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This is a "Wild Mass Guess" entry, where we pull out all the sanity stops on theorizing. The regular entry on this topic is elsewhere. Please see this programme note.
Edgar Allan Poe

The "volumes of forgotten lore" in The Raven are Lovecravian tomes.
I mean, the narrator is obviously mad or going mad, and what drives a man madder than the forgottenest of all forgotten lore?
  • This Troper says we can make this even crazier and make the narrator from the future and he's reading forgotten literature, but it's from such a far point in the future that society has been destroyed, then rebuilt itself and now resembles the 19th century. Then he can be reading forgotten tomes that consist of Poe's own works AND Lovecraftian works.... I don't know what I just said.

The Angel in "Angel of the Odd" is actually German.
This troper read an article a while back stating that the Angel's accent was of indeterminate origin. However, this troper would like to put forth the theory that his accent IS in fact identifiable. It'd explain the "Kirschenwasser" bottles he has for hands, as well as the exclamations of "Mein Gott!" every so often. Plus — "You mos not trink it so strong-you mos put de water in te wine. Here, trink dis, like a goot veller, und don't gry now-don't!" Trink = German for 'drink', 'drinking'.

The stranger in "The Masque of Red Death" was The Mysterious Stranger.
Both were mysterious figures that wear masks but are non-corporeal beings. Also, both have no problem killing humans for fun.

The stranger in "The Masque of Red Death" was yet another Mysterious Stranger.

The narrator in "The Cask of Amontillado" is gloating during his last confession.
It explains why he mentions "you who so well know the nature of my soul" during the first paragraph and why he is telling his story after fifty years of silence.

The narrator in "The Cask of Amontillado" is being forced to confess his crime after C Auguste Dupin succeded in solving the mysterious disappearance of Fortunato.

We all are a bit like William Wilson in some aspects.

The narrator of "The Tell Tale Heart" is a woman.
Back in those days, caring for the elderly was considered "women's work". Alternately....

The narrator of "The Tell Tale Heart" is a man....
....who was pissed off at being made to do bitch work.

Rodrick Usher moonlighted as an artist in Boston under an assumed name: Richard Upton Pickman
The physical changes, the references to Usher's paintings, the general eldritch weirdness... actually slightly plausible, given that Lovecraft was a Poe fanboy.

The Ushers are vampires
They're overly sensitive (really more of an Anne Rice trait), they live in a creaky old mansion, and they practically ooze Victorian Gothic vibes. Not to mention their so- called catalepsies. Dracula slept in a coffin too!

The Narrator of The Tell Tale Heart actually isn't insane and the entire story is, in many respects, a Cassandra Truth!
The Narrator probably only acted insane to avoid the Death sentence. Here's what really happened. The Narrator was taking care of the old man, saw that he was rich, and wanted all of that gold. To do this, he killed the old man and buried the old man as he said. Once the police came in and started to interrogate him, he started to suspect that they knew he was hiding something, so he acted. He immediately started acting nuts, claiming that he heard the man's heart beating. Once he was arrested, the Narrator came up with a false motive to further fool the cops into thinking he was insane. He then remembered that the old man had a very oddly shaped eye and how he (the Narrator) was always a little perplexed by it. Remembering this, he ran with that angle, acting as if the eye haunted him to no end!

Notice in the beginning that he mentions how he truly the old man, and his money had "nothing at ALL" to do with the murder. Another thing to note is the way he reveals why he REALLY did it. "I think it was his eye! yes, it was this!"

The Narrator in "The Tell Tale Heart" is a Time Lord
The Master, to be specific, perhaps under the influence of a Chameleon Arch. The "beating heart" was actually the bum-bum-bum-bum the Time Lords put in his brain as a child, as seen in "The End of Time."
The 13th WarriorWMG/LiteratureThe Edge Chronicles

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