History ComicBook / GlobalFrequency

30th Apr '16 10:28:21 AM Kalaong
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SuperCellReception: Operatives on the Global Frequency had really cool phones that appeared to use their own satellite network and give users access to any electronic resource Aleph could hack into. They also had audio/video capabilities that were terribly advanced when the graphic novels came out, but by 2016 are BoringButPractical off-the-shelf smartphones. This demonstrates that writers don't need to bypass cell phones to create tension; these geeks kick ass, but they still get into trouble the phones can't gimmick them out of.

to:

* SuperCellReception: Operatives on the Global Frequency had really cool phones that appeared to use their own satellite network and give users access to any electronic resource Aleph could hack into. They also had audio/video capabilities that were terribly advanced when the graphic novels came out, out in 2002, but by 2016 are BoringButPractical off-the-shelf smartphones. This demonstrates that writers don't need to bypass cell phones to create tension; these geeks kick ass, but they still get into trouble the phones can't gimmick them out of.
22nd Apr '16 7:51:05 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CrashingThroughTheHarem: Gender-inverted in "The Run", where Sita the ''traceuse'' takes a shortcut through the film of a gay porn video.

to:

* CrashingThroughTheHarem: Gender-inverted in "The Run", where Sita the ''traceuse'' takes a shortcut through the film filming of a gay porn video.


Added DiffLines:

* MonumentalBattle: The climax of "The Run" is a downplayed example (it's not so much a battle as a brief fist-fight), taking place at the top of the London Eye.


Added DiffLines:

* StaringKid: As Sita scales the London Eye in "The Run", she's spotted by a little Indian girl, who excitedly tells her father, "Daddy, look! Spider-Man's a girl, and she's just like us!"
22nd Apr '16 7:42:03 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtificialLimbs[=/=]CyberneticsEatYourSoul[=/=]{{Cyborg}}: Explored in the [[WallOfText exposition-laden]] ''Big Wheel''. [[AwesomeButImpractical Awesomely]], even partially enhanced subjects can tear people apart like wet cardboard. [[AwesomeButImpractical Impractical part]] in 3, 2, 1...

to:

* ArtificialLimbs[=/=]CyberneticsEatYourSoul[=/=]{{Cyborg}}: ArtificialLimbs: Explored in the [[WallOfText exposition-laden]] ''Big Wheel''."Big Wheel". [[AwesomeButImpractical Awesomely]], even partially enhanced subjects can tear people apart like wet cardboard. [[AwesomeButImpractical Impractical part]] in 3, 2, 1...



** Captain Richard Quinn, the TragicVillain of the piece, is a fully-converted HollywoodCyborg - he doesn't even have ''lungs'' anymore. '''[[AndIMustScream And He Must Scream]].'''
-->'''Member 436''': Try to imagine. You're a multiple amputee who's been ''flayed alive''. You can't feel your own ''heartbeat''. You can't feel yourself ''breathe''. You can feel metal rubbing against your muscles and organs. And ''you don't recognize the man in the mirror''.



* ComicBookFantasyCasting:
** Miranda Zero, DependingOnTheArtist: in certain issues, she looks almost exactly like Creator/MichelleForbes, who was later cast as her in the abortive TV pilot.
** In issue 4, the English gunwoman looks like Kate Moss (something of an in-joke, as Warren Ellis's ''ComicBook/{{Stormwatch}}'' and ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'' leading character Jenny Sparks was famously visually based on her).
** In issue 5, the magician Alan Crowe looks exactly like Creator/AlanCumming.
* CrashingThroughTheHarem: Gender-inverted in "The Run", where Sita the ''traceuse'' takes a shortcut through the film of a gay porn video.
-->'''Sita:''' Sorry, not looking, carry on.



* CyberneticsEatYourSoul: In "Big Wheel". Captain Richard Quinn, the TragicVillain of the piece, is a fully-converted HollywoodCyborg -- a half-dead soldier who'd been basically turned into a walking killing machine by cybernetic alterations. Then he saw his reflection and decided to live up to the role.
-->'''Member 436:''' Try to imagine. You're a multiple amputee who's been ''flayed alive''. You can't feel your own ''heartbeat''. You can't feel yourself ''breathe''. You can feel metal rubbing against your muscles and organs. And ''you don't recognize the man in the mirror''.
* {{Cyborg}}: Deconstructed and subverted in "Big Wheel", pointing out the extensive and conspicuous modifications it would take to make a real cyborg. It was so hard, in fact, that most people who underwent the procedure had psychotic breaks, and were intended more as non-nuclear [=WMDs=] than foot soldiers.



* ElectricInstantGratification: The cyborg from above would receive orgasms when he killed people.

to:

* ElectricInstantGratification: The cyborg from above in "Big Wheel" would receive orgasms when he killed people.



* FamousNamedForeigner: Danny [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Gulpilil Gulpilil]]

to:

* FamousNamedForeigner: Danny [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Gulpilil Gulpilil]]Gulpilil]], the Aboriginal-Australian talent in "Hundred".



* KillSat: The threat in "Harpoon".
* MadDoctor: The surgeons in issue 9.

to:

* ImYourWorstNightmare: Grushko introduces himself:
-->'''Grushko:''' Did you ever have a nightmare about a large man who killed your parents, and your siblings, and then your lover, and then everyone you know? And then burned down your house and destroyed everything precious you've ever conceived of? That was me.
* KillSat: The threat in "Harpoon".
"Harpoon" is a constellation of satellites armed with kinetic harpoons, a single shot weapon mostly by virtue of being a fancy orbiting crossbow that fires an artificial diamond at enough speed that the kinetic energy goes off like a nuke when it strikes the ground.
* MadDoctor: The In issue 9, surgeons in issue 9.a medical research facility became literally Mad Doctors after the leak of an experimental gas. The surgeons' pre-existing fascination with the inside of the human body escalated into fanatical worship, and so... "They went into the wards, where their volunteer patients were. And they used stem-cell technology and bioreactors to make things out of them. And they're all still alive."



* MissionControl: Aleph.

to:

* MissionControl: Aleph.Aleph was born to be the ultimate Mission Control; she's a "superprocessor" -- someone who can "handle any number of separate input processes while performing multiple complex tasks and running deductive strings." One issue features the obligatory "Baddies Invade Base" story.



* LeParkour: One issue entirely focused around a Parkour run.

to:

* OrbitalBombardment: "Harpoon" features the threat of kinetic spears, weapons designed to be dropped from satellites, heat up on re-entry, and strike the ground with the force of a tactical nuke, and as hot as the edge of the sun.
* LeParkour: One In the issue entirely focused around "The Run", a ''traceuse'' is the only Global Frequency operative who can get to a bomb in time to disarm it. The entire issue apart from the first two and last two pages is devoted to her Parkour run.



* RequiredSecondaryPowers: "Big Wheel" goes into disturbing detail about all the bits that usually get glossed over in stories about super-strong cybernetic limbs.
-->'''Member 436''': It's not a case of just sticking an artificial arm on. The surrounding bones and fibers have to be hardened and supported, or else the new arm will rip clean off your shoulder the first time you flex. You'll need tensile support across your back, or your spine will snap the first time you lift something heavy. You need new skin; human skin isn't tough enough to handle the subcutaneous tension of superhuman strength. You'll take a chip in your brain to handle the specific dataload from the artificial nerve system controlling the arm. There's more, but you're getting the idea, right?



* SovietSuperscience: Way out in Siberia, a nuclear warhead is ready to drop though a wormhole and land in San Francisco if a sleeper agent opens that hole with his brain. After years in his head, the mechanism is starting to corrode. This may not end well.

to:

* SovietSuperscience: The threat in issue #1. Way out in Siberia, a nuclear warhead is ready to drop though a wormhole and land in San Francisco if a sleeper agent opens that hole with his brain. After years in his head, the mechanism is starting to corrode. This may not end well.



* TelecomTree: The Global Frequency, a network of people specialising in all sorts of things that could, and do, {{save the world}} - or at least millions of lives.


Added DiffLines:

* TelecomTree: The Global Frequency, a network of people specialising in all sorts of things that could, and do, {{save the world}} - or at least millions of lives. Though only a couple of agents are actively involved in any particular crisis, there are a few times when the call goes out to all 1,001 members for any help they can provide (notably the the last issue of the series).
18th Feb '16 8:25:22 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ApocalypseHow: The military's 'die-back' method in ''Harpoon'' threatens planetary-scale death and societal disruption.



* ApocalypseHow: The military's 'die-back' method in ''Harpoon'' threatens planetary-scale death and societal disruption.



* LeParkour: One issue entirely focused around a Parkour run.


Added DiffLines:

* LeParkour: One issue entirely focused around a Parkour run.
18th Feb '16 8:23:33 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Badass Normal}}s: Every single person in the field teams. Let's give a special mention to Aleph, who apparently keeps track of the entire Internet 24/7 and organizes, cross-references and prioritizes basically everything that happens in the world to make sure the Frequency's efforts are directed at the right problems. A quantum computer could ''maybe'' approach her capacity for parallel processing.
18th Feb '16 8:19:41 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ApocalypseHow: The military's 'die-back' method in ''Harpoon'' is a Class 1.

to:

* ApocalypseHow: The military's 'die-back' method in ''Harpoon'' is a Class 1.threatens planetary-scale death and societal disruption.
18th Feb '16 8:18:04 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


That something is the Global Frequency. Miranda has found and signed on 1001 unique talents from around the world, ranging from athletes to scientists and from cops to hackers. They're called on when the world needs saving, connected to Miranda's home base through a computer genius girl nicknamed "Aleph" who guides them through the mission. The story is fast-paced, with minimum backstory, and each issue features a different group of agents; apart from a GondorCallsForAid sequence in the final issue, Miranda and Aleph are the only recurring characters.

to:

That something is the Global Frequency. Miranda has found and signed on 1001 unique talents from around the world, ranging from athletes to scientists and from cops to hackers. They're called on when the world needs saving, connected to Miranda's home base through a computer genius girl nicknamed "Aleph" who guides them through the mission. The story is fast-paced, with minimum backstory, and each issue features a different group of agents; apart from a GondorCallsForAid sequence those who come BackForTheFinale in the final issue, Miranda and Aleph are the only recurring characters.



* BackForTheFinale: The final issue, ''Harpoon'', unites the series' biggest badasses into one team, including Grushko and Alice April, against a planetary-scale threat.



* GondorCallsForAid: ''Harpoon'' unites the series' biggest badasses into one team, including Grushko and Alice April.
2nd Feb '16 6:58:01 PM Kalaong
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SuperCellReception: Operatives on the Global Frequency had really cool phones that appeared to use their own satellite network and give users access to any electronic resource Aleph could hack into. They also had audio/video capabilities that were terribly advanced when the graphic novels came out, but in late 2009 seem roughly on par with high-end iPhones and the like. This proves that writers don't need to bypass cell phones to create tension; these geeks kick ass, but they still get into trouble the phones can't gimmick them out of.

to:

* SuperCellReception: Operatives on the Global Frequency had really cool phones that appeared to use their own satellite network and give users access to any electronic resource Aleph could hack into. They also had audio/video capabilities that were terribly advanced when the graphic novels came out, but in late 2009 seem roughly on par with high-end iPhones and the like. by 2016 are BoringButPractical off-the-shelf smartphones. This proves demonstrates that writers don't need to bypass cell phones to create tension; these geeks kick ass, but they still get into trouble the phones can't gimmick them out of.
4th Nov '15 11:17:29 AM Gerusz
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:


In 2014, FOX announced that they are producing a pilot, produced by Creator/JerryBruckheimer. Unfortunately they announced in February 2015 that they won't order the pilot due to issues with the script.
30th Jun '15 8:05:09 AM DoctorNemesis
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* GovernmentConspiracy: Deconstructed. Several of the threats that pop up in the series are the result of governments doing naughty things that they shouldn't be doing when no one's looking... however, since these governments can be just incompetent as they can be in RealLife, nine times out of ten they completely fuck everything up and Global Frequency have to swoop in and clean up their messes.
This list shows the last 10 events of 47. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ComicBook.GlobalFrequency