History WesternAnimation / AeonFlux

18th Aug '17 1:56:01 PM Black_Diesel
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[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aeonflux.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:320:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aeonflux.org/pmwiki/pub/images/aeonflux_cartoon1.jpg]]
11th Aug '17 2:58:58 AM Scabbard
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* CloningBlues: Averted by the clone of [[spoiler: [=Æ=]on made by Trevor. Aware of being a clone, she is perfectly OK with her existence and her role in the original [=Æ=]on's BatmanGambit]]. In the canceled [=PlayStation=] game, this cloning

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* CloningBlues: Averted by the clone of [[spoiler: [=Æ=]on made by Trevor. Aware of being a clone, she is perfectly OK with her existence and her role in the original [=Æ=]on's BatmanGambit]]. In the canceled [=PlayStation=] game, this cloning
5th Jul '17 7:31:56 PM AriRockefeller
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Possibly the best way to describe ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' is that if you had ever seen it before, you would be able to recognize it immediately. The art style is a strange combination of [[GermanExpressionism Expressionism]], CyberPunk, and Gnosticism. One of the most enduring images of the series is that of a human eye staring at a fly that is trapped in its eyelashes, wherein the eye's iris rolls in to stare at it. The episodes would attempt to use the art style to further the viewer's interest as opposed to wordiness. The early shorts had no spoken words to speak of, unless you count a single "plop". As a whole, the show was a thorough {{deconstruction}} of action hero tropes and cliches.

to:

Possibly the best way to describe ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' is that if you had ever seen it before, you would be able to recognize it immediately. The art style is a strange combination of [[GermanExpressionism Expressionism]], CyberPunk, and Gnosticism. One of the most enduring images of the series is that of a human eye staring at a fly that is trapped in its eyelashes, wherein the eye's iris rolls in to stare at it.it (it rolls horizontally, mind you, which just looks...[[{{Squick}} unreal]]). The episodes would attempt to use the art style to further the viewer's interest as opposed to wordiness. The early shorts had no spoken words to speak of, unless you count a single "plop". As a whole, the show was a thorough {{deconstruction}} of action hero tropes and cliches.
16th May '17 1:10:49 PM iphobos
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** The blonde agent who assists [=Æ=]on in "Tide" is named RU-486, [[MeaningfulName whose name comes from a birth control pill]].

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** The blonde agent who assists [=Æ=]on in "Tide" is named RU-486, [[MeaningfulName whose name comes from a birth control an abortifacient pill]].
18th Apr '17 2:19:48 PM scudisreal
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*GainaxEnding: While the whole series is strange, the ending of the episode "Chronophasia" manages to be complete confusing and without any possible explanation.
16th Apr '17 9:09:36 PM nombretomado
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* DyingDream: One of the {{Mooks}} [=Æ=]on kills in the pilot has a hallucination in the vein resembling ''SteamboatWillie''. Upon realising what he is actually seeing is [[spoiler: a streak of blood on a wall, a gun floating in the literal ''lake'' of blood [=Æ=]on has created and an apparently dismembered arm]], he sheds a tear of horror.

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* DyingDream: One of the {{Mooks}} [=Æ=]on kills in the pilot has a hallucination in the vein resembling ''SteamboatWillie''.''WesternAnimation/SteamboatWillie''. Upon realising what he is actually seeing is [[spoiler: a streak of blood on a wall, a gun floating in the literal ''lake'' of blood [=Æ=]on has created and an apparently dismembered arm]], he sheds a tear of horror.
3rd Apr '17 8:45:46 AM Saurubiker
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** The blonde agent who assists [=Æ=]on in "Tide" is named RU-486, [[MeaningfulName whose name comes from a pill that induces abortions]].

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** The blonde agent who assists [=Æ=]on in "Tide" is named RU-486, [[MeaningfulName whose name comes from a pill that induces abortions]].birth control pill]].



* TheArtifact: Both [=Æ=]on's theme tune and the "Breen National Anthem" are musical artifacts from the shorts. [=Æ=]on's was originally meant to be a SuspiciouslySimilarSong version of the ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' theme, to fit with the {{Deconstruction}} of action movies. The basic tune remained as her {{Leitmotif}} for the remainder of the series, though mutated into something much weirder through Drew Neumann's distinctive style to better fit the tone the series ended up taking on. As for the Breen theme, it was originally meant simply as a leitmotif for Breen soldier Vaarsche Lockney, intended to invoke a Wagnerian feel to fit his blonde, Germanic looks.

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* TheArtifact: Both [=Æ=]on's theme tune and the "Breen National Anthem" are musical artifacts from the shorts. [=Æ=]on's was originally meant to be a SuspiciouslySimilarSong version of the ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' theme, to fit with the {{Deconstruction}} of action movies. The basic tune remained as her {{Leitmotif}} for the remainder of the series, though mutated into something much weirder through Drew Neumann's distinctive style to better fit the tone the series ended up taking on. As for the Breen theme, it was originally meant simply as a leitmotif for Breen soldier Vaarsche Lockney, intended to invoke a Wagnerian feel to fit his blonde, blond-haired, Germanic looks.



* BrokenPedestal: Gildemere spends most of ''Utopia or Deuteronopia'' trying to rescue Bregna's elected leader, Clavius and spends hours pouring over the documents he left behind, believing their incomprehensible gibberish to be a brilliant cipher. He's none too pleased when Clavius comes back and immediately orders the gangsters he'd been colluding with released from prison and reveals that [[ConspiracyTheorist the flying saucer men are not, in fact, a codename for the ministry of justice]].

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* BrokenPedestal: Gildemere spends most of ''Utopia "Utopia or Deuteronopia'' Deuteronopia" trying to rescue Bregna's elected leader, Clavius and spends hours pouring over the documents he left behind, believing their incomprehensible gibberish to be a brilliant cipher. He's none too pleased when Clavius comes back and immediately orders the gangsters he'd been colluding with released from prison and reveals that [[ConspiracyTheorist the flying saucer men are not, in fact, a codename for the ministry of justice]].



* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Between seasons two and three, [=Æ=]on changed from an AxCrazy FailureHero who would slaughter large numbers of random {{mooks}}, but usually failed at whatever she was actually supposed to be doing, to a cold, calculating and highly [[ManipulativeBastard manipulative]] [[TheChessmaster Chessmaster]].

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* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Between seasons two and three, [=Æ=]on changed from an AxCrazy FailureHero who would slaughter large numbers of random {{mooks}}, but usually failed at whatever she was actually supposed to be doing, accomplishing her actual objective, to a cold, calculating and highly [[ManipulativeBastard manipulative]] [[TheChessmaster Chessmaster]].



* CloningBlues: Averted by the clone of [[spoiler: [=Æ=]on made by Trevor. Aware of being a clone, she is perfectly OK with her existence and her role in the original [=Æ=]on's BatmanGambit]].

to:

* CloningBlues: Averted by the clone of [[spoiler: [=Æ=]on made by Trevor. Aware of being a clone, she is perfectly OK with her existence and her role in the original [=Æ=]on's BatmanGambit]]. In the canceled [=PlayStation=] game, this cloning



* PragmaticAdaptation: The videogame. The creators were obviously fans of the original series and did their absolute best to try to capture the feeling of it, using many designs and plot references from the cartoon. Still, as it was produced as a movie tie-in, they had to include several character designs and plot points from the film, much to the game's detriment.

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* PragmaticAdaptation: The videogame. The creators were obviously fans of the original series and did their absolute best to try to capture the feeling of it, using many designs and plot references from the cartoon. Still, as it was produced as a movie tie-in, they had to include several character designs and plot points from the film, film (particularly the use of Charlize Theron's voice and likeness for Aeon instead of the actual voice actress and character design from the show), much to the game's detriment.
21st Feb '17 3:37:41 PM LondonKdS
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* ManicPixieDreamGirl: [=Æ=]on quite possibly represents the ultimate deconstruction of this trope.

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* ManicPixieDreamGirl: [=Æ=]on quite possibly represents the ultimate deconstruction of this trope. While she's ideologically chaotic and superficially wild and sexy, when she behaves romantically towards someone it's almost always (except in the controversial "Reraizure") to manipulate them and/or make a philosophical point.
6th Jan '17 5:38:53 PM Matchstick
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Probably the best way to describe ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' is that if you had ever seen it before, you would be able to recognize it immediately. The art style is a strange combination of [[GermanExpressionism Expressionism]], CyberPunk, and Gnosticism. One of the most enduring images of the series is that of a human eye staring at a fly that is trapped in its eyelashes, wherein the eye's iris rolls in to stare at it. The episodes would attempt to use the art style to further the viewer's interest as opposed to wordiness. The early shorts had no spoken words to speak of, unless you count a single "plop". As a whole, the show was a thorough {{deconstruction}} of action hero tropes and cliches.

The actual content proves even stranger than the art--our lead character is a highly self-motivated secret agent doing spywork (or possibly just sabotage in the name of anarchy), and is {{Stripperific}} to pretty much the greatest conceivable extent. Her arch-nemesis and lover, also a main character, is a morally-ambiguous totalitarian ruler attempting to be a sort of benevolent dictator.

to:

Probably Possibly the best way to describe ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' is that if you had ever seen it before, you would be able to recognize it immediately. The art style is a strange combination of [[GermanExpressionism Expressionism]], CyberPunk, and Gnosticism. One of the most enduring images of the series is that of a human eye staring at a fly that is trapped in its eyelashes, wherein the eye's iris rolls in to stare at it. The episodes would attempt to use the art style to further the viewer's interest as opposed to wordiness. The early shorts had no spoken words to speak of, unless you count a single "plop". As a whole, the show was a thorough {{deconstruction}} of action hero tropes and cliches.

The actual content proves even stranger than the art--our lead character is a highly self-motivated secret agent doing spywork (or possibly just sabotage in the name of anarchy), and is {{Stripperific}} to pretty much the greatest conceivable extent. Her arch-nemesis and lover, Trevor Goodchild, is also a main character, is character; a morally-ambiguous totalitarian ruler attempting to be a sort of benevolent dictator.
6th Jan '17 5:21:45 PM Matchstick
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Back when Creator/{{MTV}} regularly produced animated programming (yes, this was [[NetworkDecay eons ago]]), they fronted some experimental animation. ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' is probably the fourth-best known example of these series (after ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'').

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Back when Creator/{{MTV}} regularly [[NetworkDecay produced animated programming programming]] (yes, this was [[NetworkDecay [[IncrediblyLamePun eons ago]]), they fronted some experimental animation. ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' is probably the fourth-best known example of these series (after ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/CelebrityDeathmatch'').



The actual content proves even stranger than the art -- our lead character is a highly self-motivated secret agent doing spywork (or possibly just sabotage in the name of anarchy), and is {{Stripperific}} to pretty much the greatest conceivable extent. Her arch-nemesis and lover, also a main character, is a morally-ambiguous totalitarian ruler attempting to be a sort of benevolent dictator.

to:

The actual content proves even stranger than the art -- our art--our lead character is a highly self-motivated secret agent doing spywork (or possibly just sabotage in the name of anarchy), and is {{Stripperific}} to pretty much the greatest conceivable extent. Her arch-nemesis and lover, also a main character, is a morally-ambiguous totalitarian ruler attempting to be a sort of benevolent dictator.



!!This work provides examples of:

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!!This work provides !! ''[=Æ=]on Flux'' contains examples of:



* LostInTransmission: A rare example that doesn't involve actual transmitting equipment. At the beginning of "The Demiurge", Trevor is speaking with an underling when he suddenly recalls a vital piece of information. What he says is "Wait, I remember!" -- and what he says next is drowned out by the sound of an explosion behind him. It ''is'' possible to make out what he's saying if you listen extremely carefully, but the line appears to have been lifted at random from a later speech in the same episode and the animators made no attempt to match the lip flaps.

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* LostInTransmission: A rare example that doesn't involve actual transmitting equipment. At the beginning of "The Demiurge", Trevor is speaking with an underling when he suddenly recalls a vital piece of information. What he says is "Wait, I remember!" -- and remember!"--and what he says next is drowned out by the sound of an explosion behind him. It ''is'' possible to make out what he's saying if you listen extremely carefully, but the line appears to have been lifted at random from a later speech in the same episode and the animators made no attempt to match the lip flaps.



* SympatheticPOV: Played with in the original short episode pilot and in the second short episode. "Pilot" opens with typical action movie music and [=Æ=]on gunning down extremely implausible numbers of soldiers, action hero style -- then the perspective abruptly changes to that of two enemy soldiers trying to support each other as they gasp for life, shot and dying in the middle of a giant pool of blood. In "War", the identity of the protagonist changes every 20 seconds or so, each one dying when his time is up, as a satire of how viewer sympathy is manipulated in typical action movies.

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* SympatheticPOV: Played with in the original short episode pilot and in the second short episode. "Pilot" opens with typical action movie music and [=Æ=]on gunning down extremely implausible numbers of soldiers, action hero style -- then style--then the perspective abruptly changes to that of two enemy soldiers trying to support each other as they gasp for life, shot and dying in the middle of a giant pool of blood. In "War", the identity of the protagonist changes every 20 seconds or so, each one dying when his time is up, as a satire of how viewer sympathy is manipulated in typical action movies.


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