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Fantomas
topic
11:54:06 AM Nov 1st 2011
The Goon Show was the ultimate radio example of this trope, and probably one of the greatest examples in any medium. Several characters constantly used the trope. Major Dennis Bloodnok would often react with outrage to the slightest hint that he was in any way lacking in courage or honesty, and give a lengthy rebuttal, then immediately afterwards prove to be larcenous coward. Bluebottle, a spotty schoolboy with delusions of grandeur as a result of reading too many comics, would frequently give a stirring speech about his willingness to risk death in a noble cause, immediately contradicted when at the end of it he was invariably asked to do something dangerous. This was a general trope throughout the series - characters claiming, usually at some length, to have any impressive skill or virtue would instantly be proven not to have it.

The ultimate hypocrite was probably Hercules Grytpype-Thynne, the only genuinely evil character, who would frequently describe himself as a paragon of honesty moments before proving himself to be the exact opposite. For example, in one show, bank clerk Neddie Seagoon has succumbed to the temptation of being left in charge of a vast amount of gold and stolen the lot. Just as he is about to make his getaway, Grytpype-Thynne, who in this show is the bank manager, catches him and fires him on grounds of dishonesty, delivering a stern lecture that makes Neddie so ashamed of himself that he bursts into tears. Grytpype-Thynne then joins him on the grounds that "There's more gold in the van than there is in the bank." (Later in the episode, he steals it for himself.) In fact, this character was so hypocritical that he was capable of telling complete lies about his motives while actually doing things that proved the exact opposite. Since all the good guys were staggeringly thick, this usually worked.
Spadge95
topic
10:44:05 AM Jan 29th 2011
Being hypocritical may put you to shame. It doesn't feel good. Why is it called Hypocritical Humour when it's not supposed to be funny. Also, the image does NOT make any sense. IS ANYONE STILL PAYING ATTENTION?!
generalmorshu
03:22:10 PM Aug 10th 2012
Simple, the trope is being used to put hypocritical things not funny things. The image is good but could be better
HawaiiKnut
04:02:19 AM Apr 2nd 2013
edited by HawaiiKnut
Hypocricy isn't neccessearly bad. Take "parental hypocricy" for example. It's often used to teach their kids not to do the same mistakes they themselves did at their age. There's also Hypocrisy Nod where one aknowlegdes his/hers own hypocricy. It may or may not work, depending on context. Hypocritical Humor can sometimes be Hypocrisy Nod when one is making fun of him/herself.
DoctorNemesis
topic
05:40:07 PM Mar 13th 2010
edited by DoctorNemesis
I did dig the old image, but I thought this one from Subnormality required less explaining of the joke, and as such was probably a bit better for our purposes. Have moved the old one to Image Links Wiki.
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