Trivia / Alice in Chains

  • Author Existence Failure: Staley and Starr both died from drug overdoses.
  • Black Sheep Hit: "No Excuses", and "Nutshell" is also a very gentle song.
  • Breakaway Pop Hit:
    • "What The Hell Have I" from the Last Action Hero soundtrack. While the film has started to pick up a following, now no one really remembers the song.
    • Arguably, "Your Decision". The song has replaced "No Excuses" as the go-to Alice In Chains acoustic ballad on rock radio. The song charted very high, since there was almost nothing new that sounded like it at the time of its release.
  • Breakthrough Hit: "Man in the Box", which brought them into MTV's Buzz Bin and served as one of the heralds of the imminent alternative explosion. The following year brought them even more critical and commercial success with their sophomore album Dirt.
  • Creator Breakdown: Applies in more ways than one: Staley's problems with addiction increasingly influencing the group's music, and his physical deterioration affecting his singing ability.
  • Doing It for the Art: As mentioned here.
  • Fan Nickname: Fans usually refer to the self-titled album as Tripod because of the three-legged dog on the front. It's also been referred to as Lucky, based on an old joke.
  • Old Shame: The band's origins in hair metal. Layne Staley was originally the vocalist for the hair metal band "Alice 'n' Chainz" (or however they spelled it), but none of the other members of Alice in Chains were in Alice 'n' Chainz. However, the other members weren't exactly clean, either.
  • One of Us: Layne Staley once boasted that when he got his first credit card, he maxed it out at a Toys R' Us buying video games.
    • One of the very last photos taken of him had him wearing a Metal Gear Solid t-shirt. The condo that he bought some time before his death also apparently had a massive TV that he used almost exclusively for gaming, and at his final recording session (the one that produced "Get Born Again" and "Died"), he spent a good deal of time talking to the runner about certain PlayStation games and giving him tips on how to get ahead or beat certain parts that he was having problems with upon noticing a console that was hooked up in the studio.
  • Reclusive Artist: Layne became this in his final years. Up near the end, it was apparently the norm for his bandmates and friends to go weeks without hearing from him; his days were likely spent playing video games, making art, or using drugs and passing out. The only people who saw him with any regularity were the patrons and employees of a nearby bar, where he was apparently a semi-regular patron (though he never bought anything and mostly just sat at an end table, usually in a drug-addled stupor; he left everyone who was there alone and they did the same). The only thing that raised any eyebrows was his accountants noticing that he had not made any bank withdrawals in two weeks, which eventually led to the police wellness check that resulted in the discovery of his body.
  • Special Guest:
    • Ann Wilson, Chris Cornell and Mark Arm contribute vocals to Sap. The song in question, "Right Turn", is credited in the liner notes to 'Alice Mudgarden'. (Wilson sings on "Brother" and "Am I Inside"; Heart at the time owned the Bad Animals Studio where Alice were recording.)
    • Tom Araya makes a guest appearance on Dirt, Metal Screaming on "Iron Gland".
  • Throw It In: The words "junk fuck" can be heard at the very beginning (before the count-off) of "Junkhead".
    • "Iron Gland" was spawned from a riff that Cantrell kept playing that the other members hated, and he promised them that he would never play it again if they allowed him to record it.
    • The main riff to "It Ain't Like That" was apparently a mistake that sounded cool enough for Cantrell to keep.
  • Updated Re-release: Dirt sort of got one almost immediately after its release. The band looked at the tracklisting and noticed that "Down In A Hole" was the second to last track. Since they wanted the album to loosely tell a story from song to songnote , they requested that the song be placed between "Rain When I Die" and "Sickman." Thus, all pressings of Dirt released after its first few months on the market have "Down In A Hole" placed as the fourth rather than twelfth track.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Trivia/AliceInChains