History Creator / KarlMarx

13th Aug '16 1:14:51 PM nombretomado
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'''Karl Marx''' (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy.

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'''Karl Marx''' (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[DichterAndDenker [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy.
9th Aug '16 10:09:39 AM DisillusionedColony
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* HyperCompetentSidekick: Friedrich Engels, his best friend and patron, was this to him. During his life he supported him financially so that Karl could focus exclusively on his academicand political work. He also helped him publish his books, and after his death actually undertook the gargantuan task of organizing all of Karl's unpublished, unfinnished manuscripts to complete Das Kapital's second and third volumes (especially the third one) and publish the completed and revised work along with his posthumous writings (the main one being Theories of surplus-value). Engels was also a key figure in the organization of the international labour moveent, and after Marx died he actively promoted the reading and study of his theories, helping in no small measure to spread his work, even at the expense of his own (Engels was also a socialist thinker, publishing a number of books, mainly about sociology). It's more than fair to say that Marx couldn't have achieved much without his friend, and Marx didn't hide that fact, thanking him by quoting his works numerous times in Das Kapital and praising his talent and efforts.
9th Aug '16 5:37:25 AM JulianLapostat
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* UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution: Marx studied this quite a lot, and where (he felt) it went right and wrong influenced his own beliefs.
* FullCircleRevolution: The problem with the use of his ideas, overall, is that all of the countries which fell to Marxist revolutions ended up becoming corrupt tyrannies which placed power in the hands of a few power-hungry leaders who oppressed the majority and violated so many human rights to stay in charge. Just like the very governments the revolutionaries fought in the first place. In the end, they became the embodiment of PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny.
** The Marxist counterpoint would be that none of the Communist revolutions of the 20th century were truly revolutionary: each either arose as a result of agitation by [[BourgeoisBohemian intellectuals]] and old capitalist elements or arose through the interference of neighboring state actors; either as resistance to capitalist forces ([[VietnamWar Vietnam]]) or interference by "Communist" ones (Eastern Europe, East Germany). Indeed, the USSR would likely be analyzed by Marx as an attempt to delay the inevitable final crisis of capitalism through a BreadAndCircuses style of government. Which viewpoint you find more convincing is a matter of taste.
** Marx never really defined how a communist society would actually be like aside from vague phrases. He spent most of his life analyzing capitalism and inequality. He did criticize several revolutions in his lifetime such as the 1848 Revolutions and even the Paris Commune of 1871, feeling they were both premature and self-destructive, whatever their other virtues.
* GoodRepublicEvilEmpire: He certainly believed that democracies and republics, where people have at least some say in how the government runs the country, were better than countries run by monarchs, which are oppressive by their very nature. He thought that it would lead to the majority having more power - as he put it, "Democracy is the road to socialism." However, he also thought that...
** DemocracyIsFlawed: Because the rich will corrupt the system and manipulate it for their benefit.

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* UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution: Marx studied this quite a lot, and where (he felt) it went right and wrong influenced his own beliefs.
* FullCircleRevolution:
FullCircleRevolution:
**
The problem with reason for the use decline of his ideas, overall, reputation and overall controversy is that all of the countries which fell to self-calling Marxist revolutions ended up becoming corrupt tyrannies which placed with power in the hands of a few power-hungry leaders who oppressed the majority and violated so many human rights to stay in charge. Just like the very governments the revolutionaries fought in the first place. In the end, they became charge becoming the embodiment of PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny.
** The Marxist counterpoint would be that none of the Communist revolutions of the 20th century were truly revolutionary: each either arose as a result of agitation by [[BourgeoisBohemian intellectuals]] and old capitalist elements or arose through the interference of neighboring state actors; either as resistance to capitalist forces ([[VietnamWar Vietnam]]) or interference by "Communist" ones (Eastern Europe, East Germany). Indeed, the USSR would likely be analyzed by Marx as an attempt to delay the inevitable final crisis of capitalism through a BreadAndCircuses style of government. Which viewpoint you find more convincing is a matter of taste.
**
In his defense, Marx never really defined how a communist society would actually be like aside from vague phrases.like. He spent most of his life analyzing capitalism and inequality. He did criticize several Marx was an observer and recorder of the revolutions in his time and place, starting from UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution to UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848, and he noted this very trend in his own lifetime such as the 1848 Revolutions and even the Paris Commune of 1871, feeling they were both premature and self-destructive, whatever revolutionaries failing to consolidate their other virtues.
early gains and sustain their momentum, and likewise on taking power find out that their lack of experience leads them to make a chain of short-sighted compromises and misteps. In either case the Communist revolutions of the 20th century differed sharply from Marx in that they took root in underdeveloped countries while Marx felt it would better fit developed nations.
* GoodRepublicEvilEmpire: He certainly believed that democracies and republics, where people have at least some say in how the government runs the country, were better than countries run by monarchs, which are oppressive by their very nature. He thought that it would lead to the majority having more power - -- as he put it, "Democracy is the road to socialism." However, he also thought that...
** DemocracyIsFlawed: Because
that DemocracyIsFlawed, because the rich will corrupt the system and manipulate it for their benefit.benefit, and that eventually a more sophisticated form of democracy would have to take shape.[[note]]In Marx's life, where women didn't have the vote, universal suffrage was far away, minorities were oppressed, colonialism was legitimately acceptable to "liberals", workers had little to none legal protections, religion controlled education and influenced the state, the contemporary idea of Democracy didn't really exist, and it only came in the 20th Century and one could argue that the revolutions and movements inspired by Marx triggered modern governments on the path to reform itself towards the current idea of Democracy, especially since each reform, despite being put forth by liberals, social democrats, and even conservatives would be labelled "communist" until proven innocent[[/note]]
5th Aug '16 7:55:37 AM JulianLapostat
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* WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons: Discussed in ''Das Kapital'', in a passus where he argues with Creator/AdamSmith, who argued that people of the working class would ''become'' morons if they were suffering from monotonous labour over time. Smith, and therefore Marx, argued that public education was necessary to hinder this.

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* WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons: Discussed in ''Das Kapital'', in a passus paragraph where he argues with Creator/AdamSmith, who argued that people of the working class would ''become'' morons if they were suffering from monotonous labour over time. Smith, and therefore Marx, argued that public education was necessary to hinder this.
5th Aug '16 5:17:43 AM Eilevgmyhren
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Added DiffLines:

* WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons: Discussed in ''Das Kapital'', in a passus where he argues with Creator/AdamSmith, who argued that people of the working class would ''become'' morons if they were suffering from monotonous labour over time. Smith, and therefore Marx, argued that public education was necessary to hinder this.
28th Jul '16 2:36:50 PM Jhonny
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* PetTheDog: Marx had a sympathetic view of women since he believed they were one of the greatest examples of what happens to the oppressed, as they were forced into the roles of housewives, cheap factory workers, and prostitutes. An early feminist, he called for more equal rights for women, and he believed that socialism and communism would lead to this equality.

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* PetTheDog: PetTheDog:
**
Marx had a sympathetic view of women since he believed they were one of the greatest examples of what happens to the oppressed, as they were forced into the roles of housewives, cheap factory workers, and prostitutes. An early feminist, he called for more equal rights for women, and he believed that socialism and communism would lead to this equality.equality.
** Many people only knowing TheThemeParkVersion of Marx might not guess it, but ''in the Communist Manifesto'' he says "The Bourgeoisie has been a truly revolutionary class in the past" - and he ''means'' it. Marx argues that Capitalism is/was a huge advance over what came before and it is/was absolutely necessary to create the conditions for a communist revolution.


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* SlaveryIsASpecialKindOfEvil: Marx was a staunch defender of the Union in the American Civil War and thought of Slavery as even worse than capitalism.
28th Jul '16 2:05:42 PM Jhonny
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* ''On the Jewish Question'' (1843) - A response to a fellow philosopher who suggested that the only way Jews could receive political emancipation in much of Europe was to abandon their religion. This work was then seen as a major study of how secular countries actually work, with Marx claiming that even countries without a state religion will see religious forces try to take power. Today, people usually look at it as anti-Semitic, though it should be pointed out that Marx was himself (ethnically) Jewish (he was of course an atheist in terms of actual religious beliefs).

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* ''On the Jewish Question'' (1843) - A response to a fellow philosopher who suggested that the only way Jews could receive political emancipation in much of Europe was to abandon their religion. This work was then seen as a major study of how secular countries actually work, with Marx claiming that even countries without a state religion will see religious forces try to take power. Today, people usually look at it as anti-Semitic, though it should be pointed out that Marx was himself (ethnically) Jewish (he was of course an atheist in terms of actual religious beliefs). May or may not have been intended as a StealthParody - the jury is still out.
28th Jul '16 1:59:17 PM Jhonny
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His social, economic, and political views are collectively known as Marxism, and they influenced nearly all left-wing revolutions and movements since the mid-19th century. He personally considered the short-lived Paris Commune of 1871 the model for all future communist societies and spoke glowingly of its highly democratic nature, but after the wholesale slaughter of the Communards by the conservative French Army, followers of his took Marx's comments about the Communards needing more discipline to heart and moved Marxism in a decidedly authoritarian direction.

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His social, economic, and political views are collectively known as Marxism, and they influenced nearly all left-wing revolutions and movements since the mid-19th century. He personally considered the short-lived Paris Commune of 1871 the model for all future communist societies and spoke glowingly of its highly democratic nature, but after the wholesale slaughter of the Communards by the conservative French Army, many followers of his took Marx's comments about the Communards needing more discipline to heart and moved Marxism in a decidedly authoritarian direction.
28th Jul '16 1:58:04 PM Jhonny
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You probably know him mostly for the book ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), which he co-wrote with Friedrich Engels in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]]. This is one of those handful of written works which completely changed the world. Contrary to how most people remember it, this is ''not'' the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought arguably goes as far back as at least the Enlightenment. This short work (it's only about 40 pages long, depending on which copy you find) radically asserted that all of history is "a history of the class struggles." Marx and Engels said that capitalist societies will lead to the handful of rich people (the bourgeoisie) who control the means of production manipulating the vast majority of workers (the proletariat) and exploiting their labor. They then predicted that, eventually, the workers will inevitably get fed up with this and revolt against those in charge and create a socialist society, where the working majority are in control. This would start a process towards a society both classless and stateless which he called communism. Marx expanded his theories in several other important works, notably the massively long ''Das Kapital'', which Engels completed upon Marx's death.

to:

You probably know him mostly for the book ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), which he co-wrote with Friedrich Engels in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]]. This is one of those handful of written works which completely changed the world. Contrary to how most people remember it, this is ''not'' the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought arguably goes as far back as at least the Enlightenment. This short work (it's only about 40 pages long, depending on which copy you find) radically asserted that all of history is "a history of the class struggles." Marx and Engels said that capitalist societies will lead to the handful of rich people (the bourgeoisie) who control the means of production manipulating the vast majority of workers (the proletariat) and exploiting their labor. They then predicted that, eventually, the workers will inevitably get fed up with this and revolt against those in charge and create a socialist society, where the working majority are in control. This would start a process towards a society both classless and stateless which he called communism. Marx expanded his theories in several other important works, notably the massively long ''Das Kapital'', which Engels completed upon Marx's death.
death. Whether or not Engels' editing distorts Marx' original points is massive FlameBait among the various Marxist schools and best not discussed here.
28th Jul '16 12:38:20 PM JulianLapostat
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** Actually, to be more presice, he (and Engels, his best friend, patron and a wealthy businessman) believed that the capitalist system was the cause of misery and opression, and that executives were a part of it, not individually evil, but that kept an evil system in place. See the note under the "Hypocryte" section.

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** Actually, to To be more presice, precise, he (and Engels, his best friend, patron and a wealthy businessman) believed that the capitalist system was the cause of misery and opression, and that executives were a part of it, not individually evil, but that they kept an evil system in place. See the note under the "Hypocryte" section.
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