Big Bad: Video Games

"The ultimate villain of the story, who's causing the problem the heroes must solve."

Note that Big Bad is not a catch-all trope for the biggest and ugliest villain of any given story. The Big Bad is the one who turns out to be behind several other seemingly independent threats.


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  • The Big Bad of .hack// could go one of two ways: Cubia (although defeating him doesn't really solve anything other than getting him out of the way), or Morganna, although you never really fight her directly. She simply uses the phases to interact and fight for her. Once Kite "kills" Aura, she is able to come back and defeat the last phase of Morganna, and truly be born.
  • Cubia from the .hack//G.U. games.
  • The Man in Glasses from Twelve Thirteen turns out not to be. He's the only person who was actually on your side throughout the entire game, while everyone else — including your apparent "ally" that he kills — were trying to stop you from performing the mission you were created for, believing you were too irretrievably damaged to be successful.
  • The Kurain Village Arc of the Ace Attorney series eventually revealed that it had a Big Bad of sorts in Morgan Fey, whose schemes to get her daughter Pearl installed as the "Master" of the Kurain Spirit Channeling technique spans two games and strikes the main characters from beyond the grave. She also has her daughter Dahlia as a Dragon of sorts.
    • Two of the games have their own Big Bad.
      • In the first game, the Big Bad is Manfred von Karma, who essentially set the entire series into motion with the murder of Edgeworth's father. A murder in the present that was orchestrated by him to get back at Edgeworth ultimately results in his comeuppance. Damon Gant is revealed as the true criminal of the bonus case in the first Ace Attorney. Gant eventually states that he is responsible for controlling Lana Skye, the High Prosecutor who in turn was responsible for "helping" Edgeworth with cases, which resulted in the rumors of Edgeworth's backhanded deals and forgeries that DIDN'T already come about from Edgeworth's already established relationship with Manfred von Karma.
      • The third game has Dahlia Hawthorne, who on top of essentially being Morgan's Dragon, is a Big Bad in her own right because of all the murders she conducted that had to be cleaned up by the end of the game, resulting in finally facing her spirit in court.
    • The second game doesn't necessarily have someone as the Big Bad, but each of the cases impact at least part of the story. In the fourth case, the Big Bad is at first thought to be Shelly de Killer, but when he turns out to be an assassin, his client becomes the Big Bad. And guess who his client is: Matt Engarde, Wright's own client. This sets up the overall theme of the game of what is a defense attorney.
    • Apollo Justice has its own Big Bad as well in Kristoph Gavin, who uses every trick in the book, from forged evidence to outright murder, to take down Phoenix Wright and keep everyone quiet about it.
    • Then Ace Attorney Investigations: Miles Edgeworth has Ambassador of Allebhast Quercus Alba, who is the head of an international crime syndicate and is quite possibly the first ever Ace Attorney villain to be the The Man Behind the Man to nearly all the other murderers in the game. With the exception of the criminal of the third case, and it's the criminal's father who has a connection to Alba's syndicate.
    • Ace Attorney Investigations 2 has the distinction of having both a Big Bad and a Greater Scope Villain. The latter is the Fake President of Zheng Fa and his minions, who controlled both Zheng Fa and the prison and legal systems of Japan/USA. The former, however, is Simon Keyes, who killed his former best friend and the aforementioned president for personal reasons and is the final boss of the game.
    • Mia Fey is implied to have had her own in Redd White of Blue Corp. He's the second criminal in the first game and he has a role in the story of the first game.
    • Dual Destinies has a Big Bad for just about everyone but Phoenix in the phantom, the man who bombed the space center seven years ago and again during the game, among other things brought on by trying to keep these crimes hidden. He's also impersonating your detective after killing him a year before the game, trying to lead the case away from himself.
  • Advanced V.G.: Miranda Jahana is the driving force behind the series' overarching plot and is the founder of her own secret bioweapons division: Section-9. Which is where she subjected her own daughter, Reimi, to inhumane experiments when she was a child and, later, created her hybrids. The tournament is little more than a smokescreen by which she gets to field-test them, by pitting them against the unsuspecting waitresses. Since Yuka Takeuchi is the strongest among them and is responsible for defeating Reimi and her hybrids, she's become the focal point of Miranda's hatred. So she'll stop at nothing to break Yuka.
  • AdventureQuest Worlds has Drakath, the Champion of Chaos, who is sending out thirteen Lords of Chaos to terrorize the land of Lore, and who killed Sepulchure, who was the Big Bad in most of Artix Entertainment's other games.
  • Alice: Madness Returns: Dr. Angus Bumby.
  • Baldour, the evil being of the Silver Star in Alisia Dragoon. His followers are trying to revive him through most of the game, and eventually do succeed... Alisia, of course, tears him a new one.
  • Alpha Protocol: Henry Leland.
  • Anaksha Female Assassin: Vincent St. Claire.
  • The Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures's Excuse Plot concerns the Nerd and company getting sucked into Game Land. At the end of the final level, the person who did this is revealed: Fred Fuchs/Fucks, the programmer for one of the games the Nerd made fun of.
  • The Armed With Wings series has Vandheer Lorde. He's the series' most recognizable antagonist and serves as the Final Boss of most of the games. The main exception is Armed With Wings 2, which has Vandheer Lorde as the Villain Protagonist and the Armed With Wings/Lone Warrior the Hero Antagonist. Network is sort of The Man Behind the Man to Vandheer Lorde in Armed With Wings 3. However, the latter still serves as the Final Boss while Network is the second-to-last boss.
  • The overarching plot of the Assassin's Creed series has Abstergo/The Templars, with Warren Vidic being their most prominently villainous member in the main games. Juno was also revealed as a chessmaster villain at the end of III. Following Vidic's death, Juhani Otso Berg becomes the master Templar. Each game also has its own Big Bad:
  • In the regular storyline of Asura's Wrath, Lord Deus and Gohma Vlitra are the primary forces that are plaguing the world that Asura finds himself in. In the Grand Finale DLC, however, it turns out that Chakravartin, the Creator, is the one responsible for the Gohma, and by extension, all the horrible things the earth gods did to try to fight them.
  • The Baldur's Gate series:
    • Sarevok in the first game.
    • Jon Irenicus in the second game
    • Amelissan the Blackhearted in the Throne of Bhaal expansion to the second game and the last part of the story.
    • For the series as a whole, Bhaal might count, but in each individual installation, he's the Greater Scope Villain.
  • The Banjo-Kazooie series has Gruntilda.
  • Batman: Arkham Asylum has the Joker, who continues to play a critical role in Batman: Arkham City, but it is Professor Hugo Strange who is responsible for the creation of the mega-prison, the unwarranted arrest of Bruce Wayne and all of the "political prisoners" in Arkham City who either knew too much about the prison's creation or spoke out against it (all without trial, no less), and even supplying the various supervillains with weapons in order to fuel their raging gang wars. At the end, it is revealed that Strange is a disciple of Ra's al-Ghul (who promised Strange immortality and his position at the head of the League of Assassins in exchange for his help), and Arkham City's purpose was to gather all of Gotham's criminals in one place so that the two could use the dangerously escalating gang violence as an excuse to cure Gotham City's criminal problem by exterminating all of the prisoners via a huge military airstrike. Joker's also in Batman: Arkham Origins.
  • Father Balder in Bayonetta.
  • Loptr in Bayonetta 2, who is revealed to be responsible for Balder becoming the villain of the first game via possession.
  • BioShock:
  • Mingrawn Timbletot in BIT.TRIP. He only shows up in two games, but is undoubtedly the villain. What his intentions are and who he is depends on your view of the series.
  • BlazBlue has Yuuki Terumi, better known as Hazama, the most proactive and involved of its antagonists, and Relius Clover, his partner in crime ever since the start of the Dark War, 100 years before the start of the first game.But as of Chronophantasma, it's revealed that they are pawns to the real Big Bad — Izanami, the Goddess of Death, who is using Saya as a Vessel as well as being Imperator. She backstabs them, leaving Terumi dead and Relius a broken man.
  • BloodRayne 2: Kagan.
  • Nene in Blue Dragon.
  • Braid inverts this trope. The supposed Big Bad in the final level is in fact rescuing the Distressed Damsel from you.
  • Lord Doviculus in Brütal Legend.
  • Bulletstorm: General Victor Sarrano.
  • Gary Smith in Bully.
  • Those Wacky Nazis serve this role for most of the Call of Duty games, excepting Black Ops, where the Big Bad is Soviet General Nikita Dragovich.
    • Modern Warfare Big Bads:
      • Call of Duty 4: Imran Zakhaev.
      • Modern Warfare 2: At first you think it's Vladimir Makarov, but it turns out to be General Shepherd.
      • Modern Warfare 3: Makarov's the real deal this time around.
    • Call of Duty: Black Ops 2: Raul Menendez.
    • Call of Duty: Ghosts: Gabriel Rorke. The leader of the Federation appears to be a Greater Scope Villain of sorts. He's never seen or referred to by name, but Rorke seems to hold him in great respect.
  • The first Call of Juarez has the titular Juan "Juarez" Mendoza.
  • Dracula in almost every Castlevania game. The Japanese title is Demon Castle Dracula for a reason. There are exceptions, however:
  • In the licensed game The Cat in the Hat, Mr. Quinn plays this role (as he did in the movie).
  • Chaos;Head: Norose Genichi.
  • Chrono Trigger has Lavos, whose influence is felt in every time period and who is ultimately responsible for not one, but two extinction-level events (extinction of the Reptites and start of a long ice age in 65,000,000 B.C., and the destruction of the magical Kingdom of Zeal in 12,000 B.C.). The heroes are trying to prevent a third which will occur in 1999 A.D.
  • City of Heroes has a number of especially powerful and influential bad guys that compete to take over the world.
  • In the Web Game The Colour Tuesday, Officer Maxwell is the closest seen in the only released installment. The closest seen.
  • In Contra, Red Falcon serves as the Big Bad for most of the games. However, in Shattered Soldier, the Big Bad at first is assumed to be Lance Bean, but the real villains in the game are the Triumvirate. In Neo Contra, the Big Bad is Master Contra though he's actually Bill Rizer, or so he thinks. Red Falcon is in the game, but here, he's more like a Giant Space Flea from Nowhere. As of Contra: Shattered Soldier, however, it turns out that the Triumvirate were truly responsible for the aliens attacking Earth in the previous games, as they had secretly stole the Relic of Moirai prior to the start of the original Contra.
  • Tiberius serves as the Big Bad in the prequel Hard Corps: Uprising.
  • Uka Uka from Crash Bandicoot. While Dr. Neo Cortex seemingly was behind all the events in the first two Crash games, it was eventually revealed in the third game that he did everything under Uka Uka's orders. However, in Crash: Mind Over Mutant, Cortex double-crosses Uka Uka and becomes the Big Bad himself. There are also four/five standalone villains: Nitros Oxide in Crash Team Racing, the Evil Twins in the main plot of Crash Twinsanity (though they're a Big Bad Duumvirate), N. Tropy (who is under Uka Uka) in the sub-plot of Twinsanity, Emperor Velo XXVII in Crash Nitro Kart, and Willy Wumpacheeks in Crash Tag Team Racing.
  • Cry of Fear has Simon's book that he uses to write his feelings in for therapy.
  • Monokuma appears to be this in both Dangan Ronpa games. He is being controlled by the real Big Bad, Junko Enoshima.
  • Dark Cloud has the Dark Genie. The sequel, Dark Chronicle, had Emperor Griffon/the Dark Element story-wise, though the Dark Genie returns in the final Bonus Dungeon.
  • The Darkness: Paulie Franchetti.
  • Forrest Kaysen in Deadly Premonition, who caused most, if not all of, the problems in the story (the murders that take place in Greenvale, and driving the townspeople insane with purple gas). It's even to the point he's responsible for horribly mentally scarring the original personality of the one called York, the original personality being Zach.
  • Dead or Alive series:
    • Raidou in the first.
    • Tengu in the second.
    • Omega / Genra in the third.
    • ALPHA-152 in the fourth and fifth.
  • Dead Island has The Voice who seems to be Ryder White, but it's really Charon/Kevin.
  • Dead Rising has Carlito Keyes, though he's more of a Big Bad Wannabe.
    • The Overtime mode introduces Brock Mason, the second Big Bad of the game.
    • Dead Rising 2 has TK throughout the entire game, although the true mastermind behind the outbreak is revealed to be Sullivan, or Stacey in the alternate timeline of Off the Record.
    • The Case West DLC seems to reveal the series' Greater Scope Villain in the form of the Director of Phenotrans, Marian Mallon.
    • Dead Rising 3: Has a Big Bad Duumvirate between, Marian Mallon and General John Hemlock.
  • Dead Space has two, Mercer and Kendra. The situation is unique as you fight neither of them, though you do fight what may or may not be considered as the third Big Bad, the Hive Mind.
    • As a normal enemy, if you're daft enough to let the Infector get through necromorphing his corpse. Considering it's puppeteering the other Necromorphs and is the final boss, yeah, I'd consider the Hive Mind to be a Big Bad. Mercer even talks about "... the Hive Mind's gift", suggesting he considers himself to be its servant.
    • Dead Space 2 has Hans Tiedmann at first, until Nicole/The Golden Marker (12B) reveals herself as the true Big Bad.
    • Dead Space 3 has Jacob Danik.
  • The Old One in Demons Souls is the source of the world's demons. Even worse, it's also the source of the setting's magic (called soul arts) and is heavily implied to be "God" too.
  • Def Jam: Fight for NY: Crow.
  • Demonbane: Nya, AKA Nyarlathotep.
  • Demons Souls' Spiritual Successor Dark Souls notably doesn't have a real Big Bad. The reason behind everything going wrong is simple entropy. Gwyndolin does try to manipulate you in a bid for power, but he's ultimately a minor player — he's not even a required boss fight. The DLC content "Artorias of the Abyss" had Manus, Father of the Abyss, who is impiled to be the Furtive Pygmy. The sequel, Dark Souls II, has Queen Nasandra, who is a Soul Fragment of the aforementioned Manus, father of the Abyss.
  • In the Dept Heaven series, while "the biggest villain" is Hector the treacherous magi, each game has its own Big Bad.
  • The Devil May Cry series has one in each game:
    • Devil May Cry has Mundus
    • Devil May Cry 2 has Arius, with Argosax the Chaos/The Despair Embodied as the Greater Scope Villain.
    • Devil May Cry 3 has Vergil and Arkham who is revealed to be the true Big Bad, and not Vergil. Though, Vergil still serves as the Final Boss
    • Devil May Cry 4 has Sanctus
    • Dm C Devil May Cry has Mundus, though, Vergil serves as the Final Boss of this game.
  • Diablo, the Lord of Terror, is the Big Bad of the series that bears his name, though in Diablo II, he shares this status with his two brothers, Mephisto and Baal, as the "Prime Evils." In Diablo III, it's Diablo again using Leah as his vessel, and in the Reaper of Souls expansion, it's the fallen angel Malthael.
  • From the Digimon videogame adaptations:
    • Digimon World has Analogman, with his Machinedramon acting as the final boss.
    • Digimon World 3 initially had the Leader of the A.o.A terrorists, the MAGAMI president, cooperating with Lord Megadeath, who backfired the Leader into getting Snatchmon, a combination of various Vemmon, for himself until Snatchmon performed a Dragon Ascendant and merged with the Gunslinger Satellite to digivolve into Galacticmon with intentions of merging with Earth itself to become Gaiamon.
  • Doctor Who Legacy has several. For the first season the main villains are the Sontarans, under the leadership of Captain Vade the Defiant. Season 2 adds in the Zygons as a Big Bad Duumvirate, though Vade gets defeated towards the end. After that the Master takes over this role.
  • The Donkey Kong Country series uses King K. Rool for the series' main Big Bad. Donkey Kong himself was the Big Bad in the earlier games with him versus Mario. Then Mario takes the role in Donkey Kong Jr, with DK being the victim. Donkey Kong Country Returns has Tiki Tong, while Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze has Lord Frederick.
  • Doom 2's big bad is the Mook Maker, the one who spawned all the enemies in the first place. Considering that it only appears once in the game, and its destruction damages untold miles of Hell's surface, we can assume that the big static face we call the Icon of Sin is the big bad of the game.
  • Doom The Roguelike has the spider mastermind. And behind her, the true evil behind the invasion, John Carmack.
  • The DonPachi series has Colonel Longhena, while Hibachi acts as the True Final Boss of every game.
  • Dragon Age
  • The Dragon Quest games have their fair share of Big Bads:
    • Dragon Quest I had the Dragonlord.
    • Dragon Quest II had Hargon, who attacks Moonbrooke and summons Malroth upon his defeat.
    • Dragon Quest III had Zoma.
    • Dragon Quest IV had Psaro the Manslayer, aka Necrosaro until the DS version added a new chapter, revealing that Psaro's apparent Dragon had in fact been manipulating him all along.
    • Dragon Quest V had Nimzo (also known as Mildrath).
    • Dragon Quest VI had Murdaw, also known as Mudo until his defeat, upon which you find out evil still plagues the world. After D(h)uran is defeated, he tells them that he, Murdaw/Mudo, and the other demon lords were just pawns of the true Big Bad, Mortamor (also known as Dethtamoor).
    • Dragon Quest VII had Orgodemir, the Demon Lord who sealed most of the continents of the world to prevent God from defeating him. In the second disk, he tries to seal the continents again, while posing as God Himself.
    • Dragon Quest VIII had Dhoulmagus until it turns out the scepter he stole had been containing the real Big Bad, Lord Rhapthorne.
    • Dragon Quest IX had Corvus, a former Celestrian driven mad by centuries of hatred and solitude.
  • In Dungeon Maker II: The Hidden War, the Big Bad is Revenger, a demon looking to restart a 70,000-year-old war that almost destroyed the world.
  • Dying Light: Has Kadir "Rais" Suleiman.
  • While not the actual final fight, Temuorin serves this role in Eien no Aselia. Not the most powerful enemy faced, either. Just the one who was in charge all along.
  • The Elder Scrolls has a different Big Bad in each game, although they're often in the service of Mehrunes Dagon, the Daedra Lord of Destruction, who serves as a Greater Scope Villain of the setting.
    • Arena, had traitorous Imperial Battlemage Jagar Tharn, who was secretly in league with Dagon.
    • Battlespire, a spin-off game taking place during Arena's time period, had Mehrunes Dagon himself leading the Daedric invasion of the Imperial Battlespire.
    • Daggerfall has several different faction leaders, but the Underking is the one most directly tied to the main quest line (and also the guy on the front cover of the game). Also, Lord Woodborne is the one who turns out to be behind the murder of the King.
      • In the end, the game doesn't really have a Big Bad. The Underking turns out to be not all that far from a good guy, and Lord Woodborne, while directly responsible for the King of Daggerfall's death, is not an independent operator...
    • Redguard, another spin-off game which tells a smaller-scale, more personal story, has Imperial governor Admiral Richton as the main antagonist.
    • Morrowind has the A God Am I supervillain Dagoth Ur. The first expansion pack, Tribunal, has Almalexia, a different A God Am I persona who acts as one of the three Dunmer gods. The second expansion Bloodmoon has Hircine, the Daedra Lord of the Hunt.
    • Oblivion has Mythic Dawn cult leader Mankar Camoran, but his master Mehrunes Dagon makes an appearance at the very end. The first expansion, Knights of the Nine, has the resurrected Ayleid lord Umaril the Unfeathered. The second expansion, Shivering Isles, has Jyggalag, Daedra Lord of Order who was transformed by the other daedra lords into Sheogorath, Lord of Madness.
    • Skyrim has Alduin, the Nordic dragon god of destruction. The first large expansion, Dawnguard, has Lord Harkon, the leader of the vampires of Castle Volkihar. The second large expansion, Dragonborn, will have the very first Dragonborn as the Big Bad.
  • The Big Bad of Epic Mickey is the Shadow Blot, retooled into an Eldritch Abomination made of paint and thinner. Oddly enough, he was created accidentally by Mickey Mouse himself!
  • E.V.O.: Search for Eden has a new Big Bad for each of the five Eras:
    • Era 1: King Kuralesache
    • Era 2: King Bee, later succeeded by Queen Bee
    • Era 3: The entire Tyrasaur/Tyrannosaurus species
    • Era 4: Bird-Man King and Sir Yeti
    • Era 5: Bolbox. In addition, it turns out the ones accidentally responsible for all of these except King Kuralesache are Martians.
  • The big bad of Fable is the demon Jack of Blades. Fable II has Lord Lucien. Fable III has The Crawler. It is hinted throughout the series that Theresa may be serving as a Greater Scope Villain, but this was outright jossed in Fable: The Journey. Theresa actually manipulated everything in order to save the world from The Corruptor (the Big Bad of the game, and the Greater Scope Villain of the series as a whole up to that point), so she's the Big Good for all intents and purposes.
  • The Fallout series:
    • Fallout 1: The Master.
    • Fallout 2: President Richardson.
    • Fallout 3: President Eden, with Colonel Autumn as the Dragon-in-Chief.
    • Fallout: New Vegas: Caesarnote , with Lanius as the Dragon-in-Chief. Aside from him, the DLC all have their own Big Bads:
      • Dead Money: Father Elijah.
      • Honest Hearts: Salt-Upon-Wounds.
      • Old World Blues: Dr. Mobius, later on revealed to be Dr. Klein.
      • Lonesome Road: Ulysses, who is also the Greater Scope Villain of the DLCs.
  • The original Far Cry game has Dr. Krieger, who is also in a Big Bad Ensemble with Harland Doyle.
    • The second game The Jackal, an arms dealer selling weapons to both waring factions, APR and UFLL, who you were sent to kill. Subverted as he turns out to be one of the good guys (if you can call it that), and by the end of the game you work with him to combat the factions, led by Nick Greaves and Hector Voorhees respectively, which team up by the games climax and intend to commit genocide on the civilians.
    • The third game it looks to be Vaas Montenegro, but it's really [Corrupt Corporate Executive Hoyt Volker.]]
    • The fourth game has Pagan Min, but it's not like Golden Path leaders Amita and Sabal are any better, in fact the ending shows us they may be worse.
  • Fatal Fury has Geese Howard.
  • Fate/stay night: "Heaven’s Feel" route is ancient mage Zouken Matou.
  • In FEAR, it's a toss-up between humongously powerful psychic Stringy-Haired Ghost Girl Alma and Corrupt Corporate Executive Genevieve Aristide. While Alma has undeniably been wronged, her revenge is... rather extreme. As for Aristide, she just wants to keep her job, and to hell with anyone who has to die in order for her to do so. Events would never have gotten as hellish as they did if either one of them wasn't in the picture.
  • The Final Fantasy series is famous for its Big Bads. Some of the most well-known, one in every game:
    • Final Fantasy I had The Four Fiends as the initial big bads, until it's revealed that Garland, the very first boss you fought, is behind the whole thing, just before you fight his true form Chaos.
    • Final Fantasy II had Emperor Mateus Palamecia as the Big Bad. He's also the notable exception in the franchise's Rogues Gallery in that he's the major antagonistic force through the entire game. Soul of Rebirth, the sequel quest released with the Game Boy Advance and PSP remakes, puts an interesting spin on this. It's revealed that after the Emperor was killed the first time, his soul split in two, one half going to Heaven and one half to Hell. The Hell Emperor was the Final Boss of the original game. In this one, the party meets the Heaven Emperor... who is also a Big Bad who has upset the natural order of the afterlife and generally made a mess of things (apparently he planned this.) Yes, the Emperor is so evil that even his good half is evil.
    • Final Fantasy III had Xande as the big bad, who gets trumped by Cloud of Darkness after she gets released.
    • Final Fantasy IV has Golbez, Cecil's brother, until later it was revealed he was under the control of the alien Zemus. Zemus is promptly killed by Golbez, and transforms into Zeromus, the game's ultimate Big Bad.
    • The After Years has the Creator, a nigh-incomprehensible alien being out to resurrect its long-dead race, no matter whose planet it has to step on to do so.
    • Final Fantasy V had Exdeath, who at first appears like a conventional evil emperor type character, but is actually made up of evil spirits that were trapped into a giant tree, and then said tree manifested itself as a humanoid. The GBA version also reveals Enou, a necromancer who was mentioned in the original game as Exdeath's predecessor, another villain who also tried to control the void, as an optional superboss battle.
    • Final Fantasy VI starts with Emperor Gestahl until he is usurped by Kefka, a Monster Clown who becomes a god by killing Espers and absorbing their souls.
    • Final Fantasy VII has Sephiroth, a Bishōnen Super Soldier with mommy issues. Sephiroth is also the Big Bad of all the spin-offs, except the following ones mentioned:
    • Final Fantasy VIII had Sorceress Edea, the schoolmaster of Galbadia Garden, until it's revealed that she was merely a puppet for Ultimecia, a sorceress from the future. It is revealed that the final boss battle leaves Ultimecia in a weakened state, in which she goes back in time, and possesses Edea, meaning the game is a time-loop paradox. Also, Edea was the wife of Balamb Garden's schoolmaster, Cid Kramer, who created a special forces military group whose sole mission is to exterminate sorceresses, including his wife.
    • Final Fantasy IX had Kuja and Garland competing for the position, the winner being Kuja, although Garland, like Professor Hojo from VII, is responsible for nearly everything in the background.
    • Final Fantasy X has the massive entity Sin until it is revealed Sin contains Yu Yevon, a god-like being with a cycle to reincarnate itself as the creature Sin. Also, the Church of Yevon turns out to be evil, with Maester Mika as the Big Bad who arranged the war with the Al Bhed and sought to keep the truth about Sin's nature from the world.
    • Final Fantasy X-2 has a similar monstrous entity, Vegnagun, who is actually not a creature but a weapon, piloted by the angry ghost of Shuyin, a hero-like character with a similar appearance to Tidus. It is implied Shuyin was the actual person the Fayths were inspired by when creating Tidus.
    • Final Fantasy XI has the Shadow Lord, revealed to originally be a Galka soldier who sold his soul to the underworld after being wronged in a love affair, in the original game and acts as the overall Big Bad. Expansion packs also added new villains:
      • Rise of the Zilart: Eald'narche
      • Chains of Promathia: Promathia
      • Treasures of Aht Urhgan: Alexander
      • Wings of the Goddess: Probably Lilith or Atomos (flashback sequences also feature the Shadow Lord's origins)
      • A Crystalline Prophecy: The Seed Crystal, creator of the other crystals which have been causing trouble.
      • Evil in Small Doses: Riko Kupenreich, Exhibit A as to why giving All Devouring Black Hole Loan Sharks cosmic power is a Very Bad Idea. Even if they are Moogles.
      • The Legend Torn, Her Empire Born: Shantotto. Both of them. Neither of whom are the original. These two are Domina Shantotto and Belle Shantotto, respectively.
    • Final Fantasy XII had Vayne, the Well-Intentioned Extremist prince of Arcadia who is actually part of a Big Bad Triumvirate with Mad Scientist Cid and the rogue Eldritch Abomination Venat.
    • Revenant Wings has Feolthanos, the crazed self-proclaimed god of a long-lost race, the Aegyl.
    • Final Fantasy XIII has Primarch Galenth Dysley, who is actually Barthandelus, the fal'Cie creator and leader of Cocoon. He and Orphan, his fellow fal'Cie who powers Cocoon, collaborate together to ensure its destruction.
    • Final Fantasy XIII-2 has Caius Ballad, and he is the only big bad in the series who wins.
    • Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII has Bhunivelze, the world's supreme deity who created Pulse, Etro, and Lindzei.
    • Final Fantasy XIV has the Garlean Empire and its unseen Emperor, though the plot of the game was never completely finished, as Square Enix decided to scrap the game in favor of a reboot, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn. It is unknown if the plot of A Realm Reborn will feature the Garlean Empire as the head villain or not. The closest character the game has to a major villain is Nael van Darnus, one of the leaders of the Garlean invasion, though he is just one of many generals.
    • In A Realm Reborn, the title of Big Bad is given to Gaius van Baelsar, a minor character from the 1.0 storyline who serves the empire as a high-ranking general/warlord. Although he's a Tin Tyrant whose main goal is to conquer Eorzea for the Empire, he is a better man than Nael ever was. A Four-Star Badass who practices the complete list of Evil Virtues and is well-meaning, if misguided, Gaius is a triumphant example of a Noble Demon who successfully activates an Artifact of Doom with intent to turn it against the series' Jerkass Gods, believing he can save Eorzea from itself by removing them from play, taking over the continent and putting himself in charge.
    • Dissidia: Final Fantasy establishes that in the Final Fantasy multiverse, the evil god Chaos is the biggest Big Bad. He bosses around most of the people listed above, and the only ones who try to double-cross him are Emperor Mateus, who plans to outlive Chaos to rule the universe and Golbez who, as he was not the Big Bad of his game, decides to help his brother, Cecil, in getting the crystal.
      • Though Chaos himself actually doesn't boss or even order anyone around at "all". Most of the orders come from either the Emperor, or oddly enough... Kefka and Kuja.
  • Final Fantasy Tactics had Lord Folmarv, who is actually Hashmal, the second-in-command and acting leader of the Lucavi. Ultima, his superior, would be considered a Greater Scope Villain of sorts as she is completely incapacitated until the final battle.
  • The Fire Emblem series is home to quite a few per game.
    • In the first game and its remake (Shadow Dragon), we have the Big Bad Duumvirate of Earth Dragon Medeus and Demon King Gharnef.
    • The second game has the dark god Doma though he's actually a pretty okay guy; he just has some cosmic-scale sibling rivalry going on.
    • Medeus and Gharnef return in the third game.
    • The fourth game has the evil deity Loptous, though he's a very impersonal opponent, and indeed you never fight him directly, with most of the direct villainy being done by his high priest Manfroy and his human vessel Yurius.
    • The fifth game, a "midquel" to the two halves of the fourth, has the dark priest Veld, though he's actually Manfroy's second-in-command.
    • Fire Emblem: Fuin No Tsurugi, the 6th game, had King Zephiel as the main Big Bad.
    • Fire Emblem: Rekka No Ken (simply Fire Emblem in the English version), the 7th installment, first focuses on Lundgren, as he's trying to kill Lyn so he can rightfully ascend to the throne of Caelin, but he's just the villain in the prologue. After that, there's a decoy Big Bad in the form of Lord Darin, but the actual wirepuller is the Dark Druid Nergal.
    • Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones features The Demon King, Formortiis, as the main enemy. He had been defeated by the five heroes many years ago, but he has been revived due to Lyon's creation of the Dark Stone from Grado's sacred stone. While indirectly responsible for Grado's military ambitions, and all that followed it, he is directly responsible for the appearance of monsters across Magvel.
    • Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance stars Ashnard, king of Daein, as the primary antagonist. He desires a world in which the strong dominate the weak, and he seeks to use Lehran's Medallion to awaken a Dark God and gain power. He is the final boss, and most of the earlier bosses are working for him. This includes the Four Riders, most notably the Black Knight.
    • Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn is divided into four parts, each part having its own big bad. In Part I, the primary antagonist is Jarod, a Begnion general who seeks to supress the Dawn Brigade's uprising in Daein. In Part II, it is Lord Ludveck, who wants to displace Queen Elincia as ruler of Crimea. Part III is unique, in that you alternately play as opposing armies; it could be considered Micaiah, or Ike, but it would better be considered Pelleas' signing of the blood pact, or rather Lekain, who orchestrated said deed. In part IV, the big bad is Goddess Ashera, who seeks to destroy the world, which she has deemed irredeemable, at the urging of Lehran.
    • Fire Emblem Awakening has Grima, the fell dragon. In the future, Grima's killing Chrom ushered in an age of darkness and brought mankind to the brink of extinction. To prevent this, the children of Chrom and his allies, led by Chrom's daughter Lucina, used Naga's power to travel back in time to prevent Grima's awakening. It is later revealed that the Avatar was created to be a vessel for Grima - and that Grima, still possessing the Avatar from the bad future, also came back to the past, following Lucina's army to ensure his own existence.
  • Five Nights at Freddy's has Freddy Fazbear himself.
    • In Five Nights at Freddy's 2, Freddy takes a backseat to the Puppet, as he is the one who gave the other animatronics life, although Freddy is still The Heavy.
    • In Five Nights at Freddy's 3, Freddy has become a mere phantom, and the new Big Bad is Springtrap AKA the Murderer and the Greater Scope Villain of the series, possessing a new body of his own. Also, it repaints the Puppet as the Big Good. A really misguided Good Is Not Nice Big Good, but one nevertheless.
    • While previews of Five Nights at Freddy's 4 painted Nightmare Freddy as the Big Bad, the true big bad was the brother of the protagonist. His bullying directly led to the protagonist becoming the Bite of '87 victim.
    • All that said, the true villain of the franchise is the nameless murderer who's responsible for all the evil surrounding Fazbear Entertainment in the first place (being the one who murdered the children whos's souls inhabit the animatronics).
  • The Dsi Ware game entitled Foto Face: The Face Stealer Strikes has the professor as the antagonist, though the description of the game mentions the professor as the Face Stealer. The professor copies your face and then causes you pure hell by wrecking havoc, causing some to blame you, while some are working for the professor, and the remaining others don't know what the heck they are doing, attacking you for no reason. However, six of the characters are not evil. Anyway, you have to chase down the professor and fight him.
  • Queen Myrrah in the Gears of War series.
  • Rez in the Gex series.
  • Each Golden Sun game has one:
    • The first game has Saturos and Menardi as a Big Bad Duumvirate, though Saturos is the dominant of the two.
    • The second game has Alex, a member of the first game's now-broken Five-Bad Band, and it's implied that he was manipulating Saturos and Menardi in the first game.
    • Golden Sun: Dark Dawn has Arcanus, whom any person who played the first games will instantly recognize as Alex.
  • The Gradius series:
    • Bacterion is usually the Big Bad of the Gradius games.
    • Gofer in Gradius II, IV, and Nemesis III (not to be confused with Gradius III)
    • Dr. Venom in Nemesis II, Nemesis III, Salamander for the MSX version, Gradius V, and Gradius Rebirth
    • Zelos in Salamander/Life Force
    • Doom in Salamander 2
    • O.V.U.M (Original Visions of Ultimate Monster)in Gradius Gaiden
  • The Grand Theft Auto series:
  • Grim Fandango: Hector Le Mans.
  • All Guild Wars campaigns have Big Bads of some sort, except perhaps Prophecies (which has several evil groups). The Nightfall campaign also makes Abaddon the big bad of the first three campaigns.
  • Lou the Devil in the Guitar Hero series tries to get aspiring rock-stars to sign his contract so he would get possession of their souls, and also kidnaps the God of Rock in order to get an artifact to drain audiences of their souls.
  • Guilty Gear has That Man, who created the Gears, who in turn have wreaked havoc on the world. He's a pretty ambiguous guy (no one even knows his name) and not much is known about him or what he's planning.
  • GUN: Colonel Thomas Magruder.
  • In Half-Life, and its expansion packs Decay, Blue Shift, and Opposing Force, the Big Bad would have to be the Nihilanth, the creature that was maintaining the rift all along. In Half-Life 2 and its Episodes, it's Wallace Breen, former administrator of Black Mesa and the human ruler of Earth under the Combine. However, with Breen's death at the end of HL2, it's not certain who the actual Big Bad is, but it's highly likely that the leader(s) of the Combine will surface in Episode 3.
  • The Halo series had two Big Bads, the Prophet of Truth (the leader of the Covenant), and the Gravemind (the leader/Hivemind of the Flood).
    • The first game has 343 Guilty Spark.
    • Halo 4 introduces a new Big Bad in the form of the Didact, the former military leader of the Forerunners.
      • Jul 'Mdama, leader of the Covenant remnant, seems to be this for the Spartan Ops co-op campaign.
  • The Big Bad of HarmoKnight is Gargan, in which his intentions are to become ruler of all of Melodia. He even planned to use the princess as an energy boost, which would let him fill the world with never ending noise, thus destroying the planet of Melodia. That's two, no, three Evil Plans for the price of one!
  • Atticus Thorn in The Haunted Mansion.
  • Hitman
  • Each game in the Homeworld franchise has a pretty clear-cut example:
    • The Taiidan emperor from Homeworld. Spends most of the game in the shadows, but according to the backstory for Homeworld: Cataclysm, he was a twisted, ruthless mess of a ruler who managed to stay on his throne by cloning himself, and who ordered the destruction of a planet — namely YOURS — mostly as a publicity stunt.
    • The Beast infection is the primary antagonist Homeworld: Cataclysm, and towards the end of the game it is controlled by The Nagarrok, an ancient alien vessel that picked up the Beast infection in Hyperspace. It even has its own Dragon in the infected lower half of the Somtaaw Command Ship.
    • The nomadic Vaygr from Homeworld 2 are led by Makaan in their attempts to conquer the galaxy. Unusually for a Big Bad, he's killed before the end of the game, and you spend the last mission fighting off what's left of his fleet as they try to bomb your planet.
  • Caleb Goldman in House of the Dead series. However, there is a Greater Scope Villain, and it's the Mysterious Man.
  • The demon Varalys in the Hydlide series.

    I - Q 
  • inFAMOUS has Kessler until the end reveals the Beast as the true Big Bad.
  • The last episode of Jack French reveals that Vince was the serial killer of that episode, and that he killed Nami from episode 1 as well.
  • Jade Empire plays with this trope: Death's Hand first appears to be a bad guy acting on his own, and then it is revealed that he has been acting on Emperor Sun Hai's orders all along and the Emperor was the one who set up the death of the Water Dragon and the upsetting of the balance in the first place. Once you defeat the Emperor, your kindly old Master Li wanders in, reveals that this was all part of his Evil Plan to get vengeance on his brother Sun Hai, and kills you, and it turns out that he was actually the mastermind behind the massacre at Dirge, as well as the final boss of the game.
  • From Jak and Daxter:
  • Each of the James Bond games with an original storyline has a Big Bad:
  • Mizar, a.k.a. Tribal leader Jeff's long-lost brother Barry, in Jet Force Gemini.
  • In Justice League Heroes: The Flash, Braniac is the one who united the villains and unleashed the robot army.
  • Kid Icarus: Uprising has Medusa, the Big Bad of the original Kid Icarus. At least for the first third of the game. Then it's revealed that she was just a pawn for the Greater Scope Villain Hades.
  • The Kingdom Hearts series has the scientist turned madman Master Xehanort serving as the main Big Bad. While by the first game's timeline he is long gone, aspects of him serve as villains of almost every game in the series. There are others. The list of villains in each game is as follows:
  • Kingdoms Of Amalur Reckoning's Big Bad is Gadflow, leader of the Tuatha Deohn. Tirnoch is the Greater Scope Villain and the actual final encounter of the game's main quest. The various factions also feature their own Big Bads of their respective questlines; the House of Ballads has the Maid of Windemere, the Warsworn have Niskaru Lord Khamazandu, the Scholia Arcana has the Dark Empyrean, the Travelers have the Hierophant/Argine of Sun Camp, the House of Sorrows has Saturnyn/King Bisarane, and the House of Valor has Tyr Magnus. The Big Bad of the first DLC, The Legend of Dead Kel, is of course Dead Kel himself, while the second, Teeth of Naros, features Primos Anokatos. Notably, more than a few of these Big Bads (the Maid, Khamazandu, and the Hierophant) can actually be sided with rather than being fought.
  • The King of Fighters varies away from it from time to time, but overall, the major villain of the series is Orochi.
  • The Kirby series has many Big Bads.
  • Knights of the Old Republic gets its fair share, with the first having Darth Malak. The second game has Darth Traya, but Darth Nihilus and Sion get their share of screen time as well.
  • Star Wars: The Old Republic has the Sith Emperor Vitiate as the main overall antagonist, though each storyline has their own central antagonist.
    • The Jedi Knight deals directly with the Emperor.
    • The Jedi Consular has the Children of the Emperor.
    • The Republic Trooper has General Rakton.
    • The Smuggler has the Voidwolf.
    • The Sith Warrior has Darth Baras
    • The Sith Inquisitor has Darth Thanaton.
    • The Imperial Agent has the Star Cabal.
    • The Bounty Hunter has Jun Seros and Supreme Chancellor Janarus.
  • L.A. Noire: Big Bad Duumvirate of Dr. Harlan Fontaine and Leland Monroe.
  • The Last of Us: Marlene, leader of the Fireflies.
  • The Last Story presents Zangurak as this, until it's revealed that Dagran is the real villain.
  • The AI Director itself in Left 4 Dead is the big bad behind every possible bad thing that happens to the players, especially on Expert difficulty where all it does is punish players for doing badly and slaughtering them for trying to be good.
  • In the Legacy of Kain series, while the morality of all of the characters is somewhat difficult to determine, by the end of Defiance, it seems to be firmly established that the big bads of the series are the Hylden Lord (and his entire race in general) and the Elder God.
  • The textbook Big Bad for The Legend of Zelda series is Ganon/Ganondorf. Ganon is frequently incapable of not being the Big Bad. There are exceptions, however:
  • Life Is Strange: In the first three episodes, it seems that Nathan Prescott is behind the drugging of girls at Vortex club parties, and behind Rachel's disappearance. In the fourth episode, we learn Nathan is but a pawn to the true apparent mastermind, Mark Jefferson.
  • Lost Eden: Moorkus Rex.
  • Lost Odyssey: Gongora.
  • Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven has Don Ennio Sallieri. Mafia II has Don Carlo Falcone.
  • Manhunt: Lionel Starkweather.
    • It's sequel has a Big Bad Ensemble Dr. Pickman and Leo Kasper, who kills Pickman and remains the antagonist for the remainder of the game.
  • MapleStory seems to be angling to have the Black Magician as the Big Bad. He sure fits it. He had several heroes frozen in ice for a while, chased the people from continent to continent, and is willing to do it all twice.
  • Marathon provides a rare, non-villainous (though certainly antagonistic) example: Durandal. Although he has his own goals and desires like any other being, Durandal was the one that set things up for the first game; he's ultimately responsible for everything that happened to the titular Marathon ship. Sure, he helps you halfway through, but only because it fits with what he was aiming for in the end.
    • In the second game, T'fear is introduced as the commander in charge of Pfhor Battle Group Seven, but he isn't even encountered, much less killed, and serves more as a Greater Scope Villain. Later in the game, Tycho is reintroduced, this time allied with the Pfhor, trying to kill Durandal and the humans (he has bad experience with both). Tycho, however, is killed about halfway through, and the rest of the game deals with cleaning up the mess.
    • The Big Bad in both Marathon Infinity: Blood Tides of Lh'Owon and Pathways into Darkness is the W'rkn'cacnter, an Eldritch Abomination capable of destroying the universe. In both cases, the Jjaro help you stop it. In Infinity, Tycho thinks that he's the Big Bad, but he doesn't know the universe is being threatened and that he's essentially a wannabe, as the Jjaro are transporting you through space and time (although he does force you to go into another timeline, thanks to his capture of you).
  • Rogue turian Spectre Saren Arterius serves as the Big Bad in Mass Effect. Only, he's not. The real Big Bad is Sovereign, Saren's flagship, in reality a fully-sentient member of an ancient race of "machine devils" known as the Reapers.
    • And in Mass Effect 2 we have the Collector General, but, again, it's a fake-out, and the real Big Bad is Harbinger, a Reaper merely useing the General to control the Collectors.
    • In Mass Effect 3, the Catalyst.
  • Max Payne has Nicole Horne in Max Payne and Vladimir Lem in The Fall of Max Payne.
  • No matter who starts the plot in each original Mega Man game, you can guarantee that Dr. Wily is behind it in some way. Same goes for Sigma in the X games (with three exceptions), and eventually, Dr. Weil in the Zero games. Even Mega Man Battle Network does this, with the villains of the 2nd, 4th, and 5th games being connected to — you guessed it — Dr. Wily.
    • We find out that prior to the Mega Man X series, then leader of the Maverick Hunters, Sigma, was infected with the Zero Virus after he fought the rampaging Zero, the last creation of — yup — Dr. Wily. Sigma eventually succumbed to the virus and turned maverick himself.
    • Dr. Weil of Mega Man Zero fame seems to be following in Wily's footsteps. Not only is he the one who caused The End of the World as We Know It, he continues to plague the world, even after his and Omega's exile. Most of the machinations behind the series' first half can be indirectly linked to Weil. And, in Mega Man ZX, it was hinted that it wasn't Serpent, Master Albert, or Master Thomas who was the true Big Bad, but it was actually Model W, which is what remained of Dr. Weil's own consciousness.
      • Moreover, Weil was closely linked to Omega, who was what Wily's Greatest Creation was supposed to be, thus creating a distinct intellectual link between the two Big Bads.
    • Mr. King in the third Mega Man Star Force game.
  • The Metal Gear series is probably best known for its mind screwiness and Gambit Roulettes, and while the series as a whole appears to go through several Arc Villain Big Bads, culminating in the reveal that there has never been a true Big Bad at all, the confusion is mitigated somewhat by the fact that each individual game has a Big Bad of its own:
  • Metal Slug has General Morden, although he's constantly upstaged by the Mars People or some other threat. In Metal Slug 6, both Morden and the Mars People are forced into an Enemy Mine situation by the Venusians.
  • In the Metroid games Ridley is Samus' Arch-Enemy, but he is rarely a Big Bad in his own right; usually, he's The Dragon to Mother Brain or a different villain. Presented chronologically, each game in the series has its own Big Bad:
  • The Might and Magic series has had a number of Big Bads over its very long run.
    • Might and Magic 1 to 5: Sheltem, a rogue Planetary Guardian, one of many created by The Ancients, who went a little bonkers and decided the best way to protect his own planet was to destroy all the other ones that were created by the Ancients.
    • Archibald Ironfist was the Big Bad of Heroes of Might and Magic 2, being the evil contender in the titular Succession War. He seems to be set up as this in Might and Magic 7, after being released in 6, but ultimately is upstaged by his Terran advisors, who themselves fail to reach this level by virtue of not causing most of the problems the heroes must solve.
    • Might and Magic 6 and Heroes of Might and Magic 3: The Kreegan, the ancient enemies of the Ancients, although their leadership changed quite frequently due to consistently being killed by the games' heroes. M&M 6 had the Kreegan Queen and HMM3 had Xenofex and, after Xenofex gets killed in M&M 7note , Lucifer.
    • Might and Magic 8: Escaton the Destroyer causes, directly or indirectly, most of the problems the heroes must face. As opposed to Sheltem, however, he is not malfunctioning, just caught between his programming and the realization that the Ancients might have failed to consider this situation or deemed it acceptable losses.
    • Might and Magic 9 and Heroes of Might and Magic 4: These two games mainly suffered from Canon Discontinuity due to 3DO games crashing and burning at the time they were made.
    • Heroes of Might and Magic 5 and Dark Messiah: The Demon Sovereign, Kha-Beleth.
  • Monkey Hero has the Nightmare King
  • Monster Girl Quest has Illias, The Creator who seeks to destroy the entire monster race. She even killed off an entire city for coexistence between monsters and humans, and sealed a former Hero for rebelling against her. Her deep-seated hatred for monsters was even made into a religion. The she started planning to recreate the world in her own image after Luka rebels against her at the end of Part 2, by killing every monster and human on the entire planet!
  • MOTHER has Giegue.
    • Giegue also comes back in the fangame Mother: Cognitive Dissonance, though he starts to change his name halfway through to Giygas the Transcendent One.
    • Giegue returns as the Big Bad in the sequel, Mother 2, aka EarthBound, though in the American game he's called Giygas.
    • Porky Minch, who serves as The Dragon for Giegue/Giygas early in the game, later has a role-reversal when it is revealed that Giygas has lost the ability to make his own thoughts, and Porky winds up pulling the strings at the end, taunting the heroes as they battle a powerful but dumb Giygas.
    • In Mother 3, Porky Minch, aka the bratty kid from the second game who turns out to be The Dragon to Giygas is revealed to be the Big Bad in the final chapter.
  • Murdered: Soul Suspect: Abigail Williams.
  • Mystery Of Mortlake Mansion: The Evil Sorceror, Cagliostro, who dwells in the "shadowy" mansion.
  • Namco X Capcom has Saya, but near the end of the game, the true villain is actually 99. Its Spiritual Successor Project X Zone has Due Frabellum as the main antagonist, however, she is only the villain until Meden Traore reveals himself as the true villain and Final Boss of the game.
  • Most Nasuverse works have one.
    • Roa/SHIKI (whoever is dominant at the time) in Tsukihime.
    • The Night of Wallachia, then White Len, in Melty Blood. It's taken over by the Dust of Osiris in Actress Again.
    • Kotomine Kirei and Gilgamesh in Fate/stay night (they didn't start everything, but are lying in wait). They did it in Fate/Zero too.
    • In Heaven's Feel, the Big Bad is Zouken (who is directly or indirectly responsible for everything bad that happens in the entire route) , although both Kotomine and (eventually) Dark Sakura could also be seen as this.
    • Araya Souren in Kara no Kyoukai. Notably, he was confronted about halfway through the series and never heard from again.
  • The Need for Speed series:
    • Eddie in Need for Speed: Underground.
    • Caleb in Need for Speed: Underground 2.
    • Razor in Need for Speed: Most Wanted.
    • Darius in Need for Speed: Carbon.
    • Ryo Watanabe in Need for Speed: ProStreet.
    • Chase Linh in Need for Speed: Undercover
  • Neverwinter Nights series:
    • The creator race queen Morag in the original. She seeks to restore the reptiloid dominion over the Sword Coast.
    • The medusa Huerodis in Shadows of Undrentide. She wants to raise the fallen Netherese city of Undrentide for unknown reasons, and manipulates you into delivering a mythallar to do it with. No word on what the next bit of her plan was.
    • The archdevil Mephistopheles in Hordes of the Underdark. After being bound on the Prime Material Plane by a powerful drow priestess called the Valsharess, he manipulates you into destroying her armies and attacking her, weakening her enough to break free. He wants to Take Over the World.
    • The King of Shadows in Neverwinter Nights 2. This is a Pure Magic Being that seeks to uphold the laws and protect the descendants of the ancient empire of Illefarn. Problem is, Illefarn is long gone due in large part to the King of Shadows' origin story, and the King is corrupted by Black Magic.
    • Akachi the Betrayer in Mask of the Betrayer. Sort of. He was transformed into a curse of elemental hunger that is slowly killing you.
    • In Storm of Zehir, the yuan-ti House Se'sehen, led by an avatar of Zehir, the yuan-ti god of poison. They want to Take Over the World.
  • Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors plays with this in a surprising way. The Big Bad ends up being Ace as the person who set everything into motion, but the current Nonary Game is actually being run by June and Santa, who are trying to punish the four men responsible for the first game and to get Junpei to save June's life. Time travel loops and all that.
  • The Night Of The Rabbit: It is the Evil Wizard Great Zaroff. Though you get hints about it early in the story, you do not discover the identity of the villain until much later.
  • Ninja Gaiden 3 (of the newer games): Clifford "Cliff" Higgins.
  • Jasper Batt Jr. in No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle. In almost every other game by Suda 51, including the first No More Heroes, whether or not there's a villain, let alone WHO, is up to interpretations. Other exceptions include Fleming in Shadows Of The Damned, and Swan in Lollipop Chainsaw.
  • Oddworld:
    • Abe's Oddysee has Molluck the Glukkon.
    • Abe's Exoddus has the Brewmaster.
    • Munch's Oddysee has Humphrey and Irwin with Humphrey as the dominant Big Bad.
    • Stranger's Wrath has Sekto.
    • Lady Margaret, as the queen of the Magog Cartel, is the Greater Scope Villain behind Molluck, Brewmaster, and all the other Glukkons, however she hasn't appeared in a game yet. Lady Margaret's grandmother is the Greater Scope Villain behind Lady Margaret, and is supposed to appear in Squeek's Oddysee.
  • Beiloune in Okage: Shadow King, who turned out to be surprisingly sinister.
  • There are three in Ōkami: Orochi, Ninetails and Yami. It's later revealed that all of the main bosses in the game, main villains and minions, come from the same source (not another villain, but rather the source of evil's very existence).
  • In Ōkamiden, there's Akuro, who may or may not be the core of Master Anura, Bullhead, Sen, Ryo, and King Fury, a part of Yami along with the previously mentioned demons, or the Greater Scope Villain of the first game, using both Orochi and Yami as vessels. The game contradicts itself a lot, though.
  • One Piece: Pirate Warriors 2 features an original alternate story with Marshall D. Teach A.K.A. "Blackbeard" and Gecko Moria joining forces to defeat Edward "Whitebeard" Newgate.
  • While all of the Persona games have one, they certainly enjoy employing Greater Scope Villains as the Man Behind the Man and True Final Bosses.
  • Although the player's goal in the Pokémon series is to become Champion, the leader of each generation's evil team serves as the Big Bad, as they are the ones responsible for whatever troubles are occurring in each region.
  • Policenauts: There is a Big Bad Duumvirate of Gates Becker and Joseph Sadaki Tokugawa.
  • Portal: GLaDOS. Not only does she place Chell in danger numerous times, half-way through the game she tries to kill her by placing her on a platform heading towards a pit of fire and at the end of the game, she almost kills her by flooding the Enrichment Centre with a deadly neurotoxin..
    • In Portal 2 GLaDOS continues the role at first, but eventually, she's overtaken by Wheatley. Finally it turns out that it's the mainframe which causes all the problems.
  • The Prince of Persia series often has one in each game:
    • Prince of Persia: Jaffar.
    • Prince of Persia 2: Jaffar returns as the Big Bad in this game. The ending has an image of a mysterious witch who had been watching the Prince. Word of God is that she was responsible for giving Jafar his powers, killing the Prince's family, and sacking the Prince's kingdom. However, the sequel it foreshadowed never came to pass.
    • Prince of Persia 3D: Rugnor, who is working with his father, Assan.
    • Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time: The Vizier.
    • Prince of Persia: The Forgotten Sands: Each version has a Big Bad.
      • Console/PC version: Ratash
      • Wii version: The Sorceress
      • PSP version: Ahihud
      • DS version: The Cult, with Master as their leader.
    • Battles Of Prince Of Persia: The Daevas.
    • Prince of Persia: Warrior Within: The Dahaka is the closest thing the game has to a Big Bad since it's who the Prince fears the most. The Empress of Time/Kaileena serves as a secondary antagonist, and the main reason The Prince goes against her is to save himself from the creature.
    • Prince of Persia: The Two Thrones: The Vizier, who has transformed into Zurvan, the God of Time, returns as the Big Bad. This game also has a secondary antagonist in the form of The Dark Prince.
    • Prince of Persia (2008): Ahriman
    • Prince Of Persia: The Fallen King: Ahriman serves as the Big Bad of this game as well.
  • Professor Layton and the Curious Village has Don Paolo.
  • Prototype has Elizabeth Greene for the Infected, and General Peter Randall for Blackwatch.
    • The true antagonist is the real Alex Mercer as he created the Blacklight virus and unleashed it in New York. Too bad you won't confront him since he died unleashing the virus.
    • The second game would have Alex Mercer.
  • Psychic Force has Richard Wong: an arrogant Smug Snake who is a Magnificent Bastard and that he sees people as nothing more than pieces on a chess board, not caring about ruining the lives of many as he seeks to, you guessed it, Take Over the World.
  • Coach Oleander in Psychonauts.

     R - Z 
  • The Ratchet & Clank series gave us a nice selection of Big Bads as well, however the most recurring is Dr. Nefarious
  • Rebuild had no designated bad guy for the first instalment, aside from the zombies. The second, however, has Father Kane, the head of the Last Judgement gang that enslave women for their own sexual pleasures and repeatedly attack your settlement. He's therefore the biggest threat aside from the zombies, and killing him and his gang is one of the conditions that allows you to win.
  • Red Dead Revolver has Govener Griffon, who betrayed Red Harlow's father and responsible for General Deigo's tyrany.
  • Red Dead Redemption has Edgar Ross. In control of John Marston for the vast majority of the game, he's not actually fought until the very, very end, and not even by Marston himself.
  • The Red Faction series has them, Axel Kaypeck in the first game but Masako pulls a Dragon Ascendant. For the remainder of the series, Kaypeck was a posthumous Greater Scope Villain. The rest of the series has -
    • In the second game, it looks to be, Victor Sopot, but it turns out to be Crate Molov.
    • Guerrilla has a Big Bad Duumvirate between Adrmiral Lucious Kobel and General Roth.
    • Armageddon has Adam Hale as the human antagonist, but the bigger threat is the queen, an alien who is mother to a race known as the plauge.
  • The Resident Evil franchise has the Umbrella Corporation, led by Ozwell Spencer, as the overarching Big Bad for the first part of the series. The individual episodes have individual Big Bads:
  • In RosenkreuzStilette, Iris is the true antagonist, as she arranged for the rebellion to be held against the Empire just For the Evulz of it. She had her father imprison Karl because He Knows Too Much and arranged for Raimund to be brought Back from the Dead. Her agenda is to become the god of the world, and intends to use the power and intellect she got from being reincarnated from Rosenkreuz to do just that.
  • Rune Factory Frontier: Gelwein.
  • RuneScape has several, usually at least one in each of the various milti-part storylines:
    • The Plague City series has Lord Iorworth and King Lathas. While nominally a Big Bad Duumvirate, each thinks they're using the other. Before this, there were two Red Herring Big Bads: Iban and King Tyras.
    • The Morytania series has Lord Lowerniel Vergidiyad Drakan, a vampyre said to be so horrible we've never actually seen him. His influence is felt mostly through his Vyrewatch commander, Vanstrom Klause.
    • The Dwarf series has Director Hreidmar.
    • The Gnome series had General Khazard for the tree gnomes and Glough for the city gnomes, and now apparently Glouphrie for both.
    • The Pirate series has Rabid Jack. Like Drakan, we've never actually seen him, but since both of the series's big villains so far, Captain Donnie and Mi-Gor, have been stated to be under his command, there's little doubt who the final foe is.
    • The Temple Knight series has Mother Mallum.
    • The Goblin series has H.A.M., led by Johannes Ulsbrecht and Sigmund.
    • And finally, the Mahjarrat series, which ties together the Desert, Dagon'hai, Defender of Varrock, Black Knight, etc. storylines into one huge Myth Arc that is probably the closest thing to a main story this very open-ended game has, has Lucien, a particularly impressive example. Once you steal the artifact that created the world, there's really no stopping you. To a lesser degree, the other Zamorak-worshiping Mahjarrat qualify, including Zemouregal, Enakhra, and Hazeel, but it's clear Lucien is really the king here.
  • Apsu in Sailor Moon: Another Story
  • The Saints Row series:
  • From Sam & Max: Freelance Police:
    • Conroy Bumpus in Hit The Road.
    • Mack Salmon in the TV series.
    • Hugh Bliss in Telltale Season One.
    • The Soda Poppers in Telltale Season Two.
    • The Narrator in The Devil's Playhouse.
  • Scarface: The World is Yours: Alejandro "Alex" Sosa.
  • Seiken Densetsu 3 puts an interesting twist on this: there are actually three different Big Bads: the Dragon Emperor, the Prince of Darkness, and the Dark Lich. The three fight among each other as well as against you throughout the first half of the game, but at the halfway point, one of the three will annihilate the other two and become the main antagonist for the second half of the story. Which one wins depends on which of the six characters you've selected to be your main character.
  • Septerra Core. Doskias is the Big Bad, right from the beginning of the game.
  • Shin Megami Tensei:
  • Shinobi's PS2 remake: Hiruko.
  • The Marquis de Montalban in Sid Meier’s Pirates!
  • Silent Hill usually has the God but is more of a Greater Scope Villain in It's appearances:
  • In Skies of Arcadia, the Valuan empire is led by Empress Teodora, although her head admiral, Lord Galcian, has his own ulterior motives and serves as the true Big Bad. Incidentally, his Dragon, Ramirez, is the actual final boss, taking over after Galcian is killed, and changing the plan from rule the world to destroy the world.
  • Sleeping Dogs: Henry "Big Smile" Lee.
  • All Sly Cooper games feature Big Bads though they where not always how they appeared.
    • Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus featured Clockwerk, an owl that traded his flesh and feathers for robotic immortality, all to wipe out the Cooper family.
    • Sly 2: Band of Thieves saw the return of Clockwerk, but in pieces, so it disqualifies him from Big Bad status. Arpeggio was resembling the Clockwerk pieces to reform the mechanical bird and fuse with him to gain immortality, but at the end of the game, Neyla quadruple-crosses him and fuses herself with the frame, dubbing herself Clock-La.
    • Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves' Big Bad is a Mad Scientist named Dr. M who has his own vendetta against Sly and the Cooper family.
    • Sly Cooper: Thieves In Time features Cyrille Le Paradox, a museum owner who uses time travel to interfere with the Cooper ancestors so he could have his revenge on Sly's father who indirectly caused Le Paradox's own father to be arrested.
  • Bruno Dondurma, whose chase after the medallion to awaken Lares is the major conflict of Solatorobo. At first.
  • The textbook Big Bad for the Sonic the Hedgehog series is Dr. Eggman/Robotnik.
  • Ballser in Something and the Evil Guy in Something Else. They even team up and fuse during the True Final Boss fight in Something Else.
  • Drazil in Soul Nomad & the World Eaters fit's the bill.
    • The Devourlord in the demon path however manages to oneup Drazil in every way. The kicker? YOU are the Devourlord.
  • Kombayn Nikoladze in the first Splinter Cell.
    • Suhadi Sadono is this at the start of Pandora Tomorrow, but by the end he has forged a Big Bad Duumvirate with Norman Soth.
    • Douglas Shetland in Chaos Theory.
    • Emile Dufraisne in Double Agent.
    • Tom Reed in Conviction.
    • Majid Sadiq in Blacklist.
  • Each Spyro the Dragon game from the classic Insomniac Games trilogy always had a main villain on their own:
  • The Rebooted trilogy The Legend of Spyro had the Dark Master Malefor as it's main villain. His Co-Dragons Dark Cynder and Gaul serving as the main villains in the first two games due to their master being Sealed Evil in a Can they're trying to free at the time, but it's ultimately Malefor manipulating everything from behind the scenes. He's finally let out at the end of The Eternal Night and causes havok and destruction for three years while the heroes are Sealed Good in a Can before serving as the direct villain of Dawn Of The Dragon.
  • Skylanders always has Kaos as the Big Bad.
  • In StarCraft, the Overmind filled this role. Kerrigan (and possibly the UED) in Brood War, and in StarCraft II, Amon, a fallen xel'naga and former master of the Overmind.
  • The Star Fox team have faced:
  • Star Gladiator has Dr. Edward Bilstein: an Emperor Scientist who takes his malevolent experimentations and universal conquest into high monstrous levels.
  • Star Wars: The Old Republic has a different Big Bad for each of the Class Stories. Each one also has a Disc One Final Boss for the first act. (Some even have a Disc Two Final Boss for the second act)
    • The Jedi Knight has Darth Angral for Chapter 1 and the Sith Emperor for the rest.
    • The Jedi Consular has Lord Vivicar for Chapter 1, Lord Kyrus for Chapter 2 until Blaseus is revealed, and The Children of the Emperor, specifically the First Son, in Chapter 3.
    • The Trooper has Harron Tavus in Chapter 1 and General Rakton in Chapter 3.
    • The Smuggler has Skavak in Chapter 1 and The Voidwolf for the rest.
    • The Sith Warrior has Nomen Karr in Chapter 1, Darth Vengean in Chapter 2, and Darth Baras in Chapter 3
    • The Sith Inquisitor has Darth Zash in Chapter 1 and Darth Thanaton for the rest.
    • The Bounty Hunter has Tarro Blood for Chapter 1 and Jun Seros for the rest.
    • The Imperial Agent has The Eagle for Chapter 1 until Darth Jadus is revealed, Ardun Kothe in Chapter 2, and The Star Cabal in Chapter 3.
  • The Stellar 7 series presents Gir Draxon as the Big Bad.
  • The Street Fighter franchise has M. Bison as its Big Bad, although in the III series, Gill serves as this, even though he may actually qualify as a Well-Intentioned Extremist. Gill's younger brother, Urien, could somehow be considered the real Big Bad of the III series as he seeks to overthrow his brother and plunge the entire world into a state of chaos and destruction.
  • Suikoden II: Luca Blight.
  • Super Mario Bros. usually has Bowser as the textbook Big Bad in the main series. While the original Paper Mario and Paper Mario: Sticker Star have Bowser as their Big Bad as usual, the other Mario RPG spin-offs featured original ones:
  • The Super Robot Wars games tend to have many Big Bads, because they're made up of multiple mecha series in a single game. The result is that said game will (usually) have each and every Big Bad the series included did. Still, they tend to add an extra-big Big Bad unique to that game, often the Final Boss. The greatest example in the series is Keisar Ephes, who turns out to be the Man Behind the Man for every single original villain in the Alpha sub-series, and, by extension, is more or less responsible, at least in part, for many of the Big Bads belonging to the various anime included. It also helps that he presents himself as the anti-Ide, making him an indirect Alternate Universe big bad for Ideon. Not bad for a guy who never shows up until the final battle.
    • In Super Robot Wars Z, The Edel Bernal is a bit of a twist on this, but not that much of a subversion. We technically see him around occasionally, but he doesn't reveal his nature and part of the plot until, like Keisar Ephes, the final battle. He's just a Psychopathic Manchild with ridiculous levels of power that organized the entire situation for his sick pleasure and let his unwitting Dragon do all the dirty work with a simple utterance of "I love you" once in a while.]]
  • The Super Smash Bros. series usually had a Big Bad in the form of Master Hand, but this changed in the Subspace Emmisary in Brawl, when it was subjected to The Worf Effect at the hands of Tabuu.
  • System Shock: SHODAN.
  • The Tale of ALLTYNEX trilogy have the titular Master Computer Alltynex OS where almost everything that goes wrong in the series can be traced back to it. Altough in reality it can be traced back to the Senate, the ones that caused Alltynex to turn rogue in the first place.
  • The Tales Series has its fair share of Big Bads, although in many of them you don't learn that they are the Big Bad until much later in the game.
    • Tales of Phantasia has Dhaos who is really trying to use the mana of the World Tree to save his homeworld, Derris-Kharlan.
    • Tales of Symphonia, the distant prequel, has Mithos Yggdrassil, who is trying to use the power of the World Tree to revive his sister Martel and create a world where all people are stripped of free will and therefore are equal.
    • Tales of Destiny 2 has Elraine at first, with Fortuna as the Greater Scope Villain.
    • Tales of Eternia alternates it, initially pointing to Balir, but he was Dead All Along and Shizel is the person behind it. However, she was possessed by a god called Nereid, triggered by Balir's very death, among other factors.
    • Tales of Graces has Lambda for the main story, along with Fodora Queen in the Future arc.
    • Tales of Legendia switches it up a bit, with Vaclav as the Disc One Final Boss during the first half. Maurits takes over the spotlight, but he's subordinate to the Nerifes, the real Big Bad. Afterward, the Character Quests' overarching plot involves the black mist, and Schwartz, the one generating it.
    • Tales of the Abyss has Vandesdelca, aka "The One Who Would Seize Glory" (more commonly known early on as Luke's swordsmanship Master, Van Grants)
    • Tales of Vesperia has Alexei Dinoia, though the last act of the game involves cleaning up his mess.
  • You don't get to fight her, but in Team Fortress 2, the Administrator is pretty much this. Until Gray Mann came along.
  • Tekken has Heihachi Mishima (1, 3 and 4), Kazuya/Devil (2 and 6) and Jin Kazama/Devil Jin (6) as Corrupt Corporate Executive, Chess Master style big bads, Ogre (3) and Azazel (6) as demonic final bosses, and Heihachi's father Jinpachi (5) along with Devil (2) as both.
  • Thief: The Dark Project has Constantine aka the Trickster.
  • Time Crisis:
  • Tomb Raider:
  • Erick Von Reitenau, aka Adam from Trauma Center: Under the Knife and its remake, Second Opinion.
    • Under the Knife 2 has Patrick Mercer, Reina Mayuzumi and Heinrich von Raitenau.
    • New Blood has Kidman, who shows up about halfway through the game, though only to be killed in the next chapter and revealed to be working for Master Vakhushti.
    • Trauma Team has the Raging Bomber in Naomi's storyline.
  • Twisted Metal series has Calypso.
  • Two thirds of the main Ultima series had Big Bads:
  • Uncharted 2: Among Thieves: Zoran Lazarevic.
  • Until Dawn: Has the killer terrorizing the protagonists on the mountain, eventually revealed to be Josh Washington, who wasn't a real killer but an elaborate and vindictive prankster. After this is revealed, it turns out the real threat are the Wendigo, which haunt the mountain. Incidently, the "main" leader of the wendigo, is Josh's sister Hannah, who disappeared a year later. In the unlockable "Events of the Past" video, we learn that the wendigo that hunted Hannah a year earlier is the biggest and most dangerous, Makkapitew, who is implied to be the one who possessed Hannah and transformed her.
  • Faulkner of Vanguard Bandits. From his very first appearance in the story, to the endgame fight against in every ending. He isn't hesitant to head out to battle himself multiple times earlier on to lay a massive-sized beatdown on any poor fool who gets in his way.
  • The Viewtiful Joe series has one, mentioned at the end of the second game being responsible for everything... but the third game doesn't seem to be coming out any decade soon.
  • The Virtua Cop series has international terrorist Joe Fang. In the first two games, he's the leader of a crime syndicate known as the EVL Inc. Then in the arcade only release Virtua Cop 3, he returns as the leader of the ECM terrorist organization.
  • The Walking Dead:
    • Season 1 has The Stranger, a mysterious figure who talks to Clementine through her supposedly-broken walkie-talkie, and later abducts her. To be fair, he is something of a subversion, since he isn't a mastermind or even particularly villainous - in the end he's just another survivor pushed past his Despair Event Horizon.
    • Wyatt's story in 400 Days has Nate from Russell's story.
    • Season 2 has William "Bill" Carver, who unlike The Stranger, is a truly evil being. He imprisons the entire group eventually, and is by far the main threat for the first three episodes. He directly causes the deaths of several main characters, is heavily implied to have raped Rebecca, and isn't even given an Alas, Poor Villain moment when he dies. However, he is brutally murdered by Kenny at the climax of Episode 3.
    • The rest of Season 2 is a bit more complicated. Depending on who you side with, which ending you get, and what you believe of the characters, either Kenny, Jane or both fall into this category. They cause the main conflict and Downer Ending of the season. If Kenny dies, however, he realises the error of his ways and tells Clementine that she made the right choice.
  • Sargeras is the ultimate Big Bad of the entire Warcraft universe, but because he's usually on his throne or out of commission, his various minions tend to take over the roles. Out of several characters, Gul'dan and Medivh probably counted as a Big Bad Duumvirate during the First War (or game), while Gul'dan took over the role alone for the Second (since he was using the orcs and fighting the humans). In the expansion, the job got handed off to Ner'zhul. In the Third War, Sargeras's Dragon, Archimonde, filled the role, while the other Dragon Kil'Jaeden and the Lich King both held it in an Evil Versus Evil situation in the Frozen Throne expansion. For World of Warcraft Big Bads, see that entry below.
  • Captain Syrup in Wario Land 1 and 2.
    • Rudy the Clown in Wario Land 3.
    • The Golden Diva in Wario Land 4.
    • The Black Jewel in Wario World.
    • The Shake King in Wario Land: Shake It!
  • Watch_Dogs: Dermot "Lucky" Quinn. The DLC Bad Blood has JB "Defalt" Markowicz.
  • When They Cry
  • In The Witcher, we are lead to believe that Azar Javed is the Big Bad of the game. The Big Bad Turns out to be Jaques de Aldersberg, head of the Order of the Burning Rose.
  • In The Witcher 2: Assassins Of Kings, Letho serves as the main antagonist, with other major antagonists varying depending on whether or not he sides with either Vernon Roche or Iorveth.
  • Wolfenstein: The New Order: Wilhelm "Deathshead" Strasse.
  • Used (and not used) variously in World of Warcraft.
    • In the original game, there were multiple story arcs, not all of which tied together and some of which had their own Big Bads, such as VanCleef (the final boss of one of the first dungeons), the Diabolical Mastermind behind the Defias who were behind everything until then in the human quests, right from the kobolds at the beginning. The closest to an overall Big Bad was dependent on the continent, with the final boss being C'Thun in Kalmindor and Nefarian in Eastern Kingdoms, respectively. Everything in Kalimdor was very obviously leading up to the Battle of Kalimdor, with the Silithid being woven in through multiple quest lines, culminating in the Scepter of the Shifting Sands quest chain, and everything in the Eastern Kingdoms was leading up to the final assault on Blackwing Lair, as Nefarian was behind Onyxia's motivations, which also led to the Defilas Start of Darkness. Neither C'Thun or Nefarian were quite the final boss before the first expansion through.
    • In Burning Crusade, the initially hyped final boss Illidan didn't really have a lot to do with much of what was going on (after all, it was called "The Burning Crusade", not "Illidan Is a Bit of a Jerk"), but this trope was fulfilled satisfactorily later on when a patch added the new final boss, Kil'jaeden, the acting leader of the Burning Legion who are behind that whole Crusade thing.
    • In Wrath of the Lich King, as the name implies, it's very clear who the Big Bad is. The Lich King is a typical Evil Overlord bent on world conquest, and makes sure to appear several times along the story (unlike Illidan).
    • The Big Bad for Cataclysm is Deathwing the Destroyer, an ancient dragon who sought to destroy the world, who also qualifies as a Greater Scope Villain for Vanilla World of Warcraft as well, as he is the father of Nefarian and Onyxia and was the driving force behind their motivations the whole time.
    • In Mists of Pandaria, this trope is zig zagged. While the Sha might seem like the expansion's Big Bad, the only reason they exist is because of all the infighting going on between the various races and factions of Pandaria, which includes the Yaungol, Mantid and Mogu (to name only three of many); and then there's the recent helpful arrival of the Horde and the Alliance, who instantly proceeded to bring their own war to Pandaria, which made the Sha problem even worse.... The Big Bad is later revealed to be Garrosh Hellscream who has pissed off everyone, who team up in the Siege of Orgrimmar to take him down. In Pandaria itself, the big bad is the Thunder King Lei Shen, who has set the stage for much of the events in Pandaria millenia ago.
    • Eventually, Grom was ursurped by Gul'Dan and the Shadow Council as leader of the Iron Horde not long after Garrosh's death.
  • X:
  • Xenoblade: The Mechon in general drive the plot, but most of early game is spent in pursuit of "Metal Face," a Mechon war leader for whom It's Personal. Later, it's revealed that he's The Dragon to Egil, the millennia-old creator of the Mechon, who is the game's real Big Bad. But the real antagonist turns out to be Zanza, one half of a duo of creator deities and a Jerkass God extraordinaire, who is also the Monado itself and has been inhabiting the main character all along.
  • Xenosaga: The Xenosaga game series (as well as Xenogears) makes particular use of Big Bads, specifically by using bait and switching the big bads multiple times. A routine of the Xenosaga games is that once a Big Bad has been "dethroned" from their role, their connections to the main characters are deepened and explained. This happens with Albedo and Margulis, among others. The ultimate Big Bad of the Xenosaga series turns out to be Wilhelm, The Chessmaster who was manipulating all the previous Big Bads (and every other character as well). The ultimate big bad in Xenogears is Deus. As an overlooked factor, Miang Hawwa, or rather the Miang Factor personified as the Urobolous Snake is the Final Boss of the game. Defeating her means Deus cannot be activated and is utterly useless.
  • Jason Stryker in the tie-in video game for X-Men: The Last Stand.
  • YoJinBo has Harumoto, upstart clan-leader wannabe and would-be murderer of Hatsuhime.
  • Yu Gi Oh BAM has the Organizer. Due to the Facebook game being canceled, his true identity was never revealed.

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