History Creator / KarlMarx

20th Jul '17 5:00:10 PM Jhonny
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Not to be confused with Creator/TheMarxBrothers, or the final boss from ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. The trope KarlMarxHatesYourGuts is named after him. Also, yes, he kinda does look a lot like a grumpy version of SantaClaus, naturally inviting facetious comparisons between his prescriptions for allocating resources and Santa's giving of gifts.

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Not to be confused with Creator/TheMarxBrothers, or the final boss from ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''.''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'' ''Also'' not to be confused with Creator/KarlMay, another German Karl M of the 19th century who wrote books sold by the millions. The trope KarlMarxHatesYourGuts is named after him. Also, yes, he kinda does look a lot like a grumpy version of SantaClaus, naturally inviting facetious comparisons between his prescriptions for allocating resources and Santa's giving of gifts.
18th Jun '17 4:14:53 PM JulianLapostat
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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Surprisingly rare for a man so prominent and influential. Even the film industries of the Communist era never quite made a major {{Biopic}} of their Prophet[[note]]Some major film-makers did have plans. Creator/RobertoRossellini, who made many films about philosophers (Socrates, Descartes) started pre-production before his death, while the Brazilian film-maker Glauber Rocha planned a film with Creator/OrsonWelles as Marx[[/note]]. Some of his depictions are actually recent (around TheNewTens), in ''Webcomics/ExistentialComics'', ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedSyndicate'' and the 2017 film ''The Young Karl Marx'' by Raoul Peck showing the early friendship between Engels and Marx. Outside of that his most famous Anglophone depiction is probably the Creator/MontyPython German versus Greek philosophers soccer parody (where Marx comes in as a substitute).


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16th May '17 9:31:53 AM nombretomado
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Despite his reputation as a prophet, with his rhetoric and tendency for visionary predictions [[NotHelpingYourCase not helping his case]] Marx's theories about revolutionary practice succeeded contemporary radical events (Revolutions of 1848, the Paris Commune) rather than anticipated it. They are indeed analytical think pieces about ongoing events and journalistic in character, and Marx used his regular paying job at the New York Herald Tribune's foreign desk to report on various events as and when they happened. The fact that Marx engaged with such political journalism is itself a radical departure from his background as an academic philosopher, and would later provide the model for the ''philosophe engagée'' codified by Creator/JeanPaulSartre. This stance was criticized by later writers (mostly, but not exclusively, grounded in analytical philosophy) since it put into question how much of Marx's ideas and practices are carefully developed theories and how much are they instinctual reactions and gut analyses of far-away events that Marx only knew by third hand. This blurring of lines meant that many of Marx's ideas, shaped by the context of the middle of the 19th Century provided an impression of a more coherent and complete view than was actually formulated. In their view, this allowed for many 20th Century revolutionaries to claim Marx based on selective interpretation. UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, spearheaded [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober the first successful Marxist revolution]] in [[TsaristRussia The Russian Empire]], and Marx's legacy is to a large extent tied to the fortunes of that event, and its highly ambiguous outcomes across the 20th Century.[[note]]Lenin, indeed made many large changes to Marxism to persuade fellow Bolsheviks and fence-sitting Mensheviks like UsefulNotes/LeonTrotsky, and other international observers [[LogicBomb how a feudal nation without a strong bourgeosie would provide the ground for Communist revolution]]. Marxism effectively split, with Orthodox Marxists criticizing Lenin for not letting industrial capitalism destroy itself and Leninists criticizing Orthodox Marxists with the claim that capitalism was getting stronger, not weaker, and that Marx's theories needed revising. The Orthodox Marxists were largely based in Europe, where they would be effectively crippled and radicalized by the rise of fascism, while Leninism gained a foothold in the colonies of the European Empires (and the unofficial American one), which were not very industrialized but had a pressing need to repel the (capitalist) imperialists from their borders. This gave rise to other self-professed Marxist states, such as [[RedChina the People's Republic of China]], UsefulNotes/NorthKorea, UsefulNotes/{{Cuba}}, Vietnam, and several others. As you may have noticed, most of these countries were poor, backward and far below the RequiredSecondaryPowers prescribed by Marx (heavy industrialization, a developed middle class, strong urban population with many working classes) as prescriptions for a communist revolution, and the governments that formed were repressive dictatorships that resorted to violence and aggressive land reform to institute the urbanization and industrialization [[YouCantThwartStageOne that Marx said should have been done before they went to Phrase 3]].[[/note]]

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Despite his reputation as a prophet, with his rhetoric and tendency for visionary predictions [[NotHelpingYourCase not helping his case]] Marx's theories about revolutionary practice succeeded contemporary radical events (Revolutions of 1848, the Paris Commune) rather than anticipated it. They are indeed analytical think pieces about ongoing events and journalistic in character, and Marx used his regular paying job at the New York Herald Tribune's foreign desk to report on various events as and when they happened. The fact that Marx engaged with such political journalism is itself a radical departure from his background as an academic philosopher, and would later provide the model for the ''philosophe engagée'' codified by Creator/JeanPaulSartre. This stance was criticized by later writers (mostly, but not exclusively, grounded in analytical philosophy) since it put into question how much of Marx's ideas and practices are carefully developed theories and how much are they instinctual reactions and gut analyses of far-away events that Marx only knew by third hand. This blurring of lines meant that many of Marx's ideas, shaped by the context of the middle of the 19th Century provided an impression of a more coherent and complete view than was actually formulated. In their view, this allowed for many 20th Century revolutionaries to claim Marx based on selective interpretation. UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, spearheaded [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober the first successful Marxist revolution]] in [[TsaristRussia [[UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia The Russian Empire]], and Marx's legacy is to a large extent tied to the fortunes of that event, and its highly ambiguous outcomes across the 20th Century.[[note]]Lenin, indeed made many large changes to Marxism to persuade fellow Bolsheviks and fence-sitting Mensheviks like UsefulNotes/LeonTrotsky, and other international observers [[LogicBomb how a feudal nation without a strong bourgeosie would provide the ground for Communist revolution]]. Marxism effectively split, with Orthodox Marxists criticizing Lenin for not letting industrial capitalism destroy itself and Leninists criticizing Orthodox Marxists with the claim that capitalism was getting stronger, not weaker, and that Marx's theories needed revising. The Orthodox Marxists were largely based in Europe, where they would be effectively crippled and radicalized by the rise of fascism, while Leninism gained a foothold in the colonies of the European Empires (and the unofficial American one), which were not very industrialized but had a pressing need to repel the (capitalist) imperialists from their borders. This gave rise to other self-professed Marxist states, such as [[RedChina the People's Republic of China]], UsefulNotes/NorthKorea, UsefulNotes/{{Cuba}}, Vietnam, and several others. As you may have noticed, most of these countries were poor, backward and far below the RequiredSecondaryPowers prescribed by Marx (heavy industrialization, a developed middle class, strong urban population with many working classes) as prescriptions for a communist revolution, and the governments that formed were repressive dictatorships that resorted to violence and aggressive land reform to institute the urbanization and industrialization [[YouCantThwartStageOne that Marx said should have been done before they went to Phrase 3]].[[/note]]
28th Apr '17 1:48:05 AM M84
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* JobStealingRobot: The rise of automation and the potential it had for making workers obsolete was one of the trends that shaped Marx's ideas.
23rd Mar '17 10:03:41 PM JulianLapostat
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->''"De omnibus dubitandum"'' ("Everything must be doubted")\\
--His personal motto
6th Mar '17 4:10:53 PM nombretomado
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Not to be confused with TheMarxBrothers, or the final boss from ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. The trope KarlMarxHatesYourGuts is named after him. Also, yes, he kinda does look a lot like a grumpy version of SantaClaus, naturally inviting facetious comparisons between his prescriptions for allocating resources and Santa's giving of gifts.

to:

Not to be confused with TheMarxBrothers, Creator/TheMarxBrothers, or the final boss from ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar''. The trope KarlMarxHatesYourGuts is named after him. Also, yes, he kinda does look a lot like a grumpy version of SantaClaus, naturally inviting facetious comparisons between his prescriptions for allocating resources and Santa's giving of gifts.
1st Feb '17 10:43:59 AM JulianLapostat
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** To be more precise, he (and Engels, his best friend, patron and a wealthy businessman) believed that the capitalist system was the cause of misery and oppression, and that executives were a part of it, not individually evil, but that they kept an evil system in place.

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** To be more precise, he (and Engels, his best friend, patron and a wealthy businessman) believed that the capitalist system was the cause of misery and oppression, and that executives were a part of it, not individually evil, but that they kept an evil system in place.place, [[SocietyIsToBlame and the system made otherwise decent people serve an evil cause]].
30th Nov '16 9:35:05 PM Xtifr
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'''Karl Marx''' (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).

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'''Karl Marx''' Karl Marx (1818-1883) was a [[LoveItOrHateIt very polarizing]] German-born [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker writer]] known best for writing about and advocating [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies socialism and communism]]. Marx is one of the most important men to ever live, though how much of his influence is good or bad depends heavily on your own beliefs. His influence is so widespread that some people have said that ''the entire [[TheTwentiethCentury twentieth century]]'' is his legacy. His most well known and proverbial works are ''The Communist Manifesto'' (1848), a short pamphlet, co-written with Friedrich Engels, in response to [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 a series of revolutions across Europe that year]] and the {{Doorstopper}} that is ''Das Kapital''. Both works are by-words for socialism and communism, but neither was the first work about socialism - it was already a common word by the time it was published, and socialist thought was grounded in some of the more left-wing ideologues of UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment (which Marx cited as his main influence).
10th Nov '16 8:33:41 AM 06tele
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* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) -- his magnum opus. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity. The opening chapters of Volume 1 are Marx's theories about labour and value, which is a pity, because many readers never make it to the much later, much more vivid and harrowing stuff about industrial conditions in 19th century England, which drew on Marx's exhaustive reading of government reports on the subject.

to:

* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) -- his magnum opus. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity. The hardest parts to understand are the opening chapters of Volume 1 are 1, which consist of Marx's abstract theories about labour and value, which value. This is a pity, because many readers never make it to the much later, much more later chapters, which contain vivid and harrowing stuff about accounts of industrial conditions in 19th century England, which drew on Marx's exhaustive reading of with extensive quotes from government reports on the subject.
10th Nov '16 8:31:43 AM 06tele
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* ''Grundrisse'' (1858) - Unfinished. An examination of a wide variety of topics, namely ones tying to economics. It is basically a dry run for ''Das Kapital''.

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* ''Grundrisse'' (1858) - Unfinished. An examination of a wide variety of topics, namely ones tying to economics. It is basically Basically a dry run for ''Das Kapital''.''Capital'', although some Marx scholars hold that there's stuff in this book that Marx left undeveloped.



* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) - Probably his masterwork. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity, since its pretty much impossible to read and understand the whole thing without devoting oneself to its study.

to:

* ''Capital: Critique of Political Economy'', also known as ''Das Kapital'' (Volume 1, 1867; Volumes 2 and 3 released posthumously) - Probably -- his masterwork.magnum opus. He set out to basically write down every single thought he had about economics and society with these books. Since Marx [[BrilliantButLazy kept procrastinating finishing the thing]] for several years, he died before the second and third volumes were fully completed. Engels edited them after Marx's death and published them. It's ''massive'', so much so that many modern Communist and Marxist movements advise not reading it out of necessity, since its pretty necessity. The opening chapters of Volume 1 are Marx's theories about labour and value, which is a pity, because many readers never make it to the much impossible to read later, much more vivid and understand harrowing stuff about industrial conditions in 19th century England, which drew on Marx's exhaustive reading of government reports on the whole thing without devoting oneself to its study.subject.
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