History UsefulNotes / SecondSinoJapaneseWar

18th Sep '16 11:11:40 PM TheWildWestPyro
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* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a TorturePorn film about, well, the Rape of Nanking.

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* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a TorturePorn film ExploitationFilm about, well, the Rape of Nanking.
13th Sep '16 12:13:19 AM TheWildWestPyro
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* ''Film/MenBehindTheSun'', a Chinese documentary about the Unit 731 human experiments made according with recovered Japanese lab notes that looks like an {{exploitation film}}.

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* ''Film/MenBehindTheSun'', a Chinese documentary "[[ExploitationFilm documentary]]" about the Unit 731 731's human experiments experiments, apparently made according with recovered Japanese lab notes that looks like an {{exploitation film}}.notes.



* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a torture-porn film about, well, the Rape of Nanking.

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* ''Black Sun: Nanking'' is a torture-porn TorturePorn film about, well, the Rape of Nanking.Nanking.



* ''Philosophy of a Knife'' is a Russian horror film about Unit 731, with real interviews mixed in.

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* ''Philosophy of a Knife'' is a an infamously violent and graphic Russian horror film film/mockumentary about Unit 731, with real interviews mixed in.
24th Aug '16 8:41:14 PM Wuz
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During this period, MaoZedong and the CCP kept [[TheUriahGambit their truce]] with Chiang to... do nothing. The CCP did everything in its power to avoid antagonising Japan or her puppet regimes and did its best to undermine Guomindang-backed and independent guerilla groups behind Japanese lines, using their network of spies and sympathisers to tell the occupation forces who they where and where to find them (while maintaining plausible deniability and avoiding looking like they were directly fighting non-CCP Chinese resistance groups). Only recently has the [[RedChina People's Republic of China]] begun to admit that The Guomindang actually did anything at all to fight the Japanese, though it still maintains that the CCP did the brunt of the fighting when in fact they did ''none at all''[[note]] In propaganda this is known as the 'big lie' principle. More astonishing was the fact that some foreign observers who visited the CCP Soviet of Yan'an at the time (e.g. Patrick Hurley) actually believed it. Then again, said people also believed that the CCP was a strongly democratic and humanitarian organisation with a deep respect for human dignity and the rule of law[[/note]] except when Stalin bullied them into committing forces (in the short-lived 'hundred regiments offensive') to save the Guomindang's hide in 1940, when the latter was on the verge of collapse. The CCP's leader, [[MaoZedong Mao]] [[FromNobodyToNightmare something]], used this failure to further undermine the pro-Soviet faction within the CCP and assert his own independence from Moscow - resuming his truce with the Japanese to focus on turning the entire countryside under nominal Japanese occupation into one gigantic Communist Soviet so that either A) when the Guomindang was destroyed the CCP could eventually come to power by taking over Wang Jingwei's government (ideally Japan would be busy fighting someone else, e.g. The USSR, by then) or B) the CCP could beat a critically-weakened Guomindang in a continuation of The Civil War.

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During this period, MaoZedong and the CCP kept [[TheUriahGambit their truce]] with Chiang to... do nothing. The CCP did everything in its power to avoid antagonising Japan or her puppet regimes and did its best to undermine Guomindang-backed and independent guerilla groups behind Japanese lines, using their network of spies and sympathisers to tell the occupation forces who they where and where to find them (while maintaining plausible deniability and avoiding looking like they were directly fighting non-CCP Chinese resistance groups). Only recently has the [[RedChina People's Republic of China]] begun to admit that The Guomindang actually did anything at all to fight the Japanese, though it still maintains that the CCP did the brunt of the fighting when in fact they did ''none at all''[[note]] In propaganda this is known as the 'big lie' principle. More astonishing was the fact that some foreign observers who visited the CCP Soviet of Yan'an at the time (e.g. Patrick Hurley) actually believed it. Then again, said people also believed that the CCP was a strongly democratic and humanitarian organisation with a deep respect for human dignity and the rule of law[[/note]] except when Stalin bullied them into committing forces (in the short-lived 'hundred regiments offensive') to save the Guomindang's hide in 1940, when the latter was on the verge of collapse. The CCP's leader, [[MaoZedong Mao]] [[FromNobodyToNightmare something]], used this failure to further undermine the pro-Soviet faction within the CCP and assert his own independence from Moscow - resuming his truce with the Japanese to focus on turning the entire countryside under nominal Japanese occupation into one gigantic Communist Soviet so that either A) when the Guomindang was destroyed the CCP could eventually come to power by taking over Wang Jingwei's government (ideally Japan would be busy fighting someone else, e.g. The USSR, by then) or B) the CCP could beat a critically-weakened Guomindang in a continuation of The Civil War.
24th Aug '16 8:25:07 PM Wuz
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Chiang kept his word and forged the United Front. Zhang Xueliang was gaoled for life, but he became a national hero almost overnight as the urban Chinese public[[note]]Chiang insisted that there should be no talk of war with Japan, as he knew fine well that the Guomindang was too weak to take Japan on and win, and he didn't want to be the one who started it.[[/note]] was just ''itching'' for a war with Japan

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Chiang kept his word and forged the United Front. Zhang Xueliang was gaoled for life, but he became a national hero almost overnight as the urban Chinese public[[note]]Chiang insisted that there should be no talk of war with Japan, as he knew fine well that the Guomindang was too weak to take Japan on and win, and he didn't want to be the one who started it.[[/note]] was just ''itching'' for a war with Japan
Japan.
11th Aug '16 7:47:54 PM Chrispang
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The governments of the respective countries are not the only forces at work, however. Beginning in the late '70s and blossoming in the late '90s, neo-conservative nationalist groups in Japan have tried to emphasise the importance of giving the Japanese nation a positive, forward-looking outlook under the leadership of a strong centralised state. Of course, there is little room in this forward-looking narrative for dwelling on the past, especially the bad bits of it, and these groups think of the Second Sino-Japanese War as a war of Pan-Asian liberation from Western Imperialism. Likewise, they are quick to claim that Japanese atrocities have been massively exaggerated, and are based mostly on hearsay from anti-Japanese sources or fabricated wholesale, all in the name of shaming the Japanese people into being hesitant to form a strong state or military; with which, the foreigners fear, they might protect their own interests rather than remaining at the mercy of the foreign powers like America and China. [[note]] Of course, cheerfully ignoring the [[http://en.people.cn/200412/13/images/n4.jpg Japanese newspapers]] that actually reported THE NUMBER OF KILLS AS AN ACHIEVEMENT for two soldiers during the Nanjing Massacre. (106 and 105 killed between the two of them)[[/note]] Several textbooks have been written along just these lines, and are often singled out for criticism.

to:

The governments of the respective countries are not the only forces at work, however. Beginning in the late '70s and blossoming in the late '90s, neo-conservative nationalist groups in Japan have tried to emphasise the importance of giving the Japanese nation a positive, forward-looking outlook under the leadership of a strong centralised state. Of course, there is little room in this forward-looking narrative for dwelling on the past, especially the bad bits of it, and these groups think of the Second Sino-Japanese War as a war of Pan-Asian liberation from Western Imperialism. Likewise, they are quick to claim that Japanese atrocities have been massively exaggerated, and are based mostly on hearsay from anti-Japanese sources or fabricated wholesale, all in the name of shaming the Japanese people into being hesitant to form a strong state or military; with which, the foreigners fear, they might protect their own interests rather than remaining at the mercy of the foreign powers like America and China. [[note]] Of course, cheerfully ignoring the [[http://en.people.cn/200412/13/images/n4.jpg Japanese newspapers]] that actually reported THE NUMBER OF KILLS AS AN ACHIEVEMENT for two soldiers during the Nanjing Massacre.Massacre, whether it actually happened or not. (106 and 105 killed between the two of them)[[/note]] Several textbooks have been written along just these lines, and are often singled out for criticism.



The IJA's Military Police were solely concerned with rooting out Socialism and internal dissent, and so didn't even try to restrain the rank-and-file as they basically did whatever they wanted. There was a little bit of official involvement in the whole thing, of course, (apart from the "Kill all captives" and "let's all look the other way" things) when it came to killing all the [=POWs=] captured in the battles for Shanghai and Nanjing and in supervising the creation of Army Brothels using conscripts as unpaid prostitutes, aside from feeding them. There weren't that many of them, though, just a few thousand "employees" at a time (though the turnover was high due to suicide and other cheery things). While the looting was fairly harmless, as we mentioned before, not as many livelihoods as you might expect were destroyed by it -- while not ''all'' of the former owners were dead, of course, many if not most ''were''. The complete break-down of law-and-order continued for about six weeks, when it just sort of petered out what with the place being a Ghost-City and barely any live females left outside the army-brothels.

to:

The IJA's Military Police were solely concerned with rooting out Socialism and internal dissent, and so didn't even try to restrain the rank-and-file as they basically did whatever they wanted. There was a little bit of official involvement in the whole thing, of course, (apart from the "Kill all captives" and "let's all look the other way" things) when it came to killing all the [=POWs=] captured in the battles for Shanghai and Nanjing and in supervising the creation of Army Brothels using conscripts as unpaid prostitutes, aside from feeding them. There weren't that many of them, though, just a few thousand "employees" at a time (though the turnover was high due to suicide and other cheery things). While the looting was fairly harmless, as we mentioned before, not as many livelihoods as you might expect were destroyed by it -- while not ''all'' of the former owners were dead, of course, many if not most ''were''. The complete break-down of law-and-order continued for about six weeks, when it just sort of petered out what with the place being a Ghost-City and barely any live females left outside the army-brothels.
army-brothels. And the conditions inside the brothels were... [[note]] One woman described her experience of being raped by an entire platoon every morning, each soldier's "turn" lasting for a few minutes before the next in line, ostensibly to "boost their spirits". Yes, they set up mass-rape stations where people lined up to rape someone. [[/note]]
11th Aug '16 7:40:28 PM Chrispang
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The governments of the respective countries are not the only forces at work, however. Beginning in the late '70s and blossoming in the late '90s, neo-conservative nationalist groups in Japan have tried to emphasise the importance of giving the Japanese nation a positive, forward-looking outlook under the leadership of a strong centralised state. Of course, there is little room in this forward-looking narrative for dwelling on the past, especially the bad bits of it, and these groups think of the Second Sino-Japanese War as a war of Pan-Asian liberation from Western Imperialism. Likewise, they are quick to claim that Japanese atrocities have been massively exaggerated, and are based mostly on hearsay from anti-Japanese sources or fabricated wholesale, all in the name of shaming the Japanese people into being hesitant to form a strong state or military; with which, the foreigners fear, they might protect their own interests rather than remaining at the mercy of the foreign powers like America and China. Several textbooks have been written along just these lines, and are often singled out for criticism.

to:

The governments of the respective countries are not the only forces at work, however. Beginning in the late '70s and blossoming in the late '90s, neo-conservative nationalist groups in Japan have tried to emphasise the importance of giving the Japanese nation a positive, forward-looking outlook under the leadership of a strong centralised state. Of course, there is little room in this forward-looking narrative for dwelling on the past, especially the bad bits of it, and these groups think of the Second Sino-Japanese War as a war of Pan-Asian liberation from Western Imperialism. Likewise, they are quick to claim that Japanese atrocities have been massively exaggerated, and are based mostly on hearsay from anti-Japanese sources or fabricated wholesale, all in the name of shaming the Japanese people into being hesitant to form a strong state or military; with which, the foreigners fear, they might protect their own interests rather than remaining at the mercy of the foreign powers like America and China. [[note]] Of course, cheerfully ignoring the [[http://en.people.cn/200412/13/images/n4.jpg Japanese newspapers]] that actually reported THE NUMBER OF KILLS AS AN ACHIEVEMENT for two soldiers during the Nanjing Massacre. (106 and 105 killed between the two of them)[[/note]] Several textbooks have been written along just these lines, and are often singled out for criticism.
11th Aug '16 7:32:40 PM Chrispang
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[[caption-width-right:350: Poster from the pro-Chinese (1937-44) phase of US propaganda [[note]] It Doesn't [[usefulnotes/china Last]]. [[/note]] [[note]] note the creators' decision to portray the Guomindang soldier with a dress cap, rather than a Straw Hat (too large, civilian-looking, and 'foreign'/'culturally backwards') or a standard-issue ''Stahlhelm'' (one of several inconvenient relics of inter-war Sino-German co-operation) [[/note]] ]]

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[[caption-width-right:350: Poster from the pro-Chinese (1937-44) phase of US propaganda [[note]] It Doesn't [[usefulnotes/china Last]].Last. [[/note]] [[note]] note the creators' decision to portray the Guomindang soldier with a dress cap, rather than a Straw Hat (too large, civilian-looking, and 'foreign'/'culturally backwards') or a standard-issue ''Stahlhelm'' (one of several inconvenient relics of inter-war Sino-German co-operation) [[/note]] ]]
11th Aug '16 7:32:14 PM Chrispang
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[[caption-width-right:350: Poster from the pro-Chinese (1937-44) phase of US propaganda [[note]] ItDoesn'tLast. [[note]] note the creators' decision to portray the Guomindang soldier with a dress cap, rather than a Straw Hat (too large, civilian-looking, and 'foreign'/'culturally backwards') or a standard-issue ''Stahlhelm'' (one of several inconvenient relics of inter-war Sino-German co-operation) [[/note]] ]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350: Poster from the pro-Chinese (1937-44) phase of US propaganda [[note]] ItDoesn'tLast. It Doesn't [[usefulnotes/china Last]]. [[/note]] [[note]] note the creators' decision to portray the Guomindang soldier with a dress cap, rather than a Straw Hat (too large, civilian-looking, and 'foreign'/'culturally backwards') or a standard-issue ''Stahlhelm'' (one of several inconvenient relics of inter-war Sino-German co-operation) [[/note]] ]]
11th Aug '16 7:31:15 PM Chrispang
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[[caption-width-right:350: Poster from the pro-Chinese (1937-44) phase of US propaganda[[note]] note the creators' decision to portray the Guomindang soldier with a dress cap, rather than a Straw Hat (too large, civilian-looking, and 'foreign'/'culturally backwards') or a standard-issue ''Stahlhelm'' (one of several inconvenient relics of inter-war Sino-German co-operation) [[/note]] ]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350: Poster from the pro-Chinese (1937-44) phase of US propaganda[[note]] propaganda [[note]] ItDoesn'tLast. [[note]] note the creators' decision to portray the Guomindang soldier with a dress cap, rather than a Straw Hat (too large, civilian-looking, and 'foreign'/'culturally backwards') or a standard-issue ''Stahlhelm'' (one of several inconvenient relics of inter-war Sino-German co-operation) [[/note]] ]]
17th Jul '16 12:21:32 AM BillyDeeWilliams
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On September 18, 1931, near the city Mukden in Manchuria (today Shenyang), a railroad owned by Japan's South Manchuria Railway was blown up (which was [[BlatantLies totally not a false flag operation]]). The Japanese military generals accused Chinese terrorists of this act, and used it as an excuse for the full-scale invasion of Manchuria. The civilian government in Tokyo was not consulted at all in this matter, but Emperor Hirohito quickly gave up on the idea of punishing the offenders, since at this point the civilian government was just a puppet of the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese Army]].

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On September 18, 1931, near the city Mukden in Manchuria (today Shenyang), some dynamite exploded a few hundred meters from a railroad owned by Japan's South Manchuria Railway was blown up (which was [[BlatantLies totally not a false flag operation]]).operation]]), causing no damage. The Japanese military generals accused Chinese terrorists of this act, and used it as an excuse for the full-scale invasion of Manchuria. The civilian government in Tokyo was not consulted at all in this matter, but Emperor Hirohito quickly gave up on the idea of punishing the offenders, since at this point the civilian government was just a puppet of the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese Army]].
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