History VideoGame / GalacticCivilizations

26th May '18 7:17:51 AM Milarqui
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* FlingALightIntoTheFuture: A race that finds itself on the ropes in a war can choose to surrender all of their assets to an ally or a race they are friendly with, with the hopes that said race will be able to avenge them.
15th May '18 4:22:33 PM wingedcatgirl
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* EvilIsEasy: Oh so easy. And profitable.
** But it does leave you in a bit of a lurch when the rest of the galaxy goes ape and declares war on each other, which seems to happen at least once per game. Being evil increases the likelihood that the goody-two-shoes alliances will declare war on ''you'' and you, being evil, won't have many friends.

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* EvilIsEasy: Oh so easy. And profitable.
**
profitable. But it does leave you in a bit of a lurch when the rest of the galaxy goes ape and declares war on each other, which seems to happen at least once per game. Being evil increases the likelihood that the goody-two-shoes alliances will declare war on ''you'' and you, being evil, won't have many friends.friends -- the other evil races aren't exactly [[EvilIsOneBigHappyFamily your big happy family]], after all.
9th Mar '18 8:38:05 PM Jeran
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** The AI in II is extremely good at exploiting abstract concepts and sabotaging the player through agents and diplomacy shenanigans, but suffers from several fundamental flaws that can completely cripple it over the course of a long game.
*** They don't use special resource tiles well at all, often ignoring juicy 300% manufacturing bonuses in favor of building farms or entertainment buildings.
*** They rely entirely on stock vessels, never retire pathetically obsolete designs (which still cost maintenance fees) and place a very low priority on researching the absolutely critical Logistics and Miniaturization technology branches.
*** They will make you pay through the nose for even the simplest military technologies, but have no problem selling vital trade goods like Xinathium Hull Plating (20% to the HP of all your ships) for a comparative pittance.
*** If you have a decent diplomacy rating, they will happily plunge themselves into years-long interstellar wars with their best trading partners for less money than it takes to rush-build a single mid-tier warship.
*** While great at sabotaging strategic buildings like your Manufacturing Capital (double planetary production) or that Interstellar Refinery you built on top of a Precursor Mine (800% regular output), the A.I will occasionally become obsessed with sending agents at comparatively useless buildings like Recruitment Centers (20% population growth), wasting dozens of agents to deny you a grand total of a few BC each turn in economic revenue.
*** The AI is paranoid about troop transports and will give you a hefty diplomatic penalty if they so much as spot a single one parsecs away from their territorial boundaries, but they will frequently ignore your use of Influence Starbases to blatantly subvert entire solar systems at once. By the time the effect grows big enough for them to declare war on you in desperation, you'll likely have claimed 4/5ths of their entire empire.
*** They will never rush-build Super Projects or Trade Goods, making it trivial to amass a stockpile of all the one-off buildings in the game just by researching them first.
13th Jan '18 11:48:25 PM DarkHunter
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** ''Painfully'' averted on the larger maps, especially if there's been a speed limit law enforced.

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** ''Painfully'' averted on the larger maps, especially if there's been a speed limit law enforced. As one review put it, the "Immense" map size seemingly approaches the actual size of a galaxy.
11th Jan '18 2:30:55 PM DrVonOppendown
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** The name Korath may also be a reference to a minor character from the [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]] era of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' named, well, [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Korath Korath]]. He even has his own Noble House named after himself, which is pretty much the Klingon equivalent of a Clan.
11th Jan '18 2:22:17 PM DrVonOppendown
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** Ends up being an aversion, however, because even though they are both merchant races, their similarities end there. The Korx were analogous to being a Space Mafia who were willing to sell anything, even their mothers, while the Iridium Corporation just really, really likes free-market capitalism, to the point that their whole society IS a corporation. While the Korx were almost pure evil, the Iridium are neither good nor evil, and while generosity might be somewhat unusual in Iridium society, it is understandable enough that it didn't stop them from electing their current leader, who is known for his great generosity.
* TechnologyUplift: the Arceans gave humanity the blueprints to a Warp Gate, which suspiciously had no "off" switch, but instead humans combined it with their fusion technology (which the Arceans may have wanted to take by invading) to develop a ship-portable hyperdrive. They then gave hyperdrive and fusion to every sapient species they could contact, and then the game begins.

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** Ends up being an aversion, however, because even though they are both merchant races, their similarities end there. The Korx were analogous to being a Space Mafia who were willing to sell anything, even their mothers, while the Iridium Corporation just really, really likes free-market capitalism, to the point that their whole society IS a corporation. While the Korx were almost pure evil, the Iridium are neither good nor evil, and while generosity might be somewhat unusual in Iridium society, it is understandable enough that it didn't stop them from electing their current leader, who is known for his great generosity.
* TechnologyUplift:
generosity. [[note]]This may be reflective of the fact that playing the Korx as their AlwaysChaoticEvil selves actually did not play to their strengths in the slightest. The commonly accepted strategy among the fans being to play them as a Neutral, leaning Good, ProudMerchantRace, which is precisely what the Iridium Corporation became.[[/note]]
* TechnologyUplift:Tthe
Arceans gave humanity the blueprints to a Warp Gate, which suspiciously had no "off" switch, but instead humans combined it with their fusion technology (which the Arceans may have wanted to take by invading) to develop a ship-portable hyperdrive. They then gave hyperdrive and fusion to every sapient species they could contact, and then the game begins.
27th Dec '17 7:24:10 AM LentilSandEater
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* AwesomeButImpractical: Terror Stars. Yes, they can blow up entire solar systems, but first you have to research them (which takes five different techs, each of which takes about a dozen turns if you set your entire economy to research), build them (which takes six Constructors and includes a 10 week waiting period between completion and actually being able to use it) and get them to the target (they move 1 parsec a turn and have no defensive weapons without using up even ''more'' valuable constructors). All in all, it's quicker and easier to just conquer people the traditional way.
** On the other hand, there are a lot of systems with no inhabitable planets, which would really be more useful if they were just asteroid fields for your space miners. When empires get rich and bored enough, and have constructors to burn, Terror Stars start looking like big mining charges.
** At full strength, Terror stars have significant defense while producing influence. Sending a pack of them allows you to gradually take over the galaxy.
*** Only in the first game. In the second expansion to the sequel, Terror Stars are their own type of starbase that can't be upgraded with weapons, defenses, or any other types of modules specifically to avoid this, requiring you to have a powerful fleet on hand to protect them.
** And end wars with one shot.
** Building lots of fully equipped starbases will give you massive bonuses to your economy, industry, influence, military, and ascendance crystal mining, but believe me when I say that it will take you a looooong time (or a lot of planets constantly churning out constructors which presents its own problems) to fully equip so much as a single starbase much less multiple.
*** That or money. Lots and lots of money.

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* AwesomeButImpractical: AwesomeButImpractical:
**
Terror Stars. Stars.
***
Yes, they can blow up entire solar systems, systems and can end wars with one shot, but first you have to research them (which takes five different techs, each of which takes about a dozen turns if you set your entire economy to research), build them (which takes six Constructors and includes a 10 week waiting period between completion and actually being able to use it) and get them to the target (they move 1 parsec a turn and have no defensive weapons without using up even ''more'' valuable constructors). All in all, it's quicker and easier to just conquer people the traditional way.
** *** On the other hand, there are a lot of systems with no inhabitable planets, which would really be more useful if they were just asteroid fields for your space miners. When empires get rich and bored enough, and have constructors to burn, Terror Stars start looking like big mining charges.
** *** At full strength, Terror stars have significant defense while producing influence. Sending a pack of them allows you to gradually take over the galaxy.
*** Only in the first game.
galaxy. In the second expansion to the sequel, Terror Stars are their own type of starbase that can't be upgraded with weapons, defenses, or any other types of modules specifically to avoid this, requiring you to have a powerful fleet on hand to protect them.
** And end wars with one shot.
** Building lots of fully equipped starbases will give you massive bonuses to your economy, industry, influence, military, and ascendance crystal mining, but believe me when I say that it will take you a looooong time (or a lot of planets constantly churning out constructors which presents its own problems) to fully equip so much as a single starbase much less multiple.
***
multiple. That or money. Lots and lots of money.



* EasterEgg: The second game has Terror Stars, which [[ApocalypseHow destroy stars]]. It is possible to get a game over by [[TooDumbToLive using Terror Stars on your own civilization]], which produces [[http://i.imgur.com/8mDrQ.png a unique game over message.]]
** Building one for the first time in a game also treats you to a brief FMV with the description advising you to "watch out for that exhaust pipe".
* EasyLogistics: One branch of the TechTree, Logistics, allows the player to field bigger fleets and more starbases.
** Mind you, the larger fleets only applies with regards to unitary task groups; you can field 200 or more battleships without ever learning about more advanced logistics. Likewise, starbases become more expensive to build once you start exceeding your logistics stat.
** Somewhat averted with trade; there are actual freighters that automatically ping-pong between the two planets involved, and they're generally defenseless in times of war. Their income also fluctates depending on where they are on the route.

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* EasterEgg: The second game has Terror Stars, which [[ApocalypseHow destroy stars]]. It is possible to get a game over by [[TooDumbToLive using Terror Stars on your own civilization]], which produces [[http://i.imgur.com/8mDrQ.png a unique game over message.]]
**
]] Building one for the first time in a game also treats you to a brief FMV with the description advising you to "watch out for that exhaust pipe".
* EasyLogistics: EasyLogistics:
**
One branch of the TechTree, Logistics, allows the player to field bigger fleets and more starbases.
**
starbases. Mind you, the larger fleets only applies with regards to unitary task groups; you can field 200 or more battleships without ever learning about more advanced logistics. Likewise, starbases become more expensive to build once you start exceeding your logistics stat.
** Somewhat averted Downplayed example with trade; there are actual freighters that automatically ping-pong between the two planets involved, and they're generally defenseless in times of war. Their income also fluctates depending on where they are on the route.
27th Dec '17 6:37:35 AM LentilSandEater
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In the sequel, the player could take control of any one of 10 civilizations, or make his own. This was increased to 12 in the first expansion pack.

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In the sequel, the player could take control of any one of 10 civilizations, or make his their own. This was increased to 12 in the first expansion pack.
6th Dec '17 6:50:16 PM Circeus
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**In GalCiv II and III, some AI ships (most notably traders) have no range limits whatsoever and will casually cross the entire galaxy, while yours are still markedly range-limited.
5th Nov '17 5:46:03 AM Rhonin
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** If the rumor is correct, a group of humans with Dread Lord tech is going to be the BigBad of Galactic Civilizations III. The subversion still hits, as this is after humans were nearly rendered extinct due to rampaging Drengin, and these guys are [[WellIntentionedExtremist simply acting on survival instinct now]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.GalacticCivilizations