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Literature: Carnacki The Ghost-Finder
Carnacki The Ghost-Finder is a collection of short stories by William Hope Hodgson, all concerning the exploits of the eponymous Thomas Carnacki, an Occult Detective. The original 1913 edition contained six stories, which had been separately published in The Idler magazine over the preceding few years; a 1948 edition added three more.

Carnacki brought an empirical attitude to his investigations, as well as several high-tech (for 1913) gadgets, ranging from photography to an protective device of his own invention called the electric pentacle. Unlike many occult detectives, his cases included a mix of hoaxes and genuine hauntings.

One Carnacki story, "The Horse of the Invisible", was adapted for television in 1971, in the British TV series The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes; Carnacki was played by Donald Pleasence.

Since Carnacki is no longer copyrighted, he's free to appear in other media as well.

Download or read the full text online at Project Gutenberg or the University of Adelaide.

This series provides examples of:

  • Catch Phrase: Carnacki's narratives are punctuated liberally with variants of "can you understand?", especially when describing states of sheer terror.
  • The Exotic Detective
  • Framing Device: Each story had one in which Carnacki invited some friends to dinner and told them about his latest case.
  • Great Big Book of Everything: Carnacki gets all his info on the supernatural from the fictional Sigsand Manuscript.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: At tense moments in his investigations, Carnacki often finds himself in a state of "funk".
  • Matron Chaperone: In "The Horse of the Invisible", while Beaumont and his fiancee Miss Hisgins are together, they're chaperoned by her aunt.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: Some stories leave details like this - for example, in The Horse Of The Invisible, some elements of the haunting are impossible to prove as genuine or faked, since the hoaxer is dead and the ghost turned out to be real anyway.
  • Noodle Incident: Carnacki often refers to earlier cases that didn't get written up and published. Usually it's just an evocative title, but sometimes he'll also drop a tantalising detail.
    "The Black Veil case, when young Aster died. You remember, he said it was a piece of silly superstition and stayed outside. Poor devil!"
  • Paranormal Investigation
  • Post-Modern Magik: Carnacki is possibly the first protagonist to fully embrace this trope, devising updated versions of medieval-era protective wards that incorporate electrical wires and multicolored neon lighting.
  • Real After All: In at least one of the stories, a haunting is revealed as a hoax, and then as the hoaxer is being confronted, the real ghost puts in an appearance.
  • Scooby-Doo Hoax: One case has smugglers faking a haunting so they can use an abandoned building.
  • Signing Off Catch Phrase: The narrator lampshades Carnacki's ritual phrase "Out you go!" for chucking his friends out once he's told his story, but also usually wraps up the narrative with some variant of "And then we all walked thoughtfully home" himself.
  • Something Completely Different: The Find regards Carnacki investigating a book forgery and has no supernatural elements whatsoever.
  • Summoning Artifact: In "Gateway of the Monster", the title being (a giant strangling hand) enters our world through the Luck Ring of the Andersons — a small pentagonal ring. It was originally activated by being worn, but continued to summon the monster afterward.
  • That Poor Cat: In "Gateway of the Monster", Carnacki's lowest-tech piece of equipment is a cat in a basket, which he places experimentally outside his magical protections.
    "I heard the basket, in which the cat lay, creak... I knew that I was going to learn definitely whether whatever was abroad was dangerous to Life. From the cat there rose suddenly a hideous caterwaul, that ceased abruptly"
    • In "The House Among the Laurels", he stakes out two dogs (this time with safeguards):
      "And then, abruptly, from the boarhound over in the far corner, there came a terrible yelling howl of agony, followed instantly by a sickening, breaking noise, and an immediate silence."
  • Who You Gonna Call?

Burgess Bedtime StoriesLiterature of the 1910sColas Breugnon
Brother CadfaelDetective LiteratureCharlie Chan
Cam JansenMystery LiteratureThe Cat Who... Series
Sherlock HolmesParanormal InvestigationKitty Norville
CaretakerFantasy LiteratureCastaways of the Flying Dutchman

alternative title(s): Carnacki The Ghost Finder
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