Trivia / Feminist Frequency

  • Cowboy BeBop at His Computer: Anita has made more than a few research mistakes. Among them:
    • She listed Clementine from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind as a straight example of a Manic Pixie Dream Girl, even though she is an outright subversion of this trope. To the point that she actually says to her romantic foil: "I'm not a concept. Too many guys think I'm a concept or I complete them or I'm going to make them alive, but I'm just a fucked up girl who is looking for my own peace of mind. Don't assign me yours." In the same video she takes the time to examine Summer from (500) Days of Summer as an example of the trope. She likewise doesn't mention that the film deconstructs this type of romance and points out how unrealistic it is.
    • She was accused of doing this in her Bayonetta review (which was edited afterwards, see here.), where she made several inaccuracies regarding both the plot and the characters. When criticized for it, she said that it was a misunderstood joke, leading her to edit it to remove the inaccurate statements.
    • In her description of Star Fox Adventures: Dinosaur Planet, she states that the game was meant to be "her [Krystal's] own game", and that Fox McCloud replaced Krystal, when in fact he replaced a different character, Sabre. The closest to a mention she makes of Sabre is when she says in passing that Krystal was meant to be "one of two playable characters". Krystal did have a larger role originally, however.
    • Her criticism of Kanye West's music video of "Monster" missed the point of the song, video, and the album as a whole, which was meant to be a critique about the depravities and vapidness of Western Society in general, hence the use of sexualized dead women. In the same video, she then criticizes Amanda Palmer's album "Who Killed Amanda Palmer" as being apart of this same "trend of fetishizing dead women" in media, which is especially baffling as the album title and artwork are meant to be a Shout-Out to Twin Peaks in the first place, and secondly she seemed to have never listened to any songs from the album itself, like "Oasis.".
    • Dollhouse:
      • She says "Dollhouse is basically a glorified brothel." For one, she fails to distinguish between Dollhouse, the show, and the Dollhouse company in the story. For another, she says it like a Wham Line, revealing something telling about the show that the show itself never realizes. In fact, the Dollhouse is described repeatedly in the series as an institution of human trafficking and sex slavery. The season one finale "Epitaph One" even uses the word "brothel."
      • After describing how the second season would move toward the themes of the season one finale, she rants about how horrifying she found the episode "Omega". While "Omega" was the last episode aired in the States, the Dollhouse season finale was "Epitaph One", an episode available for viewing on Hulu and iTunes. "Epitaph One" is a Deadly Distant Finale, and season two would explain how everything reaches that state. The events of "Omega" are irrelevant.
      • She mispronounces Joss Whedon's name. Not knowing how to pronounce the E in Whedon is one thing, but she also calls him Josh.
    • Sarkeesian cites Heike Kagero from Super Punch-Out!! as a homophobic/transphobic caricature of effeminate men. In reality, he's nothing of the sort. Heike Kagero's appearance is based on oyama, male Kabuki actors who take on female roles. Japanese culture is so different from Western culture that it's very common for Western feminists to dramatically misinterpret aspects of Japanese media as either good or bad.
    • She also lists Betty De Ville from Rugrats as an example of a Straw Feminist purely based off the fact that she was a Lad Ette who had the female symbol on her sweater. Not at one point during the series does Betty express a Straw Feminist ideal or Does Not Like Men attitude. In fact, Rugrats and several moments of the spin off emphasise that Betty deeply loves her husband. While Betty does exist as an example of Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy alongside Howard, she's not a Straw Feminist in any sense of the term.
    • Her criticism of Super Princess Peach. She takes umbrage with Peach's abilities, which are tied to her emotions, as "out-of-control frantic female emotions" and accusing Nintendo of turning PMS into a joke. Sarkeesian first says the player chooses from Peach’s special powers, then implies they’re out of control a la PMS. The entire point of the game mechanic, as Sarkeesian admits at the beginning of the paragraph, is that the player (and thus, Peach, since she’s embodying the player in the game world) chooses what to feel depending on what’s most fitting for the situation. So by definition, her emotions aren’t out of control PMS episodes.
    • Sarkeesian identifies Dixie Kong in Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest as a Ms. Male Character, referring to her as the "feminine variant and love interest of Diddy Kong." This couldn't be further from the truth; Dixie is very much an individual character with her own personality, that she and Diddy have different playstyles is a design element of the game, and her status as a playable character is even lampshaded by Cranky Kong. Furthermore, in the sequel she stars in her own title and Diddy is the one who gets damselized instead.
    • Yet another from Tropes vs. Women in Video Games: In identifying to Beatrice in Dante's Inferno as a Damsel in Distress she says that "In Dante’s Inferno your murdered wife’s soul is trapped in hell and you must fight to free her." Technically true, but this ignores the context that, rather than being a passive damsel who gets kidnapped, Beatrice actively bet her own soul that Dante, her husband, would remain faithful. Moreover, despite being trapped, Beatrice makes a regular appearance throughout Dante’s Inferno as both a helpful and harmful presence to Dante.
    • Anita complained about a mission in Watch_Dogs where the player is investigating a sex trafficking ring. Specifically she used it as an example of women being used as titillation. This is ignoring the fact that the mission is to stop the ring, and save the girls. The player is notably not rewarded with sex for this, and the game emphasises how scary and dehumanising it is for the girls. It was pointed out that this scene was meant as Nightmare Fuel, calling Anita out for the Unfortunate Implications of assuming gamers were automatically turned on by female abuse.
    • She said that the Hitman games has a level in which you go through a strip club solely so the player can go through the dressing rooms and use the women there as eye-candy, and also that the game encourages the player to kill the women and disrespect their remains. The Hitman games are called that because you're a professional assassin, and you're therefore working to kill specific targets and nobody else. The games not only discourage, but actively punish the player for disturbing, much less killing, anyone besides the specific mark. The target in this case was the strip club's owner, and there are no good paths through the level that take you through the dressing rooms. Because she showed footage of this taking place, it's even possible she actively sought out footage of players killing the girls or even recorded it herself. Which makes it doubly odd that she didn't pick up on the fact that the game clearly penalises the player for doing it.
  • One of Us: She indicates she loves Sci-Fi and fantasy shows, and does a trope-based segment. She also says she loves many of the franchises she critiques, including the Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda franchises. While a throwaway comment she made during a 2010 lecture says she's "not a fan of video games," she later clarified that she previously didn't identify as a "gamer" because of Fan Dumb policing of who is allowed to call themselves a true fan of video games but was a fan of many video games for the Wii and PC. She currently denies the label of "gamer" as a statement against the idea that there are real fans when games are for everyone. Also, she appeared on The Colbert Report.

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