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All Canadian Police Are Mounties (Launching Soon)

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Stereotype of Canadian cops.

This work is a proposed Trope, Tropers can vote and offer feedback in the comments section below.
Proposed By:
chicagomel on Mar 22nd 2013 at 4:37:14 PM
Last Edited By:
alnair20aug93 on Jul 11th 2018 at 1:04:30 PM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: Trope

Upped for Grabs by Alnair. No Launching, Eh.


If a work is set in Canada, Eh?, and features the police at all, they will most likely be members of the RCMP, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. They will always be upstanding, polite, ready to help those in need, and they will always get their man. Usually, they will be wearing their trademark red and black uniforms. Horses are not required, but are often included.

In Real Life, the RCMP began in the 1800s as the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, and was created to enforce law and order in the wilderness of Canada's northern and western areas. Today, it is Canada's federal and national police force. The Mounties are also contracted to provide local policing in small towns and rural areas. The main exceptions are Ontario and Quebec, where a provincial police force does the same role. Large cities have their own municipal police service.

So despite being by far the most famous Canadian police force, the Mounties' don't do much in Canada's cities and its two most populous provinces. Horses and the iconic red uniforms are mostly reserved for ceremonial use — everyday uniforms are gray and black.

Works featuring only the RCMP as Canadian police:

Comic Books

  • In Batman: A Word to the Wise, Batman is contacted to come to Canada to stop The Joker by the RCMP as opposed that by regular Canadian police.
  • Lucky Luke
    • When the Daltons flee North, the first thing they see is a red-uniformed man on a horse, to which Joe cries out "It's a policeman! Marvelous!". When his brothers note that it's the first time seeing a policeman makes him happy, he explains that they're now in Canada, so Lucky Luke can't arrest them. Later one they see the Mountie break up a bar fight between two lumberjack twice his size just by telling them to.
    • A far less sympathetic version shows up in the Alaskan gold rush, where he behaves more like a Meddlesome Patrolman. He eventually winds up stranded somewhere in Antarctica when he decides to confiscate Jolly Jumper.

Literature

  • Janette Oke did a series of novels set in the 1800s about a Mountie and his girlfriend/wife.
  • Part of Robert A. Heinlein's Friday takes place in Canada, so Mounties appear twice.
    • One of the characters tells a story about seeing Mounties break up a riot between three groups of religious believers. It took almost as many Mounties to subdue one of the groups as there were members of the group, when the usual ratio is one Mountie, one riot.
    • When the title character illegally crosses the border between Canada and the Chicago Imperium, she sees Mounties face off with the Imperial police. One of the Mounties cleverly bluffs the Imperials and makes them back off.

Live-Action TV

  • Due South. One of the main characters is Constable Benton Fraser, a Mountie who comes to Chicago on the trail of the killers of his father. He's a perfect example of the Mountie stereotype in every way.
  • On an episode of That '70s Show, the guys drive up to Canada to buy beer, and are confronted by a couple of Mounties. All sorts of Canada, Eh? tropage is played for laughs by these guys.
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus. The performance of the Lumberjack Song begins as a spoof of the musical Rose-Marie, but becomes a bravura celebration of transvestism and arboreal deracination with a backing chorus of Mounties.
  • An episode of Sabrina the Teenage Witch has a spell that turns Sabrina's life into a silent melodrama. Her boyfriend Harvey becomes a Mountie.
  • In How I Met Your Mother, Robin's Canadian origin is mocked quite often. As a result, Mounties are mentioned or even shown from time to time. (Notably in "P.S. I Love You" - in Robin's old music video.)

Music

  • Blue Öyster Cult's "The Red and The Black" (and an earlier sort-of prototype version "I'm On the Lam But I Ain't No Sheep" on their previous album) was about the RCMP:
    Canadian Mounted baby, police force that works
    Red and black, it's their color scheme
    Get their man in the end

Professional Wrestling

  • The WWE's The Mountie was a notable aversion of the Mountie stereotype, apart from his "The Mountie always gets his man" tagline.

Western Animation

  • Jay Ward's cartoon series Dudley Do-Right of the Mounties centers on an Idiot Hero serving with the Canadian Mounties in full dress uniform. While Dudley's arch-nemesis, Snidely Whiplash, dabbles in a few federal-class offenses, most of his misdeeds are lesser felonies such as grand larceny or kidnapping. Further, the Mounties' headquarters is a classic frontier log fort, which suggests that the Mounties not only double as Canada's police force, but as its standing army as well. Can't accuse Canada of Crippling Overspecialization that way. It was made into a live action film starring Brendan Fraser.
  • Klondike Cat from Underdog, who always gets his mouse. He belongs to the Klondike Kops, who are Mounties in all but name.
  • An episode of Archer had the heroes escorting a prisoner to Canada for trial. When things went terribly wrong, not only did the Mounties show up, but also terrorists disguised as Mounties.
  • Droopy played Sergeant McPoodle of the Mounties in "Northwest Hounded Police", taking Always Gets His Man to new heights.

Indexes:

Feedback: 92 replies

Mar 22nd 2013 at 6:46:02 PM

The Tex Avery cartoon Northwest Hounded Police, with Droopy as Sgt. McPoodle of the Mounties.

Mar 22nd 2013 at 7:05:53 PM

Newfoundland and Labrador also has its own provincial police force, the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary.

Mar 22nd 2013 at 9:50:57 PM

Live-Action TV

On an episode of That 70s Show, the guys drive up to Canada to buy beer, and are confronted by a couple of Mounties. All sorts of Canada Eh tropage is played for laughs by these guys.

Mar 22nd 2013 at 9:56:23 PM

Music

Blue Oyster Cult's "The Red and The Black" (and an earlier sort-of prototype version "I'm On the Lam But I Ain't No Sheep" on their previous album) was about the RCMP:

Canadian Mounted baby, police force that works
Red and black, it's their color scheme
Get their man in the end

Mar 22nd 2013 at 10:02:19 PM

^^^ So does every province, I think. I know Ontario has the OPP (yeah you know me... erm, I mean the Ontario Provincial Police).

Mar 22nd 2013 at 10:10:32 PM

No, just Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The other seven provinces and three territories have municipal police patrol the highways and the RCMP takes the role of provincial police. They also serve municipalities that don't have a local police force (the provincial police forces do that for municipalites in their provinces as well).

Mar 22nd 2013 at 10:17:24 PM

Western Animation: Klondike Kat, a Funny Animal Mountie who "always gets his mouse," namely his nemesis Savoir Faire.

Mar 22nd 2013 at 11:15:54 PM

Change the name to The Mounties. More recognizable, and less chance of weird camelcase issues.

  • An episode of Archer had the heroes escorting a prisoner to Canada for trial. When things went terribly wrong, not only did the mounties show up, but also terrorists disguised as mounties.

Mar 22nd 2013 at 11:45:22 PM

  • Lucky Luke: When the Daltons flee North, the first thing they see is a red-uniformed man on a horse, to which Joe cries out "It's a policeman! Marvellous!". When his brothers note that it's the first time seeing a policeman makes him happy, he explains that they're now in Canada, so Lucky Luke can't arrest them. Later one they see the mountie break up a bar fight between two lumberjack twice his size just by telling them to.
    • A far less sympathetic version shows up in the Alaskan gold rush, where he behaves more like a Meddlesome Patrolman. He eventually winds up stranded somewhere in Antarctica when he decides to confiscate Jolly Jumper.

Mar 23rd 2013 at 4:20:12 AM

Literature

  • Part of Robert Heinlein's Friday takes place in Canada, so Mounties appear twice.
    • One of the characters tells a story about seeing Mounties break up a riot between three groups of religious believers. It took almost as many Mounties to subdue one of the groups as there were members of the group, when the usual ratio is one Mounty, one riot.
    • When the title character illegally crosses the border between Canada and the Chicago Imperium, she sees Mounties face off with the Imperial police. One of the Mounties cleverly bluffs the Imperials and makes them back off.

Edited: Expanded the Friday example.

Mar 23rd 2013 at 10:11:27 AM

"Newfoundland and Labrador" is actually just one province and both the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary and the RCMP operate as provincial police there.

The RCMP is the federal and national police force which means it operates in all of Canada when it comes to matters beyond provincial law enforcement. Based on location it is also contracted as the provincial and/or municipal police.

Mar 23rd 2013 at 11:31:19 AM

Call them Mounties, or half of the Internet will have no idea what you mean.

Mar 23rd 2013 at 8:54:34 PM

Newfoundland's official name is Newfoundland and Labrador. It's also one province, not two.

Mar 23rd 2013 at 10:12:47 PM

Gotta be called The Mounties or something. And when it launches, do a search and bluelink some of the existing mentions of them to get it going (I counted at least a dozen on Canada Eh).

Apr 2nd 2013 at 12:30:49 PM

Live Action TV

[[AC:Music}}

{{Monty Python's Flying Circus}} - the performance of the Lumberjack Song begins as a spoof of the musical Rose Marie, but becomes a bravura celebration of transvestitism and arboreal deracination with a backing chorus of Mounties.

Apr 2nd 2013 at 5:40:08 PM

The description is a complete mess. It needs a complete rewrite before it could work.

Apr 2nd 2013 at 11:59:28 PM

An episode of Sabrina The Teenage Witch has a spell that turns Sabrina's life into a silent melodrama. Her boyfriend Harvey becomes a Mountie.

Apr 4th 2013 at 10:33:39 PM

Maybe not complete mess, but the brief history paragraph was definitely a complete mess, and I rewrote it. Also redid the opening paragraph, I see the unneeded 'I' stuff now, which made it rather a mess. I'll definitely pull up the Canada Eh page tomorrow...can someone clarify about the bluelink part? Do you mean just copy some of the other page's examples that fit, or somehow link to the example on the other page? I'm just not totally clear on the meaning.

Apr 5th 2013 at 10:27:34 AM

I saw them in an hour-long John Wayne movie but glancing at the back cover of our DVD collection didn't give me the title. I'll have to rewatch to figure out which one it is.

Apr 5th 2013 at 3:30:04 PM

The first part of the Friday entry should be rewritten. Friday, the main character, describes to the reader a fight involving a violent, previously unknown pseudo-religious sect who attacked a number of Scientologists and Harri Krishnas in an airport, and how it took nearly as many Mouties as there were rioters to break up, in contrast to the usual ratio of one Mountie:One riot.

For what it's worth, she also mentions the Scientologist fought admirably and removed their wounded, the Harri Krishnas only managed to get out of the fight, leaving their wounded behind, and the pseudo-religious sect fought like madmen.

Apr 5th 2013 at 3:32:24 PM

The description is better, but still needs help. Right now, it's a bit too clunky to launch.

Apr 7th 2013 at 3:19:51 PM

What exactly is too clunky? im not sure exactly.

Apr 8th 2013 at 3:50:35 AM

Cleaned up the OP examples section, including adding Namespaces, italicizing work names, Example Indentation etc.

Some of the examples are Zero Context Examples and need more information about the Mounties in them.

  • Suzannah of the Mounties starring Shirley Temple.
  • Sergeant Preston of the Yukon

Apr 8th 2013 at 4:53:22 AM

  • Sergeant Preston of the Yukon (originally titled "Challenge of the Yukon") was about a Mountie operating in the Yukon Territory during the Gold Rush of the 1890s. He was assisted by his sled dog Yukon King (the real star of the show) and horse Rex. This later became a comic book series and early television show.

Apr 8th 2013 at 11:32:08 AM

This really needs to have a purpose behind the trope. Right now this is just about the Mounties anywhere at any time--it seems to me his is just Canada Eh but more specific.

Apr 8th 2013 at 4:56:46 PM

Western Animation: The Looney Tunes short Fresh Hare depicts Elmer Fudd as a (somewhat bumbling) Mountie.

Apr 8th 2013 at 7:26:57 PM

What's wrong with it?

The first paragraph doesn't belong at all.

The sister tropes should go at the end of the description.

Spaces between commas and the following words are missing.

The examples sentence should have !! on the left to get the proper format.

Apr 8th 2013 at 7:53:25 PM

It could be made into a Useful Notes page with little changing.

Alternatively, it could be changed to "All Canadian Police Are Mounties" and only feature works that show Mounties as if they're the only peacekeeping force in all of the Great White North.

Apr 15th 2013 at 10:21:05 PM

OK, both of those work for me...I was leaning toward the second, though I'll need some tips on which works to keep and which have to be tossed. I'm short on time tonight, but I'll get back in here Wednesday (more time then as opposed to tomorrow)and rewrite the thing. Unless it'd be better to throw out this version and re-YKTTW it under the new title, but that probably isn't necessary.

Apr 18th 2013 at 1:37:28 AM

In How I Met Your Mother, Robin's Canadian origin is mocked quite often. As a result, Mounties are mentioned or even shown from time to time. (Notably in S 08 E 15 - P.S. I Love You - in Robin's old music video.)

Apr 19th 2013 at 4:50:08 PM

OK, I ditched the first paragraph, and scanned for any missed spaces...also re-titled it. Not sure if any examples need deleting, but let me know if they do.

Apr 19th 2013 at 5:34:33 PM

My issue with this trope is that almost no examples of it are going to be separate or unique from Canada Eh. They will often coincide with many other Canadian stereotypes. The issue is this is one facet of the shorthand for 'funny Canadian stereotypes', and has no personal identity of its own. This is just singling out one facet of it, a facet that doesn't need to--and almost never does--stand on its own.

Apr 19th 2013 at 5:44:37 PM

Would Flashpoint count as an aversion? It's about a police tactical response team and the series is set in a No Communities Were Harmed version of Toronto, but there are no Mounties in sight.

Apr 19th 2013 at 7:05:50 PM

Oh ok. Maybe I should ditch the examples and go Useful Notes.

Apr 19th 2013 at 7:43:32 PM

Ok. My question is,why are the French,Russian and NYPD depictions given pages but this isnt deserving of one? I'm confused.

Apr 19th 2013 at 7:47:20 PM

Huh? I'm just talking about the title.

Apr 19th 2013 at 7:50:23 PM

If the trope is about all Canadian police being portrayed as Mounties, then it's not a bad snowclone.

But yeah, if you opt for useful notes, obviously it's got to be just The Mounties.

Apr 19th 2013 at 8:24:11 PM

sorry, Star Sword, I should've been more clear...I started with yours but then went into my confusion on the trope itself. It was my fault.

Apr 20th 2013 at 2:09:25 PM

^^ Yes, but this often goes hand-in-hand with other Canadian tropes like the accent, snow, moose, etc. The issue is that it's not actually distinct (near as I can tell) from Canada Eh. It's just as unnecessary as at trope like Canada Is Always Snowy. The only way I see this being a trope is when we have a work that isn't doing Canada Eh, yet inexplicably has Mounties present as a police force where they shouldn't be. But I can't really think (nor do I see) any examples like that.

Apr 20th 2013 at 8:31:31 PM

@helterskelter: You appear to be claiming that Mounties have "no personal identity." This is false in many works.

Apr 21st 2013 at 11:59:54 AM

No. That isn't what I said. Let me put it plainly:

This is not a trope on its own. It's a cut-out from Canada Eh. Not a separate trope.

Motion to discard?

Apr 21st 2013 at 7:53:19 PM

I think there definitely is a stereotype of Canadian Mounties but I'm not sure how many examples fit. Mounties were considered a contrast to the police system in the American West. They hardly had to use violence and kept law and order mostly through strength of character (a strong jaw is often mentioned as well). They "always got their man" even if it meant running all over Canada to catch the criminal. They wore the recognizable uniform with the red shirt and brimmed hat. They always stood up straight and looked manly yet kind. In short, they were the ultimate heroes.

Some of those facts were more true than others but are largely just a myth. Recently, me and another Canadian were discussing the fact that most countries and/or cultural groups seem to have their origin myth. The Mounties seem to be a big part of Canada's.

Apr 21st 2013 at 8:01:09 PM

This Canadian Heritage Minute about legendary Mountie Sam Steele plays up the whole "keep order through strength of character" thing. Special points for the obnoxious American who gets owned. http://youtu.be/Lab6gyWsMXo

Apr 22nd 2013 at 2:29:00 PM

^^ Then the page should reflect that. It should be about the portrayals of Mounties in Canadian media. This is about Canadian stereotypes and Mounties perceived by the rest of the world--i.e. Canada Eh.

Apr 24th 2013 at 7:09:32 PM

Can someone explain the other police pages though,the French,Russian and NYPD ones?

Apr 24th 2013 at 7:22:36 PM

This trope was twisted in an episode of Where On Earth Is Carmen Sandiego. Zack and Ivy pursue Carmen to Canada where she is trying to steal a Native American totem pole, only to spot one a red-suited Mountie. Zack calls him out as a fake because mounties aren't common and they only wear red on ceremonial occasions. Zack's suspicions were correct; the false Mountie was one of Carmen's henchmen.

Apr 26th 2013 at 12:11:03 AM

The Friday example doesn't fit, since both instances happen in Manitoba, which lacks a provincial police force. The first happened in an airport, where the RCMP are usually quick to respond, while the second happens at the border, which the RCMP patrols on the Canadian side.

Both occur in Manitoba, which does not have a provincial police force.

That's also not what happens in Archer. The RCMP show up to check for passports on the train.

May 3rd 2013 at 8:51:58 PM

I likely will discard...no one knows the reason behind the other country/city police pages though?

May 4th 2013 at 11:26:25 AM

I support this being a trope, even if it needs work. The RCMP are a trope IMO.

May 25th 2013 at 8:43:20 PM

I'd like to, but most of the votes are for discard. Any others for keeping?

May 25th 2013 at 9:55:03 PM

Keep. The idea that this is covered by Canada Eh doesn't make sense. It's far too recognizable an image to just be part of a national stereotype (and it's not like it's given more than a mention on Canada Eh), and I've seen plenty of places on the wiki where it would have been used had a page existed already.

May 25th 2013 at 11:27:04 PM

I vote to keep it too. I meant to mention before that the stereotype I mentioned earlier seems to exist in other countries too. It just may be a bit dated. For example, Canadian tourist shops are usually filled with Mountie memorabilia.

May 26th 2013 at 11:33:26 PM

Discard. There's just nothing that obviously differentiates it from Canada Eh. There's a trope there, but this isn't it.

If it were about Mounties showing up where they shouldn't be (such as when provincial or municipal police would take that role), it might be useable, but none of those examples fit.

Right now, it's just "Mounties appear in a work", which isn't a trope.

May 27th 2013 at 8:43:15 PM

I can't speak to Canadian media, but generally speaking in US media if a Canadian cop appears it will be a Mountie, even if a Mountie isn't appropriate to the situation. It'd be like an FBI or CIA man handing out traffic citations, or a New York cop walking the beat in Muncie, Indiana.

May 27th 2013 at 10:19:01 PM

hm ok. Can we get examples like that, which would fit? I can rework it with those, but if there aren't that many, I'll dump it.

Jun 7th 2015 at 4:45:48 PM

  • Johnny Test. One episode had Johnny and Dukey watch a horror movie that featured Mounties protecting a group of teenagers from the movie's monster. Later, Bling Bling accidently causes his body to grow unseemly amounts of hair in his attempt to grow a mustache, causing people to think he's a real monster. After Johnny and crew help him evade the U.S. military, they cross the Canadian border only to run into some real Mounties who reveal their horses are actually high-tech robot horses that shoot lasers and missles. The gang promptly flees back to the other side of the border as they dodge fire from the Mounties....and run right back into the U.S. Army.

  • Subverted in an episode of Rugrats, where Grandpa gets into the back of the wrong car, falls asleep and wakes up seeing a "North of the Border" sign and thinks he ended up in Canada. In reality, it's a Canada-themed amusement park. When he spots what he thinks are real Mounties he hides as he doesn't have a passport. After he hides, it's shown the "Mounties" are just park employees picking up trash.

Jun 7th 2015 at 4:57:01 PM

This should be a Useful Notes article really.

Jun 7th 2015 at 5:00:37 PM

I can still do that if desired.

Mar 22nd 2016 at 10:44:36 PM

^^ I personally think it should be a trope, since many fictional works, especially those from outside Canada have been known to showcase the RCMP, It's been true in my own country (the U.S).

That being said, there really should be a Useful Notes article on the RCMP anyway, seeing as how they are so well known.

Mar 23rd 2016 at 5:56:04 AM

I know this example doesn't involve a police character, but one update for Subway Surfers (a mobile game that changes setting every month) was set in Vancouver, with the train inspector dressed as a mountie.

Mar 24th 2016 at 2:35:39 AM

  • Examples section
    • Added a line separating the Description and Examples section.
    • Add the word "Examples".
    • Namespaced work names.

Several examples are Zero Context Examples and have been marked as such (ZCE). Each one needs more specific information about how it fits the trope.

Mar 29th 2016 at 6:31:28 AM

^ You must admit, it's the shortest Laconic it could have. :)

Mar 29th 2016 at 4:13:15 PM

Also more proof that this trope is quite common up here within Canadian Media as well.

Western Animation

Jun 2nd 2016 at 5:06:47 PM

Film: Canadian Mounties vs. Atomic Invaders?

Oct 2nd 2016 at 3:31:24 PM

Well, can someone put in some bombs or hats, please? This is getting crazy.

Nov 7th 2017 at 3:16:48 AM

^^ This proposal has four Zero Context Examples, so it isn't ready to launch. By TLP rules it should have no hats at all.

Aug 12th 2017 at 9:41:03 PM

Wasn't there a mountie film starring Brandon Fraser?

Dec 7th 2017 at 10:25:36 AM

Dudley Do-Right. I think was adapted from one of the cartoons in Rocky and Bullwinkle

Dec 14th 2017 at 6:30:37 AM

That's weird. All Canadian Police Are Mounties was (mis)launched by Toxic Holy Grenade months ago, yet the draft is still here without the "Troped" mark... Was the launched trope a duplicate or something?

Jan 6th 2018 at 8:33:24 AM

  • In Batman: A Word to the Wise, Batman is contacted to come to Canada to stop The Joker by the RCMP as opposed that by regular Canadian police.

Jan 6th 2018 at 9:10:23 AM

Permit me to expand on the Dudley Do-Right example:

  • Jay Ward's cartoon series Dudley Do Right of the Mounties centers on an Idiot Hero serving with the Canadian Mounties in full dress uniform. While Dudley's arch-nemesis, Snidely Whiplash, dabbles in a few federal-class offenses, most of his misdeeds are lesser felonies such as grand larceny or kidnapping. Further, the Mounties' headquarters is a classic frontier log fort, which suggests that the Mounties not only double as Canada's police force, but as its standing army as well. Can't accuse Canada of Crippling Overspecialization that way.

Jan 21st 2018 at 2:43:21 AM

Bumping to bring examples from the (mis)launched trope (which I put into the cutlist) and sprucing it up.

Feb 2nd 2018 at 1:46:24 AM

^ The last time the OP chicagomel posted on this page was in 2015, so it is Up For Grabs.

chicagomel is still on TV Tropes (they last edited a page on January 25th) so you could send them a PM and ask if they still want it.

Apr 9th 2018 at 8:30:50 AM

So, which indexes does this fit to?

Jun 15th 2018 at 7:22:51 AM

This example might not count- let me know if this is a legitimate time for mounties to appear.

  • In Twin Peaks, a Canadian police officer shows up to demand the FBI investigate Agent Cooper for illegally crossing into Canada on his rescue operation at One Eyed Jack's, which led to several deaths. The officer is dressed as a Mountie. It later turns out to be a scam- the officer is a Crooked Cop who isn't actually a Mountie and is working for the Renault brothers.

Jun 15th 2018 at 3:35:37 PM

Like so many tropes of the All X Are Y template, this TLP is indecisive about what it wants to be about.

Is the trope that Mounties appear in fiction in places or functions they would not appear in reality?

Is the trope that Mounties in fiction wear those red uniforms even in situations they would not wear them in reality?

Is the trope that Mounties in fiction are always upstanding, polite and competent?

Is the trope that in fiction, Mounties are a shorthand for Canada?

What the trope is is going to determine which examples are valid, and what information the examples must contain. This

  • Janette Oke did a series of novels set in the 1800s about a Mountie and his girlfriend/wife.

is really not an example of anything,

In my opinion, all content and examples of this could very well go on UsefulNotes.The Mounties.

Jun 15th 2018 at 10:42:39 PM

^ Perhaps this is a parallel concept to Misplaced Wildlife, in that Canada's Mounties, which have their U.S. equivalent in Federal Marshals, tend to be deployed errantly. A Mountie typically does not bother with speeding tickets or burglars; their perps are counterfeiters and smugglers. So this proposal runs on the nonsensical notion that Mounties are Canada's one-and-only police force, and are deployed in cases outside their purview, either under Rule Of Cool, Rule Of Drama, or Rule Of Funny.

Film

  • Reginald Van Justice from Smokey And The Bandit 2 is Chief of the Quebec Mounties, and he brings a platoon of Mounties into the United States, and all the way south to the Gulf Coast to assist his brother, Sheriff Buford Justice, in apprehending legendary scofflaw Bandit. Justified in Reginald's mind because he's a pompous jerkass, just like his brother, so this is a personal favor. Not so excusable with the other Mounties, who couldn't possibly confuse Louisiana for Quebec.

Jun 22nd 2018 at 9:28:48 AM

I see misuse potential- most non-Canadian tropers (not to mention writers) won't necessarily know what is an appropriate situation for Mounties to show up (see my Twin Peaks example- I still don't know if that would fit). So I think this will quickly turn into "Mounties appear" whether we like it or not.

Jul 9th 2018 at 5:01:44 PM

  • Artemis: Rudy, the lunar city's head of security is a former Mountie who still likes to wear the uniform.

Jul 11th 2018 at 1:04:30 PM

I see this as an Artistic License trope. The creator wants a short hand for "Canadian Police" so they use Mounties even when it would be inappropriate.

  • On Shameless US Frank goes on a bender and is then abducted and dumped on a park bench. When he wakes up he is confronted and promptly arrested by two Mounties. This quickly establishes that he has been taken over the boarder into Canada and we are then told that he is in Toronto. Toronto has its own large police force and Mounties would not be patrolling its streets and making public drunkenness arrests. However, a Toronto police officer in winter gear would look similar to a Chicago police officer in winter gear so instead the distinctive looking Mounties are used so the audience immediately knows that Frank is in Canada.

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