History Usefulnotes / Americanfootball

17th Feb '17 12:04:56 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "[=Big6=]" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad. However, the 2016 NFL season also saw struggles for many of the German NFL players. Björn Werner failed to make a team after his contract with the Colts ran out as did Markus Kuhn after he was released by the New York Giants - both would announce their retirement at the end of the season on German TV. Sebastian Vollmer was on injured reserve for the Patriots throughout the season (though that did make him eligible for a Super Bowl ring nonetheless) while the aforementioned Böhringer couldn't crack the roster but stayed on the practice squad, he has since signed a futures contract with the Vikings. Kasim Edebali of the New Orleans Saints meanwhile played solidly but failed to become a starter - much to the chagrin of fellow Hamburger Patrick Esume who works as an expert for the TV show carrying the NFL in Germany.

to:

In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "[=Big6=]" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad. However, the 2016 NFL season also saw struggles for many of the German NFL players. Björn Werner failed to make a team after his contract with the Colts ran out as did Markus Kuhn after he was released by the New York Giants - both would announce their retirement at the end of the season on German TV. Sebastian Vollmer was on injured reserve for the Patriots throughout the season (though that did make him eligible for a Super Bowl ring nonetheless) while the aforementioned Böhringer couldn't crack the roster but stayed on the practice squad, he has since signed a futures contract with the Vikings. Kasim Edebali of the New Orleans Saints meanwhile played solidly but failed to become a starter - much to the chagrin of fellow Hamburger Patrick Esume who works as an expert for the TV show carrying the NFL in Germany.Series/RanNFL.
17th Feb '17 12:03:17 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "Big6" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad.

to:

In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "Big6" "[=Big6=]" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad.
squad. However, the 2016 NFL season also saw struggles for many of the German NFL players. Björn Werner failed to make a team after his contract with the Colts ran out as did Markus Kuhn after he was released by the New York Giants - both would announce their retirement at the end of the season on German TV. Sebastian Vollmer was on injured reserve for the Patriots throughout the season (though that did make him eligible for a Super Bowl ring nonetheless) while the aforementioned Böhringer couldn't crack the roster but stayed on the practice squad, he has since signed a futures contract with the Vikings. Kasim Edebali of the New Orleans Saints meanwhile played solidly but failed to become a starter - much to the chagrin of fellow Hamburger Patrick Esume who works as an expert for the TV show carrying the NFL in Germany.
17th Feb '17 6:26:45 AM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://www.sandraandwoo.com/2016/02/04/0758-poor-choice-of-words/ This strip]] from ''Webcomic/SandraAndWoo''[[note]]originates in Germany[[/note]] shows up the gulf between European and North American interpretations of the word "football". A Spanish-American girl taken to an American Football game says exactly the wrong thing as to which sort of football she prefers. Sparks fly.
[[/folder]]
7th Feb '17 7:30:37 AM ScrewySqrl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Gus}}'': a live-action Disney film about a donkey that can kick soccer ball for 100 meters, and thus a 99-yard field goal, and the hapless pro team than hires the animal and its handler to rescue their season.

to:

* ''{{Gus}}'': ''{{Film/Gus}}'': a live-action Disney film about a donkey that can kick soccer ball for 100 meters, and thus a 99-yard field goal, and the hapless pro team than hires the animal and its handler to rescue their season.
7th Feb '17 7:29:43 AM ScrewySqrl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*''{{Gus}}'': a live-action Disney film about a donkey that can kick soccer ball for 100 meters, and thus a 99-yard field goal, and the hapless pro team than hires the animal and its handler to rescue their season.
2nd Feb '17 6:44:57 PM thelivingtoad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Heisman. The league's best known player -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.

to:

* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Heisman. The league's best known player -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.
2nd Feb '17 6:44:39 PM thelivingtoad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Heisman. The league's best known player was Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.

to:

* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Heisman. The league's best known player was -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.
2nd Feb '17 6:39:29 PM thelivingtoad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''World Football League''' (1973-1975): A complete and total flop (and [[NeverTrustATrailer not even a]] [[NonindicativeName "world" football league]], the only team not on the American mainland was a team in Hawaii). Managed to last for two seasons despite laughable amounts of ineptness (one team had its equipment confiscated following the league's championship game) from almost everyone involved. Only two WFL alumni - Larry Csonka and Paul Warfield, both former NFL stars at the end of their careers - made it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

to:

* '''World Football League''' (1973-1975): A complete and total flop (and [[NeverTrustATrailer not even a]] [[NonindicativeName "world" football league]], the only team not on the American mainland was a team in Hawaii). Managed to last for two seasons despite laughable amounts of ineptness (one team had its equipment confiscated following the league's championship game) from almost everyone involved. Only two WFL alumni In its first season, the league made waves for attracting several members of the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins to join the league. Two of those Dolphins - Larry Csonka and Paul Warfield, both former NFL stars at Warfield - are the end of their careers - made only WFL players to make it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
2nd Feb '17 6:36:12 PM thelivingtoad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Heisman. The league's best known player was Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.

to:

* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Heisman. The league's best known player was Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.
2nd Feb '17 6:35:22 PM thelivingtoad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance, like QB Tommy Maddox, the league's lone MVP. Probably best known at the time for Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.

to:

* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance, like chance and were just happy to playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. Probably Heisman. The league's best known at the time for player was Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very LoveItOrHateIt move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.
This list shows the last 10 events of 1122. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Usefulnotes.Americanfootball