* The anime adaptation premiered in 2016...the same year that the first game is supposed to take place.

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** Similarly, for Apollo Justice, "Appearances Can Be Deceiving", if you take into account [[spoiler:Phoenix being disbarred but still being very much on the ball and active in the legal world, Kristoph and Klavier's bandmate being evil, Lamiroir being blind rather than Machi, and the whole debacle with forged evidence.]]
* The anime adaptation premiered in 2016...the same year that the first game is supposed to take place.
]]
11th May '16 12:50:57 PM GoldenDarkness
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* With the reveal that ''VisualNovel/AceAttorney6'' will take place in a country that relies on spirit mediums to give out verdicts on trials, many noted on Phoenix's role in pointing out the unreliability of such a method to how the DL-6 incident turned out to be - in that, sometimes, the victim has no idea who killed him. Except, there is a second, more recent example of this: [[spoiler:Dahlia Hawthorne's testimony in Case 3-5. Disregarding the fact she was uncooperative and wanted to twist the truth for petty reasons, she also had no idea who killed Misty Fey while she was channeling Dahlia]].

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* With the reveal that ''VisualNovel/AceAttorney6'' ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'' will take place in a country that relies on spirit mediums to give out verdicts on trials, many noted on Phoenix's role in pointing out the unreliability of such a method to how the DL-6 incident turned out to be - in that, sometimes, the victim has no idea who killed him. Except, there is a second, more recent example of this: [[spoiler:Dahlia Hawthorne's testimony in Case 3-5. Disregarding the fact she was uncooperative and wanted to twist the truth for petty reasons, she also had no idea who killed Misty Fey while she was channeling Dahlia]].
6th May '16 11:33:54 PM Chariset
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** For that matter, why does he try to have [[spoiler:Miles Edgeworth framed for murder until it's almost too late to prosecute anyone for the DL-6 incident? Because Miles had lost a case by then. He was ''no longer perfect''. Von Karma already wasn't too thrilled about the idealistic streak he hadn't managed to kill off in his protege, but he probably could have tolerated it if Miles had kept up a perfect record of convictions.]]

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** For that matter, why does he try wait to have [[spoiler:Miles Edgeworth framed for murder until it's almost too late to prosecute anyone for the DL-6 incident? incident? Because Miles had lost a case by then. then. He was ''no longer perfect''. perfect''. Von Karma already wasn't too thrilled about the idealistic streak he hadn't managed to kill off in his protege, protege (to say nothing of the bullet wound), but he probably could have tolerated it forgiven those if Miles had kept up a perfect record of convictions.convictions. Since he didn't, and proved himself imperfect, he become disposable.]]
6th May '16 11:31:47 PM Chariset
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** For that matter, why does he try to have [[spoiler:Miles Edgeworth framed for murder until it's almost too late to prosecute anyone for the DL-6 incident? Because Miles had lost a case by then. He was ''no longer perfect''. Von Karma already wasn't too thrilled about the idealistic streak he hadn't managed to kill off in his protege, but he probably could have tolerated it if Miles had kept up a perfect record of convictions.]]
14th Apr '16 5:43:42 AM Cyberlink420
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** Similarly, for Apollo Justice, "Appearances Can Be Deceiving", if you take into account [[spoiler:Phoenix being disbarred but still being very much on the ball and active in the legal world, Kristoph and Klavier's bandmate being evil, Lamiroir being blind rather than Machi, and the whole debacle with forged evidence.]]

to:

** Similarly, for Apollo Justice, "Appearances Can Be Deceiving", if you take into account [[spoiler:Phoenix being disbarred but still being very much on the ball and active in the legal world, Kristoph and Klavier's bandmate being evil, Lamiroir being blind rather than Machi, and the whole debacle with forged evidence.]]]]
* The anime adaptation premiered in 2016...the same year that the first game is supposed to take place.
11th Apr '16 11:50:49 PM IronInfidel
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Added DiffLines:

*** Raymond says he was working in Europe for quite some time prior to ''Investigations 2'', so he wasn't an option for those clients.
9th Apr '16 3:14:31 PM Siggu
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to:

* With the reveal that ''VisualNovel/AceAttorney6'' will take place in a country that relies on spirit mediums to give out verdicts on trials, many noted on Phoenix's role in pointing out the unreliability of such a method to how the DL-6 incident turned out to be - in that, sometimes, the victim has no idea who killed him. Except, there is a second, more recent example of this: [[spoiler:Dahlia Hawthorne's testimony in Case 3-5. Disregarding the fact she was uncooperative and wanted to twist the truth for petty reasons, she also had no idea who killed Misty Fey while she was channeling Dahlia]].
9th Apr '16 12:07:15 PM theologica
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** In that case, Dual Destinies must mean that [[spoiler:it's okay to take the blame for a crime you didn't commit because the daughter of your mentor will spend 9 years in europe to become a lawyer, repressing her true feelings, and with the posibility of a mental trauma]], geez.

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** In that case, Dual Destinies must mean that [[spoiler:it's okay to take the blame for a crime you didn't commit because the daughter of your mentor will spend 9 years in europe to become a lawyer, repressing her true feelings, and with the posibility of a mental trauma]], geez.geez.
** Dual Destinies could also be, "The Bonds of Loyalty, Friendship, and Love", given that each case has some tie to this -- [[spoiler:Athena defending Junie twice, the family bonds of Jinxie and her father, Blackquill's loyalty to his mentor, the group of friends at Themis, and the breakdown and rebuilding of Apollo's trust in Phoenix and Athena.]]
** Similarly, for Apollo Justice, "Appearances Can Be Deceiving", if you take into account [[spoiler:Phoenix being disbarred but still being very much on the ball and active in the legal world, Kristoph and Klavier's bandmate being evil, Lamiroir being blind rather than Machi, and the whole debacle with forged evidence.]]
13th Mar '16 8:12:03 AM Aesmerda
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* After [[spoiler:being disbarred]], Phoenix wears darker clothes, as seen in ''Apollo Justice'', representing [[spoiler:how far he seems to have fallen from the man he used to be, and how much darker and more underhand his approach and attitude is now]]. However, the hat he wears is the same bright blue shade as his old suit, and the writing the same colour as his tie, telling us that the old Phoenix is still here, just deferring to this more [[CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass badass]] version of himself for now. The hat is likely a gift from his daughter (it ''does'' say "Papa"), and representing Trucy as a bright spot in his life who reminds him who he's doing this for.
* Don't forget Trucy. She wears a similar outfit to her father Zak Gramarye and has followed in his footsteps as a magician- but she wears blue with a red scarf, much like her adopted daddy's former court wear.
* Trucy is literally wearing her mother's stage costume from when she was still with the Gramarye troupe.
* The von Karmas both wear a colour scheme of blue, white, slate grey and the occasional flash of gold; cold colours reflecting the cold and harsh way they operate and/or were raised, with a hint of grandeur. Also note that Franziska's colours are [[LightIsGood significantly lighter than her father's]], and Phoenix's blue is a far warmer shade than both.
* The trio of lawyers at the Wright Anything Agency, as the three primary colours. Phoenix is blue, representing his role as mentor and the balance in the agency, with his red tie hinting at his reckless and emotionally-driven streak and the gold of his locket chain representing the hope he still holds onto, years after he became a lawyer. Apollo is red, representing his loud and brash attitude at the start of his game and his tendency to be driven by emotion at times, with his blue tie hinting at the sorrows he would also face. Athena is yellow, representing stubborn hope and happiness, matching her determined personality, with her blue tie hinting at the trauma of her past.

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* ** After [[spoiler:being disbarred]], Phoenix wears darker clothes, as seen in ''Apollo Justice'', representing [[spoiler:how far he seems to have fallen from the man he used to be, and how much darker and more underhand his approach and attitude is now]]. However, the hat he wears is the same bright blue shade as his old suit, and the writing the same colour as his tie, telling us that the old Phoenix is still here, just deferring to this more [[CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass badass]] version of himself for now. The hat is likely a gift from his daughter (it ''does'' say "Papa"), and representing Trucy as a bright spot in his life who reminds him who he's doing this for. \n* In ''Dual Destinies'', he returns to his old colour scheme- complete with a hint of gold too represent his legendary status in the legal world, and as head of the Wright Anything Agency.
**
Don't forget Trucy. She wears a similar outfit to her father Zak Gramarye and has followed in his footsteps as a magician- but she wears blue with a red scarf, much like her adopted daddy's former court wear.
* *** Trucy is literally wearing her mother's stage costume from when she was still with the Gramarye troupe.
* ** The von Karmas both wear a colour scheme of blue, white, slate grey and the occasional flash of gold; gold: cold colours reflecting the cold and harsh way they operate and/or were raised, with a hint of grandeur. Also note that Franziska's colours are [[LightIsGood significantly lighter than her father's]], and Phoenix's blue is a far warmer shade than both.
* ** It seems slightly odd that Edgeworth doesn't wear the same colours as the von Karmas, seeing how he was mentored by Manfred, who essentially raised him to be a twisted image of everything Gregory Edgeworth stood for. However, then we have [[AceAttorneyInvestigations Ace Attorney Investigations 2]], where we play as Gregory in a flashback: his tie is the exact same colour as his son's suit in the present day, acting as a retroactive sign that Miles really was always Gregory's son at heart.
**
The trio of lawyers at the Wright Anything Agency, Agency as the three primary colours. Phoenix is blue, representing his role as mentor and the balance in the agency, with his red tie hinting at his reckless and emotionally-driven streak and the gold of his locket chain representing the hope he still holds onto, years after he became a lawyer. Apollo is red, representing his loud and brash attitude at the start of his game and his tendency to be driven by emotion at times, with his blue tie hinting at the sorrows he would also face. Athena is yellow, representing stubborn hope and happiness, matching her determined personality, with her blue tie hinting at the trauma of her past.



*** Morgan Fey, however, wears a black kimono with a hint of red in her sash, [[spoiler:which symbolizes her less-than-sweet intentions for her niece]]. [[spoiler:Her sister Misty, when she reappears,]] also wears black but in this case it symbolizes [[spoiler:secrecy more than malevolence]], and has additional hints of purple, showing how much stronger her spiritual power was over Morgan's.
** The Gavins. Kristoph wears dusky blue, which seems to almost be a recurring thing for defence attorneys, and highlights his kinship and friendship with Phoenix, as well as his renowned 'Coolest Defence in the West' demeanour. [[spoiler:But notice that he wears a black waistcoat underneath. And it is really ''black''. Represents the terrifying, malevolent darkness he's been hiding under a benevolent smile.]] Then take his little brother, Klavier, who wears a purple jacket a colour of decadence and pride, very suitable for a relaxed rock-star prosecutor along with a lot of black, which screams 'arrogant rival and not to be trusted'. [[spoiler:However, Klavier is genuinely a nice guy who wants the right verdict to be given, rather than be obsessed with winning the way Kristoph is. The fact that he wears the black more openly makes him all that much more of a {{Foil}} to his brother [[FridgeBrilliance both of their appearances are deceptive at first glance]].]]
** Simon Blackquill and Bobby Fulbright have colour schemes of black and white, respectively, [[{{Foil}} showing their stark contrast in personality and practice]]. [[spoiler:However, the initial expectations from this are completely reversed by the end of the final case: Simon, while putting up a front of a malicious, remorseless criminal hence his primarily black colour scheme is actually honourable, kind, and fiercely loyal, not to mention innocent of the murder he was convicted for. "Bobby Fulbright", the phantom, wears white but is secretly a sociopathic spy who is willing to murder innocents indiscriminately.]] This can actually be translated as a clever metaphor: [[spoiler:Simon hides his true self in darkness, knowing that most people will be too intimidated to delve any deeper. However, the phantom hides using light like shining a bright light into someone's eyes, most people are too dazzled by his apparent dedication to justice that they can't see past it to his true self.]]

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*** Morgan Fey, however, wears a black kimono with a hint of red in her sash, [[spoiler:which symbolizes her less-than-sweet intentions for her niece]]. [[spoiler:Her sister Misty, when she reappears,]] also wears black black- but in this case it symbolizes [[spoiler:secrecy more than malevolence]], and has additional hints of purple, showing how much stronger her spiritual power was over Morgan's.
was.
** The Gavins. Kristoph wears dusky blue, which seems to almost be a recurring thing theme for defence attorneys, and highlights his kinship and friendship with Phoenix, as well as his renowned 'Coolest Defence in the West' demeanour. [[spoiler:But notice that he wears a black waistcoat underneath. And it is really ''black''. Represents the terrifying, malevolent darkness he's been hiding under a benevolent smile.]] Then take his little brother, Klavier, who wears a purple jacket jacket- a colour of decadence and pride, very suitable for a relaxed rock-star prosecutor prosecutor- along with a lot of black, which screams 'arrogant rival and who is not to be trusted'. [[spoiler:However, Klavier is genuinely a nice guy who wants the right verdict to be given, rather than be obsessed with winning the way Kristoph is. The fact that he wears the black more openly makes him all that much more of a {{Foil}} to his brother brother- [[FridgeBrilliance both of their appearances are deceptive at first glance]].]]
** Simon Blackquill and Bobby Fulbright have colour schemes of black and white, respectively, [[{{Foil}} showing their stark contrast in personality and practice]]. [[spoiler:However, the initial expectations from this are completely reversed by the end of the final case: Simon, while putting up a front of a malicious, remorseless criminal criminal- hence his primarily black colour scheme scheme- is actually honourable, kind, and fiercely loyal, not to mention and entirely innocent of the murder he was convicted for. "Bobby Fulbright", the phantom, wears white but is secretly a sociopathic spy who is willing to murder innocents indiscriminately.]] This can actually be translated as a clever metaphor: [[spoiler:Simon hides his true self in darkness, knowing that most people will be too intimidated to delve any deeper. However, the phantom hides using light light- like shining a bright light into someone's eyes, most people are too dazzled by his apparent dedication to justice that they can't see past it to his true self.]]



** Taken UpToEleven in ''Dual Destinies'', where invariably one of the murderer's VillainousBreakdown scenes involves their appearance changing to reflect what's going on BeneathTheMask. [[spoiler:Ted Tonate's goggles explode as he goes completely AxCrazy from his previous stoic smugness; Florent L'Belle loses his makeup and artificial hair coloring, developing a shabbier as how truly ass-deep in debt he now is occurs to him; Aristotle Means restyles his hair to be far more warlike when he decides to stop playing games and reveal himself for the KnightTemplar he really is, then loses the teeth he flashes when he's disagreeing with someone as his arguments break down; and Phantom's Phoenix mask becomes a little loose fitting as he feels fear for the first time in a while, then begins to randomly switch when he has a full identity crisis. The only exception is Yuri Cosmos, who isn't a villain, but even his breakdown is an example he messes up the controls on his segway, showing how he's utterly lost control of the situation and failed to prevent the explosion he was afraid of.]]

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** Taken The visual implications are taken UpToEleven in ''Dual Destinies'', where invariably one of the murderer's VillainousBreakdown scenes involves their appearance changing to reflect what's going on BeneathTheMask. [[spoiler:Ted Tonate's goggles explode as he goes completely AxCrazy from his previous stoic smugness; Florent L'Belle loses his makeup and artificial hair coloring, developing a shabbier as how truly ass-deep in debt he now is occurs to him; Aristotle Means restyles his hair to be far more warlike when he decides to stop playing games and reveal himself for the KnightTemplar he really is, then loses the teeth he flashes when he's disagreeing with someone as his arguments break down; and Phantom's Phoenix mask becomes a little loose fitting as he feels fear for the first time in a while, then begins to randomly switch when he has a full identity crisis. The only exception is Yuri Cosmos, who isn't a villain, but even his breakdown is an example he messes up the controls on his segway, showing how he's utterly lost control of the situation and failed to prevent the explosion he was afraid of.]]



** More like FridgeLogic, but during The Inherited Turnabout during AAI:2, von Karma's shocked sprite doesn't grip his shoulder. Of course [[spoiler: he hasn't been shot there yet.]]

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** More like FridgeLogic, but during The Inherited Turnabout during AAI:2, von Karma's shocked sprite doesn't grip his shoulder. Of course course- [[spoiler: he hasn't been shot there yet.]]



* There's a pretty neat MusicalSpoiler that is this trope: Try listening to Florent L'Belle's theme, then listen to Luke Atmey's theme. They sound rather similar, no? Well, that makes sense; they're both self-centered, SmallNameBigEgo LargeHam characters. But how about this? [[spoiler:Compare Atmey's theme to Masque*[=DeMasque=]/Ron [=DeLite=]'s theme. Atmey's theme is based on [=DeMasque=]'s, and Atmey at one point claims to be [=DeMasque=], having disguised himself thusly to provide an alibi for the murder he committed. [=DeMasque=], as played by Atmey, is a murderous thieving blackmailer who hid his identity behind a mask, a famous identity, that ''wasn't his''. What was L'Belle again? Ah, yes. A murderous blackmailer and attempted thief who hid his identity behind the famous mask of another man. WHO it should be noted, is the one who actually does own the mask, which was the person they were blackmailing]]. How's THAT for a good case of NotSoDifferent?

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* There's a pretty neat MusicalSpoiler that is this trope: Try listening to Florent L'Belle's theme, then listen to Luke Atmey's theme. They sound rather similar, no? Well, that makes sense; they're both self-centered, SmallNameBigEgo LargeHam characters. But how about this? [[spoiler:Compare Atmey's theme to Masque*[=DeMasque=]/Ron [=DeLite=]'s theme. Atmey's theme is based on [=DeMasque=]'s, and Atmey at one point claims to be [=DeMasque=], having disguised himself thusly to provide an alibi for the murder he committed. [=DeMasque=], as played by Atmey, is a murderous thieving blackmailer who hid his identity behind a mask, a famous identity, that ''wasn't his''. What was L'Belle again? Ah, yes. A murderous blackmailer and attempted thief who hid his identity behind the famous mask of another man. WHO Who it should be noted, is the one who actually does own the mask, which was the person they were blackmailing]]. How's THAT ''that'' for a good case of NotSoDifferent?



* April May [[Music/TheyMightBeGiants has got her ear to the walls and she's tappin' the calls. If you've got a secret, Mia... Forget about it! 'Cause she's a... hotel detective!]]
* Doubles as RewatchBonus. In Case 3-4, Edgeworth mentions a ConvenientlyUnverifiableCoverStory about Melissa Foster [[spoiler: to cover the fact she's actually Dahlia Hawthorne]]. If you replay Case 1-4, you'll notice that von Karma states a ConvenientlyUnverifiableCoverStory - the boat rent shop's owner has amnesia and does not remember his name [[spoiler: to cover the fact he's actually Yanni Yogi]]. One subtle detail about von Karma's mentoring...
* Manfred von Karma's [[spoiler: killing of Gregory Edgeworth on {{Revenge}} of his first penalty ever]] looks like an extreme case of DisproportionateRetribution, and it indeed is. However, his actions take a whole new meaning after playing the fourth case of ''Investigations 2'' - the whole reason von Karma was penalized was because [[spoiler:the chief prosecutor was the one who forged evidence (von Karma was an UnwittingPawn) and wanted to cover his tracks]]. He's still guilty of forcing witnesses into giving out false confessions, but his DisproportionateRetribution is not ''as'' disproportionate following that reveal. Problem is, he unleashed it on the wrong person.
* When Blackquill breaks his restraints for the first time, Apollo and the Judge panic, only for Blackquill to quip that he doesn't kill cowards. [[spoiler: After seeing the final case, [[MetaphoricallyTrue it's very likely that he's never killed]] ''[[MetaphoricallyTrue anyone]]'' [[MetaphoricallyTrue before,]] having been definitively cleared of the UR-1 incident and no mention of him killing anyone while imprisoned. He's probably willing to make an exception for the Phantom, which is why he threatened to attack him when the latter tried to escape, but [[KickTheSonOfABitch can you blame him?]]]]

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* April May [[Music/TheyMightBeGiants has got her ear to the walls and she's tappin' the calls. If you've got a secret, Mia... Forget about it! 'Cause she's a... hotel detective!]]
* Doubles as RewatchBonus. In Case 3-4, Edgeworth mentions a ConvenientlyUnverifiableCoverStory about Melissa Foster [[spoiler: to cover the fact she's actually Dahlia Hawthorne]]. If you replay Case 1-4, you'll notice that von Karma states a ConvenientlyUnverifiableCoverStory - ConvenientlyUnverifiableCoverStory- the boat rent shop's owner has amnesia and does not remember his name [[spoiler: to cover the fact he's actually Yanni Yogi]]. One subtle detail about von Karma's mentoring...
* Manfred von Karma's [[spoiler: killing of Gregory Edgeworth on {{Revenge}} of his first penalty ever]] looks like an extreme case of DisproportionateRetribution, and it indeed is. However, his actions take a whole new meaning after playing the fourth case of ''Investigations 2'' - 2''- the whole reason von Karma was penalized was because [[spoiler:the chief prosecutor was the one who forged evidence (von Karma was an UnwittingPawn) and wanted to cover his tracks]]. He's still guilty of forcing witnesses into giving out false confessions, but his DisproportionateRetribution is not ''as'' disproportionate following that reveal. Problem is, he unleashed it on the wrong person.
* When Blackquill breaks his restraints for the first time, Apollo and the Judge panic, only for Blackquill to quip that he doesn't kill cowards. [[spoiler: After seeing the final case, [[MetaphoricallyTrue it's very likely that he's never killed]] ''[[MetaphoricallyTrue anyone]]'' [[MetaphoricallyTrue before,]] before]], having been definitively cleared of the UR-1 incident and no mention of him killing anyone while imprisoned. He's probably willing to make an exception for the Phantom, which is why he threatened to attack him when the latter tried to escape, but [[KickTheSonOfABitch can you blame him?]]]]
20th Feb '16 12:06:30 PM AlienPatch
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** Not to mention the sheer amount of caffeine that man ingests. Also, [[spoiler: the portraits Larry drew (which we see during the epilogue of Trials and Tribulations) seem to suggest that he has, in fact, passed away.)]]

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** Not to mention the sheer amount of caffeine that man ingests. Also, [[spoiler: the portraits Larry drew (which we see during the epilogue of Trials and Tribulations) seem to suggest that he has, in fact, passed away.)]]]]
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