History Creator / KarlMarx

20th Jan '18 10:19:20 AM Malady
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''The Communist Manifesto'' condenses Marx's idea that history is "a history of the class struggles" and that the new capitalist societies of the 19th Century while originally revolutionary (in that they toppled the corrupt aristocracies during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the later wars of reunification in Italy and Germany) led in turn to a new ruling class (labelled the "bourgeosie"[[note]]It originally meant people who lived in bourg or burg, i.e. city-dwellers. Marx used it as a metonym for "the ruling class", later writers would describe it as a pejorative for stuffy middle-class values of property and family. Marx intended it to refer to the owners of capital, i.e. the very 1% of industrialists as opposed to the lower-middle classes of professionals (lawyers, teachers, doctors) and salarymen, and later stockholders, who had not yet developed in Marx's lifetime into an economically significant bracket[[/note]]) that comprised of those who owned capital and means of production that nonetheless functioned on exploitation of the vast majority of workers who did the majority of work for little pay, no protection and in deplorable conditions. In the same way [[HoistByHisOwnPetard the aristocrats created the bourgeosie who replaced them as the ruling class]], the bourgeosie will in turn [[HereWeGoAgain be succeeded and replaced by the newly emergent]] working-class who in sharp contrast to the bonded peasantry of feudalism, was urban and educated([[RequiredSecondaryPowers necessary for them to work the machines and other tools]]), organized into labouring units that brought them into contact with workers from other parts of the capitalist nation, leading to the development of a new identity. They constituted in Marx's view, a new revolutionary class, nurtured in the conditions of the capitalist state. They will become more intelligent as society advances, until the workers had it with their oppression under the class system and set to pave the way for a revolt and the creation of a new socialist society. This would start a lengthy process that would lead, initially to a society, governed first by the working class (i.e. the Dictatorship of the Proletariat[[note]]Dictatorship in the pre-Caesar Roman sense, i.e. Washington's hero {{Cincinnatus}}. This is one of the most notorious misconceptions about him, as Marx envisioned it to resemble Athenian direct democracy[[/note]]) but gradually guide it to Scientific Communism, a global, classless, stateless technological society.[[note]]A vision that to modern eyes and ears, has a suspicious resemblance to science-fiction, but was grounded in Marx's views of the mechanization of labour in the GrandUnifiedTimeline/FirstIndustrialRevolution which would he note eventually lead to workers being replaced by machines, that in Marx's view would free them up to do other kinds of work which they wanted to do. However, Capitalism forced them to do jobs they hate for no pay merely to survive and escape unemployment, and the rise of captialism and inequality and progressive mechanization mean that this would increase as time went on, as owners seek for newer and cheaper labour. In a purely communist society, machines such as A.I. would do all the menial labour, thus providing people the freedom and security to truly PursueTheDreamJob[[/note]]

to:

''The Communist Manifesto'' condenses Marx's idea that history is "a history of the class struggles" and that the new capitalist societies of the 19th Century while originally revolutionary (in that they toppled the corrupt aristocracies during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the later wars of reunification in Italy and Germany) led in turn to a new ruling class (labelled the "bourgeosie"[[note]]It originally meant people who lived in bourg or burg, i.e. city-dwellers. Marx used it as a metonym for "the ruling class", later writers would describe it as a pejorative for stuffy middle-class values of property and family. Marx intended it to refer to the owners of capital, i.e. the very 1% of industrialists as opposed to the lower-middle classes of professionals (lawyers, teachers, doctors) and salarymen, and later stockholders, who had not yet developed in Marx's lifetime into an economically significant bracket[[/note]]) that comprised of those who owned capital and means of production that nonetheless functioned on exploitation of the vast majority of workers who did the majority of work for little pay, no protection and in deplorable conditions. In the same way [[HoistByHisOwnPetard the aristocrats created the bourgeosie who replaced them as the ruling class]], the bourgeosie will in turn [[HereWeGoAgain be succeeded and replaced by the newly emergent]] working-class who in sharp contrast to the bonded peasantry of feudalism, was urban and educated([[RequiredSecondaryPowers necessary for them to work the machines and other tools]]), organized into labouring units that brought them into contact with workers from other parts of the capitalist nation, leading to the development of a new identity. They constituted in Marx's view, a new revolutionary class, nurtured in the conditions of the capitalist state. They will become more intelligent as society advances, until the workers had it with their oppression under the class system and set to pave the way for a revolt and the creation of a new socialist society. This would start a lengthy process that would lead, initially to a society, governed first by the working class (i.e. the Dictatorship of the Proletariat[[note]]Dictatorship in the pre-Caesar Roman sense, i.e. Washington's hero {{Cincinnatus}}. This is one of the most notorious misconceptions about him, as Marx envisioned it to resemble Athenian direct democracy[[/note]]) but gradually guide it to Scientific Communism, a global, classless, stateless technological society.[[note]]A vision that to modern eyes and ears, has a suspicious resemblance to science-fiction, but was grounded in Marx's views of the mechanization of labour in the GrandUnifiedTimeline/FirstIndustrialRevolution UsefulNotes/IndustrialRevolution which would he note eventually lead to workers being replaced by machines, that in Marx's view would free them up to do other kinds of work which they wanted to do. However, Capitalism forced them to do jobs they hate for no pay merely to survive and escape unemployment, and the rise of captialism and inequality and progressive mechanization mean that this would increase as time went on, as owners seek for newer and cheaper labour. In a purely communist society, machines such as A.I. would do all the menial labour, thus providing people the freedom and security to truly PursueTheDreamJob[[/note]]
6th Jan '18 4:04:46 PM nombretomado
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''The Communist Manifesto'' condenses Marx's idea that history is "a history of the class struggles" and that the new capitalist societies of the 19th Century while originally revolutionary (in that they toppled the corrupt aristocracies during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the later wars of reunification in Italy and Germany) led in turn to a new ruling class (labelled the "bourgeosie"[[note]]It originally meant people who lived in bourg or burg, i.e. city-dwellers. Marx used it as a metonym for "the ruling class", later writers would describe it as a pejorative for stuffy middle-class values of property and family. Marx intended it to refer to the owners of capital, i.e. the very 1% of industrialists as opposed to the lower-middle classes of professionals (lawyers, teachers, doctors) and salarymen, and later stockholders, who had not yet developed in Marx's lifetime into an economically significant bracket[[/note]]) that comprised of those who owned capital and means of production that nonetheless functioned on exploitation of the vast majority of workers who did the majority of work for little pay, no protection and in deplorable conditions. In the same way [[HoistByHisOwnPetard the aristocrats created the bourgeosie who replaced them as the ruling class]], the bourgeosie will in turn [[HereWeGoAgain be succeeded and replaced by the newly emergent]] working-class who in sharp contrast to the bonded peasantry of feudalism, was urban and educated([[RequiredSecondaryPowers necessary for them to work the machines and other tools]]), organized into labouring units that brought them into contact with workers from other parts of the capitalist nation, leading to the development of a new identity. They constituted in Marx's view, a new revolutionary class, nurtured in the conditions of the capitalist state. They will become more intelligent as society advances, until the workers had it with their oppression under the class system and set to pave the way for a revolt and the creation of a new socialist society. This would start a lengthy process that would lead, initially to a society, governed first by the working class (i.e. the Dictatorship of the Proletariat[[note]]Dictatorship in the pre-Caesar Roman sense, i.e. Washington's hero {{Cincinnatus}}. This is one of the most notorious misconceptions about him, as Marx envisioned it to resemble Athenian direct democracy[[/note]]) but gradually guide it to Scientific Communism, a global, classless, stateless technological society.[[note]]A vision that to modern eyes and ears, has a suspicious resemblance to science-fiction, but was grounded in Marx's views of the mechanization of labour in the IndustrialRevolution which would he note eventually lead to workers being replaced by machines, that in Marx's view would free them up to do other kinds of work which they wanted to do. However, Capitalism forced them to do jobs they hate for no pay merely to survive and escape unemployment, and the rise of captialism and inequality and progressive mechanization mean that this would increase as time went on, as owners seek for newer and cheaper labour. In a purely communist society, machines such as A.I. would do all the menial labour, thus providing people the freedom and security to truly PursueTheDreamJob[[/note]]

to:

''The Communist Manifesto'' condenses Marx's idea that history is "a history of the class struggles" and that the new capitalist societies of the 19th Century while originally revolutionary (in that they toppled the corrupt aristocracies during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the later wars of reunification in Italy and Germany) led in turn to a new ruling class (labelled the "bourgeosie"[[note]]It originally meant people who lived in bourg or burg, i.e. city-dwellers. Marx used it as a metonym for "the ruling class", later writers would describe it as a pejorative for stuffy middle-class values of property and family. Marx intended it to refer to the owners of capital, i.e. the very 1% of industrialists as opposed to the lower-middle classes of professionals (lawyers, teachers, doctors) and salarymen, and later stockholders, who had not yet developed in Marx's lifetime into an economically significant bracket[[/note]]) that comprised of those who owned capital and means of production that nonetheless functioned on exploitation of the vast majority of workers who did the majority of work for little pay, no protection and in deplorable conditions. In the same way [[HoistByHisOwnPetard the aristocrats created the bourgeosie who replaced them as the ruling class]], the bourgeosie will in turn [[HereWeGoAgain be succeeded and replaced by the newly emergent]] working-class who in sharp contrast to the bonded peasantry of feudalism, was urban and educated([[RequiredSecondaryPowers necessary for them to work the machines and other tools]]), organized into labouring units that brought them into contact with workers from other parts of the capitalist nation, leading to the development of a new identity. They constituted in Marx's view, a new revolutionary class, nurtured in the conditions of the capitalist state. They will become more intelligent as society advances, until the workers had it with their oppression under the class system and set to pave the way for a revolt and the creation of a new socialist society. This would start a lengthy process that would lead, initially to a society, governed first by the working class (i.e. the Dictatorship of the Proletariat[[note]]Dictatorship in the pre-Caesar Roman sense, i.e. Washington's hero {{Cincinnatus}}. This is one of the most notorious misconceptions about him, as Marx envisioned it to resemble Athenian direct democracy[[/note]]) but gradually guide it to Scientific Communism, a global, classless, stateless technological society.[[note]]A vision that to modern eyes and ears, has a suspicious resemblance to science-fiction, but was grounded in Marx's views of the mechanization of labour in the IndustrialRevolution GrandUnifiedTimeline/FirstIndustrialRevolution which would he note eventually lead to workers being replaced by machines, that in Marx's view would free them up to do other kinds of work which they wanted to do. However, Capitalism forced them to do jobs they hate for no pay merely to survive and escape unemployment, and the rise of captialism and inequality and progressive mechanization mean that this would increase as time went on, as owners seek for newer and cheaper labour. In a purely communist society, machines such as A.I. would do all the menial labour, thus providing people the freedom and security to truly PursueTheDreamJob[[/note]]
15th Dec '17 8:52:35 AM Anddrix
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Karl Marx (5 May 1818 14 March 1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to have ever lived, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).

to:

Karl Marx (5 May 1818 14 March 1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] polarizing German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to have ever lived, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).
18th Nov '17 12:27:44 AM blerg223
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Karl Marx (5 May 1818 14 March 1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).

to:

Karl Marx (5 May 1818 14 March 1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to have ever live, lived, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).
14th Nov '17 9:18:48 AM memememememe
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''The Communist Manifesto'' condenses Marx's idea that history is "a history of the class struggles" and that the new capitalist societies of the 19th Century while originally revolutionary (in that they toppled the corrupt aristocracies during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the later wars of reunification in Italy and Germany) led in turn to a new ruling class (labelled the "bourgeosie"[[note]]It originally meant people who lived in bourg or burg, i.e. city-dwellers. Marx used it as a metonym for "the ruling class", later writers would describe it as a pejorative for stuffy middle-class values of property and family. Marx intended it to refer to the owners of capital, i.e. the very 1% of industrialists as opposed to the lower-middle classes of professionals (lawyers, teachers, doctors) and salarymen, and later stockholders, who had not yet developed in Marx's lifetime into an economically significant bracket[[/note]]) that comprised of those who owned capital and means of production that nonetheless functioned on exploitation of the vast majority of workers who did the majority of work for little pay, no protection and in deplorable conditions. In the same way [[HoistByHisOwnPetard the aristocrats created the bourgeosie who replaced them as the ruling class]], the bourgeosie will in turn [[HereWeGoAgain be succeeded and replaced by the newly emergent]] working-class who in sharp contrast to the bonded peasantry of feudalism, was urban, educated in some amount of technical know-how by their masters ([[RequiredSecondaryPowers necessary for them to work the machines and other tools]]), organized into labouring units that brought them into contact with workers from other parts of the capitalist nation, leading to the development of a new identity. They constituted in Marx's view, a new revolutionary class, nurtured in the conditions of the capitalist state, and set to pave the way for a revolt and the creation of a new socialist society. This would start a lengthy process that would lead, initially to a society, governed first by the working class directly (i.e. the Dictatorship of the Proletariat[[note]]Dictatorship in the pre-Caesar Roman sense, i.e. Washington's hero {{Cincinnatus}}. Marx also said it was a dictatorship by class and envisioned it to resemble Athenian direct democracy[[/note]]) but gradually to the establishment of a classless society, and finally to the pure communist society where the state itself would wither, having no political parties and only containing a bureaucracy that handled technocratic functions of maintenance, roadworks, hygiene, sewage and transportation.[[note]]A vision that to modern eyes and ears, has a suspicious resemblance to science-fiction, but was grounded in Marx's views of the mechanization of labour in the IndustrialRevolution which would he note eventually lead to workers being replaced by machines, that in Marx's view would free them up to do other kinds of work which they wanted to do but as a result of Capitalism, forced them to do jobs they hate for no pay merely to survive and escape unemployment, and the rise of captialism and inequality and progressive mechanization mean that this would increase as time went on, as owners seek for newer and cheaper labour. Pure communism in Marx's view would provide people the freedom and security to truly PursueTheDreamJob[[/note]]

to:

''The Communist Manifesto'' condenses Marx's idea that history is "a history of the class struggles" and that the new capitalist societies of the 19th Century while originally revolutionary (in that they toppled the corrupt aristocracies during UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the later wars of reunification in Italy and Germany) led in turn to a new ruling class (labelled the "bourgeosie"[[note]]It originally meant people who lived in bourg or burg, i.e. city-dwellers. Marx used it as a metonym for "the ruling class", later writers would describe it as a pejorative for stuffy middle-class values of property and family. Marx intended it to refer to the owners of capital, i.e. the very 1% of industrialists as opposed to the lower-middle classes of professionals (lawyers, teachers, doctors) and salarymen, and later stockholders, who had not yet developed in Marx's lifetime into an economically significant bracket[[/note]]) that comprised of those who owned capital and means of production that nonetheless functioned on exploitation of the vast majority of workers who did the majority of work for little pay, no protection and in deplorable conditions. In the same way [[HoistByHisOwnPetard the aristocrats created the bourgeosie who replaced them as the ruling class]], the bourgeosie will in turn [[HereWeGoAgain be succeeded and replaced by the newly emergent]] working-class who in sharp contrast to the bonded peasantry of feudalism, was urban, educated in some amount of technical know-how by their masters ([[RequiredSecondaryPowers urban and educated([[RequiredSecondaryPowers necessary for them to work the machines and other tools]]), organized into labouring units that brought them into contact with workers from other parts of the capitalist nation, leading to the development of a new identity. They constituted in Marx's view, a new revolutionary class, nurtured in the conditions of the capitalist state, state. They will become more intelligent as society advances, until the workers had it with their oppression under the class system and set to pave the way for a revolt and the creation of a new socialist society. This would start a lengthy process that would lead, initially to a society, governed first by the working class directly (i.e. the Dictatorship of the Proletariat[[note]]Dictatorship in the pre-Caesar Roman sense, i.e. Washington's hero {{Cincinnatus}}. This is one of the most notorious misconceptions about him, as Marx also said it was a dictatorship by class and envisioned it to resemble Athenian direct democracy[[/note]]) but gradually guide it to the establishment of Scientific Communism, a classless society, and finally to the pure communist society where the state itself would wither, having no political parties and only containing a bureaucracy that handled technocratic functions of maintenance, roadworks, hygiene, sewage and transportation.global, classless, stateless technological society.[[note]]A vision that to modern eyes and ears, has a suspicious resemblance to science-fiction, but was grounded in Marx's views of the mechanization of labour in the IndustrialRevolution which would he note eventually lead to workers being replaced by machines, that in Marx's view would free them up to do other kinds of work which they wanted to do but as a result of Capitalism, do. However, Capitalism forced them to do jobs they hate for no pay merely to survive and escape unemployment, and the rise of captialism and inequality and progressive mechanization mean that this would increase as time went on, as owners seek for newer and cheaper labour. Pure communism in Marx's view In a purely communist society, machines such as A.I. would provide do all the menial labour, thus providing people the freedom and security to truly PursueTheDreamJob[[/note]]



** Marx's main idea was that the Communist Revolution would take place in developed nations like England, France and the United States and that he felt that the Communist state required a proper nurturing and development of economic infrastructure and social upheaval before it can be possible. Indeed, Leninism modified and differed with Marxism ''on this very point'' and he had to justify why a poor feudal nation like Russia with huge swathes of the population suffering from illiteracy would set up a Communist utopia. Marx noted that his ideas were popular in Russia towards the end of his life and wondered if revolution could take root there, but he was highly cautious and skeptical about it.

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** Marx's main idea was that the Communist Revolution would take place in developed nations like England, France and the United States States; nations with advanced technology, democratic government and that he felt that the Communist state required a proper nurturing and development of economic infrastructure and social upheaval before it can be possible. highly-educated working class who are intelligent enough to understand what is wrong with capitalist society. Indeed, Leninism modified and differed with Marxism ''on this very point'' and he had to justify why a poor feudal nation totalitarian backwater like Russia with huge swathes of the population suffering from illiteracy would set up a Communist utopia. Marx noted that his ideas were popular in Russia towards the end of his life and wondered if revolution could take root there, but he was highly cautious and skeptical about it.



* InsistentTerminology: There are many (so-called) Marxists who believe that other (so-called) Marxists, such as UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin, UsefulNotes/MaoZedong, and UsefulNotes/CheGuevara, were not really Marxists. It's pretty much a FlameBait subject. It's accurate in that Marx himself certainly didn't refer to ''his'' ideas as Marxist [[ViewersAreGeniuses and he often assumed or expected people would read his works with the same attention to context and detail that he read everything]] so would make references to complex ideas assuming his readership were familiar with it. The other thing is that before the October Revolution, not all of his works were published, and only after the USSR came in, that his earlier works, (called "Young Marx" by academics) were unearthed, showing a more humanistic and analytical side than his later works did. So the views people had about him began to change as his older works were published. The Soviets for their part could hardly be blamed for not reading all his books since they went by what was published.

to:

* InsistentTerminology: There are many (so-called) Marxists who believe that other (so-called) Marxists, such as UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin, UsefulNotes/MaoZedong, and UsefulNotes/CheGuevara, were not really Marxists.Marxists but statist oligarchs who abused the word of Marx to gain quasi-religious power. It's pretty much a FlameBait subject. It's accurate in that Marx himself certainly didn't refer to ''his'' ideas as Marxist [[ViewersAreGeniuses and he often assumed or expected people would read his works with the same attention to context and detail that he read everything]] so would make references to complex ideas assuming his readership were familiar with it. The other thing is that before the October Revolution, not all of his works were published, and only after the USSR came in, that his earlier works, (called "Young Marx" by academics) were unearthed, showing a more humanistic and analytical side than his later works did. So the views people had about him began to change as his older works were published. The Soviets for their part could hardly be blamed for not reading all his books since they went by what was published.



* ReligionIsWrong: Marx was inspired by the work by German Academics in advancing textual criticism of the Bible which showed that it was a religious text shaped by circumstances rather than divine truth. This led to him view all religion as a function of the rich and powerful to control the masses, grounded in his readings of classical antiquity, and the cynicism of Ancient Romans[[note]]As noted by Edward Gibbon: ''The policy of the emperors and the senate, as far as it concerned religion, was happily seconded by the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.''[[/note]].
** His most famous quote is actually quite nuanced: ''Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of the people is the demand for their real happiness. To call on them to give up their illusions about their condition is to call on them to give up a condition [[HoldingOutForAHero that requires illusions]].'' i.e. one mustn't get rid of religion without getting rid of the conditions [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions that make people turn to religion in the first place]].
** Indeed, Marx in ''On the Jewish Question, The German Ideology, The Holy Family'' criticized the Young Hegelians a rabidly atheistic group for their arguments that religion was the only force blocking progress and that as soon as everyone became atheist all of society's problems would be solved. He pointed out that the United States of America had entered the Second Religious Revival and was also an aggressively capitalist and certainly progressive society by the standards of the 19th Century. In other words, while Marx was an atheist and proponent of science and secular education it would not be fair to see him as fundamentally anti-religious in the 21st Century sense[[note]]i.e. a view that sees religion as a backward and feudal relic with no role and function in a democratic advanced society, Marx saw it as related to income inequality and the reduction of the same would lead to a reduction in religious belief[[/note]].

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* ReligionIsWrong: Discussed.
** His most misinterpreted quote is this ''Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of the people is the demand for their real happiness. To call on them to give up their illusions about their condition is to call on them to give up a condition [[HoldingOutForAHero that requires illusions]].'' i.e. the suffering of people force them to turn to religion as a form of {{Escapism}}. If you want to get rid of religion, then don't be an insufferable HollywoodAtheist, but rather first get rid of the conditions [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions that make people turn to religion in the first place]].
**
Marx was inspired by the work by German Academics in advancing textual criticism of the Bible which showed that it was a religious text shaped by circumstances rather than divine truth. This led to him view all religion as a function of the rich and powerful to control the masses, grounded in his readings of classical antiquity, and the cynicism of Ancient Romans[[note]]As noted by Edward Gibbon: ''The policy of the emperors and the senate, as far as it concerned religion, was happily seconded by the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.''[[/note]].
** His most famous quote is actually quite nuanced: ''Religion is However, [[JesusWasWayCool at the sigh same time he respected Jesus Christ and early Apostolic Christianity]] as the prototypical example of a communal society where private property was considered a sin, and everything was voluntarily shared between members of the oppressed creature, community for the heart benefit of all. He acknowledged Jesus as the example of a heartless world, proto-communist who condemned all forms of property ownership ("camel in the eye of a needle" and was murdered because he opposed the massively capitalistic system operated by the Jewish moneylenders and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of the people is the demand for their real happiness. To Roman Slave Society. However, he did call on them to give up their illusions about their condition is to call on them to give up a condition [[HoldingOutForAHero that requires illusions]].'' i.e. one mustn't get rid of religion without getting rid of the conditions [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions that make people turn to religion early Apostolic community as a form of ''Primitive Communism'', which, though effective in small groups like hunter-gatherer tribes and the first place]].
Paris Commune, cannot work in a modern large-scale society.
** Indeed, Marx in was also critical of {{Hollywood Atheist}}s as short-sighted on what truly blocks social progress. In ''On the Jewish Question, The German Ideology, The Holy Family'' he criticized the Young Hegelians a rabidly atheistic group for their arguments that religion was the only force blocking progress and that as soon as everyone became atheist all of society's problems would be solved. He pointed out that the United States of America had entered the Second Religious Revival and was also an aggressively capitalist and certainly progressive society by the standards of the 19th Century. In other words, while Marx was an atheist and proponent of science and secular education it would not be fair to see him as fundamentally anti-religious in the 21st Century sense[[note]]i.e. a view that sees religion as a backward and feudal relic with no role and function in a democratic advanced society, Marx saw it as related to income inequality and the reduction of the same would lead to a reduction in religious belief[[/note]].
4th Nov '17 7:35:34 AM dlchen145
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Karl Marx (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).

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Karl Marx (1818-1883) (5 May 1818 14 March 1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).
2nd Oct '17 7:35:24 PM JulianLapostat
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** He also argued that socialists should LetNoCrisisGoToWaste and suggested that such economic crises was a proper time to mount a revolution or reform, and since these crises are inevitable features of capitalism, there's always an opportunity and potential for change. Fittingly, sales of Marx's works always go up during times of economic downturn.[[note]]Of course in actual history, socialist revolutions came out during times of war, as in the case of UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and TheGreatDepression resulted in the rise of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany. It was only in America, that the Depression actually led to socially democrat policies being instituted during the New Deal, and even then it was done to specifically prevent communist or right-wing movements. Marx was optimistically projecting his reading of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which came after an economic crisis, into the future.[[/note]]

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** He also argued that socialists should LetNoCrisisGoToWaste and suggested that such economic crises was a proper time to mount a revolution or reform, and since these crises are inevitable features of capitalism, there's always an opportunity and potential for change. Fittingly, sales of Marx's works always go up during times of economic downturn.[[note]]Of course in actual history, socialist revolutions came out during times of war, as in the case of UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and UsefulNotes/RedOctober. During TheGreatDepression resulted in Europe, social democrat parties in Germany and communists in western Europe actually faced a major setback, and this led to the rise of fiercely anti-communist UsefulNotes/NaziGermany. It was only in America, that the Depression actually led to socially democrat policies being instituted during the New Deal, and even then it was done to specifically prevent communist or and right-wing movements. Marx was optimistically projecting his reading of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which came ''did'' come after an economic crisis, into the future.[[/note]]future, and took what was a one-time fluke for what turned out to be an imprecise model for revolutionary development[[/note]]
2nd Oct '17 7:23:40 PM JulianLapostat
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** He also argued that socialists should LetNoCrisisGoToWaste and suggested that such economic crises was a proper time to mount a revolution or reform, and since these crises are inevitable features of capitalism, there's always an opportunity and potential for change. Fittingly, sales of Marx's works always go up during times of economic downturn.[[note]]Of course in actual history, socialist revolutions came out during times of war, as in the case of UsefulNotes/RedOctober. It was only in America, that the Depression actually led to socially democrat policies being instituted during the New Deal, and even then it was done to specifically prevent communist or right-wing movements. Marx was optimistically projecting his reading of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which came after an economic crisis, into the future.[[/note]]

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** He also argued that socialists should LetNoCrisisGoToWaste and suggested that such economic crises was a proper time to mount a revolution or reform, and since these crises are inevitable features of capitalism, there's always an opportunity and potential for change. Fittingly, sales of Marx's works always go up during times of economic downturn.[[note]]Of course in actual history, socialist revolutions came out during times of war, as in the case of UsefulNotes/RedOctober.UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and TheGreatDepression resulted in the rise of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany. It was only in America, that the Depression actually led to socially democrat policies being instituted during the New Deal, and even then it was done to specifically prevent communist or right-wing movements. Marx was optimistically projecting his reading of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which came after an economic crisis, into the future.[[/note]]
2nd Oct '17 6:44:17 PM friendlyhand
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** He also argued that socialists should LetNoCrisisGoToWaste and suggested that such economic crises was a proper time to mount a revolution or reform, and since these crises are inevitable features of capitalism, there's always an opportunity and potential for change. Fittingly, sales of Marx's works always go up during times of economic downturn.[[note]]Of course in actual history, socialist revolutions came out during times of war, as in the case of UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and TheGreatDepression resulted in the rise of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany. It was only in America, that the Depression actually led to socially democrat policies being instituted during the New Deal, and even then it was done to specifically prevent communist or right-wing movements. Marx was optimistically projecting his reading of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which came after an economic crisis, into the future.[[/note]]

to:

** He also argued that socialists should LetNoCrisisGoToWaste and suggested that such economic crises was a proper time to mount a revolution or reform, and since these crises are inevitable features of capitalism, there's always an opportunity and potential for change. Fittingly, sales of Marx's works always go up during times of economic downturn.[[note]]Of course in actual history, socialist revolutions came out during times of war, as in the case of UsefulNotes/RedOctober, and TheGreatDepression resulted in the rise of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany.UsefulNotes/RedOctober. It was only in America, that the Depression actually led to socially democrat policies being instituted during the New Deal, and even then it was done to specifically prevent communist or right-wing movements. Marx was optimistically projecting his reading of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which came after an economic crisis, into the future.[[/note]]
30th Aug '17 9:35:41 PM Dedars1
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* HarsherInHindsight:[[invoked]] Marx did always support the existence of a strong state, and the ''manifesto'' declares that this state has to take charge of ''everything'' from social services to banks. Some Russians with bright ideas took this to heart during the early days of the twentieth century. When they developed this thought further, another tyranny was inevitable.
** This viewpoint led to a crass break with the anarchists, who vouched for a no-state solution. Marx however did believe that even in the end point of socialism, where the state would wither away, some form of government would exist to look after roads, electricity, mass transit and other public utilities. Marx felt that this would be merely a technical function and purpose and not really be tied to politics and class interests.

to:

* HarsherInHindsight:[[invoked]] Marx did always support the existence of a strong state, and the ''manifesto'' declares that this state has to take charge of ''everything'' from social services to banks. Some Russians with bright ideas took this to heart during the early days of the twentieth century. When they developed this thought further, another tyranny was inevitable.
**
This viewpoint led to a crass break with the anarchists, who vouched for a no-state solution. Marx however did believe that even in the end point of socialism, where the state would wither away, some form of government would exist to look after roads, electricity, mass transit and other public utilities. Marx felt that this would be merely a technical function and purpose and not really be tied to politics and class interests.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.KarlMarx