History Creator / KarlMarx

23rd Mar '17 10:03:41 PM JulianLapostat
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->''"De omnibus dubitandum"'' ("Everything must be doubted")\\
--His personal motto
6th Mar '17 4:10:53 PM nombretomado
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Not to be confused with TheMarxBrothers, or the final boss from ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. The trope KarlMarxHatesYourGuts is named after him. Also, yes, he kinda does look a lot like a grumpy version of SantaClaus, naturally inviting facetious comparisons between his prescriptions for allocating resources and Santa's giving of gifts.

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Not to be confused with TheMarxBrothers, Creator/TheMarxBrothers, or the final boss from ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. The trope KarlMarxHatesYourGuts is named after him. Also, yes, he kinda does look a lot like a grumpy version of SantaClaus, naturally inviting facetious comparisons between his prescriptions for allocating resources and Santa's giving of gifts.
1st Feb '17 10:43:59 AM JulianLapostat
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** To be more precise, he (and Engels, his best friend, patron and a wealthy businessman) believed that the capitalist system was the cause of misery and oppression, and that executives were a part of it, not individually evil, but that they kept an evil system in place.

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** To be more precise, he (and Engels, his best friend, patron and a wealthy businessman) believed that the capitalist system was the cause of misery and oppression, and that executives were a part of it, not individually evil, but that they kept an evil system in place.place, [[SocietyIsToBlame and the system made otherwise decent people serve an evil cause]].
30th Nov '16 9:35:05 PM Xtifr
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'''Karl Marx''' (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).

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'''Karl Marx''' Karl Marx (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).
10th Nov '16 8:33:41 AM 06tele
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* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) -- his magnum opus. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity. The opening chapters of Volume 1 are Marx's theories about labour and value, which is a pity, because many readers never make it to the much later, much more vivid and harrowing stuff about industrial conditions in 19th century England, which drew on Marx's exhaustive reading of government reports on the subject.

to:

* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) -- his magnum opus. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity. The hardest parts to understand are the opening chapters of Volume 1 are 1, which consist of Marx's abstract theories about labour and value, which value. This is a pity, because many readers never make it to the much later, much more later chapters, which contain vivid and harrowing stuff about accounts of industrial conditions in 19th century England, which drew on Marx's exhaustive reading of with extensive quotes from government reports on the subject.
10th Nov '16 8:31:43 AM 06tele
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* ''Grundrisse'' (1858) - Unfinished. An examination of a wide variety of topics, namely ones tying to economics. It is basically a dry run for ''Das Kapital''.

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* ''Grundrisse'' (1858) - Unfinished. An examination of a wide variety of topics, namely ones tying to economics. It is basically Basically a dry run for ''Das Kapital''.''Capital'', although some Marx scholars hold that there's stuff in this book that Marx left undeveloped.



* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) - Probably his masterwork. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity, since its pretty much impossible to read and understand the whole thing without devoting oneself to its study.

to:

* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) - Probably -- his masterwork.magnum opus. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity, since its pretty necessity. The opening chapters of Volume 1 are Marx's theories about labour and value, which is a pity, because many readers never make it to the much impossible to read later, much more vivid and understand harrowing stuff about industrial conditions in 19th century England, which drew on Marx's exhaustive reading of government reports on the whole thing without devoting oneself to its study.subject.
22nd Oct '16 11:12:14 AM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

* FlameBait: Marx and his views in general (he was himself no stranger to heated debate and kicked out of his place of residency more than once for his views), but [[SchmuckBait for added fun]] say something like "Marx was right" in the US or ask whether a Marxist revolution can happen prior to industrialization in Marxist circles. If you get out alive, you will hear some very interesting arguments.
22nd Oct '16 5:41:16 AM Morgenthaler
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* InsistentTerminology: There are many (so-called) Marxists who believe that other (so-called) Marxists, such as UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin, MaoZedong, and UsefulNotes/CheGuevara, were not really Marxists. It's pretty much a FlameBait subject. It's accurate in that Marx himself certainly didn't refer to ''his'' ideas as Marxist [[ViewersAreGeniuses and he often assumed or expected people would read his works with the same attention to context and detail that he read everything]] so would make references to complex ideas assuming his readership were familiar with it. The other thing is that before the October Revolution, not all of his works were published, and only after the USSR came in, that his earlier works, (called "Young Marx" by academics) were unearthed, showing a more humanistic and analytical side than his later works did. So the views people had about him began to change as his older works were published. The Soviets for their part could hardly be blamed for not reading all his books since they went by what was published.

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* InsistentTerminology: There are many (so-called) Marxists who believe that other (so-called) Marxists, such as UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin, MaoZedong, UsefulNotes/MaoZedong, and UsefulNotes/CheGuevara, were not really Marxists. It's pretty much a FlameBait subject. It's accurate in that Marx himself certainly didn't refer to ''his'' ideas as Marxist [[ViewersAreGeniuses and he often assumed or expected people would read his works with the same attention to context and detail that he read everything]] so would make references to complex ideas assuming his readership were familiar with it. The other thing is that before the October Revolution, not all of his works were published, and only after the USSR came in, that his earlier works, (called "Young Marx" by academics) were unearthed, showing a more humanistic and analytical side than his later works did. So the views people had about him began to change as his older works were published. The Soviets for their part could hardly be blamed for not reading all his books since they went by what was published.
18th Sep '16 9:37:15 PM JulianLapostat
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He actually spent much of his life outside of his homeland. Due to his open, enthusiastic association with all of the most radical people of the day, Marx essentially had no chance of ever becoming a professional academic and the Kingdom of Prussia eventually exiled him. He moved to Paris in 1843, and was kicked out of France in 1849. From then on, he mostly lived in London. Nevertheless, Marx is still an icon throughout much of Germany. A nationwide poll in 2003 saw that Germans voted him as the third-greatest German of all time, behind only [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer]] and Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther. To put this in perspective, Marx ranked above all of the country's [[Music/JohannSebastianBach great]] [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart classical]] [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven composers]], UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein, and UsefulNotes/OttoVonBismarck. In fact, Marx has a far better reputation in Europe (and Asia, Africa, South America) than he does in the United States. People over there, even several of his critics, are more willing to admit that he actually was a smart guy who accomplished a lot, while Americans usually associate him with [[GloriousMotherRussia their old enemy the Soviet Union]] and their satellite nations they fought in ProxyWar during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Germany's version of him is the more accurate one: He was (probably) incorrect about how the future will inevitably lead to a classless paradise, but he was right about many other things. In any case, by taking the stances that Marx did, he is certain to remain controversial and contentious for future generations and since h never wrote for academic and mainstream respectability to start with, [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority it would suit him just fine that his ideas are still outside the mainstream establishment more than 130 years after his death]].

to:

He actually spent much of his life outside of his homeland. Due to his open, enthusiastic association with all of the most radical people of the day, Marx essentially had no chance of ever becoming a professional academic and the Kingdom of Prussia eventually exiled him. He moved to Paris in 1843, and was kicked out of France in 1849. From then on, he mostly lived in London. Nevertheless, Marx is still an icon throughout much of Germany. A nationwide poll in 2003 saw that Germans voted him as the third-greatest German of all time, behind only [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer]] and Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther. To put this in perspective, Marx ranked above all of the country's [[Music/JohannSebastianBach great]] [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart classical]] [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven composers]], UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein, and UsefulNotes/OttoVonBismarck. In fact, Marx has a far better reputation in Europe (and Asia, Africa, South America) than he does in the United States. People over there, even several of his critics, are more willing to admit that he actually was a smart guy who accomplished a lot, while Americans usually associate him with [[GloriousMotherRussia their old enemy the Soviet Union]] and their satellite nations they fought in ProxyWar during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Germany's version of him is the more accurate one: He was (probably) incorrect about how the future will inevitably lead to a classless paradise, but he was right about many other things. In any case, by taking the stances that Marx did, he is certain to remain controversial and contentious for future generations and since h he never wrote for academic and mainstream respectability to start with, [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority it would suit him just fine that his ideas are still outside the mainstream establishment more than 130 years after his death]].
18th Sep '16 9:36:43 PM JulianLapostat
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He actually spent much of his life outside of his homeland. Due to his open, enthusiastic association with all of the most radical people of the day, Marx essentially had no chance of ever becoming a professional academic and the Kingdom of Prussia eventually exiled him. He moved to Paris in 1843, and was kicked out of France in 1849. From then on, he mostly lived in London. Nevertheless, Marx is still an icon throughout much of Germany. A nationwide poll in 2003 saw that Germans voted him as the third-greatest German of all time, behind only [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer]] and Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther. To put this in perspective, Marx ranked above all of the country's [[Music/JohannSebastianBach great]] [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart classical]] [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven composers]], UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein, and UsefulNotes/OttoVonBismarck. In fact, Marx has a far better reputation in Europe than he does in the United States. People over there, even several of his critics, are more willing to admit that he actually was a smart guy who accomplished a lot, while Americans usually associate him with the [[GloriousMotherRussia their old enemy the Soviet Union]] and their satellite nations they fought in ProxyWar during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Germany's version of him is the more accurate one: He was (probably) incorrect about how the future will inevitably lead to a classless paradise, but he was right about many other things. In any case, by taking the stances that Marx did, he is certain to remain controversial and contentious for future generations.

to:

He actually spent much of his life outside of his homeland. Due to his open, enthusiastic association with all of the most radical people of the day, Marx essentially had no chance of ever becoming a professional academic and the Kingdom of Prussia eventually exiled him. He moved to Paris in 1843, and was kicked out of France in 1849. From then on, he mostly lived in London. Nevertheless, Marx is still an icon throughout much of Germany. A nationwide poll in 2003 saw that Germans voted him as the third-greatest German of all time, behind only [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer]] and Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther. To put this in perspective, Marx ranked above all of the country's [[Music/JohannSebastianBach great]] [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart classical]] [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven composers]], UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein, and UsefulNotes/OttoVonBismarck. In fact, Marx has a far better reputation in Europe (and Asia, Africa, South America) than he does in the United States. People over there, even several of his critics, are more willing to admit that he actually was a smart guy who accomplished a lot, while Americans usually associate him with the [[GloriousMotherRussia their old enemy the Soviet Union]] and their satellite nations they fought in ProxyWar during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Germany's version of him is the more accurate one: He was (probably) incorrect about how the future will inevitably lead to a classless paradise, but he was right about many other things. In any case, by taking the stances that Marx did, he is certain to remain controversial and contentious for future generations.
generations and since h never wrote for academic and mainstream respectability to start with, [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority it would suit him just fine that his ideas are still outside the mainstream establishment more than 130 years after his death]].
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