History Film / TheHaunting1999

8th Jan '17 11:29:35 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: The assault upon Nell in her bedroom by Hugh Crain--his ghost plunges down from the ceiling toward her with a wide, leering mouth ([[{{Squick}} filled with many grasping arms]], no less), while the bed is pulled toward him and Nell is held pinned in place by [[RefugeInAudacity numerous long, thin wooden spikes decorated with barbs]]. WordOfGod described the ceiling moving downward and [[DoubleEntendre the spikes growing longer]] as a manifestation of Nell's claustrophobia, but [[FreudWasRight hmmm]]... See also HeirClubForMen.

to:

* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: The assault upon Nell in her bedroom by Hugh Crain--his ghost plunges down from the ceiling toward her with a wide, leering mouth ([[{{Squick}} filled with many grasping arms]], no less), while the bed is pulled toward him and Nell is held pinned in place by [[RefugeInAudacity numerous long, thin wooden spikes decorated with barbs]]. WordOfGod described the ceiling moving downward and [[DoubleEntendre the spikes growing longer]] as a manifestation of Nell's claustrophobia, but [[FreudWasRight hmmm]]...hmmm... See also HeirClubForMen.
16th Oct '16 10:04:49 PM Raptorslash
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in ''[[Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse the original Jackson novel]]'' or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have attempted to kill his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.

to:

** While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in ''[[Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse [[Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse the original Jackson novel]]'' novel]] or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have attempted to kill his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.
16th Oct '16 10:04:20 PM Raptorslash
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have attempted to kill his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.

to:

** While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in ''[[Literature/TheHauntingOfHillHouse the novel original Jackson novel]]'' or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have attempted to kill his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.
15th Oct '16 1:44:02 AM Raptorslash
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.

to:

** While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed attempted to kill his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.
15th Oct '16 12:31:46 AM Raptorslash
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalVillainy: While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: AdaptationalVillainy:
**
While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed his second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.mills.
** While he isn't a villain, Marrow outright lies about the purpose for the guests staying at the house, while Montague, his book counterpart, and Markway, his equivalent in the 1963 film, were open about the supernatural nature of the experiment from the start.
15th Oct '16 12:25:51 AM Raptorslash
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalVillainy: While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and he not only drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed his second) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his first wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and in life he not only intentionally drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed his second) second when she discovered his crimes) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.
15th Oct '16 12:20:17 AM Raptorslash
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalVillainy: While Hugh Crain was by [[AbusiveParents no means]] [[HolierThanThou a pleasant character]] in the novel or the original film, his attitude was suggested to come in part from the accidental death of his wife. In this adaptation he is explicitly identified as the malevolent presence in Hill House and he not only drove his first wife to suicide (and is strongly implied to have killed his second) but kidnapped and murdered children from his mills.
10th Sep '16 2:59:05 AM Ingonyama
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ClosedCircle: The gates are locked every night when the Dudleys leave and, as in both the book and the original movie, they stay in town since "no one will come any closer than that" and "they couldn't even hear" if they needed help. In a concession to the modern setting, Dr. Marrow has a cell phone for emergencies (and he uses it to call the hospital before Todd leaves with Mary), but this is, conveniently enough, broken during Marrow's rescue of fugue-state Nell from the rickety wrought-iron staircase.

to:

* ClosedCircle: The gates are locked every night when the Dudleys leave and, as in both the book and the original movie, they stay in town since "no one will come any closer than that" and "they couldn't even hear" if they needed help. In a concession to the modern setting, Dr. Marrow has a cell phone for emergencies (and he uses it to call the hospital before Todd leaves with Mary), but this is, [[GenreSavvy conveniently enough, enough]], broken during Marrow's rescue of fugue-state Nell from the rickety wrought-iron staircase.
10th Sep '16 2:58:14 AM Ingonyama
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MissingTrailerScene: There's a brief scene when Nell and Theo are exploring the house and discover false doors that open up to brick walls.
10th Sep '16 2:50:57 AM Ingonyama
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PsychicPowers: Aside from Nell, both Marrow's snide commentary and her own reactions to the house imply his assistant Mary has these too. Which may be why she was injured and made to flee the house.

to:

* PsychicPowers: Aside from Nell, both Marrow's snide commentary and her own reactions to the house imply his assistant Mary has these too. [[GenreSavvy Which may be why she was injured and made to flee the house.house]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 53. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.TheHaunting1999