History UsefulNotes / SecondSinoJapaneseWar

17th Apr '17 8:31:25 AM astrixzero
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During this period, the CCP kept [[TheUriahGambit their truce]] with Chiang to... do nothing. The CCP did everything in its power to avoid antagonising Japan or her puppet regimes and did its best to undermine Guomindang-backed and independent guerilla groups behind Japanese lines, using their network of spies and sympathisers to tell the occupation forces who they where and where to find them (while maintaining plausible deniability and avoiding looking like they were directly fighting non-CCP Chinese resistance groups). Only recently has the [[RedChina People's Republic of China]] begun to admit that The Guomindang actually did anything at all to fight the Japanese, though it still maintains that the CCP did the brunt of the fighting when in fact they did ''none at all''[[note]] In propaganda this is known as the 'big lie' principle. More astonishing was the fact that some foreign observers who visited the CCP Soviet of Yan'an at the time (e.g. Patrick Hurley) actually believed it. Then again, said people also believed that the CCP was a strongly democratic and humanitarian organisation with a deep respect for human dignity and the rule of law[[/note]] except when Stalin bullied them into committing forces (in the short-lived 'hundred regiments offensive') to save the Guomindang's hide in 1940, when the latter was on the verge of collapse. The CCP's leader, [[UsefulNotes/MaoZedong Mao]] [[FromNobodyToNightmare something]], used this failure to further undermine the pro-Soviet faction within the CCP and assert his own independence from Moscow - resuming his truce with the Japanese to focus on turning the entire countryside under nominal Japanese occupation into one gigantic Communist Soviet so that either A) when the Guomindang was destroyed the CCP could eventually come to power by taking over Wang Jingwei's government (ideally Japan would be busy fighting someone else, e.g. The USSR, by then) or B) the CCP could beat a critically-weakened Guomindang in a continuation of The Civil War.

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During this period, the CCP kept [[TheUriahGambit their truce]] with Chiang to... do nothing. The sit back and let the KMT soak up the damage. While the CCP did everything engage in its power isolated guerrilla battles against the IJA, it also attempted to preserve resources and avoid antagonising heavy engagements with Japan or her puppet regimes regimes, and did its best to undermine Guomindang-backed warlords and independent guerilla groups behind Japanese lines, using their network of spies and sympathisers to tell the occupation forces who they where and where to find them (while maintaining plausible deniability and avoiding looking like they were directly fighting non-CCP Chinese resistance groups). Only recently has the [[RedChina People's Republic of China]] begun to admit that The the Guomindang actually did anything at all to fight the Japanese, though it still maintains that the CCP did the brunt of the fighting fighting, when in fact they did ''none at all''[[note]] In reality, being a peasant-based guerrilla army, the overall contributions of the CCP towards winning the war is rather limited,[[note]]This issue is still hotly debated among Chinese historians. Traditionally, Maoist propaganda this is known as depicted the 'big lie' principle. More astonishing was the fact that some foreign observers who visited KMT military as more interested in attacking the CCP Soviet of Yan'an at than fighting the time (e.g. Patrick Hurley) actually believed it. Then again, said people also believed that Japanese. With a change of political climate however, the CCP was a strongly democratic and humanitarian organisation with a deep respect for human dignity and current Chinese government now acknowledges the rule contributions of law[[/note]] KMT generals in an effort to promote Chinese nationalism against supporters of Taiwanese independence. Meanwhile, Taiwanese historians rarely acknowledge the CCP's contributions, such as the Battle of Pingxingguan.[[/note]] except when Stalin bullied them into committing forces (in the short-lived 'hundred regiments offensive') 'Hundred Regiments Offensive') to save the Guomindang's hide in 1940, when the latter was on the verge of collapse. The CCP's leader, [[UsefulNotes/MaoZedong Mao]] [[FromNobodyToNightmare something]], used this failure to further undermine the pro-Soviet faction within the CCP and assert his own independence from Moscow - resuming his truce with the Japanese to focus on turning the entire countryside under nominal Japanese occupation into one gigantic Communist Soviet so that either A) when the Guomindang was destroyed the CCP could eventually come to power by taking over Wang Jingwei's government (ideally Japan would be busy fighting someone else, e.g. The USSR, by then) or B) the CCP could beat a critically-weakened Guomindang in a continuation of The Civil War.
18th Dec '16 9:14:16 AM YT45
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* ''Literature/TheCorps'' series by Creator/WEBGriffin begins in the Shanghai International Zone in late 1940, and follows several officers and enlisted men of the 4th Marines stationed there, particularly Corporal Kenneth "Killer" [=McCoy=], a young Marine [[TheOmniglot fluent in Japanese, Italian, French, and several Chinese dialects]] as he conducts intelligence operations in and around the city. Japanese atrocities, the lawless nature of much of the Chinese countryside, and the tensions between American, British, and Japanese forces (as well as Chinese locals) on the eve of WWII are described in detail. The series follows [=McCoy=] and several other Marines through WWII and eventually to the Korean War, where they are involved in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir fighting the Red Chinese.

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* ''Literature/TheCorps'' series by Creator/WEBGriffin begins in the Shanghai International Zone in late 1940, and follows several officers and enlisted men of the 4th Marines stationed there, particularly Corporal Kenneth "Killer" [=McCoy=], a young Marine [[TheOmniglot [[{{Omniglot}} fluent in Japanese, Italian, French, and several Chinese dialects]] as he conducts intelligence operations in and around the city. Japanese atrocities, the lawless nature of much of the Chinese countryside, and the tensions between American, British, and Japanese forces (as well as Chinese locals) on the eve of WWII are described in detail. The series follows [=McCoy=] and several other Marines through WWII and eventually to the Korean War, where they are involved in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir fighting the Red Chinese.
18th Dec '16 9:13:22 AM YT45
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheCorps'' series by Creator/WEBGriffin begins in the Shanghai International Zone in late 1940, and follows several officers and enlisted men of the 4th Marines stationed there, particularly Corporal Kenneth "Killer" [=McCoy=], a young Marine [[TheOmniglot fluent in Japanese, Italian, French, and several Chinese dialects]] as he conducts intelligence operations in and around the city. Japanese atrocities, the lawless nature of much of the Chinese countryside, and the tensions between American, British, and Japanese forces (as well as Chinese locals) on the eve of WWII are described in detail. The series follows [=McCoy=] and several other Marines through WWII and eventually to the Korean War, where they are involved in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir fighting the Red Chinese.
18th Dec '16 8:46:54 AM YT45
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Nanjing, China's "Southern Capital", was the Guomindang's centre of administration, and by extension the Capital City of China. Once word spread that Shanghai was lost, the GMD government fled from the city -- it was clear to everyone that Nanjing was a sitting duck. As the Japanese ground forces made their way to Nanjing, their air force began bombing the capital. Nanjing's defenses had several weaknesses, due to the breakdown of morale among the retreating soldiers from the battle outside the city walls. Nanjing fell on December 13th, and opened its gates for the Japanese expeditionary force. Someone -- either the forces' commander, Crown Prince Asaka or one of his aides -- issued an order: "KILL ALL CAPTIVES." And so the Nanjing Massacre... occurred. It's also been given the cheerful moniker [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Rape of Nanking]]... because of the mass-rapes, you see. The official Japanese death toll was about 2000, but we're pretty sure that 200,000 civilians and a few [=POWs=] were killed during the course of it. Given that there were only a hundred thousand or so Japanese soldiers in and around the city at the time, this disproves the notion that each one massacred a small mountain of innocent civilians by themselves. The participation of most soldiers in the event was restricted to looting, or wisecracking as your mates tortured someone to death or shot some random people in the street on a whim, and finding someone to rape with thirty of your best friends. Now we know what you're thinking: "being raped by thirty-plus people, ''even if it does'' happen every day for a week, doesn't kill you!" That's true. But unfortunately, most Japanese soldiers "forgot" to feed the civilians they restrained for such purposes... and they had a nasty of habit of killing their play-things when they were bored with them.

to:

Nanjing, China's "Southern Capital", was the Guomindang's centre of administration, and by extension the Capital City of China. Once word spread that Shanghai was lost, the GMD government fled from the city -- it was clear to everyone that Nanjing was a sitting duck. As the Japanese ground forces made their way to Nanjing, their air force began bombing the capital. Nanjing's defenses had several weaknesses, due to the breakdown of morale among the retreating soldiers from the battle outside the city walls. The US State Department ordered the American Embassy evacuated, and the US Navy sent the Yangtze River Patrol boat USS ''Panay'' upstream from Shanghai to get them out. The Japanese were quite familiar with the YRP, and allowed the American boat upstream unmolested, but on December 12th, as ''Panay'' headed back downstream, Japanese bombers appeared overhead. A news crew was aboard, and filmed the Japanese planes as they orbited for several minutes, confirmed the gunboat's identity, then attacked. ''Panay'' was sunk, 3 American Sailors killed, and 43 more wounded. Though hunted by the Japanese, the survivors were rescued by GMD soldiers and conveyed back to the Shanghai International Zone. The Japanese government would claim [[BlatantLies that the unprovoked attack was the result of mistaken identity, poor communication, and poor visibility.]] Despite a brief public outcry, the Roosevelt administration accepted the excuse and seized the footage of the incident, which showed clear skies and highly-visible American flags flying from the gunboat's masts.

Nanjing fell on December 13th, and opened its gates for the Japanese expeditionary force. Someone -- either the forces' commander, Crown Prince Asaka or one of his aides -- issued an order: "KILL ALL CAPTIVES." And so the Nanjing Massacre... occurred. It's also been given the cheerful moniker [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Rape of Nanking]]... because of the mass-rapes, you see. The official Japanese death toll was about 2000, but we're pretty sure that 200,000 civilians and a few [=POWs=] were killed during the course of it. Given that there were only a hundred thousand or so Japanese soldiers in and around the city at the time, this disproves the notion that each one massacred a small mountain of innocent civilians by themselves. The participation of most soldiers in the event was restricted to looting, or wisecracking as your mates tortured someone to death or shot some random people in the street on a whim, and finding someone to rape with thirty of your best friends. Now we know what you're thinking: "being raped by thirty-plus people, ''even if it does'' happen every day for a week, doesn't kill you!" That's true. But unfortunately, most Japanese soldiers "forgot" to feed the civilians they restrained for such purposes... and they had a nasty of habit of killing their play-things when they were bored with them.
1st Nov '16 2:40:02 PM TheNerevarine
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* Referenced in ''ComicBook/RequiemVampireKnight'' Vol. 9, where a Japanese soldier that participated in the Nanking Massacre reincarnates as a vampire samurai and he gets challenged by a Chinese ghoul that had his family murdered by him.
22nd Oct '16 5:47:46 AM Morgenthaler
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In 1949, after three years of Civil War and at least another half-dozen million dead, the Guomindang under UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors lost its last major holdouts on the mainland]] and was reduced to just Chinese Central Asia (Xinjiang, Qinghai, etc) and the isles of Hainan and Taiwan. Their foe, the Communist Party of China under MaoZedong, proclaimed the establishment of a People's Republic of China on the First of October that year. The People's Republic soon reached a level of cultural understanding and reconciliation with Japan despite the differences in their ideologies[[note]]Communist China was ''[[SeriousBusiness very big]]'' on ideology, such that it was a major cause in itself for the Sino-Soviet Split[[/note]] and economic systems.

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In 1949, after three years of Civil War and at least another half-dozen million dead, the Guomindang under UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors lost its last major holdouts on the mainland]] and was reduced to just Chinese Central Asia (Xinjiang, Qinghai, etc) and the isles of Hainan and Taiwan. Their foe, the Communist Party of China under MaoZedong, UsefulNotes/MaoZedong, proclaimed the establishment of a People's Republic of China on the First of October that year. The People's Republic soon reached a level of cultural understanding and reconciliation with Japan despite the differences in their ideologies[[note]]Communist China was ''[[SeriousBusiness very big]]'' on ideology, such that it was a major cause in itself for the Sino-Soviet Split[[/note]] and economic systems.



During this period, the CCP kept [[TheUriahGambit their truce]] with Chiang to... do nothing. The CCP did everything in its power to avoid antagonising Japan or her puppet regimes and did its best to undermine Guomindang-backed and independent guerilla groups behind Japanese lines, using their network of spies and sympathisers to tell the occupation forces who they where and where to find them (while maintaining plausible deniability and avoiding looking like they were directly fighting non-CCP Chinese resistance groups). Only recently has the [[RedChina People's Republic of China]] begun to admit that The Guomindang actually did anything at all to fight the Japanese, though it still maintains that the CCP did the brunt of the fighting when in fact they did ''none at all''[[note]] In propaganda this is known as the 'big lie' principle. More astonishing was the fact that some foreign observers who visited the CCP Soviet of Yan'an at the time (e.g. Patrick Hurley) actually believed it. Then again, said people also believed that the CCP was a strongly democratic and humanitarian organisation with a deep respect for human dignity and the rule of law[[/note]] except when Stalin bullied them into committing forces (in the short-lived 'hundred regiments offensive') to save the Guomindang's hide in 1940, when the latter was on the verge of collapse. The CCP's leader, [[MaoZedong Mao]] [[FromNobodyToNightmare something]], used this failure to further undermine the pro-Soviet faction within the CCP and assert his own independence from Moscow - resuming his truce with the Japanese to focus on turning the entire countryside under nominal Japanese occupation into one gigantic Communist Soviet so that either A) when the Guomindang was destroyed the CCP could eventually come to power by taking over Wang Jingwei's government (ideally Japan would be busy fighting someone else, e.g. The USSR, by then) or B) the CCP could beat a critically-weakened Guomindang in a continuation of The Civil War.

to:

During this period, the CCP kept [[TheUriahGambit their truce]] with Chiang to... do nothing. The CCP did everything in its power to avoid antagonising Japan or her puppet regimes and did its best to undermine Guomindang-backed and independent guerilla groups behind Japanese lines, using their network of spies and sympathisers to tell the occupation forces who they where and where to find them (while maintaining plausible deniability and avoiding looking like they were directly fighting non-CCP Chinese resistance groups). Only recently has the [[RedChina People's Republic of China]] begun to admit that The Guomindang actually did anything at all to fight the Japanese, though it still maintains that the CCP did the brunt of the fighting when in fact they did ''none at all''[[note]] In propaganda this is known as the 'big lie' principle. More astonishing was the fact that some foreign observers who visited the CCP Soviet of Yan'an at the time (e.g. Patrick Hurley) actually believed it. Then again, said people also believed that the CCP was a strongly democratic and humanitarian organisation with a deep respect for human dignity and the rule of law[[/note]] except when Stalin bullied them into committing forces (in the short-lived 'hundred regiments offensive') to save the Guomindang's hide in 1940, when the latter was on the verge of collapse. The CCP's leader, [[MaoZedong [[UsefulNotes/MaoZedong Mao]] [[FromNobodyToNightmare something]], used this failure to further undermine the pro-Soviet faction within the CCP and assert his own independence from Moscow - resuming his truce with the Japanese to focus on turning the entire countryside under nominal Japanese occupation into one gigantic Communist Soviet so that either A) when the Guomindang was destroyed the CCP could eventually come to power by taking over Wang Jingwei's government (ideally Japan would be busy fighting someone else, e.g. The USSR, by then) or B) the CCP could beat a critically-weakened Guomindang in a continuation of The Civil War.
20th Oct '16 10:25:46 AM Morgenthaler
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The Second Sino-Japanese War was, right behind the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Soviet-German War]], the biggest and most costly war in human history. It was fought by UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan against UsefulNotes/{{China}}, beginning in the summer of 1937[[note]]actual aggression started in 1931, with the Mukden incident[[/note]] and ending in the summer of 1945. The conflict was eventually eclipsed by WWII in 1939 and became part of the wider war in 1941, with China and Japan respectively joining the Allies and Axis, and ended with the complete surrender of Japan to the Allied powers. It was also the largest war ever fought in Asia, leaving some 5-15 million Chinese military and civilian dead [[note]] Frankly, this is just a guess based on the agricultural productivity of the land and the data from the first census (conducted in 1950). It's impossible to separate the 1937-45 dead from those who died in [[NoMoreEmperors the Chinese Civil War of 1946-50]]. Just like the Soviet Union and the numbers of people dead in WorldWarOne and the [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober Russian Civil War]] (2 versus 8 million), Communist China also likes to 'shift' dead people from the Civil War to the Second Sino-Japanese War - neither country can/could afford to advertise the fact that people fought and died to keep them from coming to power. [[/note]] -- and just short of half a million Japanese military dead.

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The Second Sino-Japanese War was, right behind the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Soviet-German War]], the biggest and most costly war in human history. It was fought by UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan against UsefulNotes/{{China}}, beginning in the summer of 1937[[note]]actual aggression started in 1931, with the Mukden incident[[/note]] and ending in the summer of 1945. The conflict was eventually eclipsed by WWII in 1939 and became part of the wider war in 1941, with China and Japan respectively joining the Allies and Axis, and ended with the complete surrender of Japan to the Allied powers. It was also the largest war ever fought in Asia, leaving some 5-15 million Chinese military and civilian dead [[note]] Frankly, this is just a guess based on the agricultural productivity of the land and the data from the first census (conducted in 1950). It's impossible to separate the 1937-45 dead from those who died in [[NoMoreEmperors [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors the Chinese Civil War of 1946-50]]. Just like the Soviet Union and the numbers of people dead in WorldWarOne and the [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober Russian Civil War]] (2 versus 8 million), Communist China also likes to 'shift' dead people from the Civil War to the Second Sino-Japanese War - neither country can/could afford to advertise the fact that people fought and died to keep them from coming to power. [[/note]] -- and just short of half a million Japanese military dead.
20th Oct '16 9:26:14 AM Morgenthaler
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* Creator/ZhangYimou's ''The Flowers of War'' a.k.a. ''Nanjing Heroes'', set during the Rape of Nanking. Creator/ChristianBale plays an American mortician who helps to protect a group of Catholic schoolgirls and an equal number of Chinese prostitutes from the invading Japanese army.

to:

* Creator/ZhangYimou's ''The Flowers of War'' ''Film/FlowersOfWar'' a.k.a. ''Nanjing Heroes'', set during the Rape of Nanking. Creator/ChristianBale plays an American mortician who helps to protect a group of Catholic schoolgirls and an equal number of Chinese prostitutes from the invading Japanese army.
20th Oct '16 9:25:04 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/LustCaution'', about a plot to assassinate a pro-Japanese collaborator in occupied Shanghai.
* ''Literature/TheGirlWhoPlayedGo'' is about a relationship between a Chinese girl and a Japanese officer in the early stages of the war.
* ''Film/CityOfLifeAndDeath'', a drama film set during the Nanking Massacre.
* ''Film/EmpireOfTheSun'' by J.G. Ballard (and the movie based on it) is about the author's childhood inside a Japanese prison camp for Western civilians.
* Franchise/{{Tintin}}'s adventure ''[[Recap/TintinTheBlueLotus The Blue Lotus]]'' depicts the Japanese encroachment on China in the [[TheThirties 1930s]].
* ''Film/MenBehindTheSun'', a Chinese "[[ExploitationFilm documentary]]" about Unit 731's human experiments, apparently made with recovered Japanese lab notes.
* ''Flying Tigers'', a 1942 war film starring John Wayne.

to:

* ''Film/LustCaution'', about a plot to assassinate a pro-Japanese collaborator in occupied Shanghai.
* ''Literature/TheGirlWhoPlayedGo'' is about a relationship between a Chinese girl
[[AC:Anime and a Japanese officer in the early stages of the war.
* ''Film/CityOfLifeAndDeath'', a drama film set during the Nanking Massacre.
* ''Film/EmpireOfTheSun'' by J.G. Ballard (and the movie based on it) is about the author's childhood inside a Japanese prison camp for Western civilians.
* Franchise/{{Tintin}}'s adventure ''[[Recap/TintinTheBlueLotus The Blue Lotus]]'' depicts the Japanese encroachment on China in the [[TheThirties 1930s]].
* ''Film/MenBehindTheSun'', a Chinese "[[ExploitationFilm documentary]]" about Unit 731's human experiments, apparently made with recovered Japanese lab notes.
* ''Flying Tigers'', a 1942 war film starring John Wayne.
Manga]]



* ''The Rape of Nanking'' by Iris Chang, which popularized the term. Provides much historical information about this event. Unfortunately, she committed suicide a few years after writing it.
* ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ntNgjr5LPI The Battle of China]]'' is a 1944 propaganda documentary by Frank Capra with first-rate footage of the war.

to:

* ''The Rape The manga ''Ron'' by Motoka Murakami, author of Nanking'' by Iris Chang, which popularized the term. Provides much historical information ''Manga/{{Jin}}''.
* The anime ''Anime/NightRaid1931'' is
about this event. a group of Japanese spies in China, 1931, and its plot involves the events leading up to the war, from the Mukden Incident to the creation of the Manchukuo puppet government. Notably it avoids Japanese jingoism and revisionism.
* Most of ''Zipang'' does not take place in China, but events in China form a critical background to its plot (much more important in the manga version than the incomplete anime version.) Anime viewers are treated to a GeniusBonus in the form of General Ishihara, who had complex schemes in real life concerning Manchuria that ran somewhat contrary to the more militant Japanese leaders but were still exploitative and imperialistic from the perspective of the subject peoples, who plays an important if subdued role.
Unfortunately, she committed suicide a few years after writing it.
* ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ntNgjr5LPI The Battle of China]]'' is a 1944 propaganda documentary by Frank Capra with first-rate footage
the continuation of the war.anime series into the Manchuarian plots was never produced.

[[AC:Comic Books]]
* Franchise/{{Tintin}}'s adventure ''[[Recap/TintinTheBlueLotus The Blue Lotus]]'' depicts the Japanese encroachment on China in the [[TheThirties 1930s]].



* ''Seven Man Army'' (八道樓子) is a 1976 UsefulNotes/HongKong film about the defense of the Great Wall in the early stages of the war.
* Creator/ZhangYimou's directorial debut, ''Red Sorghum'', is set at a sorghum-liquor distillery in the middle of the war. His epic ''To Live'' touches on it briefly, but focuses more on the UsefulNotes/ChineseCivilWar and [[RedChina what came afterward]].
* Creator/ZhangYimou's ''The Flowers of War'' a.k.a. ''Nanjing Heroes'', set during the Rape of Nanking. Creator/ChristianBale plays an American mortician who helps to protect a group of Catholic schoolgirls and an equal number of Chinese prostitutes from the invading Japanese army.
* Chen Kaige's own directorial debut, ''Yellow Earth'', is set in a remote rural region in 1939.
* Jiang Wen's ''Devils on the Doorstep'' (鬼子来了) takes place in northern China in the last phase of the war.
* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a TorturePorn ExploitationFilm about, well, the Rape of Nanking.
* ''The Children of Huang Shi'' deals with the evacuation to safety of orphaned Chinese children by two Westerners during the war.
* ''Dragon Seed'' by Pearl Buck.

to:

* ''Seven Man Army'' (八道樓子) is a 1976 UsefulNotes/HongKong film about the defense of the Great Wall in the early stages of the war.
* Creator/ZhangYimou's directorial debut, ''Red Sorghum'', is set at a sorghum-liquor distillery in the middle of the war. His epic ''To Live'' touches on it briefly, but focuses more on the UsefulNotes/ChineseCivilWar and [[RedChina what came afterward]].
* Creator/ZhangYimou's ''The Flowers of War'' a.k.a. ''Nanjing Heroes'', set during
The Italian comic book ''ComicBook/{{Lilith}}'' has its titular time travel visit the Rape of Nanking. Creator/ChristianBale plays an American mortician who helps to protect a group of Catholic schoolgirls and an equal number of Chinese prostitutes from the invading Japanese army.
* Chen Kaige's own directorial debut, ''Yellow Earth'', is set
Nanjing in a remote rural region in 1939.
* Jiang Wen's ''Devils on the Doorstep'' (鬼子来了) takes place in northern China in the last phase of the war.
* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a TorturePorn ExploitationFilm about, well, the Rape of Nanking.
* ''The Children of Huang Shi'' deals with the evacuation to safety of orphaned Chinese children by two Westerners during the war.
* ''Dragon Seed'' by Pearl Buck.
one volume.

[[AC:Comic Strips]]




[[AC:Film]]
* ''Film/LustCaution'', about a plot to assassinate a pro-Japanese collaborator in occupied Shanghai.
* ''Film/CityOfLifeAndDeath'', a drama film set during the Nanking Massacre.
* ''Film/EmpireOfTheSun'' by J.G. Ballard (and the movie based on it) is about the author's childhood inside a Japanese prison camp for Western civilians.
* ''Film/MenBehindTheSun'', a Chinese "[[ExploitationFilm documentary]]" about Unit 731's human experiments, apparently made with recovered Japanese lab notes.
* ''Flying Tigers'', a 1942 war film starring John Wayne.
* ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ntNgjr5LPI The Battle of China]]'' is a 1944 propaganda documentary by Frank Capra with first-rate footage of the war.
* ''Seven Man Army'' (八道樓子) is a 1976 UsefulNotes/HongKong film about the defense of the Great Wall in the early stages of the war.
* Creator/ZhangYimou's directorial debut, ''Red Sorghum'', is set at a sorghum-liquor distillery in the middle of the war. His epic ''To Live'' touches on it briefly, but focuses more on the UsefulNotes/ChineseCivilWar and [[RedChina what came afterward]].
* Creator/ZhangYimou's ''The Flowers of War'' a.k.a. ''Nanjing Heroes'', set during the Rape of Nanking. Creator/ChristianBale plays an American mortician who helps to protect a group of Catholic schoolgirls and an equal number of Chinese prostitutes from the invading Japanese army.
* Chen Kaige's own directorial debut, ''Yellow Earth'', is set in a remote rural region in 1939.
* Jiang Wen's ''Devils on the Doorstep'' (鬼子来了) takes place in northern China in the last phase of the war.
* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a TorturePorn ExploitationFilm about, well, the Rape of Nanking.
* ''The Children of Huang Shi'' deals with the evacuation to safety of orphaned Chinese children by two Westerners during the war.



* The manga ''Ron'' by Motoka Murakami, author of ''Manga/{{Jin}}''.
* The anime ''Anime/NightRaid1931'' is about a group of Japanese spies in China, 1931, and its plot involves the events leading up to the war, from the Mukden Incident to the creation of the Manchukuo puppet government. Notably it avoids Japanese jingoism and revisionism.



* ''Literature/ShanghaiGirls'' starts out in this period. It is about wealthy sisters Pearl and May Chin who find out that their father lost all of their money and they are forced to move to America.



* Most of ''Zipang'' does not take place in China, but events in China form a critical background to its plot (much more important in the manga version than the incomplete anime version.)
** Anime viewers are treated to a GeniusBonus in the form of General Ishihara, who had complex schemes in real life concerning Manchuria that ran somewhat contrary to the more militant Japanese leaders but were still exploitative and imperialistic from the perspective of the subject peoples, who plays an important if subdued role. Unfortunately, the continuation of the anime series into the Manchuarian plots was never produced.



* The Italian comic book ''ComicBook/{{Lilith}}'' has its titular time travel visit the Rape of Nanjing in one volume.


Added DiffLines:


[[AC:Literature]]
* ''Literature/TheGirlWhoPlayedGo'' is about a relationship between a Chinese girl and a Japanese officer in the early stages of the war.
* ''The Rape of Nanking'' by Iris Chang, which popularized the term. Provides much historical information about this event. Unfortunately, she committed suicide a few years after writing it.
* ''Dragon Seed'' by Pearl Buck.
* ''Literature/ShanghaiGirls'' starts out in this period. It is about wealthy sisters Pearl and May Chin who find out that their father lost all of their money and they are forced to move to America.
20th Oct '16 6:58:22 AM Morgenthaler
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* Creator/ZhangYimou's directorial debut, ''Red Sorghum'', is set at a sorghum-liquor distillery in the middle of the war. His epic ''To Live'' touches on it briefly, but focuses more on the ChineseCivilWar and [[RedChina what came afterward]].

to:

* Creator/ZhangYimou's directorial debut, ''Red Sorghum'', is set at a sorghum-liquor distillery in the middle of the war. His epic ''To Live'' touches on it briefly, but focuses more on the ChineseCivilWar UsefulNotes/ChineseCivilWar and [[RedChina what came afterward]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.SecondSinoJapaneseWar